Developing Army leaders: Counseling an important responsibility

Loading...

http://www.forthoodsentinel.com/news/developing-army-leaders-counseling-an-important-responsibility/article_74020744-d697-54aa-8694-6c62ff61c94a.html

Developing Army leaders: Counseling an important responsibility Sgt. 1st Class Cameron Held, Assistant Inspector General Nov 26, 2009

You have probably noticed that the III Corps and Fort Hood Developmental Counseling policy letter (CSM-05) was rescinded on 2 November 2009. This does not mean counseling has been rescinded. Counseling is one of the most important leadership development responsibilities for Army leaders. The primary purpose of counseling is to improve performance and to professionally develop the rated Soldier. A quality counseling session does not dwell solely on the past; it focuses on the future and what can be done better. It is the responsibility of leaders and Soldiers to work together to ensure goals are set and understood, observations are shared, credit for successes are documented, and recommendations for improvement are acknowledged. Remember, the overall quality and usefulness of counseling is a shared responsibility between the rater and the rated Soldier. Leaders should transition their counseling efforts to comply with the Army standards. Let’s take a minute to explore the Army’s counseling standards and eliminate potential confusion. The current Army standards for counseling are outlined in AR 623-3, DA Pamphlet 623-3 (Appendix C), and FM 6-22 (Appendix B). The following are the time frames for each type of required counseling: Initial counseling: 1. All officers – within 30 days (DA Form 67-9-1) 2. Officers in the rank of WO1, CW2, LT, or CPT – within 30 days (DA Form 67-9-1a, in addition to DA Form 67-91 listed above) 3. Noncommissioned officers (including CPL if rated as an NCO) – within 30 days (DA Form 2166-8-1) 4. Enlisted Soldiers in the rank of PVT through SPC (including CPL if not rated as an NCO) – within 30 days (DA Form 4856) Follow-up Counseling: 1. All officers – mid-point and as needed (DA Form 67-9-1) 2. Officers in the rank of WO1, CW2, LT, and CPT – quarterly (DA Form 67-9-1a) 3. Noncommissioned officers (including CPL if rated as an NCO) – quarterly for Active Army and AGR NCOs and at least semiannually for ARNG and USAR NCOs performing IDT 4. Enlisted Soldiers in the rank of PVT thru SPC (including CPL if not rated as an NCO) – monthly and as needed All counseling: In accordance with the Army Campaign Plan for Health Promotion Risk Reduction and Suicide Prevention, all initial and subsequent performance counseling will include the importance of Soldier, DA civilian, and family physical and behavioral well-being. This will enhance available programs by increasing awareness and reducing the stigma associated with seeking health assistance. Additional counseling: Additional counseling may be required in certain situations. For instance, counseling may be required for a specific event, crisis, referral, promotion, adverse separation, or professional growth. The Inspector General’s Office handles numerous complaints every day. In many cases, the root cause is a lack of communication. Two-way communication is the key to success. Leaders must strive to provide predictability to their Soldiers and families through the communication process. Effective communication between leaders and subordinates enhances predictability, eliminates confusion, and reduces problems created by a lack of understanding. Leaders must focus their counseling efforts towards establishing open and maintainable lines of communication. Soldiers cannot perform to standard if they don’t know the standard. Remember, quality counseling enables leaders to set their Soldiers up for success and access their full potential. For more information on effective counseling and communication engage your chain of command, or your local Inspector General. As always, we’re here to help.

Loading...

Developing Army leaders: Counseling an important responsibility

http://www.forthoodsentinel.com/news/developing-army-leaders-counseling-an-important-responsibility/article_74020744-d697-54aa-8694-6c62ff61c94a.html ...

15KB Sizes 3 Downloads 13 Views

Recommend Documents

Developing Leaders - British Army
Case Study: Adventurous Training as a Team Building Tool. Adventurous Training (AT) is universally recognised as a power

Empowering Sustainability Leaders: Developing an Authentic
Since reading this quote during my first term in the LSE program, I began to ... leader, I saw leadership as positional,

Developing an SAP certification course for the Army - GCSS-Army
The VSU courses cover topics in ERP systems, project management, Microsoft. Project, SAP Project System, logistics infor

army counseling, reception and integration counseling
get army counseling statement examples for reception and integration as well as initial counseling statement examples an

Counsel Quick - Army Counseling Online
... Family Care Plan (Initial); Family Care Plan (Invalid); Family Care Plan (Valid); Fully Eligible Not Recommended for

Army initial counseling examples - Cidic
PVT ______, this is your initial counseling statement. This counseling statement is to inform you of my expectations of

Updated Army Counseling Statement Examples
Underweight Counseling. Off Limits Areas. Fraternization. No Contact Order. Inappropriate Relations. Protective Order. M

ARMY PCMH Operations Manual Leaders Guide to Army Patient
Jan 24, 2014 - options to access services, provide team-based care, focus on care coordination, and partnership with wel

Updated Army Counseling Examples - Army Cut off scores
Redeployment Safety. Improper Use of Prescription Drugs. Underweight Counseling. Off Limits Areas. Fraternization. No Co

initial counseling example for soldiers, army counseling form pvt-spc
initial counseling statement example for soldiers pvt to spc. all new soldiers should be counseled within the first 30 d