the management of teachers' performance at high performing islamic

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International Research-Based Education Journal, Vol. 1 No. 1, January 2017

THE MANAGEMENT OF TEACHERS’ PERFORMANCE AT HIGH PERFORMING ISLAMIC SCHOOLS IN MALANG REGENCY Muhadjir Religious Ministry Offices, Surabaya, Indonesia

ABSTRACT The aim of the study was to find and give in-depth description of teachers’ performance in State Islamic Junior High School 3 Gondanglegi, State Islamic Junior High School Turen, and State Islamic Junior High School Lawang. The data was collected by using participant observation, in-depth interview, and documentation. The findings of the study were: (1) the teachers’ performance programs were planned by involving the stakeholders and were based on the vision, the mission, and the goals of the Islamic schools which were in line with the specialties and the characteristics of the Islamic schools, (2) teachers’ performance programs which were suitable with the lesson plan were carried out by the teachers. The implemented teaching and learning strategies varied based on the materials and the characteristics of the learners, (3) the evaluation model of the teachers’ performance was done by the principals by evaluating the sets of learning in the beginning of the academic year, supervising the ongoing teaching and learning in the classroom, evaluating the teachers’ performance through the teachers’ diary, giving questionnaire to and interviewing the students, and thoroughly evaluating by using DP3 form at the end of the academic year, (4) the good management of the teachers’ performance led to the improvement of the teachers’ professionalism and the improvement of the teachers’ professionalism led to the improvement of the students’ academic and non-academic achievement. Keywords: management, teachers' performance, high-performing Islamic schools

the education as the basic alternative which would be managed in order to create an education system which covered religion but still provided science and technology proportional space to anticipate the society development which was becoming more global; (3) there were less Muslim generation who mastered Islam both in terms of quantity and quality and they were far from understanding Islam thoroughly (akidah, syari’ah and akhlak); and (4) the availability of the internal resource problems and their utilization for developing the Islamic schools in the future (Muhaimin, 2009: 186). In line with the aforementioned opinion, Furchan (2004: 49) stated that the obstacles faced by Islamic schools were (1) the change in the orientation of the society education. The preparation to face industrialization era had changed the society education from learning for knowledge to learning for preparing to look for a job; (2) the following consequences of that condition, in society, were that general education was more prioritized than religion education. The Islamic schools which emphasized more on the religion education than on the general one found a lot of difficulties in keeping up with the public schools in terms of general knowledge; (3) in general, in fact, the quality of education given by Islamic schools was deemed to be lower than the one given by most of schools in general, especially public schools. One of the strategies to improve the education quality in terms of the quality of human resources was through the development of teachers' performance. A teacher should fulfill several qualifications of professional teachers. As stated in the Law number 14 the year 2005

INTRODUCTION Islamic schools basically were: (1) society-based educational institutions which organized education based on the specialties of Islam as well as the social, culture, aspiration, and potential of the Islamic society and as the realization of education which was from, by, and for Islamic society; (2) general education which included elementary education (Islamic elementary schools and Islamic junior high) and higher education (Islamic senior high) and prioritized the widening of knowledge that the students needed to pursue higher education and/ or to live in the society; (3) religion education which was the basic and the higher education prepared the students to carry out their roles which were in line with the mastery and the practice of the Islamic values and teaching (Muhaimin, 2009:186-187). Nowadays, the Islamic schools had been existing along with other school systems (Hasyim, 2009:37). The ratification of Law number 20 the year 2003 about National Education System and the Government Policy of Republic of Indonesia number 42 the year 2013 about the change of Government Policy number 19 the year 2005 about National Education Standards gave the space for Islamic schools to be equal to the public schools. Therefore, the Islamic schools were demanded to be able to fulfill the national education standard. Until now, however, Islamic schools had overcome many problems in keeping up with what they missed. In general, there were four main problems faced by the Islamic schools which were (1) the identity problem of the Islamic schools so their development programs were often unclear and undirected; (2) problems related to the type of 32

