NEW YORK STATE COUNCIL ON THE ARTS Annual Report 1966

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NEW YORK STATE COUNCIL ON THE ARTS Annual Report 1966

250 West 57th Street/New York, N.Y. 10019 121 E. Genesee St., Hanover Square / Syracuse, N.Y. 13202

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Front Cover A few of the over 225,000 visitors who saw the Council's exhibit, The City: Places and People, at the 1965 World's Fair. In the background: Edward Hopper's Barber Shop, 1931. End Papers Instructions and a section from the score of lohn Cage's Concert for Piano and Orchestra which was performed at the Buffalo Festival of the Arts Today, with Council support.

2

Table of Contents

Foreword Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller

5

Introduction Brooks Atkinson

6

The Chairman's Review Seymour H. Knox

9

The Performing Arts Professional Touring Program Omar K. Lerman

13

Educational Presentations Robert E. Armstrong

29

Special Projects

33

Exhibitions William Hull Lucille Rhodes

37

Special Studies

43

Technical Assistance William Hull Robert E. Armstrong

47

Associate Director's Statement William Hull

51

Executive Director's Statement John B. Hightower

55

Council Permanency Legislative Act

50

Advisors and Consultants

53

Financial Statement

59

Council and Staff

7-|

Council Publications and Credits

72 3

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Governor’s Foreword

On May 13,1965, the New York State Council on the Arts became a permanent agency of the State government. It is a special tribute to the members of the Council and its staff, as well as the people of the State, that the bill introduced in the Senate by Minority Leader Brydges and in the Assembly by Speaker Travia was the first item passed on the 1965 Legislative agenda. This action is a result of a conviction which the Legislature and I shared in 1960 that government had a responsibility for the arts as one of the State's most timeless resources. Since the Council began, our shared conviction has been endorsed throughout the country. The National Council on the Arts and Humanities has been formed. Thirty-five other states, thus far, have established or are planning commissions which will give recognition and support to the arts. The pioneering role of New York's leadership is an acknowledged fact of this national acceptance. Significantly, the results of the Council's programs have been outstanding be¬ cause the citizens of the State have responded to them with increased enthusi¬ asm and involvement. The success proves that people respond to government action that serves, rather than inhibits, local participation and initiative. Within the next decade, the arts will undoubtedly be a stronger factor in all our lives than ever before. As more and more people are able to see outstanding performances and works of art within their own communities, individual efforts to stimulate interest in the arts locally will be transferred into collective pride. The artist, in turn, will benefit from additional opportunities to display his talent before an expanded and more knowledgeable audience.

Members of New York State's expanding audi¬ ence for the arts at per¬ formances and exhibi¬ tions sponsored by the Council during 1965.

Much of the Council's effectiveness in the last six years already reflects these developments. Its future has now been assured. The extent to which the Council fulfills its role will be determined not only by the Legislature and the dedication of its members, but by the continued participation of the people of the State. Nelson A. Rockefeller

Governor 5

Introduction

After a trial period of five years the New York State Council on the Arts has become an established part of the State government. The Legislature and the Governor, satisfied with the Council's preliminary accomplishments, have given it permanent tenure. In 1961 the State appropriated $450,000 for the Council. In 1965, $766,000. The difference between the two appropriations is one way of measuring the State's vote of confidence. In addition to the positive accomplishments that go on the record in this report, the Council can take pride in two negative achievements. Although it has become an important factor in the cultural life of many small communities, although it has helped them support opera, music, ballet, and theatre, it has not developed the styles of a despot or evangelist. It is so self-effacing that most of the citizens of New York City, which has enormous artistic resources, have never heard of the Council and do not know what it has been doing for Oneonta, Kingston, Amenia, and Delhi which have limited artistic resources. Although government bureaus have an instinct for self-preservation and look for a secure place in the power structure of the State, the Council has no politi¬ cal ambition. Regarding itself as a service organization, it has gone about its mission of encouraging participation in and appreciation of the arts without calling attention to itself. It has not conducted propaganda for itself or put up a building where bureaucrats can acquire prestige. The Council has another negative asset. It does not impose its ideas or tastes from above. In liberal establishments, administrators of cultural programs are inclined to assume that they know what is good for the people and are destined to improve the taste of the public. That patronizing point of view has some justification. En masse the public has low tastes: it prefers the dismal beat of the Beatles to the celestial harmonies of Handel's "Messiah". But in a democracy the public is entitled to its own taste—particularly if, as in America, the public has the ability to make sound decisions in its national life. Teaching the people what they should like is a hazardous occupation; worrying about the uses they make of their leisure is not only fatuous but futile. There is much to be learned from the people, and the Council is to be commended for respecting them. 6

Students and advocates of the arts (of whom I am one) cannot imagine life with¬ out the criticism and illumination that the arts supply. Whether we know it or not we all live in a world that has been in part shaped by the artists. The King James version of the Bible, the plays and poetry of Shakespeare, the symphonies of Beethoven, and the paintings of Leonardo da Vinci affect the life we lead day by day. After Shakespeare said that life is a tale told by an idiot, signifying noth¬ ing, no enlightened person could be complacent again. But the blunt fact is that appreciation of the arts represents an advanced state of civilization after the ground work has been laid by farmers and mechanics, statesmen and educators. In America the early settlers were not much interested in the arts; in some cases they opposed the arts as instruments of the devil. The spiritual and intellectual energy of America went into the arts of government. Food, clothing, houses, and political order are more essential than the arts; and when America needed the essentials, America produced the men who could supply them. If there had been more leisure in the colonial and early Federalist days, some of the energy absorbed in the founding of the nation might have gone into the arts. Although artists do not like to think so (and neither do I), the arts do not flourish until the people are free of the immediate necessities and have a little margin in which to consider their relation to the universe. It took New York State about three centuries to feel the necessity of a Council on the Arts. But it has a Council now and will have one as long as the State endures, for the basic services that the State supplies are of limited value if the people are not aware and en¬ lightened. Life without criticism is not worth living, and the arts are one of the ways in which a society criticizes itself. As the increase in the State appropriations over five years proves, people want more of this experience the more they have of it. “Art brings life to life," John Sloan said. It opens the eyes and sharpens the mind and raises the spiritual temperature. Entertainment is a proper function of art; everybody is entitled to a good time. But great art adds depth and height to the experience of living. I have never been able to find the place where art leaves off and religion begins, because they are closely related. As the material satisfactions of life increase in New York State, the demands on the Council on the Arts will also increase. For comfort is not enough. It does not have the vitality of an idea.

Brooks Atkinson 7

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The Chairman’s Review

In reporting on the accomplishments of the New York State Council on the Arts during the year 1965, the most significant event was the faith in its program which the Legislature expressed by making the Council a permanent agency of the State government. When we began as a temporary commission in 1960, few of us could have realized the dramatic expansion in the arts that has taken place throughout the country since then. At that time, the foresight of Governor Rockefeller and the Legislature in composing the legislative concept of encour¬ aging the practice and enjoyment of the arts was unprecedented. Today, a National Council on the Arts and a National Endowment for the Arts are functioning in Washington. The initial grants of the National Endowment indicate that areas in the arts which have too long been ignored are being strengthened and recognized with insight. By latest count, thirty-five states are now actively working toward developing programs for their own arts councils or commissions. The number last year at the time our annual report was issued was twenty-eight. The current prediction is that in less than three years, every state in the nation will have established an agency to encourage appreciation and understanding of the arts. For much of this growth New York can be proud. Were it not for the results of the New York Arts Council experience, there would be no enthusiasm for repeating our efforts. As it is, the enabling act of the Council has set a legislative standard which a number of other states are following—a practice which we welcome and encourage. Other significant events in the Council's year included the beginning of a pro¬ gram of educational presentations. By introducing new and, frequently, young audiences to the arts through master classes, workshops, lecture-demonstrations,

The Second Presbyterian Church in Delhi, built in 1831, is a landmark in New York State architec¬ ture. This gracious exam¬ ple of the Creek Revival period is part of a special architectural survey by the Council.

open rehearsals, and seminars, the Council hopes to develop a more knowl¬ edgeable audience for the arts. Over 225,000 visitors to the New York World's Fair stopped to look at the Coun¬ cil's second exhibition, The City-Places and People, in the New York State Pavil¬ ion. The fascination of New York's urban growth was vividly depicted in paint¬ ings by artists that included Georgia O'Keeffe, Childe Hassam, Edward Hopper, John Sloan, Philip Evergood, Hans Hofmann, Willem de Kooning, Philip Guston, 9

and Franz Kline. The exhibition was assembled for the Council by Katharine Kuh, art critic of The Saturday Review, providing a sequel to the Council's 1964 exhibit, The River—Places and People, which emphasized the strong artistic influence of the Hudson River on the painters and culture of earlier centuries. During the fall of the year, the New York Philharmonic, under the direction of guest conductor William Steinberg of the Pittsburgh Symphony, was host to conductors from all over the state. The workshop for promising conductors gave several men of special talent an opportunity to work with a major symphony orchestra under the guidance and instruction of Maestro Steinberg. The Ameri¬ can Symphony Orchestra League organized the week-long program which included seminars on orchestra administration and a chance for orchestra members throughout the metropolitan New York area to rehearse and perform with the musicians of the Philharmonic. The Council's continuing concern for the preservation of New York's architec¬ ture led to the publication of Architecture Worth Saving in Rensselaer County in September, 1965. Another attempt to enhance our surroundings was initiated when the Governor asked the Council to administer a series of awards which he conceived as a means of "encouraging individuals, organizations and whole communities for outstanding initiatives in support of physical enhancement of life in New York State". These major events in the Council's year were based on what has proved to be a sound foundation—a combination of technical assistance, travelling exhibi¬ tions, and touring performances designed to expand the audience for the arts and, in turn, increase the artist's opportunity to perform and display his work. The public acceptance of this approach found formal expression this past year in the legislation which guaranteed the Council's permanency. The lists of performances given and exhibitions seen which are published in this and previous reports provide evidence to justify the Legislature's action. Yet these facts and figures are curiously remote. It is the extent to which the work of the Council affects individual lives which makes this legislation among the most important in New York's history.

Seymour H. Knox Chairman 10

Edward Hopper, one of the great men of Ameri¬ can painting at the open¬ ing of the Council's show, The City: Places and Peo¬ ple in the New York State Pavilion at the World's Fair.

