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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

CORRESPONDENCE MANUAL

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Table of Issuances and Revisions/Changes SECNAV Manual

Basic Issuance Date

5216.5

March 2010 June 2015

Change/Revision History

Date Published

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June List of Revisions/Changes Some grammatical, administrative, and other minor corrections have been incorporated into this Revision of the Manual. The following list outlines those changes. They have not been highlighted. 1. References, page x, added SECNAVINST 5216.7, MARADMIN 733/12, DoD Manual 5200.01, Vols 2, 3, and 4 2. Chapter 2, page 2-2, paragraph 1a(4)(a) 3. Chapter 2, page 2-3, paragraph 2a and 2b 4. Chapter 2, page 2-4, paragraph 4 and paragraph 5b(2) 5. Chapter 2, page 2-5, paragraph 5e and paragraph 6 6. Chapter 2, page 2-6, paragraph 8b(2) and paragraph 8c 7. Chapter 2, page 2-7, paragraph 10 8. Chapter 2, page 2-8, paragraph 11a(5) and 11b(3) 9. Chapter 2, page 2-9, paragraph 13 10. Chapter 2, page 2-10, paragraph 13a and paragraph 14e 11. Chapter 2, page 2-11, paragraph 15 and paragraph 17a 12. Chapter 2, page 2-12, paragraph 19b(10) 13. Chapter 2, page 2-13, paragraph 19b(11) and paragraph 21 14. Chapter 3, page 3-1, paragraph 3a 15. Chapter 3, page 3-2, paragraph 3b and paragraph 3e 16. Chapter 4, page 4-1, section 4-1, section 4-2, paragraph 1c, and paragraph 2c 17. Chapter 4, page 4-2, paragraph 4a and paragraph 4b(5) 18. Chapter 5, page 5-1 and 5-2, paragraphs 2a thru 2c 19. Chapter 5, page 5-2, paragraph 3a

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 20. Chapter 6, page 6-1, section 6-1, and section 6-2, paragraphs 2a thru 2c 21. Chapter 6, page 6-2, paragraph 3a(6) 22. Chapter 6, page 6-3, paragraph 4 23. Chapter 6, page 6-5, Figure 6-2 24. Chapter 6, page 6-7, Figure 6-4 25. Chapter 7, page 7-1, Section 7-2, paragraphs 1 thru 3, and paragraph 3a(2) 26. Chapter 7, page 7-2, paragraphs 3a(2)(a) thru 3a(2)(c), and paragraph 4 27. Chapter 7, page 7-3, paragraph 5, paragraph 6a(1) and 6a(2) 28. Chapter 7, page 7-4, paragraph 7b 29. Chapter 7, page 7-5, paragraph 8c, 8d, and 9a 30. Chapter 7, page 7-6, paragraph 10b(1) 31. Chapter 7, page 7-10, paragraph 10b(16) 32. Chapter 7, page 7-12, paragraph 11f and paragraph 12 33. Chapter 7, page 7-15, paragraph 16 and paragraph 17 34. Chapter 7, page 7-20, Figure 7-5 35. Chapter 7, page 7-21, Figure 7-6 36. Chapter 7, page 7-22, Figure 7-7 37. Chapter 7, page 7-23, Figure 7-8 38. Chapter 8, page 8-1, Section 8-3 39. Chapter 8, page 8-3, Figure 8-2 40. Chapter 9, page 9-1, Section 9-1 41. Chapter 9, page 9-2, paragraph 4 42. Chapter 9, page 9-3, Figure 9-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 43. Chapter 9, page 9-4, Figure 9-2 44. Chapter 10, page 10-7, Figure 10-5 45. Chapter 10, page 10-8, Figure 10-6 46. Chapter 11, page 11-4, paragraph 15 47. Chapter 12, page 12-1, paragraphs 1, 2a, 2a(1) thru 2a(3) 48. Chapter 12, page 12-2, paragraph 4a and 4b 49. Chapter 12, page 12-3, paragraph 1a and 1b 50. Chapter 12, page 12-4, paragraph 2e(1) 51. Chapter 12, page 12-5, paragraph 4 52. Chapter 12, page 12-6, Section 12-4 and paragraph 1a(8) 53. Chapter 12, page 12-9, Figure 12-1 54. Chapter 12, page 12-16, Figure 12-8 55. Appendix A, page A-2 and A-3 56. Appendix B, page B-5 and B-7 57. Appendix C, page C-1, paragraph 1d(1) 58. Appendix D, page D-1, paragraphs 1 thru 5 59. Appendix E, pages E-1 thru E-6, updated

