Empanelment - Community Health Center Network

Loading...

Empanelment Foundation for and Heart of the Medical Home Preservation Park Oakland, California July 21, 2016 Presented by:   Regina Neal, MPH, MS

THANK YOU TO OUR HOSTS AND  SUPPORTERS Alameda Health Consortium Community Health Center Network California Improvement Network The California HealthCare Foundation 2

Welcome, Introductions

3

Learning Objectives By the end of this training you will be able to:  • Identify and use the steps to create panels  • Apply specific principles and tactics to respond to  typical challenges in empanelment in your practice • Plan, lead, implement and support an on‐going  empanelment process for the practice • Develop and use data to assess key empanelment,  population health management and quality metrics  in the practice 4

Ground Rules Agreements to Optimize Learning • Be engaged – Participate, share ideas, ask questions

• Leave titles at the door – Give everyone an equal voice

• Be open‐minded – Respect all ideas and opinions

• Use technology sparingly – If you have to take a call, please step  out of the room

• One conversation at a time • Have fun! 5

Live Twitter feed! • Aha Moments / Inspirations • Questions I have… • When I get home I will…

6

Empanelment A deliberate set of actions to  identify the group of patients for  whom a primary care clinician and  care team are responsible. “Empanelment is a vital enabler of many elements of high‐performing primary care.” Source: Kevin Grumbach, MD, and J. Nwando Olayiwola, MD, MPH JABFM March–April 2015 Vol. 28 No. 2 7

All Systems are Designed Perfectly to Give  the Results You Get

Like Magic? (“Every system is perfectly designed…”) http://tinyurl.com/hoqyerx

8

9

Think Different

10

Change Concepts for Practice Transformation

Wagner EH, Coleman K, Reid RJ, Phillips K, Abrams MK, Sugarman JR. The Changes Involved in Patient-Centered 11 Medical Home Transformation. Primary Care: Clinics in Office Practice. 2012; 39:241-259.

Importance of Empanelment to Transformation

12

Empanelment  Key Changes • Assess practice supply and demand to determine “right‐ size” for each provider’s panel • Assign all patients to a provider panel and confirm  assignments with providers and patients • Review and update panel assignments on a regular on‐ going basis to ensure all panels remain right‐sized and  current  • Establish process for re‐empaneling patients when  providers or residents change clinical time or leave • Provide care teams with panel specific data (registries)  to enable them to proactively plan care, close gaps, and  track patients 13

Empanelment →Team‐Based Care, Continuity,  Access, Relationships, Outcomes Whose Patient Is It?

Our Team’s Patients

New Goals, New Thinking, Improved Results 14

System Design for Empanelment Success Depends on Balance between Supply and Demand

15

Why Supply and Demand Matter • Enable access and continuity to be reliable features  of the system • When not in balance, workload inequity can create  tension among providers and staff • Too large: delays for appointments, deflections,  discontinuity, rework, overwork • Too small: demand may not be adequate to support  the practice financial needs 16

J Am Board Fam Med 2015;28:173–174

• Of concern due to increasing expectations on  managing and coordinating care for populations • Without panels, provider handicapped when  attempting to perform advanced primary care  functions 17

The Work Going Forward “Given the difficulty so many of the respondents had in estimating panel size, we suspect that much of the variation reflects inattention to systematically measuring, standardizing, and addressing panel size as a core element of practice management.”

Source: Kevin Grumbach, MD, and J. Nwando Olayiwola, MD, MPH JABFM March–April 2015 Vol. 28 No. 2 18

Empanelment: Steps in the Process • Leaders commit organization, time and resources to initial  and ongoing processes for empanelment • Panels are created (S + D; 4‐cut; testing to learn what  works; then scale implementation; involve providers,  patients) • Implement organizational processes to support continuity  (scheduling) and population health management (panel‐ specific registry data) • Implement organizational processes (with on‐going staffing)  to maintain right‐sized panels over time (panel  management) • Use data (visible, transparent) to monitor panel and practice  level performance against goals and standards; act based on  results  19

All Patients Are Empaneled • Patients assigned to the practice or who opt to use the  practice for care (select it as primary care provider)  should all be empaneled. • Empanelment is not the same as assignment from  MCOs or other payers – assignment is to credentialed providers and not right‐sized – Need to assign patients to specific provider and care team 