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Professional Touring Program

"Town Hall Tonight!" A familiar and stirring call once used to announce a community meeting is now used to announce still other kinds of community events—events in the per¬ forming arts. Programs and times may have changed, but the community par¬ ticipation remains, and in recent years, through the Council's program of assistance to touring performing arts groups, a new vitality and enthusiasm in the arts seems evident throughout the State. Pick a date-any date. October 15? Verdi's Tosca performed by the Goldovsky Grand Opera Theatre had a full house in Oneida, Jean Erdman's dance adapta¬ tion of James Joyce's The Coach with the Six Insides played to capacity in Saratoga Springs, and the Pulitzer Prize-winning play, The Subject Was Roses, was sold out in Tarrytown. November 4? Brahms (The Syracuse Symphony Orchestra) in Cortland and Shakespeare (The National Players) in Fredonia. November 13? Symphony in Merrick and Plattsburgh, ballet in Ithaca, and grand opera in Brooklyn. This kaleidoscopic activity in the arts is largely the result of the Professional Touring Performing Arts Program, specifically designed to give advice, assist¬ ance, and necessary financial support to local arts groups anxious to begin or expand the cultural program in their communities. Acting as a catalyst, the Council program brings together a community desire for quality entertainment and the equally strong demand of the artists to perform for the expanding audience. The Professional Touring Performing Arts Program provides local sponsors necessary financial support to make up the difference between what is earned by ticket sales and contributions and the sum required to pay artist fees and expenses.

One of many who waited in fine at the box office to get seats for the New York City Opera perform¬ ance of Carmen in Auburn.

The local sponsor makes the selection from over 100 professional dance, opera, concert, children's entertainment, and theater attractions included on the Council's list. This choice is based solely on the sponsors' taste, desires, and interest. Evidence of the level of this taste is indicated by the following: There are some 35 quartet, quintet, and chamber ensemble concerts; 18 avant-garde dance recitals; 5 performances of a Greek tragedy; and 18 grand opera perform¬ ances in the 255 performances given under this program this year. 73

There will be baroque music in Watertown, Aurora, and Rockaway Park; full symphony orchestras in Beaver Falls, Elma, and Elbridge; modern dance in Ravena, Stony Brook, Keuka Park, and Oneonta; opera in Delmar, Cobleskill, and Saugerties; ballet in Lackawanna, Geneseo, and Jamestown; theatre in Granville, South Fallsburg, and Ogdensburg; and children's entertainment in 30 communities stretching from Amenia to Olean, Odessa to Valley Stream. Too often there is a tendency to prove success by statistical measurements, charts, graphs, and figures. (Ours follows, but only to confirm.) But what unit of measure can one use to record the "enthusiastic response" of the Schroon Lake audience at the Festival Orchestra performance, or evaluate the humanizing effects of the In White America performances in Ithaca and Jamestown. What figures can one use to record the psychic rewards, the excitement, or the stimulation gained through performances by the Bach Aria Group, the New York City Opera, and Merce Cunningham? The numbers, percentages, and cost per performance certainly provide an im¬ portant view on the operation of this program. Further, they may suggest trends, but they are woefully inadequate in indicating the effects of the program on the arts themselves. They do not explain that the performing artist with more play¬ ing engagements and improved financial status, can develop more freely and fully. They cannot begin to gauge the effects this expanding audience for the arts has on the creative artists, nor is it possible to calculate the spiritual enrichment to young audiences discovering the live arts.

Concert Requests for concert performances continue to dominate the program. In the current year 35% of the performances (84 out of 255*) will be presented by full symphony and chamber orchestras, brass and woodwind quartets, choral groups, string trios, and other small ensembles. In the 1964-65 program, last season, 80 adult concerts (plus some 30 in-school performances-a category not included under the Professional Touring Performing Arts Program this year) were given support. Funds for this section of the program in 1965-66 totalled $71,350. This is approximately 42% of the artists' fees of $166,855. While the Council participation.has been reduced slightly from last year, (44% of fees), artists' fees and total support have increased. (*AII figures used in this section of the report are Council commitments as of December 10, 1965 for performances scheduled between April 1,1965 and May 31,1966.)

14

Claude Monteux conducting Council-supported performance by the Turnau Opera Players and the Hudson Valley Phil¬ harmonic in a Christmas soecial — Humperdinck's Hansel and Cretel-w/i/ch was performed in SaugertiesandYorktown Heights.

Calendar Of Performances Troy Schenectady Aurora, Canandaigua, Cazenovia, Clinton, East Rochester, Rochester, Syracuse, Watertown Houghton, Syracuse Long Beach, Norwich, Plattsburgh, Rome, Saranac Lake Elma, Glens Falls, Kenmore, Oneonta,Troy Glen Cove, Riverhead Alfred, Geneva, Houghton, Patchogue, Troy Stony Brook Mineola Schroon Lake

ALBANY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA ALBANY SYMPHONY ARS ANTIQUA SOCIETY

BACH ARIA GROUP BALTIMORE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

BUFFALO PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

CHICAGO LITTLE SYMPHONY CINCINNATI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CONTEMPORARY CHAMBER ENSEMBLE DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

Schenectady

FESTIVAL WINDS

Schenectady

FINE ARTS QUARTET

Garden City, Schroon Lake Chatham Rensselaerville Chatham, Pawling Saugerties, Yorktown Heights Merrick Great Neck Briarcliff Manor, Potsdam

GUARNERI STRING QUARTET HUDSON VALLEY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA HUDSON VALLEY STRING QUARTET HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA with THE TURNAU OPERA COMPANY INDIANAPOLIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA KOHON STRING QUARTET LENOX QUARTET

Ithaca, Potsdam

NEW YORK BRASS QUINTET

Briarcliff Manor, Cedarhurst

NEW YORK CHAMBER SOLOISTS

Greenvale Buffalo, Rockaway Park Schroon Lake Oceanside, Ithaca, Selden, Upton

NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA NEW YORK PRO MUSICA MOTET ENSEMBLE NEW YORK WOODWIND QUINTET ORCHESTRA DA CAMERA

Oneonta

PHILADELPHIA WOODWIND QUINTET

Brooklyn

ROMEROS, THE ROYAL FAMILY OF THE GUITAR

Beaver Falls, Cortland, Elbridge, Skaneateles Cazenovia

SYRACUSE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

SYRACUSE SYMPHONETTA

The Alwin Nikolais Dance Company was one of five appearing in the Hunter College Dance series, which was supported by the Council. Pictured here, Imago.



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Theater This season legitimate theater bookings were below last year's level. Last season Council funds supported 51 performances in 40 communities. The Council this year will provide $25,075—about 35% of the attraction fees of $72,250—to sup¬ port 35 performances in 32 communities. While it is always difficult, if not impossible, to state the reasons for "bad business" it must be noted that there were fewer theater attractions included in the program than in previous years. Further, it must always be remembered that these statistics do not give the com¬ plete picture of the performing arts activity in the State. Not every performance by these attractions receives State support, nor are these attractions the only ones that are performing.

Calendar Of Performances

Ithaca, Jamestown, Saratoga Springs Delhi

Auburn

Clinton, Cortland, Farmingdale, New Rochelle, Poughkeepsie, Rochester, South Fallsburg Staten Island, Troy Albany, Canton, Cazenovia, Fredonia, Granville, Troy Geneseo, Middletown, Ogdensburg, Oneida, Plattsburgh, Syracuse, Tarrytown Alfred, Auburn, Brockport, Buffalo, Syracuse

IN WHITE AMERICA Marechal Productions, Inc. THE MISER National Players OLIVER! Guettel Cantor Oliver Company PICTURES IN THE HALLWAY Dick Weaver Attractions

ROMEO AND )ULIET National Players THE SUBJECT WAS ROSES Touring Theatre, Inc.

TROJAN WOMEN Circle In the Square

A bus brings In White America to Jamestown, New York. Over twenty appearances were spon¬ sored by the Council. At right: Booker T. Brad¬ shaw, Jr., and Clark Mor¬ gan in performance.

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Opera Large companies and production costs make opera attractions the most finan¬ cially demanding touring organizations. Few towns have halls with an audience capacity large enough to make opera performances even remotely feasible. However, opera booms all over New York State. This year, with Council funds, 6 opera companies performed 27 times in that many cities. This is almost double the number of performances given last year. Support covered $43,960 of the $108,950 artists' fees.

Calendar Of Performances

Brooklyn, Oneida, Schenectady Ellenville

Rochester

Cobleskill, Johnstown Delmar, Potsdam, Troy Corning, Middletown, Plattsburgh, Syracuse Auburn, Batavia, Ogdensburg, Clean, Schenectady

Manhasset Mineola Brooklyn White Plains Laurelton, Utica Student volunteers and a member of the chorus re¬ lax backstage during one of 4 performances of Carmen by the New York City Opera in upstate New York. This is the fifth year that the Opera has toured in New York State with Council assistance.

Saugerties, Yorktown Heights

GOLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA THEATRE Don Giovanni La Boheme METROPOLITAN OPERA NATIONAL COMPANY La Cenerentola METROPOLITAN OPERA STUDIO Don Pasquale La Cenerentola NEW YORK CITY OPERA Barber of Seville Carmen

NORTH SHORE OPERA COMPANY Cos! Fan Tutti Hansel and Cretel Marriage of Figaro Rita TURNAU OPERA PLAYERS Don Pasquale Hansel and Crete! with the Hudson Valley Philharmonic Orchestra

21

Dance Traditional and classical ballet still seem the most popular dance forms through¬ out the State, notwithstanding the unprecedented success of modern dance companies in New York City. The number of dance performances rose from 34 performances in 30 communities last year to 41 performances in 37 com¬ munities this year. Last year artists' fees were $52,000; this year, $76,600; and support increased from $24,000 to $28,850, 37% of the total artists' fees. This increase in artists' fees is significant. Long the stepchildren of the perform¬ ing arts, dancers have been notoriously underpaid. The Council, especially within this program, encourages producers to raise their fees, which in turn means more equitable compensation for the individual performers. Calendar Of Performances

Brooklyn Staten Island Brooklyn, Elmira, Lackawanna Ceneseo Oneonta, Saratoga Springs, Schenectady, Stony Brook Brooklyn Great Neck, Scarsdale Corona East Meadow Fredonia, Liberty Ithaca Schenectady Schenectady Brooklyn, Flushing, Middletown, Orangeburg, Syracuse Brooklyn Brooklyn, Ravena Cazenovia Brooklyn, Ithaca, Jamestown Keuka Park Southampton Oneonta Utica

22

ALBA/REYES SPANISH DANCE COMPANY ALVIN AILEY DANCE THEATRE AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE RUTH PAGE'S CHICAGO OPERA BALLET THE COACH WITH THE SIX INSIDES

MERGE CUNNINGHAM DANCE COMPANY JEAN-LEON DESTINE DANCE COMPANY DINIZULU AND HIS AFRICAN DANCERS ANDRE EGLEVSKY BALLET COMPANY JOSE GRECO AND COMPANY ERICK HAWKINS DANCE COMPANY LUCAS HOVING DANCE TRIO PAULINE KONER JOSE LIMON DANCE COMPANY SOPHIE MASLOW DANCE COMPANY MATA & HARI CAROLA GOYA AND MATTEO NATIONAL BALLET DANIEL NAGRIN ALWIN T. NIKOLAIS DANCE COMPANY NORMAN WALKER AND DANCE COMPANY YURIKO DANCE COMPANY

The Council sponsored Merce Cunningham and his dance company in a performance of Summerspace, a new ballet, with sets and costumes designedbyRobertRauschenberg — a highlight of the Buffalo Festival of the Arts Today.