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June FOREWORD This manual implements policy set forth in Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5216.7, is issued to prescribe uniform standards for the management and preparation of correspondence, and is applicable to all commands and activities of the Department of the Navy. The following manual is cancelled: SECNAV M-5216.5 of March 2010 Local supplements to amplify this manual may be issued and inserted as chapter 13. A local supplement shall not contradict or repeat information contained in this manual. This manual may be accessed through the Department of the Navy Issuances Web site http://doniadm.documentservices.dla.mil/. Contact information is provided below for assistance or to offer recommended changes: OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATION 1000 NAVY PENTAGON ROOM 4D652 WASHINGTON DC 20350-1000

RAY MABUS

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June TABLE OF CONTENTS TITLE

PAGE

FOREWORD

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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REFERENCES

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CHAPTER 1 – CORRESPONDENCE MANAGEMENT 1-1 – Objective and Responsibilities 1 Objective 2 Responsibilities CHAPTER 2 – CORRESPONDENCE STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES 2-1 – Correspondence Standards and Procedures 1 General 2 North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) 2-2 – Procedures 1 Correspondence Through Channels 2 Take Advantage of Correspondence Shortcuts 3 Coordination 4 Submit Finished Products for Signature 5 Signature Authority 6 Electronic Signatures 7 Incoming Correspondence Controls 8 Replies to Correspondence 9 Outgoing Correspondence Controls 10 Limit Use of Social Security Numbers (SSN) 11 Identifying Navy and Marine Corps Personnel 12 Letterhead Stationery 13 Enclosures 14 Copies 15 Expressing Military Time 16 Expressing Dates 17 Abbreviations and Acronyms 18 Punctuating, Capitalizing, Spelling, Hyphenating, and Separating Words 19 Proofreading 20 Typeface 21 Color of Ink

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1-1 1-1 1-1

2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-3 2-3 2-4 2-4 2-5 2-5 2-6 2-6 2-7 2-7 2-8 2-9 2-10 2-11 2-11 2-11 2-12 2-12 2-13 2-13

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June TITLE CHAPTER 3 - ELECTRONIC RECORDS 3-1 - General 3-2 - Procedures 1 Creation 2 Naming Files 3 Maintenance 4 Restrictions 5 Disposition

PAGE 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-2 3-2

CHAPTER 4 - ELECTRONIC MAIL 4-1 - General 4-2 - Procedures 1 Managing E-Mail 2 Formal Correspondence 3 Informal Correspondence 4 Security and Privacy Issues 5 Records Management 6 Digital Signatures

4-1 4-1 4-1 4-1 4-2 4-2 4-2 4-3

CHAPTER 5 - FACSIMILE TRANSMISSION SERVICES 5-1 - General 5-2 - Procedures 1 Managing Facsimile Services 2 Security and Privacy Issues 3 Records Management

5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-2

CHAPTER 6 – POSTAL STANDARDS 6-1 - General 6-2 - Procedures 1 Choosing the Right Size Envelope or Container 2 Sources of Address Information 3 Delivery and Return Address Formats 4 Mail Classifications 5 Mail Markings Figure 6-1 Folding Techniques Figure 6-2 Standard Address Abbreviations Figure 6-3 State/Territory Abbreviations Figure 6-4 Envelope Addressing Standards CHAPTER 7 – CORRESPONDENCE FORMAT 7-1 - Requirements 7-2 - Format 1 Margins

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6-1 6-1 6-1 6-1 6-2 6-3 6-3 6-4 6-5 6-6 6-7; 6-8

7-1 7-1 7-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June TITLE 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Figure 7-1 Figure 7-2 Figure 7-3 Figure 7-4 Figure 7-5 Figure 7-6 Figure 7-7 Figure 7-8 Figure 7-9 Figure 7-10

Font Sender’s Symbols Classified Correspondence For Official Use Only “From:” Line “To:” Line “Via:” Line Subject Line Reference Line Enclosure Line Text Paragraphs Signature Line “Copy To:” Line Identifying Second and Later Pages Page Numbering Correspondence Package Assembly Tabbing a Correspondence Package Standard Letter – First Page Standard Letter – Second Page Standard Letter – Window – Envelope Joint Letter Standard Letter with Classification Markings – First Page Standard Letter with Classification Markings – Second Page Standard Letter with FOUO Markings Paragraph Structure Format Assembly of a Standard Correspondence Package Using Stacking Method Tabbing Correspondence Packages

CHAPTER 8 – MULTIPLE-ADDRESS LETTER 8-1 - General 8-2 - Listing Addressees 1 Using a “To:” Line Only 2 Using a “Distribution:” Line Only 3 Using Both a “To:” Line and “Distribution:” Line 8-3 - Preparing and Signing Copies 8-4 - Assembly of Multiple-Address Letters Figure 8-1 Multiple-Address Letter Using “To:” Line Figure 8-2 Multiple-Address Letter Using “Distribution:” Line Figure 8-3 Multiple-Address Letter Using a “To:” and “Distribution:” Line Figure 8-4 Assembly of a Multiple-Address Letter