• Each practice needs to consider if there are any patient  groups that would not be empaneled  – This should be the exception in a very small number of  specific cases 20

Building Patient Panels Provider Panels

Practice Panel

• Determine the “right‐size” for each  provider panel using supply and  demand data • Determine current or de facto  panels based on current patterns  and place patients on one panel (use  4‐cut method) • Engage providers in process to  review and accept panel • Engage patients to confirm  PCP/team assignment; maintain  relationships  • Finalize panels • Update panels regularly 21

Data and Computing Power Needed • Information systems, report  generation and data manipulation  and analysis capabilities to provide:

Leadership Enabled

– Supply – Demand – Data array of all visits by patient and by  provider to determine the current, de  facto, panels – Apply the 4‐cut method to current data  to form panels (each patient on one  panel) 22

Information Needed Provider‐level data (Supply) • Provider clinical FTE and “supply” of appointments per year Practice–level data (Patient Demand) • Unduplicated count of active primary care patients in the practice  over the past 15, 18 or 24 months  Active defined as at least one visit in selected time period • Total number of primary care visits made by these patients in  same time frame (to estimate “demand” for service) • Calculate average visits per patient per year (calculate from  above data) Patient‐level data (Current, de facto, Panels) • Visits by patient by provider for 15, 18 or 24 month time period 23

The Mechanics of Empanelment Building Patient Panels

24

Provider Supply • PCP is any provider who is expected to take care of a  panel of patients • For each PCP, determine their clinical FTE in the practice – Clinical FTE is the time available to see patients; excludes  admin, teaching, research, meeting, vacation and CME time

• Methods – # of visits expected per year – # of visits per session  # sessions per year – # of visits/hour  # of clinical hours expected per year

• Compare expected supply to actual visits seen – Number of actual patient visits seen in the past 12 months – How does it compare to expected? 25

Calculate Provider Supply : Example #1 Provider Clinical FTE = 1.0 FTE (5 days per week) Provider visits scheduled/day = 24 Days in clinic/year = 5d/w 52w/y = 260 days Time off = PTO, Holidays, CME = 20 + 10 + 5 = 35 Clinical days = 260 – 35 = 225 Appointment supply = 225 24 = 5,400 Visits seen in most recent 12 months: 5,670

26

Calculate Provider Supply : Example #2 Provider Clinical FTE = 0.6 FTE (3 days per week) Provider visits scheduled/day = 24 Days in clinic/year = 3d/w 52w/y = 156 days Time off = PTO, Holidays, CME = 12 + 6 + 5 = 23 days Clinical days = 156 – 23 = 133 Appointment supply = 133 24 = 3,192 Visits seen in most recent 12 months: 3,574

27

Calculate Provider Supply : Example #3 Provider Clinical FTE = 0.8 FTE (4 days per week) Provider visits scheduled/day = 24 Days in clinic/year = 4d/w 52w/y = 208 days Time off = PTO, Holidays, CME = 16 + 8 + 5 = 29 days Clinical days = 208 – 29 = 179 Appointment supply = 179 24 = 4,296 Visits seen in most recent 12 months: 3,792

28

Provider Supply Provider 1

Provider 2

Provider 3

Provider Clinical FTE

1.0

0.6

0.8

Provider Visits/day

24

24

24

Clinical Days/year

260

156

208

Time off (days)

35

23

29

Clinical Days available

225

133

179

Appointment supply

5,400

3,192

4,296

Visits in past 12 months

5,670

3,574

3,792 29

Provider  Supply and Capacity Community Health Center Provider

Supply Capacity (Expected Visits) (Actual Visits)

Difference (Visits)

Goode (1.0 FTE)

5,400

5,670

+270

Monroe (0.6 FTE)

3,192

3,574

+382

Schafer (0.8 FTE)

4,296

3,792

-504

Jones (0.5FTE) – left 2,700 practice

1,434

-1,266

30

Patients (Demand) in Practice • What is the number of unique patients who have seen  any provider in the practice in a recent 15, 18 or 24  month period? – How many are pediatric patients (< 18 years of age) – How many are adults (≥ 18 years of age)

• Determine the total number of visits made by patients in  the same 15, 18 or 24 month period for the following: – All patients – Pediatric patients  – Adult patients

• For each group, calculate the average visits per patient in  the period – Average visits per patient = # of patient visits for the group  ÷the total # of patients in the group 31