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Children’s Entertainment Children's entertainment is an area of great concern to the Council. For many of the children who attend, it is the first exposure to the performing arts and its effect can be lastingly important. By insisting that local sponsors establish reasonable ticket prices and by encouraging sponsors to present series rather than single events, budgets were increased and more funds were made available for additional performances and for providing better salaries to the performers. Council support per performance was also increased for these reasons. In this year's program, support has increased from last year's $5,400 to $9,065, although the 67 performances were only four more than last year. Council funds account for about 42% of the artists' fees of $20,325. Calendar Of Performances Amenia Astoria Croton-on-Hudson Endwell Jeffersonville

BARBER OF SEVILLE BABU, BEAUTY AND THE BEAST BLUE PLANET, YOUNG TOM JEFFERSON PINOCCHIO POETRY IN 3-D

Jericho

ANDRE ECLEVSKY BALLET COMPANY

Massapequa Park

TONY MONTANARO MIME THEATRE

Merrick Newburgh New York (All Day Neighborhood Schools)

Odessa Clean Port Washington Rye

Scarsdale Schenectady Smithtown Troy Valley Stream

24

HANSEL AND GRETEL

BABU, TREASURE ISLAND PETEY AND THE POGO STICK POETRY IN 3-D AESOP UNLIMITED YOUNG ABE LINCOLN, YOUNG BEN FRANKLIN YOUNG TOM EDISON PETEY AND THE POGO STICK YOUNG ABE LINCOLN PRINCESS QUA QUA INDIAN CAPTIVE THE TINDER BOX, THE MAGIC FIDDLE TONY MONTANARO MIME THEATRE PRINCESS QUA QUA ANDRE ECLEVSKY BALLET COMPANY MERRY-CO-ROUNDERS FUN WITH MUSIC BABU POETRY IN 3-D A JOURNEY THROUGH MUSIC AMERICAN THEATRE DANCE

A scene from the Paper Bag Players' production My Horse is Waiting. The company gave a series of performances and lecturedemonstrations for chil¬ dren in Harlem, East Harlem, and Creenpoint under Council sponsor¬ ship.

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FIVE YEAR COMPARISON OF THE PROFESSIONAL TOURING PERFORMING ARTS PROGRAM

Council Support

Artists' Fees

Performances

Communities

1965-66*

$178,300

$445,000

255

106

140

83

1964-65**

$155,570

$405,000

233t

92

120

70

1963-64**

$155,550

$342,000

224

88

68

57

1962-63

$264,500

$264,500

107

53

451

9

1961-62

$330,000

$330,000

92

46

401

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Local Touring Sponsors Companies

In 1961-62 and 1962-63, the program sponsored specially-arranged tours by a limited number of attractions. The current program, expanding the number of available attractions, began in 1963-64. •Through 72/70/65 ••Revised 72/7/65 +Not including 30 in-school concerts tApproximate

Summary Each year's figures for the Professional Touring Program seem to confirm a growing interest in the arts. The requests for support and the number of per¬ formances for which support is granted have steadily increased. So has audience attendance. During the 1963-64 season, 130,000 people filled 80% of the total number of all available seats for sponsored performances. In the 1964-65 season attendance rose to 160,000 and the percentage of empty seats decreased. The number of sponsoring organizations increased in two years from 68 in 1963-64 to 140 in 1965-66, and the number of communities who participated in the pro¬ gram rose from 88 in 1963-64 to 106 in 1965-66. Artists' fees were also higher this year and the average dollar expenditure per performance has increased from $565 in 1964-65 to $700 in 1965-66, although the average percentage of Council support remained reasonably constant—38% in 1964-65 and 39% this year. 26

Professors Baumol and Bowen, in their excellent report, On the Performing Arts: The Anatomy of Their Economic Problems, prepared for The Twentieth Century Fund, draw continual attention to the disparity between salaries of artists and their peers in other professions, and conclude that immediate action to narrow the gap is essential for a vital and thriving industry. The Council, by supplementing sponsors' budgets, eliminates the touring attraction's need to "play cheap" in order to attract more playing dates. These extra funds make it possible for groups to pay higher salaries to the performers. This, in addition to making possible an increasing number of playing dates, decidedly and happily affects the actual earnings of the participating artists. A primary concept of the Council is to keep this a program of support, not sub¬ sidy. Each sponsoring organization and each patron should understand that the Council has to support newly developing programs throughout the State. There¬ fore, sponsors receiving assistance are expected to provide an increasing share of the cost of their existing programs each year. As the communities are able to broaden their audiences, gradually raise admission prices to proper levels, and find local sources of financial support, less Council support should be required. Through such programming, the effects of what drama critic Stanley Kauffmann refers to as the "Golden Vise", that is, the pressures brought about by an in¬ creased audience for entertainment, and the increasing cost of producing that entertainment, can be minimized, and both the artist and the audience can be justly rewarded.

Omar K. Lerman

Special Consultant for the Performing Arts 27

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Educational Presentations

During the fall of 1965, an Educational Presentations Program was inaugurated, and with it, the Council's first concerted effort to bring the professional per¬ forming artist into the classroom. Patterned on the Council's Professional Tour¬ ing Program, the new program offers financial assistance to any school, college, or university in the State wishing to augment its own curriculum with a presen¬ tation by a professional company or artist. The forms these presentations take vary widely: Lecture-demonstrations have served to introduce an art form to a previously uninitiated student audience; master classes have made instructors out of some of the country's top profes¬ sional dancers and instrumentalists for periods ranging from a day to a week; workshops and clinics have proved effective means for increasing student inter¬ est as well as improving the quality of instruction; performances specifically programmed for students are developing an audience for the future. Nearly 100 presentations are scheduled under this program for schools and colleges in New York State during the 1965-66 academic year. A "600" school in Brooklyn, whose students are selected from "emotionally disturbed" chil¬ dren, is developing an active interest in dance among its students and has sched¬ uled a lecture-demonstration and master class by Daniel Nagrin. The Ithaca Quartet gave a lecture-demonstration for the Binghamton Youth Orchestra and remained to conduct a workshop for the string section. With the assistance of the Council, the high school students of eight communities upstate have seen performances of the Metropolitan Opera Studio's production of Donizetti's "Don Pasquale", toured under the auspices of the Lincoln Center Student Program. While the Council's contribution to programs of this nature has ranged from $50 to well over $1,000, support has averaged about 40% of the artist's fee. The A violin student and her instructor at the St. James Community Center School of the Arts in Harlem. The string instruction program, directed by Thomas Scherman, is sup¬ ported by the Council.

establishment of this new program coincides with the passage of the Federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 which, through Title III of the Act, provides funds for projects designed to "enrich the programs of local elementary and secondary schools and to offer a diverse range of educational experience to persons of varying talents and needs". The "educational experi¬ ence" has been defined to include the visual and performing arts. 29

The opportunities under the provisions of this remarkable legislation are a source of much encouragement to those concerned with increasing discerning audiences for the future and with the recognition and development of young talent. The Council is working closely with the State Education Department both in expanding its own educational program and with projects materializing under Title III. Calendar Of Performances Albany Mamaroneck Batavia, Bath, Penn Van South Fallsburg Albany, Copiague, Fredonia, Granville, Flempstead, Huntington, Little Falls Syracuse, Cazenovia Saratoga Springs Rochester Bedford Hills, Brooklyn, Little Neck, New York City Huntington Liberty, New York City South Fallsburg Batavia, Buffalo, Rochester, Rome, St. Bonaventure Babylon, Copiague, Farmingdale, Huntington, Ithaca, Jericho, Malverne, North Merrick, Rockville Centre, Roslyn, Syosset, Wantagh, West Islip Binghamton Rome North Collins, Tonawanda Fayetteville, Huntington, Gouverneur

RENAISSANCE QUARTET JOSE LIMON DANCE COMPANY ROCHESTER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA VIVECA LINDFORS METROPOLITAN OPERA STUDIO

SYRACUSE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA NORMAN WALKER DAVID DIAMOND AND PAUL CAVERT DANIEL NAGRIN LINCOLN CENTER REPERTORY THEATER PANTOMIME THEATER OF NEW YORK RICHARD DYER-BENNETT ARS ANTIQUA ORCHESTRA DA CAMERA

ITHACA QUARTET BALTIMORE SYMPHONY BUFFALO PHILHARMONIC NEW YORK CITY BALLET

Poughkeepsie

SHAKESPEARE SCENE BY SCENE

New York City

ALBERT FULLER & FESTIVAL WINDS

Bronx, Briarcliff Manor, Valley Stream Brooklyn Arlington

OLATUNJI DORIAN QUINTET HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC

Robert E. Armstrong Special Programs Associate

30

Here, Dan Wagoner, a member of the Norman Walker Dance Company, conducts a class. Council support made it possible for dance instructors to attend eight-week ses¬ sions at the Summer Dance Workshop of Adelphi University.

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Special Projects

Special Projects form the one program of the Council which offers direct finan¬ cial support to a performing group, a school, or a similar organization connected with some aspect of the arts. Special Projects fall rather easily into two main classifications: those which serve to focus attention on an area in the arts which has been neglected, and those with an educational basis designed to improve the quality of instruction in the arts and to develop a broader and betterinformed audience for the arts. While the Council cannot provide long-term support for organizations, it considers specific proposals which will help accom¬ plish this purpose. The programs described below comprise the Council's Spe¬ cial Projects for 1965-66. Paper Bag Players, which Newsweek magazine has called "the most original children's theater group in the country", received special assistance from the Council in 1965 to enable them to conduct a series of performances and lecturedemonstrations in schools throughout economically depressed areas in New York City: Greenpoint, Harlem, East Harlem, and the Bronx. Young Audiences, Inc. received support from the Council for the third year to assist it in bringing some fifteen chamber groups, ranging from a harp trio to a brass quintet, into elementary and high schools in upstate New York. Nearly two hundred schools participated in this program, fifty of them for the first time. The Metropolitan Opera Studio toured its production of Rossini's La Cenerentola into the schools of a dozen upstate communities in April and May. The Council on the Arts joined with local sponsors in meeting the costs of these presentations.

George Balanchine and Richard Duffalo, assistant conductor of the Buffalo Philharmonic, at a re¬ hearsal of Agon during the Council-supported week of ballet in Buffalo involving members of the New York City Ballet.