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PAGE 7-1 7-1 7-2 7-3 7-3 7-4 7-5 7-5 7-6 7-10 7-12 7-12 7-13 7-14 7-15 7-15 7-15 7-15 7-16 7-17 7-18 7-19 7-20 7-21 7-22 7-23 7-24 7-25

8-1 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-2 8-3 8-4 8-5

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June TITLE CHAPTER 9 – ENDORSEMENTS 9-1 - General 9-2 - Format 1 Endorsement Line 2 “Via:” Line 3 Adding References 4 Adding Enclosures 5 “Copy To:” Addressees 6 Forwarding Your Endorsement and Copies 7 Assembly of an Endorsement Figure 9-1 Same Page Endorsement Figure 9-2 New Page Endorsement Figure 9-3 Assembly of an Endorsement

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CHAPTER 10 – MEMORANDUMS 10-1 - General 10-2 - Formats 1 Memorandum For The Record 2 From-To Memorandum 3 Plain-Paper Memorandum 4 Letterhead Memorandum 5 Decision Memorandum 6 Memorandum of Agreement or Memorandum of Understanding Figure 10-1 Memorandum For The Record Figure 10-2 Printed “From-To” Memorandum Figure 10-3 Plain-Paper “From-To” Memorandum Figure 10-4 Letterhead Memorandum Figure 10-5 Memorandum of Agreement Figure 10-6 Memorandum of Understanding – First Page Figure 10-7 Memorandum of Understanding – Second Page

10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-2 10-2 10-3 10-4 10-5 10-6 10-7 10-8 10-9

CHAPTER 11 – BUSINESS LETTERS 11-1 - General 11-2 - Parts of a Business Letter and Format 1 Identification Symbols 2 Inside Address 3 Attention Line 4 Salutation Line 5 Subject Line 6 Body of the Letter 7 References and Enclosures 8 Complimentary Close 9 Signature Line 10 Enclosure Line 11 Separate Mailing

11-1 11-1 11-1 11-1 11-2 11-2 11-2 11-2 11-3 11-3 11-3 11-3 11-4

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June TITLE 12 13 14 15 Figure 11-1 Figure 11-2 Figure 11-3 Figure 11-4 Figure 11-5 Figure 11-6

“Copy To:” Line Outgoing Copies Identifying Second and Succeeding Pages Numbering Pages Business Letter Paragraph Formats Business Letter – First Page Business Letter – Second Page Business Letter For Window Envelopes Business Letter With An “Attention” Line Short Business Letter

CHAPTER 12 - EXECUTIVE CORRESPONDENCE 12-1 - General 12-2 - Processes 1 Correspondence Management 2 Assigning Action to Incoming Correspondence 3 Routing Changes 4 Due Dates 5 Extensions 6 Interims 7 Distribution 12-3 - General Guidelines for Preparing a Letter 1 Stationery 2 Format 3 Date Line 4 Complimentary Closing 5 Page Numbering 6 Congressional Committees or Subcommittees Correspondence 12-4- General Guidelines for Preparing a Memorandum 1 Action or Information (“Info”) Memorandums 2 Package Assembly Figure 12-1 SD Form 391 – DoD Correspondence Action Report Figure 12-2 Sample Interim Response for Incoming Correspondence Figure 12-3 Sample Interim Response for Congressional Correspondence Figure 12-4 Congressional Response, One Chairperson Figure 12-5 Congressional Response, Two Chairpersons Figure 12-6 Congressional Response, to a Chairman of a Select Committee Figure 12-7 Flag Stationery (7 x 9) - Secretary of the Navy Figure 12-8 Flag Stationery (5 x 7) - Chief of Naval Operations Figure 12-9 Action Memorandum Figure 12-10 Information Memorandum Figure 12-11 Coordination Page Figure 12-12 Standard Memorandum For

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12-1 12-1 12-1 12-1 12-2 12-2 12-2 12-2 12-3 12-3 12-3 12-3 12-5 12-5 12-5 12-5 12-6 12-6 12-7 12-9 12-10 12-11 12-12 12-13 12-14 12-15 12-16 12-17 12-18 12-19 12-20

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June TITLE APPENDIX A – Military Models of Address APPENDIX B – Civilian Models of Address APPENDIX C – Stationery Requirements APPENDIX D – Forms and Envelopes APPENDIX E – Index

PAGE A-1 B-1 C-1 D-1 E-1

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June REFERENCES REFERENCE SECNAVINST 5216.7 NATO Standardization Agreement (STANAG) Number 2066 SNDL (OPNAVINST 5400.45) MCO 5216.19 SECNAVINST 5730.5J