Demand for Visits: An Example • Unduplicated number of patients in time period (15,  18 or 24 months) • Total number of visits for these patients in time  period • Calculate average number of visits per year Practice Patients and Visits (Demand) Unduplicated Patient Count Total Visits Average Visits/Per Patient

4,057 patients 13,892 visits 3.4 visits/patient (average) 32

What is the Current Panel? Using the Four‐Cut Method

33

Who’s on the Current Panel? • Determine the current de facto panel to determine if  patients are all assigned to the right provider  – Who did each patient actually see for each visit?  – Often patients see providers other than assigned provider – Patients often see more than one and sometimes more than  two providers in the practice

• These data will be used to assign patients to the panel of  one provider • Will not be 100% accurate but it is a good starting point  for the process of establishing right‐sized patient panels  with the right patients on them 34

Patients by Provider (Current Panel) Community Health Center Visits by Patient and by Provider Seen Provider 

Goode

Monroe

Schafer

Former Provider

Assigned to Panel of…

Patient ↓ A….

5

8

1

0

B…

1

1

1

7

C…

3

3

0

2

D…

6

0

0

1

35

The 4-Cut Method for Panel Assignment CUT

PATIENT DESCRIPTION

ASSIGNMENT

1

Patients who have seen only one provider

To that sole provider

2

Patients who have seen multiple providers, but one provider the majority of the time

To the majority provider

3

Patients who have seen two or more providers equally (no majority can be determined)

To the provider who performed the last physical

4

Patients without a physical or health check who have seen multiple providers

To provider seen most recently

Source: Murray et .al,. “Panel Size: How Many Patients Can One Doctor Manage?” Family Practice Management, April 2007

36

4‐Cut Method Report Community Health Center Visits by Patient and by Provider Seen Provider 

Goode

Monroe

Schafer

Former Provider

Assigned to Panel of…

Patient ↓ A….

5

8

1

0

Monroe

B…

1

1

1

7

Schafer1

C…

3

3

0

2

Monroe2

D…

6

0

0

1

Goode

1. Schafer did most recent PE 2. No PE; Monroe did most recent visit 37

Results Community Health Center Provider Panels (de facto using 4-Cut Method) Provider

Number of Patients

Goode

1,846

Monroe

903

Schafer

1,073

Unassigned Total

276 4,098

38

39

Is Current de facto Panel in Balance with  Available Provide Supply and Capacity • For each provider how does the current panel size  calculated using the 4‐cut method (de facto)  compare to the calculated size for the right‐size  panel?  Current panel size is about the same  Current panel size is larger than the right‐size panel  Current panel size is smaller than the right‐size panel

40

Assessing the Results Community Health Center Provider Panels (de facto using 4-Cut Method) Provider

Panel Size Based on S-D calculation

Assessment of Results

Current Panel

S-D Panel Size

Over/Under

Adjust?

Goode

1,846

1,588

+258

?

Monroe

903

939

-36

?

Schafer

1,073

1,264

-191

?

--

--

Unassigned 276

reassign

Jones (left)

41

Getting Panel Size Right • Formulaic systems are very useful, but imperfect • The goal is to make a serious effort to appropriately  match resources (supply) to need (demand) • Whatever system is used should be both  transparent and flexible • Over time panel sizes will become more accurate

42

Panel Size and Adjustments

43

How Big Can a Panel Be? • Panel size has some elasticity • Practice patterns and system design can  influence maximum panel size possible • Using teams who “share the care” is a key  contributor to being able to manage larger panel  sizes  – recent study suggests delegation of preventive and  chronic care tasks to non‐physician team members  can allow team to care for a larger panel than would  otherwise be possible 44

Practice Patterns Influence Panel Size • Visits per patient per year – Can decrease with continuity; lower visit return rate; provide more  service at each visit; increase role of team members so all care not  delivered by provider; use alternatives to traditional visits, e.g.,  telephone, email, group visits

• Provider visits per day – Increase by improving visit show rates; share the care among team  members; improve workflow efficiency; increase number of exam  rooms; remove all unnecessary work from providers to maximize  appointment supply

• Provider sessions or days per year – Do as much as possible to protect provider time during patient care  hours from non‐patient care activities; e.g., incorporate  administrative time duties  into the work of the team; use non‐ patient care hours for meetings 45

46

Source: Murray et .al,. Panel Size: How Many Patients Can One Doctor Manage? Family Practice Management, April 2007.