The Little Orchestra Society, under the musical direction of Thomas Scherman, conducted a Council-supported tour of upstate New York in November, giving a series of sixteen Youth Concerts in communities spread from Middletown to Ogdensburg. Ann Gardner, soprano, Thomas Head, baritone, and Carol Rankin, pianist, appeared as soloists in an all-Mozart program. Hunter College Dance Series was designed to provide a showcase for some of the country's best modern dance companies. In this second year of the program, the companies include those of Paul Taylor, Alvin Ailey, Gene Tetley, Erick Hawkins, Alwin Nikolais, and Donald McKayle. 33

Adelphi University continued to operate a professional-level Summer Dance Workshop on its Long Island Campus during July and August. With the assist¬ ance of the Council, the University was able for the first time to offer eighteen partial scholarships to performers and teachers from civic and regional dance companies and schools in New York State. The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra Society, with the assistance of the Council, continued to expand its role as a regional orchestra by making its services avail¬ able to the smaller communities of Western New York. In the 1965-66 season, the orchestra initiated its first full series of concerts, including a youth concert in Lima, where previously only isolated dates had been possible. The New York City Ballet provided two groups of dancers, one headed by Melissa Hayden and the second by Edward Villella, to conduct an extensive program of lecture-demonstrations, master classes, and dance workshops for one and two weeks in Binghamton and Buffalo. In addition to their obvious educational value, these projects were further designed to focus attention on ballet in two areas where interest in dance is developing. The Academy of American Poets, with partial support from the Council, organ¬ ized two educational programs, Dialogues on the Art of Poetry and Poetry Readings in the Public Schools, for the benefit of students and teachers of English in New York City schools. The New York Philharmonic and the Council co-sponsored a one-week Con¬ ductors' and Orchestral Seminar in September. Under the supervision of William Steinberg, eight promising professional conductors worked with the New York Philharmonic in a series of workshops which culminated in a full performance. Over forty other conductors audited the sessions. The program was administered by the American Symphony Orchestra League. Richard and John Contiguglia, a young duo-piano team from Auburn, New York, launched their first American tour with a series of performances, master classes, and symposia in community colleges and universities from the Bronx to Brockport. The Star Lake Music Camp of the State University College at Potsdam and the Youth String Workshop at Ithaca College both received assistance from the Council in the form of professional chamber ensembles. At Star Lake, both the Lenox Quartet and the New York Brass Quintet were on hand, while at Ithaca the Salzburg String Quartet served as artists-in-residence for the week of workshops. 34

New Dramatists and the Playwrights Unit of Theater 7966 were supported by the Council to assist the creative artist. Through these organizations, the Council made possible a number of professional workshop productions of promising young American playwrights whose work had not been produced before. The Lake George Opera Festival presented a repertory of Cos/ Fan Tutte, La Boheme, The Telephone, Pagliacci, and The Taming of the Shrew at a series of student matinees in its new home in Glen Falls during July and August. The St. James Community Center School of the Arts, founded and directed by Miss Dorothy Maynor, continues to expand its remarkable range of instruction in the arts for the children of Harlem. Council assistance has been directed toward the establishment of a string instruction program under the musical direction of Thomas Scherman. The Roberson Memorial Center, with assistance from the Council, is developing a ballet school of professional standards to serve the Binghamton and SouthCentral New York area. The Syracuse Symphony Orchestra and the Council have established a Resident Operatic Artist Program in Syracuse, under which four young American singers have been engaged to serve as artists-in-residence with the Orchestra for the 1965-66 season. This pilot program may serve to prepare the way for similar projects with orchestras across the country and make it less essential for a young singer to spend his formative years in Europe in order to gain recognition in the United States. Theater in the Street, in its second year of Council support, doubled the number of its performances in the streets of metropolitan New York's Harlem, Williams¬ burg, Spanish Harlem, Chelsea, and Bedford-Stuyvesant. Works by Moliere and Chekhov were performed in both English and Spanish. The Westchester Music Camp, a summer program for junior and senior high school students, received assistance to enable it to engage professional musi¬ cians and dancers for a series of workshops and master classes.

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Exhibitions

The demand for museum services throughout the State has expanded dramat¬ ically in recent years. To aid museums in fulfilling their obligations to meet this demand, the Council has underwritten a large portion of the costs of exhibitions organized by the American Federation of Arts and made them readily available to supplement the exhibition programs of the State's variety of excellent mu¬ seums. As a result, the serious strain of time and research required in organizing museum exhibit programs is being relieved to allow more attention for the maintenance and expansion of permanent collections. Acting specifically upon the recommendations of museum directors at a meet¬ ing held in Utica during October, 1964, the Council last year supported a major retrospective exhibition of the work of John Quidor. The show, organized by Edward Dwight, director of the Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute in Utica and John I. H. Baur, associate director of the Whitney Museum in New York City, will be seen in New York, Utica, Rochester, and Albany. Another recommen¬ dation resulted in a sales exhibition, Prints for Home and Office, designed to encourage and support the artists of New York State directly. Max W. Sullivan, director of the Everson Museum in Syracuse; Harris K. Prior, director of the Rochester Memorial Gallery; and Una Johnson, curator of prints and drawings at the Brooklyn Museum organized the exhibit. The work of thirtyeight artists included in the show will begin an extensive state-wide tour with a preview in Syracuse on February 1, 1966.

"The Symposium" by Joseph Demarais (above); "The Prince" by Robert E. Marx (left); and "The Enlightened Pause" by Robert T. Schuler (right) are three of the 44 prints in the Council-sponsored sales exhibition, "Prints for Home and Office".

Perhaps the most far-reaching program begun in 1965 is one to assist regional museums in broadening the range of their exhibition programs through support of new non-circulating exhibits. The first three were: Art in Science, at the Albany Institute of History and Art, September 1965; American Painting Since 1830 at the Everson Museum in Syracuse, December 1965; and American Folk Art at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, also in December. Other exhibits that will be shown in 1966 include: William Bartlett and His Imitators, at the Arnot Art Gallery in Elmira; Japanese Painters of the Floating World, at the Andrew White Museum in Ithaca; and Masterpieces from the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, at the Rochester Memorial Gallery. The Council continues to work with historical museums that have facilities for changing exhibits, to help smaller cities and towns form community art 37

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38

centers and public galleries, and to encourage libraries to use visual arts exhibitions. The talents of specialized museums and the art departments of universities have been utilized to design exhibitions which conform to the space requirements of smaller institutions. During the past summer, four of the graduates of The Cooperstown Graduate Program in History Museum Training spent three months as interns in smaller historical museums as a result of the Council's support. In the coming year, the Council will continue to support internship training in order to alleviate the urgency developing from the lack of experienced individuals to meet the requirements of expanding museum audiences and the needs of conserving the State's wealth of museum resources.

CURRENT CIRCULATING EXHIBITIONS American Federation of Arts

AMERICAN HARDWARE Organized by Lewis Rubenstein, curator, John Jay House. AMERICAN SILVER Organized by Marvin Schwartz, curator of decorative arts, Brooklyn Museum. THE PAPER ON THE WALL Organized by Hedy Backlin-Landman, former curator of decorative arts, Cooper Union Museum. Small, self-installed exhibits presenting the history of three decorative arts indigenous to New York State. AMERICAN IMPRESSIONISM Selected by William H. Gerdts, Jr., curator of American painting and sculpture, the Newark Museum. An exhibition of twenty paintings including the work of Clackens, Hassam, Henri, Lawson, Prendergast, Sargent, and Twachtman. THE FIGURE INTERNATIONAL Organized by Professor Anthony Smith of Hunter College. Paintings, drawings, and watercolors by artists noted for their portrayal of the figure. Edward Dwight, Director of the Munson-WiMamsProctor Institute in Utica, directing the installation of a major retrospective exhibition of John Quidor, nineteenth century New York State artist.

HOWTO LOOK AT A PAINTING (two editions) Organized by Bartlett H. Hayes, Jr., director of the Addison Gallery of American Art. An expert guides a novice into the world of art. THREE CENTURIES OF ARCHITECTURE IN NEW YORK Selected by Dr. Carl Hersey, professor of Fine Arts, the University of Rochester. A survey from the 1600's to 1960 of architecture from all sections of the State. 39

Brooklyn Museum TECHNIQUES OF PAINTING TECHNIQUES OF GRAPHIC ARTS TECHNIQUES OF SCULPTURE Three self-installed educational exhibitions organized with the cooperation of Hanna T. Rose, curator, Education Division. Each explores the creative process and the nature of the given media with photographs, diagrams, and art. Cooper Union Museum of Art COLOR IS LIGHT GRAPHIC ARTS: THE MAKING OF PRINTS WEAVING: THE ART OF THE LOOM Three educational panel exhibitions circulated by regional museums to area high schools. Everson Museum of Art PRINTS FOR HOME AND OFFICE A sales exhibition organized by Miss Una Johnson, curator of prints, Brooklyn Museum; Max Sullivan, director of the Everson Museum of Art; and Harris Prior, director of the Rochester Memorial Art Gallery. Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute JOHN QU1DOR, 1801-1881 An exhibition and catalogue on this influential nineteenth-century New York State artist organized by Mr. Edward Dwight, director of the Munson-WilliamsProctor Institute of Utica, with John I. H. Baur, associate director of the Whitney Museum. Museum of Early American Folk Arts RUBBINGS FROM NEW ENGLAND GRAVESTONES Executed by Ann Parker and Avon Neal, lent for circulation by the Abby Aldrich Rockfeller Collection of Williamsburg, and prepared for circulation by Mrs. Mary Black, director of the Museum of Early American Folk Arts of New York City. Pratt Graphic Art Center PRINTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD Twenty-five original prints in a variety of media from artists of twenty-five nations. Selected by Mr. Andrew Stasik, associate director, Pratt Graphic Art Center.

40

PRIZE WINNING AMERICAN PRINTS

Twenty-five original prints which were the recipients of major prizes or awards in national and international competitions and exhibitions. Skidmore College THE ARTIST: VISAGE AND VISION Two exhibitions which explore the contemporary art world through photo¬

graphic portraits of artists, reproductions, quotations, and biographic sketches. Designed and organized by Mr. Earl Pardon and Mr. Peter Baruzzi, School of Art, Skidmore College with photographs by Marvin Lazarus. Syracuse University INTERACTION OF COLOR

An exploration of the color theories of Josef Albers, twentieth-century artist and teacher associated with the Bauhausand formerchairman of the Yale School of Art. PROBLEMS IN COLOR

An approach to color characteristics organized and designed for the high school audience by Mr. Onogrio Charles Giordano, assistant professor of Art, Syracuse University.