EO 9397 MCO 5215.1K GPO Style Manual SECNAV M-5210.1 SECNAV M-5210.2 SECNAV M-5510.36 SECNAVINST 5720.42F 5 U.S.C. §552a 28 U.S.C. §1074 SECNAVINST 5000.37 SECNAVINST 5239.3B USD P&R Memo OPNAVINST 5218.7C OPNAVINST 5222.1 DLM 4000.25, Vol 6 SECNAVINST 5211.5E SECNAVINST 5430.7Q MARADMIN 733/12, USMC SSN DoD Manual 5200.01 Vol 2 DoD Manual 5200.01 Vol 3 DoD Manual 5200.01 Vol 4 DoD Manual 5110.04 Vol 1 DoD Manual 5110.04 Vol 2

TITLE Department of the Navy Correspondence Management Program Format and Abbreviations in NATO Standardization Agreement

Standard Navy Distribution List Administration Action (AA) Form (NAVMC 10274, Rev. 3-86) Mission, Function, and Responsibilities of the Office of Legislative Affairs and Procedures for Handling Legislative Affairs and Congressional Relations Executive Order 9397 Marine Corps Directives Management Program U.S. Government Printing Office Style Manual Department of the Navy Records Management Program Manual Department of the Navy Standard Subject Identification Code (SSIC) Manual Department of the Navy Information Security Program Manual Department of the Navy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act of 1974 Federal Rules of Evidence Provision of the Department of the Navy Documentary Material Department of the Navy Information Assurance Policy Policy for Digital Signature Functionality and Acceptance, of 12 December 2006 Navy Official Mail Management Instructions Navy Taskers Business Rules Department of Defense Activity Address Directory (DoDAAD) Department of the Navy Privacy Act (PA) Program Assignment of Responsibilities and Authorities in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy Reduction in Use, Plan, Phase Three DoD Information Security Program: Marking of Classified Information DoD Information Security Program: Protection of Classified Information DoD Information Security Program: Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) DoD Manual for Written Material: Correspondence Management DoD Manual for Written Material: Examples and Reference Material

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

CHAPTER 1 Correspondence Management 1-1 Objective and Responsibilities 1. Objective. To prescribe standards for the management and preparation of correspondence throughout the Department of the Navy (DON). 2.

Responsibilities

a. The Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) shall administer the DON Correspondence Management Program and coordinate proposed changes to this manual with the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) and the Commandant of the Marine Corps (CMC). b. CNO and CMC shall administer the Correspondence Management Program within the Navy and Marine Corps, respectively. c. Commanding Officers and Heads of Activities shall establish a correspondence management program based on the requirements and guidance of this manual and ensure that: (1) Correspondence is screened, controlled, reviewed, and answered accordingly. (2) Correspondence practices are reviewed periodically to improve products and procedures. (3) The most economical communications media and techniques available are used. (4) Only essential correspondence is produced. d.

Administration Officers will:

(1) Screen incoming correspondence, assign action offices and due dates, and indicate any required concurrences. (2) Review outgoing correspondence for correct format and ensure prescribed procedures are followed.

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CHAPTER 2 Correspondence Standards and Procedures 2-1 Correspondence Standards 1. General. To a large degree, the image and effectiveness of the DON is portrayed by the tone, quality, and responsiveness of correspondence. Properly written correspondence that clearly and succinctly establishes a position, correctly and completely answers questions, and conveys the right message, all aid in the effective management and operation of the DON. In order to achieve this, correspondence must: a. Be neat in appearance, correctly formatted, error free, and grammatically correct. With the use of computers and advanced word processing software, the long-accepted practice of allowing legible “pen and ink” changes to a piece of correspondence is no longer acceptable. All correspondence shall be free of typographical errors and technically correct before it is signed. b. Avoid stereotyping men and women based on gender. Use pronouns and titles that are gender neutral. c. Do not write unless you must. A conversation in person, by telephone, or by electronic mail (e-mail) often saves two letters - the one you would have written and the other person’s response. Conversations are often better than correspondence for working out details. Confirm your conversation with a short memorandum (also referred to as “memo”) to the other person or a “Memorandum For The Record” if issues of importance or policy are agreed upon during the conversation. d. Always include a point of contact, return telephone number, and e-mail address when your correspondence might prompt a reply or inquiry. 2. North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). When writing to other NATO Forces, use the format and abbreviations in NATO Standardization Agreement (STANAG) Number 2066, Layout for Military Correspondence. STANAG Number 2066 is stocked by the Naval Aviation Supply Office (ASO), 5801 Tabor Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19120-5099. 2-2 Procedures 1.