International Research-Based Education Journal, Vol. 1 No. 1, January 2017

teachers and lecturers, the competencies that teachers had to have were pedagogic, personal, social, and professional competencies. The quality teaching and learning processes could be carried out by teachers who had excellent competencies and high motivation in doing their duties. The quality education would produce quality graduates. On the other hand, if the teaching and learning were done by unqualified teachers, the graduates would not be in good quality. It would affect to the graduates' competence in facing the harsh life competition (Barnawi and Arifin. 2012: 14). Related to the teachers' performance in conducting their teaching and learning processes, there were teacher professional duties as stated in the Law of Republic of Indonesia number 14 the year 2005 about teachers and lecturers Article 20 (a) which were planning the teaching and learning processes, implementing quality teaching and learning, and assessing as well as evaluating the learning outcome. A good teachers' performance was surely reflected on their academic and professional competence which meant that they were able to manage the teaching and learning processes in and outside the classroom well. According to Piet A. Sahertian as stated by Kusmito (Directorate of Education Personnel, 2008: 21), the standard of teachers' performance was related to their quality in carrying out their duties, such as (1) work with the students individually, (2) prepare and plan the teaching and learning, (3) utilize learning media, (4) involve the students in various learning experience, and (5) actively lead (Barnawi and Arifin, 2012: 14) The management of the teachers’ performance was the management of the teachers’ competence and effort to carry out their duties as best as they could in terms of planning teaching and learning programs, implementing the teaching and learning, and evaluating the learning outcome. The achieved teachers’ performance should be based on the standards of professional competence while they were doing their duties as teachers at the schools. The management approach of teachers’ performance was an approach that considered five aspects which were (1) integrating the performance of all teachers involved at the Islamic schools; (2) involving all parties (not only the higher ranking personnel) in managing the teachers' performance; (3) integrating all processes in managing the teachers' competence by focusing on the achievement of the vision, the mission, and the goals of the Islamic schools; (4) using systematic processes which could thoroughly fulfill the needs of the administration as well as the teaching and learning; (5) focusing on the improvement of teachers’ performance in the future.

and Taylor, 1993: 18). The current study utilized multisite study research design because the objects of the study had many similarities as stated by Biklen and Bogdan (1998: 63). The sites of the study were in Malang regency which was State Islamic Junior high school 3 Gondanglegi in Gondanglegi district, State Islamic Junior High School Turen in Turen district, and State Islamic Junior High School Lawang in Lawang district. In line with the aims of the study, the choice of the informants was done by using purposive sampling. This technique was used to get the needed data through selection and the informants would be the ones who had information about the problems and could be trusted as the source of the data. Beside purposive sampling technique, this study also utilized time sampling technique. It meant that the researcher met the informants by considering the time to obtain the needed data. Researcher estimated the good time to observe and to interview. The data analysis was done twice which were (1) on-site data analysis and (2) multi-site data analysis. Analyzing and gathering the data were done cyclically in order to obtain findings and solve the problems.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION The on-site research findings at State Islamic Junior High School 3 Gondanglegi, State Islamic Junior High School Turen, and State Islamic Junior High School Lawang could be stated as follows:

State Islamic Junior High School 3 Gondanglegi The arrangement of teachers' performance at State Islamic Junior High School 3 Gondanglegi referred to (a) the needs to develop the institution which was the development of the vision, the mission, and the goals of the Islamic schools. The arrangement of the teachers' performance programs also referred to the flagship programs which were acceleration program, bilingual class program, excellent program, special talent program, Islamic character building, and entrepreneurship development; (b) the teachers' performance programs were made at the beginning of every academic year; (c) in developing the teachers' performance programs, the principal involved all teachers who were grouped according to their subjects and were coordinated by the department of curriculum, student, or public relation affair. The implementation of the teachers' performance programs at State Islamic School Malang 3 Gondanglegi was as followed: (a) the implementation of the teachers' performance programs was under the supervision of vice principal of each department which was curriculum, student, and public relation affair; (b) the implementation of the teaching and learning processes in State Islamic School Malang 3 used full day school system; (c) the implemented teaching and learning strategies were inquiry, discovery, and inquiry-discovery which were suited to school subjects. The implementation of PAKEM (active, creative, effective and joyful learning/ ACEJL) teaching and learning strategy and paradigm development

METHODS The current study used qualitative approach because of the objects of the study in the natural condition. The unveiled data was not in the form of numbers but in the form of words, sentences, paragraphs, and documents. The objects of the study were not manipulated or given any special treatments so they were in the natural state. The data was gathered through field observation and interview then the data was analyzed inductively (Bogdan 33