Lucille Rhodes Visual Arts Assistant 47

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Special Studies

In September, the Council's second county-wide study in Architectural Conser¬ vation was published in Troy. Architecture Worth Saving in Rensselaer County by Professor Bernd Foerster at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been hailed as "a determined effort to preserve our distinguished landmarks from the bull¬ dozer and the iron ball" and "a model for emulation in other states" by leaders in American urban and regional planning. Rensselaer County was chosen as the subject for this signal study for its wealth of eighteenth-century rural domestic buildings and the remarkable number of important buildings and building-complexes in Troy. Attention was directed to superb examples of single buildings in the Troy area such as the 1827 Cluett blouse by Philip Hooker and the 1818 Vail House, and to important industrial and commercial structures including the 1862 Curley Building, the 1870 cast-iron-fronted Warren Building, and the Burden Iron Company Office of 1881. Professor Foerster called particu¬ lar attention to the unique complexes of fine town houses in Troy which could be restored successfully for urban living. He also discussed the particularly fine combination of occupied Brownstone houses on Fifth Avenue in Troy, sched¬ uled for demolition under Urban Renewal, which should be retained to enhance a section of the City in need of their special character and human dimension. Parenthetically, it should be noted that as a result of the concern engendered by this study, the Rensselaer County Council of the Arts has recently purchased, for its own use, one of the houses on Washington Park in Troy. It is gratifying to note that a second edition of Architecture Worth Saving in Onondaga County was published by the Syracuse University Press this year. The Onondaga County study was the first Council-supported survey of this type, and the second edition was made available with no additional funds from the Council. The Council's third architectural conservation survey (in Wayne County) will be completed by April, 1966, and publication is scheduled for following October. The Burden Iron Com¬ pany Office built in 1881 is included in the Coun¬ cil special study, Archi¬ tecture Worth Saving in Rensselaer County.

It should be noted that the Council has designated only one further publication in this series, and that surveys are not intended for the entire State. The Council intends the present series as thoughtful guides for other areas and is prepared 43

44

to advise on privately supported publications and to provide special aid through its Technical Assistance Program. Two further programs initiated last year under Special Studies will be completed in 1966. The Binghamton ordinance which established the unique concept of a Commission on Architectural and Urban Design has had a year in which to assemble experience and test its effectiveness. The results, when gathered to¬ gether in publishable form, will be made available to cities and communities throughout the state that may wish to establish similar municipal legislation. Another study which began early in 1965 will be completed shortly after this report is issued. In conjunction with the American Guild of Musical Artists, an investigation has been undertaken to determine the physical and financial re¬ quirements of establishing a permanent home for modern dance in New York City. The final report will outline the specific requirements of a showcase theater, rehearsal facilities, and administrative organization necessary to enable choreographers of merit to experiment and display their work without the en¬ cumbrance of managerial detail which has plagued their artistic freedom. As a result of advisory meetings during 1965, a special study of the possibilities of relating recent dramatic developments in electronic technology to the needs of notating dance movement will be developed. Current indications reveal that computers may soon have the capacity to record the dance and reproduce scores for study by individual dancers. Acceptability of notation throughout the field of dance will be a critical corollary to the study. As more and more states establish arts councils, the New York State Council on the Arts will be readily available for any help and advice we can provide. We will work closely with the National Council and the National Endowment for the Arts as well as Arts Councils of America, Inc., which is providing information and consultation on concerns that arts councils at every level are encountering.

Binghamton's Commis¬ sion on Architecture and Urban Design has led to a special study by the Council for eventual use in establishing similar agencies in other com¬ munities. Pictured: a de¬ sign to replace the railings on the city's Memorial Bridge.

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Technical Assistance

The Council's Technical Assistance Program is its principal means of support for amateur organizations in the arts, regional museums, local historical soci¬ eties and arts councils, as well as other groups with limited means and staff. While not offering direct financial assistance, the Council does provide expert advisory services designed to assist an organization in finding long-range solu¬ tions to chronic problems. A community theater concerned with lighting, for example, may apply to the Council for assistance in engaging a professional lighting designer for consultation in an effort to work out their difficulties. Similarly, a regional museum may need professional assistance in identifying a collection of Oriental ceramics; here again, the Council will make available the services of an expert in the field. A group of individuals of arts organizations considering the establishment of a local arts council can also apply to the Council for professional advice on how to proceed. The range of consultative services offered by the Council has continued to keep pace with the increasing number of demands for assistance. A growing roster of consultants (listed in the back of this report) includes many of the outstand¬ ing names in almost every area of the arts, from conservation to choreography, from architectural history to lighting, from musicology to management.

Through its Technical Assistance Program the Council has arranged help in establishing the Waterford Historical So¬ ciety. The 1830 White Homestead, center for the Society, is shown be¬ low in transit and above after successful relocation to more spacious sur¬ roundings.

Inevitably, success stories provide the best means of illustrating what Technical Assistance can mean to an organization. The Studio Arena Theater, a newly established repertory company in Buffalo, turned to the Council for advice just before the opening of its first season in the fall of 1965. The Council arranged for a visit to Buffalo by Milton Lyon of Actors' Equity, who, along with Omar K. Lerman of the Council staff, reviewed the problems facing the organization in an effort to pinpoint its most pressing needs. This review resulted in a form of extended Technical Assistance which permitted a professional consultant to devote himself to the problem of audience development for a full three months. A need for assistance in setting up effective management procedures for the Theater was met by the assignment, on a consultative basis, of Marvin A. Krauss, General Manager of Music Fair Enterprises, Inc. Mr. Krauss also helped in hiring managerial personnel to implement his recommendations. 47

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The effect of this assistance made possible by the Council is best summarized in the words of Neal Du Brock, Executive Director of the Theater: .. Marvin Krauss gave us a foundation for a sound future in the admini¬ strative and business end of the theater. Your assistance in getting Brian Avnet as General Manager may very well mean the difference between success or failure. In short, I would say that the New York State Council on the Arts has virtually guaranteed our life." The following table indicates the number and types of consultations completed in 1965 for both the visual and performing arts: General Administration and Organizational Techniques Architectural Conservation Architectural Survey Architectural Adaptation Community Relations and Promotion Techniques Education and Training Programs Programming Publications Criticism and Adjudication Artistic Production General Technical Production Costume Design and Fabrication Set Design Lighting Cataloguing and Accessioning Conservation and Identification Display Techniques Storage and Handling Miscellaneous

The mirrored ceiling of the new Studio Arena Theater in Buffalo reflects a mid-week intermission audience and the deter¬ mination of a city to have a theater. The mirrors, previously covered by several layers of paint, were scraped and pol¬ ished by volunteers. Technical assistance from the Council provided help in audience devel¬ opment and management planning.

22 7 16 70 76 78 7 4 7 7 3 2 6 4 5 77 6 2 3

The history of technical assistance has been one of the most significant features of a basic Council philosophy—to guide and assist, but not subsidize, the efforts of communities and groups encouraging an awareness of the arts. The imme¬ diacy of putting professionals from all areas of the arts into direct contact with people at the local level has raised the standards of amateur efforts and made it possible for communities to have the best possible advice for their artistic pro¬ grams. The effect in the six years of the Council's operation has been lasting; with permanency now assured for the Council, it will be possible to insure that it continues to be.

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Associate Director’s Statement

As this is written, discussions between the Council and an upstate city govern¬ ment are under way to determine the best use of municipal funds for sculpture and murals in a new public plaza. The Council's role is largely catalytic in that we will provide advisors of authority in the arts to guide the city government toward an imaginative solution. Increasing requests for help in solving problems involving the more public arts have heightened the Council's concern for the environmental arts. This is an appropriate matter for a state council on the arts since it affects the lives of so many. It is also time for a thoughtful appraisal of our environment as munici¬ palities experience the radical changes wrought by the twentieth century. There can be no argument that there is need for solving new urban requirements engendered by the population explosion of our century, but it is questionable whether the whole fabric of human activity has been considered in our head¬ long rush to accommodate this population. Too often, we have bulldozed a considerable segment of our urban centers, tearing out both good and bad, the despoiled and the recoverable, to substitute in their stead highrise rabbit war¬ rens instead of human habitations. And far too often, we have seen the same dreary solutions applied without regard for the essential character of existing surroundings. Fortunately, the more enlightened practices of selective urban renewal or, where applicable, historic districting, are beginning to temper our cityscapes and the "new town" approach to housing is being considered to relieve city congestion.

The four famous court¬ houses of Horatio Nelson White (1805-1892) are still standing. Three are used for their original purpose. The fourth, in Syracuse, with no present plans for its adaptive use, is in danger of demolition.

There is a tendency to look to solutions being applied to the long overcrowded conditions of European cities, but such answers as Europe may supply will be tempered by American indifference to our own traditions. In New York State, the cores of our principal cities and villages are essentially the products of the second half of the nineteenth century. The present century has tended to reject the architecture of this too-immediate past even though it symbolizes a thor¬ oughly American period of industrial technology. We do seem to respect the architecture of our so-called Federal period and the colonial era, and the rare 57

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examples that exist from those times are carefully guarded. However, if we are to have cities of interest and enjoyment, the best of all the parts of our heritage must be saved. Through the Council's Technical Assistance Program, it is possible to supply knowledgeable architectural historians to communities requesting assessment of their architectural character, and to provide authoritative judgments for cities seeking help with decisions affecting municipal design. Such helps as these are only a first step in an increasing desire for more satisfying surroundings. In order to implement the talents of such advisors and consultants, the Council will investigate concrete ways to accomplish their recommendations. In January, 1966, a first step towards this further goal will take place. A conference will be sponsored by the Council to establish recommendations for legislation affecting architectural conservation and public blight. From this conference, it is hoped there will emerge a sound legal base which will aid communities enhancing the physical aspects of their everyday activities. It is hoped, too, that the Council may insure the development of each com¬ munity according to its own intrinsic character, for one of the greatest pleasures of travelling through the Empire State is to discover the enormously varied archi¬ tectural treasures that portray her rich history.

An exhibit of Rubbings from New England Grave¬ stones organized by the Museum of Early Ameri¬ can Folk Arts is being toured through New York State with Council spon¬ sorship.

William Hull Associate Director 53

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Executive Director’s Statement

In the next ten years the development of the arts will be beyond anything this country has known before. The implications are at once promising and perilous. Without the influence of a discerning audience, the present captivation with the arts could cause a confusion of mediocrity. As the Council continues to help the public realize the promises that the best in the arts offer, its responsibility will also be to point out the pitfalls of indiscriminate enthusiasm. Several warnings are already apparent. A critical one involves standards, which are essential to any meaningful development of the arts. The proliferation which comes of well-meaning attempts to start cultural programs without the neces¬ sary resources, either artistic or financial, can lead to an acceptance of hollow compromise. Settling for a second-rate museum, for example, may in turn be reflected by the quality of what takes place elsewhere in the community. The embrace of the arts by over-zealous crusaders is another danger that can sometimes lead to a preoccupation with the crusade rather than a realization that the primary source of the arts is the artist—not the community arts council, the government, the cultural center, nor the organization attempting to en¬ courage appreciation of the arts. When the appeal of the arts becomes that of organization, administration, promotion, and socializing, the quality and vitality of the arts suffer. This clouding of basic purposes can defeat sincere efforts to have the arts become an important factor in the life of a community.