Correspondence through Channels

a. Use the Chain of Command. Follow your chain of command when corresponding on substantive matters such as command decisions, policy issues, and official recommendations. (1) Address communications directly to the top official of the organization concerned by title. Show the action office by including the code or person’s title in parentheses immediately after the activity’s name.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June (2) Address correspondence concerning policy, management decisions, or other important matters via the chain of command or those commands, activities, or offices who have cognizance over the subject matter. This keeps intermediate commands informed and allows them to comment or approve as necessary. (3) A “Via” addressee will always forward official correspondence with an endorsement. The endorsement may be as simple as using the term “forwarded” when no opinion or comment is needed. A “Via” addressee may elect to take final action, divert the routing, or return the correspondence to the originator with appropriate explanation (chapter 9). (4) When there is no time to send important correspondence “Via” the chain of command and still meet a deadline, you may: (a) Send correspondence via the chain of command, with an advance copy to the “To” addressee. To alert all addressees to this unusual routing, repeat the action addressee by Standard Navy Distribution List (SNDL) short title in a “Copy to:” line and include the term “(advance)” after the short title (chapter 7). (b) Send correspondence directly to the “To” addressee with a concurrent copy to each intermediate addressee. Include in the text a statement like this: “A copy of this correspondence has been mailed directly to all addressees. Request “Via” addressees forward your endorsement(s) directly to....” Additionally, include the “Via” addressees by SNDL short titles in the “Copy to:” line. b.

Variations to Corresponding Through the Chain of Command

(1) Authorized subordinates of different activities may correspond directly with each other on routine matters. (2) List any cognizant addressees in the “Via:” line when it is determined that they should see a letter before it reaches the “to” addressee. (3) Include intermediate commands as “Copy to” addressees instead of “Via” addressees if you want them to see certain routine correspondence without having to endorse it. (4) Bypass intermediate commands that clearly have no interest in a letter’s content and no requirement to comment or act. c.

Individuals Writing to Higher Authority

(1) Navy Personnel. When writing to higher authority on a personal matter affecting the command, prepare your letter on plain bond paper in standard letter format. Examples include requests for retirement or resignation. Address the letter to the higher authority and send it “Via” your chain of command. Each “Via” addressee will prepare an endorsement and forward the correspondence to the next addressee.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June (2) Marine Corps Personnel. Use NAVMC 10274, Administrative Action (AA) Form, as prescribed in Marine Corps Order 5216.19 (MCO 5216.19). 2.

Take Advantage of Correspondence Shortcuts

a. E-mail. You can use e-mail for formal and informal correspondence. See chapter 4 for additional information. b. Facsimile Machines. Facsimile machines provide a fast and reliable means for sending official correspondence (chapter 5). c. Window Envelopes. Window envelopes eliminate the cost of addressing envelopes and the risk of putting letters in the wrong envelopes. To format letters for use with window envelopes see page 7-18. It should be noted that the window-envelope letter format has no “From:” line, so every copy that goes outside your activity must be on letterhead to show its origin. Do not use a window envelope for material that: (1) Is classified. (2) Involves national security. (3) Is of a personal nature. (4) Is sent to high-level officials. (5) Is FOUO. d. Form and Guide Letters. Periodically review correspondence for recurring, routine topics that can be addressed with a standard response. This standard response can be developed into a form or format letter to save time. See “Form and Guide Letters, an Information Resources Management Handbook by the General Services Administration (GSA).” This handbook is available through the Military Standard Requisitioning and Issue Procedures (MILSTRIP) system. (1) Use form letters when possible for routine matters that require no personal touch. Avoid form letters when expressing sympathy, apology, or appreciation. (2) Guide letters are pre-drafted standard letters that contain paragraphs that you may pick from to best fit the situation for which you are writing. Type or print them individually so they seem personally composed. 3. Coordination. Coordination is a critical step in the processing of outgoing correspondence. In order to ensure that a proper response or original letter is prepared, the originator will need to decide who needs to concur before the letter is signed. The originator will obtain appropriate concurrences, resolve major differences, and arrange for any needed retyping.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June a. Always coordinate during the drafting stage, before the correspondence is put into final form and submitted for signature. Ensure all coordination inputs are retained and filed with the file copy of the signed correspondence. b. Limit reviews to only those offices that have a substantial interest in the topic of the correspondence. c. In some cases, coordination can be done quickly and informally. Discussions by phone or in person or coordination via e-mail are often more efficient than formal written coordination, especially if a letter is brief and routine. 4. Submit Finished Products for Signature. Submit correspondence for signature in final form. Use double-spaced drafts only when changes are likely, perhaps because a subject is controversial or a policy statement needs precise wording. Alternatively, submit correspondence electronically, using track changes for review. Early guidance to writers about a signer’s preferences will reduce the frequency of changes. 5.

Signature Authority. Delegate signature authority to the lowest legal and practical level.

a. What the Commander/Commanding Officer/Officer in Charge Must Sign. The commander/commanding officer/officer in charge must personally sign documents that: (1) Establish policy. (2) Center on the command’s mission or efficiency and are addressed to higher authority. (3) Deal with certain aspects of military justice. (4) Are required by law or regulation. b.