International Research-Based Education Journal, Vol. 1 No. 1, January 2017

which was more student-oriented were also carried out; (d) the pleasant outdoor learning was used and the functions of the laboratory as learning media was also optimized. There were several steps that the principal did in order to evaluate the teachers' performance which was (a) evaluating all teachers' sets of learning included annual program, semester program, syllabus and lesson plan; (b) observing and supervising each class during the ongoing teaching and learning processes; (c) 0evaluating the teachers' performance through teachers' diary. This diary was the notes about teachers' performance in the form of matrix consisting of day/ date, time, types of activities (main, addition, PKB), description of activities, implementation basis, output, and the signature of the superiors; (d) at the end of the academic year, the principal always evaluated the performance thoroughly in the form of DP3 (List of Work Implementation Assessment/ LWIA) so teachers could have teachers' promotion according to their results of LWIA. The management of teachers’ performance directly affected the improvement of teachers’ professionalism. A good management of teachers’ performance would make them put some efforts to improve their performance. In the end, the improvement of teachers’ professionalism would lead to the improvement of the students’ academic and non-academic achievement. The management of teachers’ performance would indirectly influence the improvement of the students’ academic and nonacademic achievement.

thoroughly in the form of DP3 (List of Work Implementation Assessment/ LWIA) so teachers could have teachers’ promotion according to their results of LWIA. The management of teachers’ performance directly affected the improvement of teachers’ professionalism. A good management of teachers’ performance would make them put some efforts to improve their performance. In the end, the improvement of teachers’ professionalism would lead to the improvement of the students’ academic and non-academic achievement. The management of teachers’ performance would indirectly influence the improvement of the students’ academic and nonacademic achievement.

State Islamic Junior High School Lawang The arrangement of teachers' performance at State Islamic Junior High School Turen referred to: (a) the vision, mission, and goals of the Islamic school; (b) the teachers' performance programs were made at the beginning of every academic year and begun from the distribution of degree of duty of each teacher and workshop. In the workshop, Islamic school work plan (RKM) and Islamic school activity and budget plan (RKAM) were made; (c) in drafting the teachers’ performance programs, the principal involved all teachers and they were grouped based on their clumps of subjects. The implementation of the teachers' performance programs at State Islamic Junior High School Lawang referred to; (a) the programs that had been prepared by each teacher in the form of sets of learning (estimation of time allocation, annual program, semester program); (b) the coaching of extracurricular activities; (c) the use of school-based and 2013 curriculum; (d) the use of PAKEM (active, creative, effective and joyful learning/ ACEJL) teaching and learning method; (e) additional intra curriculum learning time for students of acceleration program, 7th, 8th, 9th excellent classes, and 9th regular class to have national exam preparation. The implementation of teachers’ performance evaluation was done by the principal of the Islamic school by (a) evaluating the sets of learning of all teachers which consisted of the annual program, semester program, and lesson plan; (b) observing and supervising each class during the ongoing teaching and learning processes; (c) evaluating the teachers’ performance through teachers’ diary. This diary was the notes about teachers’ performance in the form of matrix consisting of day/ date, time, types of activities (main, addition, PKB), description of activities, implementation basis, output, and the signature of the superiors; (d) at the end of the academic year, the principal always evaluated the performance thoroughly in the form of DP3 (List of Work Implementation Assessment/ LWIA) so teachers could have teachers’ promotion according to their results of LWIA. The management of teachers’ performance directly affected the improvement of teachers’ professionalism. A good management of teachers’ performance would make them put some efforts to improve their performance. In

State Islamic Junior High School Turen The arrangement of teachers’ performance at State Islamic Junior High School Turen referred to: (a) the vision, mission, and goals of the Islamic school; (b) teachers’ performance management referred to the existing RKM (Islamic school work plan); (c) all teachers were involved in making the teachers’ performance programs and were grouped based on their subjects; (d) the drafting of teachers’ performance programs included the preparation of sets of learning which were annual program, semester program, lesson plans, and assessment. The implementation of the teachers' performance programs at State Islamic Junior High School Turen was as followed: (a) referring to the sets of learning (estimation of time allocation, annual program, semester program) and the annual program for additional duties; (b) coaching the extracurricular activities; (c) using school-based curriculum and 2013 curriculum; (d) being strengthened by routine activities in subject teacher forum (MGMP). The implementation of teachers’ performance evaluation was done by the principal of the Islamic school by (a) evaluating the sets of learning of all teachers which consisted of the annual program, semester program, syllabus and lesson plan; (b) observing and supervising each class during the ongoing teaching and learning processes; (c) evaluating the teachers’ performance through teachers’ diary; (d) giving questionnaire and interviewing the students; (e) at the end of the academic year, the principal always evaluated the performance 34

International Research-Based Education Journal, Vol. 1 No. 1, January 2017

the end, the improvement of teachers’ professionalism would lead to the improvement of the students’ academic and non-academic achievement. The management of teachers’ performance would indirectly influence the improvement of the students’ academic and nonacademic achievement.