Professor Bernd Foerster, author of Architecture Worth Saving in Rens¬ selaer County discusses the problem of blight which here has almost obscured the church tower of Wyantski 11: "Adverse surroundings can destroy a building as surely as a wrecking ball, though not necessarily as permanently."

Many of the problems are inter-related. The same over-enthusiasm, and the desire for a concrete symbol of community interest, can obscure the fact that quality of performance is not measured by the grandness of the setting but by the caliber of the work and the artists who perform. The result is frequently a monument to a fund-raising campaign in which little of value is seen or heard. It is disturbing to realize that plans for cultural centers abound while oppor¬ tunities for some of our finest professional artists to perform are far from enough to provide them with a year-round living wage. Despite the problems of increased activity, a number of towns and villages which have taken an interest in the arts have discovered a regeneration of com55

munity pride and excitement. Local performances by companies which include the New York City Opera and the New York City Ballet, plays such as In White America and /A Man for All Seasons, concerts by first-rate musical organizations, and exhibitions from outstanding museums have added to the ability of com¬ munities to offer their citizens a "better place to live" in the most profound sense of the phrase. It is not simply a matter of attending and enjoying perform¬ ances and exhibitions. The development of the arts can lead to an instinctive abhorrence of blight and ugliness. The neon signs that shroud our cities, the sterility of faceless housing projects, and the urban redevelopment programs planned more to accommo¬ date automobiles than human beings, are painful evidence that our sense of beauty is in a state of atrophy. As Marya Mannes puts it:"...we must start nowin every school in the country from 1st grade onward—to teach children how to see, how to listen, how to touch. To open their brutalized and neglected senses to form, design, and meaning in their daily lives. To make them so aware of actual and possible beauty that they grow up with a rage against ugliness". The process of developing an awareness of the arts takes time. The effect is gradual, but the results are impressive. During 1966, the Council will continue to expand its role of encouraging the arts by increasing the audience for them. This has proved an effective approach for government. The description in this report of the Professional Touring Program includes an array of performances, many of which took place in communities where professional companies had never been seen before. The same is true of the Exhibitions Program and Educa¬ tional Presentations. As part of the Council's continuing contribution to this process, a program will be undertaken in the coming year to meet the demand of audiences throughout the State for an opportunity to see fine examples of classic and contemporary films in their local theaters. In addition, a number of poets will be assisted by the Council to introduce their work to college-level groups. Perhaps the undertaking which will make the most lasting impression on the future will be an attempt by the Council to consolidate the effects of its archi¬ tectural publications in legal and practical terms so that it will not be necessary to rely on public awareness alone to protect the architecture of our State from destruction. In addition, a recognition of the immense consequences all govern¬ ment has on the arts will also be emphasized by the Council in 1966. Respon¬ sible government should be careful and cognizant of its artistic judgments. The architecture of public buildings, whether college dormitories or depart56

mental offices; the design of roads and bridges; the physical appearance of public housing; the graphic art of publications-these are everyday aspects of the arts. A conference will be sponsored by the Council to examine the influence that the State government has on our surroundings and to plan specific means for improvement. One further problem exists which has not yet been resolved. It should be remem¬ bered by those who are actively involved in government support of the arts. Curiously enough, in the experience of the New York State Council on the Arts, political pressure has not been the curse of government support of the arts that many originally predicted. Instead, bureaucracy has proved a more insidious form of censorship. The encounter with procedures, applications, and processes instead of individual attention; the lack of decisiveness that results from over¬ organization; a creeping complacency of thought, and action; a tendency to submerge innovation in trivia; and a reliance on the "safe" rather than the "experimental" are aspects of government's involvement that may be more stifling to the arts than politics could ever be. Solutions can be found; in the meantime, avoiding these entanglements requires recognition and familiarity, and the ability to be inventive about getting around them. These frustrations are slight, however, compared to the rewards of an enlightened program in the arts. To say that the arts can introduce us to beauty and the limitless variety of human capacity may seem like an oversimplified cliche. But it is as true today as it was when Pennsylvania Station was built-a time Richard Whalen describes as one in which "men had a more considerable estimate of themselves". The enjoy¬ ment of the arts is justification enough for their encouragement. However, it will be our ability to transfer the artist's insights into what we see and hear around us each day that will indicate, during the next ten years, whether we can realize fully the promise that the arts provide.

John B. Hightower Executive Director 57

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Council Permanency

The enabling Act making the New York State Council on the Arts a temporary commission of the State government in 1960 has proved to be extremely work¬ able. Not only is its legislative language outstanding, but its concept "to encour¬ age the practice and enjoyment of the arts" is unprecedented in this country. On May 13,1965, Governor Rockefeller signed the bill establishing the Council as a permanent agency. The Act in its entirety is included here for the benefit of all who read this report. Other states may find it useful as a guide for develop¬ ing similar legislation.

LAWS OF NEW YORK.-By Authority

CHAPTER 181 AN ACT to amend the executive law, in relation to the creation and operation of a council on the arts within the executive department and to transfer the powers and duties of the temporary state commission known as the New York state council on the arts to the council on the arts in the executive department Became a law May 13, 1965, with the approval of the Governor. Passed by a majority vote, three-fifths being present The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows: Section 1. The executive law is hereby amended by inserting therein a new article, to be article 19-1, to read as follows:

ARTICLE 19-1 COUNCIL ON THE ARTS Section 526. 527. 528. 529.

After a Young Audiences' lecture-concert sponsored by the Council, a new enthusiast gets acquainted with a cello.

Legislative findings and declaration of policy. Council on the arts. General powers and duties of council. Assistance of other agencies.

§ 526. Legislative findings and declaration of policy. It is hereby found that many of our citizens lack the opportunity to view, enjoy or participate in living theatrical performances, musical concerts, operas, dance and ballet recitals, art exhibits, examples of fine architecture, and the performing and fine arts gen¬ erally. It is hereby further found that, with increasing leisure time, the practice and enjoyment of the arts are of increasing importance and that the general welfare of the people of the state will be promoted by giving further recogni¬ tion to the arts as a vital aspect of our culture and heritage and as a valued means of expanding the scope of our educational programs. It is hereby declared to be the policy of the state to join with private patrons and with institutions and professional organizations concerned with the arts to insure that the role of the arts in the life of our communities will continue to

59

grow and will play an ever more significant part in the welfare and educational experience of our citizens and in maintaining the paramount position of this state in the nation and in the world as a cultural center. It is further declared that all activities undertaken by the state in carrying out this policy shall be directed toward encouraging and assisting rather than in any ways limiting the freedom of artistic expression that is essential for the well-being of the arts. § 527. Council on the arts. 1. There is hereby created in the executive depart¬ ment a council on the arts. The council shall consist of fifteen members, broadly representative of all fields of the performing and fine arts, to be appointed by the governor, with the advice and consent of the senate, from among private citizens who are widely known for their professional competence and expe¬ rience in connection with the performing and fine arts. In making such appoint¬ ments, due consideration shall be given to the recommendations made by representative civic, educational and professional associations and groups, concerned with or engaged in the production or presentation of the performing and fine arts generally. 2. The term of office of each member of the council shall be five years, provided, however, that the initial members shall be those persons who are members of the temporary state commission known as the New York state council on the arts, and the terms of such initial members shall expire in accord¬ ance with their appointments to such temporary state commission. Vacancies in the council occurring otherwise than by expiration of term, shall be filled for the unexpired term in the same manner as original appointments. The governor shall designate a chairman and a vice-chairman from the members of the council, to serve as such at the pleasure of the governor. The chairman shall be the chief executive officer of the council. 3. The chairman shall receive compensation fixed by the governor and shall be reimbursed for all expenses actually and necessarily incurred by him in the performance of his duties hereunder, within the amount made available by appropriation therefor. The other members of the council shall receive no compensation for their services, but shall be reimbursed for all expenses actually and necessarily incurred by them in the performance of their duties hereunder within the amount made available by appropriation therefor. 4. The chairman may appoint such officers, experts and other employees as he may deem necessary, prescribe their duties, fix their compensation and provide for reimbursement of their expenses within amounts available therefor by appropriation. § 528. General powers and duties of council. The council shall have the following powers and duties: 1. To stimulate and encourage throughout the state the study and presen¬ tation of the performing and fine arts and public interest and participation therein; 2. To make such surveys as may be deemed advisable of public and private institutions engaged within the state in artistic and cultural activities, including but not limited to, music, theatre, dance, painting, sculpture, architecture, and allied arts and crafts, and to make recommendations concerning appropriate methods to encourage participation in and appreciation of the arts to meet the legitimate needs and aspirations of persons in all parts of the state; 3. To take such steps as may be necessary and appropriate to encourage public interest in the cultural heritage of our state and to expand the state's cultural resources; 4. To hold public or private hearings; 5. To enter into contracts, within the amount available by appropriation therefor, with individuals, organizations and institutions for services furthering the educational objectives of the council's programs; 6. To enter into contracts, within the amounts available by appropriation therefor, with local and regional associations for cooperative endeavors further¬ ing the educational objectives of the council's programs; 7. To accept gifts, contributions and bequests of unrestricted funds from