Team‐Based Care Influence on Panel Size • Findings from study – If portions of preventive and chronic care services are delegated to non-physician team members, practice panels of larger size are possible Type of Delegation

Panel Size % Increase from Base

Prevent/Chronic Prevent/Chronic  Delegation  Delegation LOW NONE (%  =50/25) (% = 0/0)

983

Prevent/Chronic Delegation MED (% = 60/30)

Prevent/Chronic Delegation HIGH (% =  77/47)

1,387

1,523

1,947

41%

55%

98%

Source: Altschuler, et.al., Estimating a Reasonable Panel Size for Primary Care Physicians with Team‐based Task Delegation. Annals of Family Medicine, Vol 10, No. 5; September/October 2012 47

What About Adjusting for Type of Patient,  Acuity, Complexity? • Most asked about:  adjustments for complexity, acuity • Most useful: age‐gender adjustments

Remember… One panel adjusted down requires another to be adjusted  up – Can lead to a complicated process within the practice – Can stall or delay the process without material improvement  in panel sizes 48

Adjusting for Age and Gender

Source: Murray et .al,. Panel Size: How Many Patients Can One Doctor Manage? Family Practice Management, April 2007.

49

Try Redesign and Teams First “Practices should consider whether many of the age  and acuity factors could be managed more effectively  by providing focused team support than by adjusting  panels.” ‐‐ Mark Murray

50

Assessing Panel Size • Saying “yes” can mean “no” if we can’t provide what the patient  needs and wants, can’t maintain access with continuity • Leads to escalating chaos within the practice, increase in rework,  decrease in outcomes and experience; burnout, decreased  patient experience and poorer outcomes • To maintain panels at right size, you may find you need to add  more providers.  • Recommended:  First try the following (redesign, improvement  approaches) ─ build teams; redesign workflows; exploit power of technology;  eliminate needless work and re‐work; add staff to do the right  work e.g., care coordinators, care managers, pharmacists,  behavioral health, etc. 51

Adjusting a Panel That Is Too Large • Bolster the care team:  shift more resources to support  the provider & care team, e.g., additional nursing  and/or clerical support; additional exam rooms • Excuse the provider from seeing patients of absent  providers • Let attrition take its course • Close the panel temporarily • Move patients to another panel.  Develop a patient‐ centered and thoughtful process – Providers need to inform their patients directly 52

What if the Panel is Too Small? • Develop a plan to grow a small panel • Consider whether the provider is new to  practice or an experienced provider  • Use the opportunity to move patients if it  makes sense from panels that may be too large  or from providers who are reducing FTE or may  be leaving the practice – Always consider the patient’s desires in any plan to  redistribute patients to a different panel 53

Assessing the Results Community Health Center Provider Panels (de facto using 4-Cut Method)

Provider

Panel Size Based on S-D calculation

Assessment of Results

Current Panel

S-D Panel Size

Over/Under

Adjust?

Goode

1,846

1,588

+258

?

Monroe

903

939

-36

?

Schafer

1,073

1,264

-191

?

--

--

Unassigned 276

reassign

Jones (left)

54

Engage Providers and Teams in the Process • Medical leadership is essential in this process • Use a process designed to engage providers and care  teams so panels are accepted, embraced, owned – Consider their suggestions seriously – Have providers talk together as a group – The Practice’s patients are the responsibility of the whole  Practice so decisions need to ensure all patients are on a  panel which is their medical home

• Allow all providers to review their panel as thoroughly  as they want; encourage discussion, questions Source Amit Shah, MD, Multnomah County, OR

55

Confirm Panel with Providers • Review de facto panel and ideal panel size with  providers to engage them in process and develop  ownership of their panel –

This is an ongoing process from beginning



Medical leadership is essential



Start with goals, benefits



Review process, methods, data



Have a dialogue (on‐going) about goals, benefits,  concerns, process for assessment, making adjustments



What data will you use to assess outcome goals and  panel size over time? 56

Engage Patients in the Process Too • Involve patients by checking with them when they  come into the clinic to confirm that they agree that  Dr. Smith or the NP, Ms. Jones, is their provider • When patients call the clinic always ask “who is your  assigned provider?” and ensure that the call is  routed to the right care team • Communicate and reinforce provider–patient link in  as many ways as possible to emphasize continuity  and access to the care team vs. to an appointment  with any provider 57

Are Panels Working?  Don’t Guess. Measure.  • Use metrics to assess – periodic reports – Panel size compared to right‐size; assess based on results – Operational and clinical measures • • • •

% of all patients empanelled Continuity rate for patients by panel 3rd next available  for patients by panel Clinical outcomes

• Ask patients how it is working for them (experience) – Can they get an appointment easily when they want it? – Are they seeing their provider and care team regularly?