Multi-Site Research Findings at Site 1, 2, and 3 The research findings summary of Site 1 (State Islamic Junior High School Malang 3) and Site 2 (State Islamic Junior High School Turen) compared to the Site 3 (State Islamic Junior High School Lawang) could be summarized in the form of comparison matrix as followed Table 1.

Table 1 The Summary of Research Findings Focusing on the Preparation of Teachers’ Performance Programs at Site 1, Site 2, and Site 3 Research Findings at Site 1 and 2

Research Findings at Site 3

Referred to the vision, mission, and goals of the Islamic schools

The drafting of the teachers’ performance programs was referred to the implementation of the vision, the mission, and the goals of the Islamic schools which were the improvement of status, rank, and achievement to reach the academic and nonacademic achievement.

The drafting time of the teachers’ performance programs

In the beginning of every academic year

The personnel who were involved in the drafting of the teachers’ performance programs

All teachers were directly involved in the drafting of the teachers’ performance programs. They made the sets of learning individually and in group based on their clumps of subjects.

In general, there were several components needed to achieve the vision, mission, and goals of the Islamic school which were the support of qualify human resources, adequate facilities and infrastructure, teachers’ effort to develop the students’ potential in achieving the academic and non-academic achievement. In the beginning of every academic year. It was started by distributing the decree of duties to each teacher then followed by workshop as well as the drafting of the Islamic school work plan. The principal involved all teachers and the teachers were grouped based on their clumps of subjects

Sub Focus

Multi-site Research Findings at Site 1, 2 and 3 The drafting of the teachers’ performance programs was the implementation of the vision, mission, and goals of the Islamic schools to improve their status and to improve the students’ learning outcome.

In the beginning of every academic year

Involved all teachers and they were grouped based on their competence, duties, and responsibilities.

Table 2 The Summary of Research Findings Focusing on the Implementation of Teachers’ Performance Programs at Site 1, Site 2, and Site 3 Research Findings at Site 1 and 2

Research Findings at Site 3

Teaching and learning processes in the classroom as the implementation of the teachers’ performance

All teachers carried out the teaching and learning processes inside and outside the classroom as needed.

The strategy of teaching and learning used

These two Islamic schools had used ACEJL as orientation

The implementation of the teachers’ performance referred to the programs that had been prepared by each teacher in the form of sets of learning and the additional annual program of additional duties as well as the coaching of extracurricular activities The teaching and learning method used was PAKEM

Sub Focus

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Multi-site Research Findings at Site 1, 2 and 3 All teachers carried out the teaching and learning processes according to the sets of learning that had been prepared

The strategy was varied depending on the learning materials and the

International Research-Based Education Journal, Vol. 1 No. 1, January 2017

Sub Focus

Research Findings at Site 1 and 2

Research Findings at Site 3 (active, creative, effective, and joyful learning). The additional time of intra curriculum activities was intended for students of acceleration class, excellent class of 7th, 8th, and 9th, as well as for the 9th graders of regular class in order to have national exam preparation.

Multi-site Research Findings at Site 1, 2 and 3 characteristics of the students

Table 3 The Summary of Research Findings Focusing on the Evaluation Model of Teachers’ Performance Programs at Site 1, Site 2, and Site 3 Sub Focus How to evaluate

Research Findings at Site 1 and 2 The evaluation of the teachers’ performance was done by evaluating the sets of learning, supervising in the classroom, and checking the teachers’ diary

Research Findings at Site 3 (1) evaluate the sets of learning of each teacher including annual program, semester program, and lesson plans, (2) observe and supervise each class during an ongoing teaching and learning process, (3) evaluate the teachers’ performance through teachers’ diary, (4) evaluate the DP3 (List of Work Implementation Assessment) at the end of every academic year

Multi-site Research Findings at Site 1, 2 and 3 The evaluation was done by evaluating the sets of learning, supervising in the classroom, checking teachers’ diary, giving questionnaire to the students