individuals, foundations, corporations and other organizations or institutions for the purpose of furthering the educational objectives of the council's programs; 8. To make and sign any agreements and to do and to perform any acts that may be necessary, desirable or proper to carry out the purposes of this act. § 529. Assistance of other agencies. To effectuate the purposes of this article, the council on the arts may request from any department, board, bureau, com¬ mission or other agency of the state, and the same are authorized to provide, such assistance, services and data as will enable the council properly to carry out its powers and duties hereunder. § 2. Transfer of functions. All of the functions and powers possessed by and all the obligations and duties of the temporary state commission known as the New York state council on the arts, created by chapter three hundred thirteen of the laws of nineteen hundred sixty, entitled “An act creating a temporary state commission, to be known as the New York state council on the arts, to make a comprehensive survey of the state's cultural resources and to make recommendations concerning appropriate methods to encourage participation in and appreciation of the arts, and making an appropriation for the expenses of such commission," as amended by chapters two hundred thirty and three hundred forty-four of the laws of nineteen hundred sixty-two, are hereby trans¬ ferred and assigned to, assumed by and devolved upon the council on the arts in the executive department. § 3. Transfer of officers and employees. Upon the transfer of functions to such council on the arts pursuant to this act, provisions shall be made for the transfer to such council of such officers and employees of such temporary state commission who are engaged in carrying out such functions as the chairman of such council on the arts may deem necessary for the exercise of the functions herein transferred to such council. Officers and employees so transferred shall be transferred without further examination or qualification and shall retain their respective civil service classifications and status. For the purpose of deter¬ mining the employees holding permanent appointments in competitive class positions to be transferred, such employees shall be selected within each class of positions in the order of their original appointment, with due regard to the right of preference in retention of disabled and nondisabled veterans. Any such employee who, at the time of such transfer, has a temporary or provisional appointment shall be transferred subject to the same right of removal, examina¬ tion or termination as though such transfer had not been made. Employees holding permanent appointments in competitive class positions who are not transferred pursuant to this section shall have their names entered upon an appropriate preferred list for reinstatement pursuant to the civil service law. § 4. Transfer of appropriations heretofore made. All appropriations or reap¬ propriations heretofore made to such temporary state commission or segre¬ gated pursuant to law, to the extent of remaining unexpended or unencumbered balances thereof, whether allocated or unallocated and whether obligated or unobligated, are hereby transferred to and made available for use and expendi¬ ture by such council on the arts for the same purposes for which originally appropriated or reappropriated and shall be payable on vouchers certified or approved by the chairman of such council on the arts on audit and warrant of the comptroller. Payments for liabilities for expenses of personal service, main¬ tenance and operation heretofore incurred by such temporary state commission, and for liabilities incurred and to be incurred in completing its affairs, shall also be made on vouchers or certificates approved by the chairman of such council on the arts on audit and warrant of the comptroller. § 5. Transfer of records. The chairman of such temporary state commission shall deliver to the chairman of such council on the arts all books, papers, rec¬ ords and property of such temporary state commission. § 6. Continuity of authority. Such council on the arts shall be deemed and held to constitute the continuation of such temporary state commission, and not a different agency or authority. § 7. Continuance of rules and regulations. All rules, regulations, acts, deter-

minations and decisions of such temporary state commission, in force at the time of such transfer, assignment, assumption or devolution shall continue in force and effect as rules, regulations, acts, determinations and decisions of such council on the arts until duly modified or abrogated by such council on the arts. § 8. Continuity of proceedings. Any proceeding or other business or matter undertaken or commenced by or before such temporary state commission, and pending on the effective date of this act may be conducted and completed by such council on the arts in the same manner and under the same terms and conditions and with the same effect as if conducted and completed by such temporary state commission. § 9. Terms occurring in laws, contracts and other documents. Whenever such temporary commission or the chairman of such temporary state commission is referred to or designated in any law, contract or other document, such reference or designation shall be deemed to refer to such council on the arts or the chair¬ man of such council on the arts, respectively. § 10. Existing rights and remedies preserved. No existing right or remedy of any character shall be lost, impaired or affected by reason of this act. § 11. Section ten of chapter three hundred thirteen of the laws of nineteen hundred sixty, entitled "An act creating a temporary state commission, to be known as the New York state council on the arts, to make a comprehensive survey of the state's cultural resources and to make recommendations concern¬ ing appropriate methods to encourage participation in and appreciation of the arts, and making an appropriation for the expenses of such commission," as such section was amended by chapter two hundred thirty of the laws of nine¬ teen hundred sixty-two, is hereby amended to read as follows: § 10. The provisions of this act shall continue in full force and effect until [March thirty-first, nineteen hundred sixty-seven] lune first, nineteen hundred sixty-five. § 12. This act shall take effect June first, nineteen hundred sixty-five. STATE OF NEW YORK ( Department of State ) ss' I have compared the preceding with the original law on file in this office, and do hereby certify that the same is a correct transcript therefrom and of the whole of said original law.

JOHN P. LOMENZO Secretary of State

Explanation-Matter in italics is new; matter in brackets [ ] is old law to be omitted.

Advisors and Consultants

In any government activity which affects the arts, it is necessary to make artistic judgments. To keep choices and decisions from being arbitrary, the Council has relied heavily on the advice and counsel of acknowledged experts on various aspects of the arts. The advisors and consultants listed below have guided the direction of the Council since 1960. They have responded to our needs with enthusiasm and selflessness for which the Council, as well as the people of the State, are in¬ debted. We shall continue to call on the most qualified individuals available to help define our role and clarify those choices that must be made.

Advisors and Consultants to the New York State Council on the Arts

Walter Abel • Joan Abouchar • W. Howard Adams • Dorothy Adlow • Alvin Ailey • Betsy Ainslie • Betty Allen • Kenneth Allen • Mario Amaya • Robert M. Anderson • Harold Arberg • H. Harvard Arnason • Brooks Atkinson • F. C. St. Aubyn • Hedy Backlin • Edmund N. Bacon • George Balanchine • William Ball Ann Barak • Julien Barber • Dorothy Barck • Leonard Barkin • Will Barnet Samuel Baron • Richard Barr • Herbert Barrett • Irma Bartenieff • Fred Bartle Stephan Bauer-Mengelberg • Genevieve Bazinet • Spofford Beadle • Alice B. Beer • Ralph Bellamy • Yemema Bengal • Isadora Bennett • Robert Benson Murray Bernthal • Harry Bertoia • Theodore Bikel • Alice Bingham • Stephen Bird • David Black • Ralph Black • Peter Blake • Howard Boatwright • John Booth Charles Bowden • Leonard Bradley • Mireille K. Briane • Oleg Briansky • Maude Brogan • James M. Brown • James Browning • Kirk Browning • John Brownlee Helen Duprey Bullock • Thomas S. Buechner • Ralph Burgard • Henry Butler John Cage • Robert Cahlman • Herbert Cahoon • Mary Canberg • Carl Carmer 63

Dominick Cascio • John Celentano • William Chanson • Schuyler Chapin • Lucia Chase • Fong Chow • Mrs. LaBar H. Clark • Langdon Clay • Margaretta Clulow Harold Clurman • William Cochrane • Patricia Collins • Howard Conant • Arthur Conescu • Marc Connelly • Raymond Cook • Steven A. Coons • James Coover Jane Costello ' Leonard Crainford • Charles L. Crangle • John Crosby • Freda Crunden • Francis W. Cunningham • Merce Cunningham • James Curtin • Edgar Curtis • Peter Cusick • Stanley Czurles • Carl Dahlgren • Eugene Dakin • Edith Dappert • Carl C. Dauterman • Martha Davies • Mrs. John E. Davis • Harlow Dean • James E. Dean • John Decesare • Agnes DeMille • Edwin Denby • *Gerald Devlin • Michael Dewell • Thea Dispecker • Vladimir Djury • Alice Dockstader Frederick J. Dockstader • Paul Doktor • Daniel Domb • Robert Douglass Ormond Drake • Virginia Drane • Jeff Duncan • Richard Duffalo • Robert E. Dunn • Thomas Dunn • Walter S. Dunn • Phillip Dunning • Edward H. Dwight Robert Eagan • Mary Earl • Patricia Earle • Joseph Eger • Andre Eglevsky Marcella Eisenberg • Michael Ellis • Carl Engelhart • Roger Englander • Donald Engle • Jean Erdman • Janet Reed Erskine • Maurice Evans • Alexander Ewing Maskell Ewing • Hy Faine • John Fearnley • Werner Louis Feibes • Pauline Feingold • Marian Feman • St. Julian Fishburne • James Marston Fitch • Patricia Fitzgerald • Allen Fletcher • Leroy Flint • Richard Stuart Flusser • Bernd Foerster Lukas Foss • Frank Forest • Edward Fricke • Ira Friedlander • Albert Gardner R. Niell Gardner • Sally W. Gardner • Marvin Garner • H. A. Gasteyer • Georgina Geddis • Edna Geisen • William H. Gerdts • Charles Giordano • Jacob Click Wilbur H. Glover • Joseph Golden • Robert Goldwater • Lloyd Goodrich • Mary Gordon • Clyde Gore • Murray Goulde • Charles Graney • Jane des Grange Sidney Green • Wilder Green • S. William Green • Lewis S. Greenleaf III • Els Grelinger • Tom Gruenewald • Henry Guettel • Jean Guest • Per Guldbeck • John Gutman • T. Edward Hambleton • Edward P. Hamilton • R. Philip Hanes Jr. Nancy Hanks • Howard Hanson • Hugh Hardy • David Hare • Rene d'Harnoncourt • Fran Harris • Jay Harrison • Mrs. Jay Harrison • Philip Hart Helen Harvey • Dee Henoch • Doris Hering • Carl K. Hersey • James J. Heslin Louis Hetler • Peyton Hibbitt • Martha Hill • Lee Hirsche • Alice Hirson Stuart Hodes • Jay K. Hoffman • Lee Hoiby • Harlan Holladay • Louise Homer Howard Hook • Theodore Hollenbach • Helen Hosmer • Jacob Hotchkiss Robin Howard • John K. Howat • John Daggett Howell • Paul Huey • Allen Hughes • John Hultberg • Sterling Hunkins • Ada Louise Huxtable • Robert Bruce Inverarity • Louis Ismay • Alan Jacobs • Steven W. Jacobs • Esther Jackson 64

Mrs. Helen M. Thompson, executive vice-president of the American Sym¬ phony Orchestra League, speaking at the manage¬ ment conference held in conjunction with the New York Philharmonic Con¬ ductors' Workshop in September. Also pictured: Ralph Burgard, Harold Schonberg, Mark Shubart, lames Browning, Phil Miller (partially hidden)

L 4*

Newell Jenkins • Ninita Johns • Charlotte Johnson • Harriet Johnson • William H. Johnson Jr. • Una Johnson • Florence Jonas • Barclay G. Jones • Rev. William Kalaidjian • Morris Kantor • Melvin Kaplan • Ulysses Kay • Caroline Keck Sheldon Keck • Byron Kelley • Burnham Kelly • John D. Kendall • Billie Kirpich Richard Kirschner • Lincoln Kirstein • E. F. Knowles • Klaus Kolmar • Arnold Kohn • Pauline Kohner • Irving Kolodin • William Kolodny • Lawrence Kornfeld Ben Kornzweig • Louis J. Koster • Paul Kozelka • Louis Krasner • Marvin Kraus Elizabeth Kray • Karl Kritz • Lucy Kroll • Igor Kropotkin • Katharine Kuh • Pearl Lang • Mary Ann Larkin • Nancy LaSalle • William L. Lassiter • Robert A. Laurer Marvin P. Lazarus • Richard Leach • Sherman Lee • John Lehne • W. Colston Leigh • James Lerch • Martha Lerman • Omar K. Lerman • R. D. LeSage • Denise Levertov • Emory Lewis • Robert Lewis • Victor Liguori • Jose Limon • Howard Lindsay • Seymour Lipton • Lewis Lloyd • Norman Lloyd • Laurance Longley Milton Lyon • John H. MacFayden • Janet MacFarlane • Fritz Mahler • Gertrude Macy • Margaretta Maganini • Paul Malo • P. W. Manchester • Irving Manfredi Robert Mann • *Leopold Mannes • Jack Manning • Thalia Mara • Charles Mark Fletcher Martin • Homer Martin • Keith Martin • Laura Martin • Virginia Martin Joseph B. Martinson • Sophie Maslow • Walter Mason • Dorothea Masters Michael Maule • Jerome Max • Christa Mayer • Ruth Mayleas • William McCleery • Charles B. McCraw • Donald McKayle • Harley J. McKee * James McKenzie • Neil McKenzie • Maxwell McKnight • Richard B. K. McLanathan Sally McLean • Peter Mennin • Gian Carlo Menotti • Herbert Migdoll • Georges Miguelle



Ralph Miller



Edward Mintz



Edna Mitchell



John D.