• Ask staff how it is working from their point of view – Are they able to manage the demand? – Are they able to use registry data for planned care, outreach 58

Principles for Successful Empanelment

59

Leading Change What It Takes

Engage and Enable the Organization

Implement and Sustain Changes • •

Create the Climate for Change • • •

• • •

Build, Sustain Communication Campaign Empower Action; Remove Barriers to Action Build Belief with Early “Wins”

Keep It Going; Don’t Let Up Make It Permanent (Anchor in Org. Culture)

Drive the Urgency Build the Guiding Coalition Develop Vision (What, Where), Connect to the Strategies (How)

Based on John Kotter, Leading Change, 1996

60

Leading Change How It Works

Engage and Enable the Organization

Implement and Sustain Changes

Create the Climate for Change

Based on John Kotter, Leading Change, 1996

61

Principles to Enable Successful Empanelment • Organizational resources (including the time needed, an  improvement team, engaged leadership) to support initial and on‐ going empanelment are readily available • Process and results of empanelment are patient‐centered and give  patient a dependable medical home in the practice and respects  patient’s preferences • Processes to create right‐sized panels are transparent and engage  providers and care teams as stakeholders • Processes consider the care team as the point of continuity for  patients on the panel • Operational processes are developed and prioritize continuity and  access for patients and for care teams • Teams have time, tools, training and authority to develop processes  for managing their panel through shared care and  population health  management • Teams have access to data for their panel and take accountability for  their panel and outcomes (access, continuity, experience and clinical) 62

Empanelment Process Takes Time • Started with pilot clinic  to ensure the process  worked • Process took 6 months  for all clinics • Had empanelled 99% of  patients within 8  months; had started  with 6,000 unassigned  patients , many more  assigned to an incorrect  provider • Implementation of new  processes were  maintained post‐ empanelment Source Amit Shah, MD, Multnomah County, OR

63

Implementation Timeline Example E m p a n e l m e n t

Develop, use performance data Provide registries, patient data Create panels for remaining providers Develop, implement policies to support empanelment Develop, Implement changes to support continuity Create panel for 2nd provider

T a s k s

Begin team-based care Build commitment for the change throughout the practice Create panel for one provider

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Months 64

Gnarly Issues Let’s Discuss

65

Which Patients are Empaneled? • Medical home is proactive; empanels patients  assigned or who choose the practice as their provider  organization • Have process to assign new patients to panels – Explain process to patient, assess preferences, confirm  assignment; provide information  on team (do warm  introduction if possible) – Share information on new patient to provider and care  team

• Have processes to reach out to the patient to begin  engagement process for the patient and assess need  for visit or initial health assessment 66

Which Providers Should Have a Panel? • All providers > 60% FTE • Providers 40‐60% FTE share a panel or cover for each  other • Providers < 40% FTE work locums to provide coverage in  the practice (no assigned panel) • NPs: two options – as PCP, empanel, using same sizing as for provider – on team with physician sharing panel (factor into supply for  panel size);  provider and NP determine delegation of  responsibility 

• PAs: shared panel with physician provider (factor into  supply for panel size) 67

Fears and Misperceptions About Empanelment “My patients will have less access.  How can they see me  since my schedule is fully booked for the next five  months.  Assigning patients to me will only make this  worse.  This won’t benefit me or my patients.”

68

Invest in the Care Team to Enhance Continuity, Access

Teams are forged by the work they do  together to achieve their common  purpose

SOURCE:  Katzenbach, J. R. and Smith, D.K. (1993), The  Wisdom of Teams: Creating the High‐performance  Organization, Harvard Business School Press

• Team small group of  people; complementary  skills; committed to a  common purpose,  performance goals and  approach for which they  are mutually accountable • Team challenges are  complex enough to require  the skills, experience,  training of more than one  person to be successfully  completed 69

70

Linking Empanelment to Appointment Scheduling for Continuity • Ensure that scheduling is done to prioritize continuity  for patient with provider and care team – It is easy for scheduling process to revert to looking for the  next available provider vs. the assigned provider – Address access delays