Table 4 The Summary of Research Findings Focusing on the Effect of Teachers’ Performance Programs towards teachers’ professionalism at Site 1, Site 2, and Site 3 Multi-site Research Research Findings at Research Findings at Site Findings at Site 1, 2 Sub Focus Site 1 and 2 3 and 3 The effect of teachers’ A good management A good management of The better the performance of teachers’ teachers’ performance management of the management towards performance could made the teachers put teachers’ performance the teachers’ improve the teachers’ some efforts to improve was, the better teachers’ professionalism and professionalism and their performance. In the professionalism would the improvement of the students’ end, the teachers’ be students’ achievement achievement professionalism would directly affect the improvement of the students’ academic and non-academic achievement The preparation of teachers' performance programs at State Islamic schools in Malang Regency was the implementation of the vision, mission, and goals of the schools which were in line with the specialties of each Islamic school such as Islamic schools which had offered a bilingual program, excellent program, etc. In preparing the teachers' performance programs, the Islamic schools

involved all the teachers of each subject who were led by the principals assisted by vice principal of curriculum affairs. The preparation of the teachers' performance programs in the three state Islamic schools in Malang regency was done at the beginning of every academic year. The process of preparing the teachers' performance 36

International Research-Based Education Journal, Vol. 1 No. 1, January 2017

programs was started by creating the Islamic school work plan (RKM), then it was broken down into the work program of each teacher according to their main duties. In the beginning of every academic year, teachers who taught the same subjects gathered and developed the activity plan for the upcoming academic year. To finalize the preparation processes, a workshop was held in each Islamic school and in the subject teacher forum at each school as well as together with other Islamic schools. It was in line with 11 criteria which could be used as indicators of personal development so the schools could be considered as an effective school. The criteria were: (1) there was an improvement in the school development, (2) it was designed to improve the teachers’ performance, (3) it was planned and implemented well for short-term program, (4) it involved teachers and began by conducting needs assessment, planning, programming, making decision, and evaluating, (5) concentration, specification, and individual in terms of theory and general, (6) it determined the teachers’ needs of position, skills/ expertise, performance, (7) it gave the teachers chance to train their skills and strategies, (8) it gave feedback continuously to teachers related to their level of skills and strategies that had been done, (9) it happened in a certain period of time, (10) there were regular meetings to discuss ideas and problems as well as other promotions, and (11) it utilized the local human resources rather than hiring consultants from abroad (Nurhadi, 2004: 45). Essentially, teachers’ performance was a behavior shown by a teacher in carrying out his/ her duties as a teacher or educator when he/ she taught in front of the class which was according to certain criteria. Supriadi (2001) stated that a teacher who had good performance was a professional teacher. Further, a professional teacher should have five aspects which were: (1) a teacher who had high commitment to the students and the process of teaching and learning, (2) a teacher who mastered the subject he/ taught well and had technique as well as the teaching and learning methods according to the materials that he/ she taught, (3) a teacher who was responsible for observing his/ her students’ learning outcome and mastered various types of evaluation technique, (4) a teacher who did reflection and self-corrections and was able to systematically thought about what he/she could do and learned from his/ her experience, and (5) a teacher should think that he/ she was a part of the learning society within his/ her working environment. Hamelin (2002) mentioned 10 profiles of teachers’ basic competence including (1) competence in mastering the materials, (2) competence in managing the teaching and learning programs, (3) competence in managing the classroom with learning experience, (4) competence in using learning media and sources with learning experience, (5) competence in mastering the foundations of education with learning experience, (6) competence in managing the teaching and learning interaction with learning experience, (7) competence in evaluating the students’ achievement with learning experience, (8) competence in