Delegation of Signature Authority

(1) Delegation of signature authority may be made to military and civilian subordinates. All delegations of signature authority will be made in writing and signed by the person delegating the authority. If the delegation of authority is provided for in a directive, indicate this delegation in a generic reference to a billet or position title. For each individual that the delegation of authority applies, a letter so delegating that authority to the individual, by name, will be prepared. Include a brief outline of the scope of delegation, and if appropriate, authorize the individual to further delegate or sub-delegate the authority. In the absence of specific subdelegation guidance, delegated signature authority shall not be sub-delegated. (2) An individual who signs correspondence under delegated authority will use the term “By direction” typed below their name when signing documents under this delegated authority. Refer to chapter 7.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June EXAMPLE:

S. E. CHEEK By direction

c. Acting for the Commander/Commanding Officer/Officer in Charge. In the absence of the commander/commanding officer/officer in charge, and where specifically authorized by law or regulation, an officer who temporarily succeeds to command shall sign official correspondence with the term “Acting” typed below their name. EXAMPLE:

D. L. CISCEL Acting

d. Acting for an Official Who Signs by Title. When the signatory has been formally, but temporarily, appointed to replace an official who signs correspondence by title rather than “By direction,” the word “Acting” is typed below the typed name. EXAMPLE:

E. S. HOWARD Deputy Acting

e. Signing “For” an Absent Official. When correspondence is in final form and the official that would normally sign the correspondence is unable to do so, it is permissible to have the correspondence signed “for.” Rather than modifying the document to replace the signature line, an individual already delegated signature authority may sign the correspondence and hand write the term “for” before the typed name of the regular signing official. This method should be used only when a delay would fail to meet a crucial deadline. 6. Electronic Signatures. Commanders/commanding officers/officers in charge or civilian equivalents may authorize the use of an electronic signature that replicates his or her signature where personal signing of a piece of correspondence is impractical or the correspondence is of a routine nature. Personnel authorized to use a signature stamp of someone else’s signature shall pen their initials next to each signature they stamp to authenticate the stamp. Safeguard signature stamps from unauthorized use. 7. Incoming Correspondence Controls. Controlled correspondence is correspondence that requires some type of action, requires a response, or has long-term reference value. a. Date Stamp. Date stamp all incoming controlled correspondence on the day it arrives at the command. It is a good practice to date stamp all incoming correspondence, not just controlled correspondence. b. Restrict Assignment of Controls. Assign controls to only incoming mail that requires a response or has long-term reference value. Incoming action correspondence should be routed directly from the correspondence management office to the action office. If necessary, send duplicate copies to intermediate or coordinating offices.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 8. Replies to Correspondence a. Controlled Correspondence. Take prompt action on incoming correspondence that requires action or a response. Normally, correspondence should be answered within 10 working days or as prescribed by the immediate superior in command or by the tasking authority for the response. b.

Congressional Correspondence

(1) Reply directly to members of Congress if they contact your activity on routine and non-policy matters. When doubt exists over whether to release certain information, contact the Office of Legislative Affairs for guidance. (2) Correspondence from Congress shall be answered within 5 workdays of receipt. If a response (refer to chapter 12, page 12-3 for guidance on preparing an interim response) cannot be provided within 5 days, send an interim response that acknowledges receipt of the correspondence and provides an estimated date when a final response will be sent. Send the original response plus an additional copy when responding to a Congressional Inquiry. Also, send a blind copy of your final reply and substantive interim replies to: CHIEF OF LEGISLATIVE AFFAIRS NAVY DEPARTMENT WASHINGTON DC 20350-1000 (3) The opening line in the text of the response should read, “Thank you for your letter of [date], concerning [issue].” NOTE: The date format is month day, year (i.e., June 19, 2009). (4) When responding to a Congressional request, the closing line in the text of the response should read, “If I may be of any further assistance, please let me know.” (5) For more information on the handling of naval legislative affairs refer to SECNAVINST 5730.5J, Mission, Function, and Responsibilities of the Office of Legislative Affairs and Procedures for Handling Legislative Affairs and Congressional Relations. c. Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Requests. Answer Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests and Privacy Act requests within 20 workdays of receipt. If a response cannot be provided within 20 days, send an interim response that acknowledges receipt of the correspondence and provides an estimated date when a final response will be sent. Ensure all responses for FOIA information and Privacy Act information is reviewed by the base or command FOIA and Privacy Act Coordinator or the base or command Judge Advocate General. 9.