• Use scripts at clinic reception during check‐in, and when  making appointments to validate patient’s provider and  patient preference to maintain panels.  Standardize the 

process • Monitor data to ensure access and continuity 71

Part‐Time Providers, Coverage, FTE Minimums • Establish minimum clinical FTE  for providers • Establish minimum number of  days per week in clinic • Partner part‐time providers (2‐3)  for coverage of panel over all  sessions for a week, no gaps

Leadership Enabled

• No overlapping vacation  schedules for partners

Source Amit Shah, MD, Multnomah County, OR

72

Considerations for Part‐Time Providers • Create “practice partners” by pairing part‐time  providers in a shared practice/panel situation: • • • •

Pair up to equal one FTE Compatibility, Chemistry Share a care team for continuity purposes  Coordinate and share to ensure coverage during vacations  and other time off • Communication is key; schedule to enable face‐to‐face  contact at least one time per week to foster  communication  73

Provider (or Resident) Leaving the Practice, On Long  Term Leave, Reducing Clinical Time • Risks to patients during provider transitions – – – – –

Patient loss to follow‐up or timely follow‐up Missed test results Delayed care Medical errors More acute care (E.D. and hospital)

• Patients can lose trust in practice and lose momentum  around their own self‐management • Other teams taking up the demand of absent provider – – – –

Reduces access and continuity for their patients Discontinuity, deflection, delay in access and care Burnout, staff and provider dissatisfaction Poor patient experience 74

Provider (or Resident) Leaving the Practice, On Long  Term Leave, Reducing Clinical Time

The Opportunity How can we design, implement and anchor processes  for high quality transitions for provider transitions to  ensure the best planned and implemented patient  hand‐offs between providers?

75

What to Do: Plan and Prepare Well  • Design and use standard processes for managing a provider transitions  Provide notice to allow for adequate preparation to ensure smooth  transitions for patients and other teams  Ensure all providers and teams know the processes and their roles  Identify patients that will have a transition (permanent or temporary)  Define and identify high‐risk and fragile patients who will be  prioritized for person‐to‐person hand‐off process  Decide who will provide care to other patients if there will be any  gaps or long term provider absences that will not be filled quickly  Commit to not allow gaps in transitions even if using locums or other  providers as temporary coverage.  Design a process to inform patients about the transition and a  mechanism to provide real‐time responses to their concerns 76

What to Do:  Implement well • Provide protected time for hand‐off process between providers  and care teams • Preserve relationships between patients and care team – Design effective processes for keeping the care team of transitioning  provider involved as much as possible; the team knows the patients.

• Prioritize use of warm hand‐offs for high‐risk patients and other  patients as possible to introduce new provider; maintain care  team • Establish a process to minimize loss to follow‐up for high‐risk and  fragile patients  Next visits in timeframe intended (prioritize scheduling with right provider)  Completion of testing processes as needed (and track for completion)

• Engage clinic operations staff to help with scheduling 77

What to Do:  Get Feedback, Improve Processes • Get feedback (prioritize real‐time asking vs. survey) – from patients – from providers and care teams involved • Track data to evaluate effectiveness – access, continuity, clinical goals • Use learning to refine process over time

78

78

Resistance “In the choice between changing one’s  mind and proving there's no need to do so,  most people get busy on the proof.” ‐John Kenneth Galbraith

Source: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnkennet121078.htm l 79

Principles for Overcoming Resistance to Change • • • • •

It is natural and inevitable: Expect it It does not always show its face: Find it It has many motivations: Understand it When you meet it, deal with concerns  rather than arguments:  Confront it There is no one way to deal with it:  Manage it

Hammer, Michael & Steven A. Stanton, The Reengineering Revolution, Harper Business, 1995

80

Make Empanelment Permanent

81

Maintaining Panels in Practice • The empanelment process needs to be used regularly to keep  panels right‐sized over time • Requires processes to: – Ensure all new practice patients are linked to a specific  provider as soon as they are assigned or choose the practice  as their medical home; develop outreach process as well – Develop a process for patient or provider request for  switching a patient panel assignment – To re‐empanel patients whose providers leave the practice  or cut back their clinical time (see info on minimum FTE) – Remove patients who are no longer using the practice 82