Mitchell • Donald Mochon • Claude Monteux • George Montgomery • Gertrude Moore



Lillian Moore

Mosley •

Isabel Mount •

Brahms Nathanson Nikolais







Franklin E. Morris Henry L. Munson

Beaumont Newhall

Donald E. Nichols



Michael Noll

• Tamara Northern

Julian Olney



Mrs. Julian Olney



Letha Nims •

• •



Carlos

Tharon Musser •

Carol Morse

Lucille

Danny Newman •

Donald Oenslager • •

Ken Olsen



Takako Nishizaki •

Alwin •

A.

James A. Oliver

George Oppenheimer

Joel Oppenheimer • Martha Orrick • William Owens • Mary Pace • Robert Paddock • William Palmer • Joseph Papp • Earl B. Pardon • Aldo Parisot • Albert E. Parr • *Fred Patrick • Jerome Patterson • Edward W. Pattison • Robert Pearlman • I. M. Pei • Mary Peltz • Orna Pernell • Paul Perrot • Sven Petersen • Paul Bruce Pettit • Peter Piening • Susan Pimsleur • Carol Plantamura Harold Powers • Reynolds Price • Robert Prince • Harris K. Prior • Alan 66

Pryce-Jones • John Quinn • Dorothy Raedler • Frederick J. Rath, Jr. • Lois Rathburn Frances Raynolds • Norman S. Redmon • Alvin Reiss • Judith Resnick • Joel Reuben • Norman Rice • Michael Ries • Dorothy W. Riester • Alan Rich • George Rickey * Edward M. Risse. William Ritman • Jerome Robbins • Francis Robinson James Rorimer • Seymour Rosen • Samuel Rosenbaum • Philip Rosenberg • Al Rossin • L. C. Rubenstein • Julius Rudel • Susanne P. Sack • Russell Sanjek • Allen Sapp • D. Kenneth Sargent • Robert Saudek • Glen Sauls • Carmen Savoca Charles C. Schaffner • Thomas Scherman • Alan Schneider • Joseph Schoenfelt Mark Schubart • Gunther Schuller • Carole Schwartz • Marvin D. Schwartz Dean Jeanette Scudder • John R. Searles, Jr. • Susan Seidman • Marvin L. Seiger William Seitz • Rose L. Senehi • Whitney North Seymour, Jr. • Jack Shana • Corlis J. Sharp • Harold Shaw • Lew Shaw • David Shields • Herman Shumlin • Paul Shyre • Paula E. Silberstein • Robert Sinclair • Norman Singer • Alice Smiley C. Duryea Smith III • Carleton S. Smith • Donald S. Smith • Gordon Smith Martha Moore Smith



Oliver Smith



Benson Snyder



Carleton Snyder

Sheldon Soffer • Hans Sondheimer • Hugh Southern • Frank O. Spinney • Samuel Spurbeck • Theodores Stamos • Grace Stanistreet • Janos Starker • William C. Steere • Stuart W. Stein • Frederick Steinway • Hedda Sterne • Philip H. Stevens Milo Stewart • John Stix • Franz Stone • Alfreda Storm • Carl Streuver • Theodore Strongin • Max W. Sullivan • Ann Summers • Donald Sweeney • Martin Tahse Maria Tallchief • Jerry Tallmer • Joseph Tapscott • Mildred Taylor • Walter Terry Marie Audrey Thomas •

M. W. Thomas



Frank B. Thompson



Helen M.

Thompson • R. L. Tobin • Alvin Toffler • Carola Trier • David Tudor • Robert Tuggle • Richard Turner • Francis Tursi • Everard M. Upjohn • Giles Y. van der Bogert • James Grote Vanderpool • Daniel Vandersall • Donald Vlack • *Helen Vaughan • Stuart Vaughan • Lucy Venable • Frederick Vogel • Jan Von Adlmann J. R. Von Reinhold-Jamesson • John Von Wicht • Lois Wann • James Waring Gordon B. Washburn • Donald Waterman • Gerald Watland • Anne Waugh Franz Waxman • Donald Webster, Jr. • Lester G. Wells • Rene Wennerholm Christopher West • Harold G. Weston • Robert G. Wheeler • P. Franklin White William White • Robert Whitehead • Michael Whiteman • Ruth Wilkins • Galen Williams • Joseph Wincenc * Peter Wingate • Ralph Winkler • Blanche Winogran Sue Winston • Paul Winter • Blanche Wise • Lothar P. Witteborg • John Workman • R. A. Young • Stanley Young • Alexander Yow • Gerald Zampino

*deceased 67

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Financial Statement

Financial Statement

1963

1964

1965

$49,885

$55,495

$67,550

4,000

13,180

24,254+

27,180

29,485

48,6201

30,000

47,700

76,295

166,800

153,300

178,300

80,250

96,850

127,890

Personal Service Staff Temporary Help Maintenance and Operation Programs Technical Assistance Touring Performing Arts Visual Arts Educational Presentations

50,000



Special and Educational Projects

73,480

112,175

142,986

Special Studies

73,480

38,450

30,000

29,144

15,700

20,000

$562,335

$765,895

Other Services Conferences, Panel Meetings, Annual Report, Publications TOTAL

$534,219*

Note: Additional funds contributed from $6,000

private sources for specific projects

Ching Ling and the Magic Peach, one of four productions presented by Theater in the Street at some 25 locations in Brooklyn, Manhattan, and the Bronx, during the summer of 1965.

Total Appropriation, 1962

$560,250

Total Appropriation, 7967

$450,000

^Includes administrative costs of new program and World's Fair, tlndudes installation and move to larger quarters. [*This figure represents a 5% reduction of $28,116 from the original appropriation of $562,335 in accordance with the Division of the Budget.]

69

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Council and Staff

Members of the Council

Staff

Seymour H. Knox, Chairman

John B. Hightower, Executive Director

Henry Allen Moe, Vice Chairman

William Hull, Associate Director

Mrs. Harmar Brereton

Omar K. Lerman, Special Consultant, Performing Arts

Angus Duncan Theodore M. Hancock August Heckscher Louis Clark Jones David M. Keiser

Robert E. Armstrong, Special Programs Associate Suzanne F. Kibbe, Office Manager Lucille Rhodes, Visual Arts Assistant Susanna Mauser, Program Assistant

Eric Larrabee

Ellen Thurston, Program Assistant

Mrs. David Levene

Suzanne Walker, Secretary

Frederick W. Richmond

Mary Crowley, Secretary

Mrs. Richard Rodgers

Alison Mack, Secretary

Mrs. Aline Saarinen Frank Stanton Hale Woodruff

Temporary Office Personnel Dominic Chianese Stephen Kaprelian

Past Council Members

Giovanna Koegel

Reginald Allen

Barbara Zymalski

Cass Canfield

Philip Yenawine

Mrs. W. Averell Harriman From left to right: (above) Chairman Seymour H. Knox with Governor Nel¬ son A. Rockefeller; Ex¬ ecutive Director John B. Hightower; (below) Asso¬ ciate Director, William Hull; Omar K. Lerman, special consultant, per¬ forming arts; Special Projects Associate Robert E. Armstrong.

Wallace K. Harrison Miss Helen Hayes *Alfred J. Manuti Richard B. K. McLanathan Richard Rodgers Lewis A. Swyer *Deceased 71

Council Publications A new publication, How the New York State Council on the Arts Can Serve Your Community, describes in detail the programs of the Council and the steps to

be followed by a community organization requesting Council assistance. This and the publications listed below can be obtained by writing to the New York City offices of the Council at 250 West 57th Street: New York State Council on the Arts Annual Report, 7965 Professional Touring Performing Arts Program, 1966-67 Educational Presentations Program, 1966-67 Title III and the Arts

Two architectural surveys commissioned by the Council can be obtained directly from the publisher at the cost indicated: Architecture Worth Saving in Onondaga County

Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, New York. $3.95 Architecture Worth Saving in Rensselaer County

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York. $2.75 Also available: Art in New York State

The Buffalo Fine Arts Academy, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York. $1.00

Credits Page 4

Page 8 Page 11 Page 12 Page 15 Page 17 Page 19 Page 20 Page 23 Page 25 Page 28 Page 32 Page 31 Page 36 Page 38 Page 42 Page 44

72

Photographs by Carl Roodman; Jonathan Brand; K. C. Fairbridge; Fine, Syracuse; Courtesy of Young Audiences Photograph by Milo V. Stewart Photograph by Carl Roodman Photograph by K. C. Fairbridge Photograph by K. C. Fairbridge Photograph by Sosenko Photograph by K. C. Fairbridge Photograph by K. C. Fairbridge Photograph by Jack Mitchell Photograph by David Preston Photograph by Bill Anderson Photograph by Hugh Rogers Photograph by Jim Tuttle Three Prints courtesy of; Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, N.Y. Courtesy of the MunsonWilliams-Proctor Inst. Photograph by Bernd Foerster Photograph by Jack Burlingame Studio Binghamton, N.Y.

Page 46 Page 48 Page 50 Page 52

Page 54 Page 58 Page 65 Page 68 Page 70

Cover End Papers

Design: Typography: Printing:

Photograph by Milo V. Stewa't Photograph by K. C. Fairbridge Photograph by Milo V. Stewart Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Collection; Photograph courtesy of the Miuseum of Early American Folk Arts Photograph by Bernd Foerster Courtesy of Young Audiences Photograph by Whitestone Stjdio, New York, N.Y. Photographs by Allan Grossman; Jonathan Brand; Henry Grossman Photograph by K. C. Fairbridge Photograph by Milo V. Stewart Courtesy of the Albright-Knox Gallery Photographs by Milo V. Stewart © by Henmar Press Inc., 373 Pk. Ave. South N.Y. 16, N.Y. International © Secured. All Rights Reserved. Martin Stephen Moskof, New York Arrow Typographic Service, Inc., New York Harry Hoffman Printing, Inc., Buffalo, N.Y.

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NEW YORK STATE COUNCIL ON THE ARTS Annual Report 1966

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