Outgoing Correspondence Controls

a. Impose Realistic Due Dates. When sending correspondence that requires a response or has action for the recipient, put a “reply by” due date in your letter only when you have a compelling reason to receive a response back by that date. When choosing the due date, allow

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June time for your letter to make its way up the chain of command to be signed, time for it to reach the people who will take action, time for them to gather information and prepare a response, and time for the response to make it back to you. b. Sign and Mail. Correspondence should be signed at intervals throughout the day. This method will keep signed correspondence from lingering overnight before it goes out. Arrange for a special trip to the mailroom for important correspondence that is signed after the last regular messenger and before the last mail dispatch. Alert the mailroom to the urgency. c. Trace Late Replies. If a response is not received within a reasonable amount of time or by the directed “reply by” date, follow up with the command that the correspondence was sent to. There are two methods to follow up on late correspondence: (1) Forward a copy of the original correspondence with the term “TRACER – [date]” written or stamped in the top margin. (2) Contact the command that the correspondence was originally sent to by phone or via e-mail. 10. Limit Use of Social Security Numbers (SSN). Memorandums, letters, spreadsheets, hard copy lists, electronic lists and surveys that collect, use, or maintain the SSN must meet acceptable use criteria and all other required Privacy Act considerations. Commands shall ensure that a review of these collections is conducted to determine that there is an authoritative basis and requirement for continued SSN use. If no authority or legal requirement exists, the collection and use of the SSN shall cease unless and until such authority is obtained. In certain environments where continuity of operations requires the use of the SSN in memorandums, letters, spreadsheets, hard copy lists, electronic lists or surveys, approval by local commanders can be granted. Effective 1 October 2015 all memorandums, letters, spreadsheets, hard copy or electronic lists and surveys that collect, use, or maintain the SSN shall be eliminated unless justification for continued use of the SSN can be verified. After 1 October 2015, potential exceptions shall undergo a documented review and justification process similar to the requirements for official forms and IT systems. Each exception must meet acceptable use criteria and all other required Privacy Act considerations. The list of Acceptable Use Criteria can be found at: http://www.doncio.navy.mil/ContentView.aspx?id=1833. 11. Identifying Navy and Marine Corps Personnel. This information is generally included in the subject line of the standard letter and in the first paragraph of the business letter. Fully identify the member when you first mention him or her. In later references to the member, simply use the rank or rate and last name. Do not capitalize every letter of a member's last name, except in the subject and signature lines. Capitalize the words "Sailor," "Marine" and “Service Member” when referring to members of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps. a.

Navy Requirements

(1) Abbreviated rank for officers and rate and warfare designator for enlisted personnel (e.g., AD1(AW), BM2(SW), CSSN(SS)) with no space between rank/rate and warfare designator,

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June (2) first name, middle initial if any, and last name, (3) staff corps abbreviation (if any), (4) branch of service, (5) the 10-digit Electronic Data Interchange Personal Identifier (EDIPI), referred to as the DoD ID number (should be used as a substitute for the SSN whenever possible). The last four digits of the SSN (when use of the SSN is justified), (6) the designator for an officer. EXAMPLE:

b.

ADM Michelle L. Howard, USN, XXX-XX-1234/1110 CAPT Vorrice J. Burks, USN, XXX-XX-1234/6410 LCDR Kenneth O. Allison, USN, XXX-XX-1234/3100 YN1 (SW) Robert L. Gabel, USN, 1234567890 YN2 Jazsmne Wilson, USN, XXX-XX-1234

Marine Corps Requirements (1) Unabbreviated grade, (2) first name, middle initial if any, and last name,

(3) the 10-digit Electronic Data Interchange Personal Identifier (EDIPI), referred to as the DoD ID number (should be used as a substitute for the SSN whenever possible). The last four digits of the SSN (when use of the SSN is justified), (4) military occupational specialty, and (5) branch of service. EXAMPLES:

Colonel Rodney C. Jones 0123456789/0430 USMC Major Timothy C. Beck 2013538698/0202 USMC Sergeant J. Keller 3096589299/0411 USMC

12. Letterhead Stationery. The standard size paper for all official letterhead stationery is 8-1/2 inches by 11 inches. Preprinted or computer generated letterhead is acceptable. Use white, plain bond paper. Refer to appendix C for stationery usage guidelines. a.

Use of Letterhead Stationery

(1) Use command letterhead stationery only for official matters of the command. Printing names of officials on letterhead stationery is prohibited. When using letterhead stationery, the “From:” line will always contain the title of the activity head and command name. The “From:” line will never contain the name of an individual.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June (2) Use command letterhead stationery when corresponding as a member of a DON approved board or committee. Indicate the letter is from the signing official by using the board or committee title in the “From:” line. (3) Do not use letterhead as personal stationery. For example, CDR Baker, captain of the ship’s basketball team, may not use it for matters involving the team. (4) The use of letterhead is authorized for commanders, commanding officers, officers in charge and directors or those who have signature authority for commands that are represented in the SNDL only. b.