Build an Empanelment Process • Define Roles and Responsibilities – Assign a Panel Manager to oversee all processes for empanelment – Identify other staff needed

• Develop standard process for PCP assignments – Initial for new patients – Patients leaving practice, providers leaving practice or changing  their clinical FTE – Patient or provider requested move of patient to another panel

• Run supply and demand data periodically to ensure panel  size is neither too large or too small • Identify unassigned patients monthly and develop process  for assigning 83

Examples of Policies for Panel Management

84

Population Health Management “Primary care physicians will increasingly be paid  for their ability to achieve goals across the body  of patients most closely associated with them:   their ‘panel’.” J Am Board Fam Med 2015;28:173–174

85

Empanelment and Data Driven Improvement • Triple Aim & Value‐based Payment – Population‐based clinical and experience results  expected, required  

• Feedback for teams and organization for  continuous improvement efforts to achieve  highest levels of performance • Absent empanelment process, who how are  these outcomes achieved and sustained? 

86

Adult Population Risk Distribution 40-50% costs

Severe Problems (5%) Chronic Conditions (40%)

At Risk for Poor Health (20%)

Population  Health  Strategies : 1. Manage  patients  effectively and  efficiently at  each level 2. Keep patients  from moving up  the pyramid 3. Ensure a good  medical home

Generally Healthy (35%) Source: Kevin Grumbach, M.D., UCSF. Webinar, “Patient Empanelment”, July 18, 2016

87

88

89

Using Panel Data for Outreach and PHM

90

91

92

Performance Results

93

94

What Will You Do to Advance  Empanelment in Your Practice? • Identify two to three action steps that you will take  as soon as tomorrow • How will these support your work to move forward? • Who is accountable for each step? • How confident are you that you can complete these  actions and then take the next set of steps to create  momentum? • Whose support do you need?  How will you secure  it? 95

Check‐in for Progress • Two to three weeks after the  training session – hold a virtual office‐hours session (60  minutes) – 2 dates and times – to take questions from training  participants – hear about the progress and  challenges – Seek solutions

• This is an opportunity to increase  the likelihood that the  empanelment effort will be  completed and thereby produce  the ROI that it offers for continuity,  access, team development,  population health management  

96

Feedback 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Overall usefulness of the training (scale 1 to 5) I can use what I learned (yes or no) Most important thing I learned (post‐it note) Confidence about taking actions (scale 1 to 5) Suggestions to improve this training (post‐it note)

97

Have Questions? Reach Out! Regina Neal [email protected] 949‐892‐2066

98

Thank You

99

Loading...

Empanelment - Community Health Center Network

Empanelment Foundation for and Heart of the Medical Home Preservation Park Oakland, California July 21, 2016 Presented by:   Regina Neal, MPH, MS TH...

3MB Sizes 0 Downloads 0 Views

Recommend Documents

Advocacy Campaigns - Community Health Center Network
Oct 23, 2014 - Public Health & Prevention. Rural Health. Workforce. Advocacy Campaigns. Key Contacts Program. CPCA's Gov

Community Health Network: Home
...from the nearest appointment. From scrapes to earaches to broken bones, Connect to Care helps you find immediate qual

Patient Empanelment - Stratis Health
How to Use. 1. Review this tool to understand more about patient empanelment, its purpose, steps for implementing patien

Community Health Network Provider Directory
Center. (661) 322-2206. 6501 Truxtun Ave. Bakersfield, CA 93309. Ammar MD, Neal. Fernandez MD, Geover. Diagnostic Radiol

Fertility Care | Community Health Network
Community Health Network's assisted fertility services offers complete laboratory services, including embryology (in vit

Employee Services | Community Health Network
Community Health Network Employees. InComm is the location for Community Health Network providers and employees to acces

Community Resources - Petaluma Health Center
Sonoma County |. -Healdsburg, Windsor, Santa Rosa | Alliance Medical Center Resource Guide (Eng/Sp) www.alliancemed.org/

Substance Abuse — Active Community Health Center
A comprehensive clinical evaluation is performed to gather information about clients who are in need of outpatient subst

Center for Community Health Downtown | JWCH Institute
Primary Medical Care Homeless Health Care Women's Health Care AIDS HIV Services Behavioral Health Care Dental Care The C

Community Health Nursing - The Carter Center
Nursing. Daniel Mengistu. Equlinet Misganaw. University of Gondar. In collaboration with the Ethiopia Public Health Trai