recognizing the functions and the programs of guidance and counseling service, (9) competence in in recognizing and organizing school administration with learning experience, and (10) competence in understanding the principles and interpreting the results of educational research for the sake of teaching. In line with the opinion above, Depdikbud (1995) stated that teachers who had high performance were those who had ten basic professional competencies. The professional abilities or competencies were: (1) ability to master the learning materials, (2) ability to manage the teaching and learning programs, (3) ability to manage the class, (4) ability to choose and use the learning media and sources, (5) ability to implement the principles of education foundation, (6) ability to manage the teaching and learning interaction, (7) ability to evaluate the students' achievement, (8) ability to recognize the functions and the programs of guidance and counseling service, (9) ability to recognize and organize the school administration, and (10) ability to analyze the results of educational research and implement them in the process of teaching and learning. On each site of the current study, it was found that the implemented teaching and learning were inquiry, discovery, and inquiry-discovery which were suited to the subjects. The PAKEM (active, creative. effective, and joyful learning) strategy was also implemented and student-oriented paradigm was also developed. The three state Islamic schools in Malang also used outdoor learning area which was joyful and optimized the functions of the laboratory as a learning facility. All teachers implemented the teaching and learning processes according to the sets of learning that they had prepared. The learning strategies also varied depending on learning materials and the characteristics of the students. The performance implementation could be inside and outside the classroom as well as the coaching of extracurricular activities. The evaluation of the teachers’ performance was done through several ways which were evaluating the sets of `in beginning of every academic year and followed by supervising in the classroom, checking the teachers’ diary containing the description activities done by the teachers every day, giving out the questionnaires to the students and interviewing them as well as conducting full evaluation at the end of every academic year by using DP3 (List of Work Implementation Assessment) form. The result of the study conducted on the three sites showed that a good management of teachers' performance led to the improvement of the teachers' professionalism. The planned follow-up of the results of the good performance evaluation in the form of coaching, training, and assignment to study at graduate programs had been done by the principals of the Islamic schools. Then, the improvement of the teachers' professionalism led to the improvement of the students' academic and non-academic achievement. It could be seen from the achievement at the national exam of each Islamic schools and the nonacademic achievement from year to year.

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International Research-Based Education Journal, Vol. 1 No. 1, January 2017

professionalism and the professionalism affected the improvement of the students' academic and non-academic achievement.

CONCLUSION Based on the data and the research findings as well as the research discussion of the findings, it could be concluded that (a) the preparation of the good teachers' performance programs was the one that was made according to the understanding of the vision, mission, and goals of Islamic schools which were in line with the specialties and the characteristics of the Islamic schools; (b) the implementation of the teachers' performance programs at the three Islamic schools in Malang regency were done by all teachers by referring to all the work programs that had been prepared at the beginning of every academic year. The implementation of the teaching and learning programs was in line with the sets of learning that they had prepared. The teaching and learning strategies done by the teachers had varied and were suited with the learning materials and the characteristics of the students; (c) the evaluation of the teachers' performance was continuously done by the principals. The evaluation was in the form of evaluating the sets of learning made by each teacher including the syllabus, the annual program, the semester program, the lesson plans, the suitability of the indicators, the materials, and the learning media. Supervision then was done during ongoing teaching and learning processes. Evaluating the teachers' performance through teachers' diary and giving questionnaire as well as interviewing the students were also done. The thorough evaluation by using DP3 (List of Work Implementation Assessment) form was done at end of every academic year; (d) the management of teachers' performance directly affected the improvement of the teachers'

REFERENCES Barnawi & Arifin, M. (2012). Kinerja Guru Profesional. Jogjakarta: Ar-Ruzz Media Bogdan, R.C., & Biklen, S.K.B.(1998). Qualitative Research for Education : An Introduction to Theory and Methods. Boston. Allyn and Bacon, Inc. Bogdan, R., & Taylor, S.J. (1993). Kualitatif DasarDasar Penelitian. Penterjemah : A. Khozin Afandi. Surabaya : Usana Offset Printing. Furchan, A. (2004). Transformasi Pendidikan Islam di Indonesia, Anatomi Keberadan Madrasah dan PTAI. Yogyakarta: Gama Media Hasyim, F.(2009). Strategi Madrasah Unggul. Jogjakarta: Ar-Ruzz Media Muhaimin. (2009). Pengembangan Kurikulum Pendidikan Agama Islam: di Sekolah, Madrasah dan Perguruan Tinggi. Jakarta : Raja Grafindo Persada. Nurhadi, Yasin, B., dan Senduk, A. G. (2004). Pembelajaran Kontekstual Dan Penerapannya dalam KBK. Malang: Program Pasca Sarjana UM. Supriadi, D., & Jalal, F. (2001). Reformasi pendidikan dalam konteks otonomi daerah. Kerjasama Depdiknas, Bapenas, dan Adicita Karya Nusa.

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the management of teachers' performance at high performing islamic

International Research-Based Education Journal, Vol. 1 No. 1, January 2017 THE MANAGEMENT OF TEACHERS’ PERFORMANCE AT HIGH PERFORMING ISLAMIC SCHOOLS...

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