Letterhead Format

(1) Letterhead stationery of the DON shall bear a one-inch in diameter seal of the DoD. Other seals, emblems, insignia, decorative or emblematic devices shall not be incorporated. See appendix C for additional guidance. (2) The letterhead begins with "DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY" centered on the fourth line from the top of the page. Center the activity's name, address, and nine-digit zip code on succeeding lines. Do not use abbreviations or punctuation in the address. EXAMPLE: DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS 2000 NAVY PENTAGON WASHINGTON DC 20350-2000

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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS 3000 MARINE CORPS PENTAGON WASHINGTON DC 20350-3000

(3) The address lines of letterhead for Navy activities shall conform to the SNDL address for that activity. Marine Corps activities shall comply with current Marine Corps Directives Management Program, MCO 5215.1K. 13. Enclosures. An enclosure can prevent a letter from becoming too detailed. Try to keep letters short, down to one page whenever possible, and use enclosures for lengthy explanations that cannot be avoided. An enclosure may include such things as manuals, publications, photocopies of correspondence, charts, etc. belonging to the specific DON organization only. No external documents area allowed to be enclosures. Consider making them references instead. 2-9

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June a. Marking Enclosures. Enclosures must be marked on the first page; however, you may mark all pages. An enclosure marking goes in the lower right corner, whether the text is arranged in portrait or landscape orientation. Type “Enclosure” and its number in parentheses. Arrange the typed pages lengthwise so they can be read from the right. EXAMPLE: (First page. The enclosure line is right justified.) Enclosure (1) EXAMPLE: (Succeeding pages. The enclosure line is right justified and the page number is centered and 2 lines below the enclosure line. Enclosure (1) 2 b. Numbering Pages of Enclosures. Number only second and later pages. If you have several different enclosures, number the pages of each independently. c. Sending Enclosures Separately. When size, weight, or other factors prevent sending an enclosure with a letter, send it separately and type “(sep cover)” after the enclosure’s description. EXAMPLE: Encl: (1) SECNAV M-5216.5 (sep cover) 14. Copies. Keep in mind the following when reproducing paper copies: a.

Use two-sided photocopying whenever possible.

b. If your letter must have “Copy to” addressees, include only those with a genuine need to know. Be realistic. c. Avoid “just in case” copies and whole batches of 10 or 15 copies when you can pinpoint the quantity precisely. d. Make the most of the “read, initial, and date” approach to information copies within your command. Circulate a single copy among those who need to read the document, and have them pass it on. e. Distribute copies by e-mail or put information copies on your local area network. If using either of these two methods, distribute the copy in approved File Access Mode (FAM) software application format. f. Avoid redundant file copies. Keep official command files in one central location to simplify access. Retain one official file copy of all outgoing correspondence.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 15. Expressing Military Time. Express military time in four digits based on the 24-hour clock. The time range is 0000 to 2359. The first two digits are the hour after midnight and the last two digits are the minutes. Do not use a colon to separate the hour from the minutes. EXAMPLE:

6:30 am in civilian time is 0630 in military time 3:45 pm in civilian time is 1545 in military time

16. Expressing Dates. There are three date formats allowed for use in Navy correspondence. The formats and their use are described below. In all date formats, the day is represented as one or two digits (do not use a zero preceding the numerals 1 through 9 when the day is single digit). The abbreviated format and the standard format are used when corresponding with other military organizations. The civilian format is used when corresponding with Congress, civilian agencies and businesses, and individuals. a. Abbreviated Format. The abbreviated format is only used as part of the sender’s symbol, or in the absence of the sender’s symbol, as the date for the letter. The format consists of a 1- or 2-digit day, the 3-letter abbreviation for the month, and the 2-digit abbreviated year. EXAMPLE:

15 Feb 09 25 Mar 09

b. Standard Format. The standard format is only used in the text of correspondence. The format consists of a 1- or 2-digit day, the spelled out month, and the 4-digit year. EXAMPLE:

5 May 2015 17 April 2015

c. Civilian Format. The civilian format is used as both the date of the correspondence and in the text. Do not use an abbreviated civilian format. The format consists of the spelled out month, the 1- or 2-digit day, a comma, and the 4-digit year. EXAMPLE:

January 14, 2014 December 25, 2014

17. Abbreviations and Acronyms. Abbreviations and acronyms are one of the most misused aspects of correspondence. When using abbreviations and acronyms the writer must consider the audience. What is familiar to you may not be familiar to the reader. The use of abbreviations and acronyms tends to detract from the content of the correspondence by causing the reader to have to pause, remember what the abbreviation or acronym means, then continue reading. a. Established abbreviations are acceptable in all but the most formal writing (e.g., directives) where every abbreviation and acronym must be identified no matter how well known. Some examples include “Mr.” (Mister), “Ms.” (Miss), “e.g”. (for example), “i.e.” (that is), and “etc.” (et cetera), “sonar” (sound navigation and ranging), and “radar” (radio detecting and ranging).

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June b.

Do not abbreviate military titles in the text of press reports.

c. If you use an acronym, spell it out first and then define the acronym in parentheses. After the initial definition, the acronym may be used without explanation. EXAMPLE:

North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)

SECOND USE: The NATO is holding a meeting in March. 18. Punctuating, Capitalizing, Spelling, Hyphenating, and Separating Words. For examples on punctuating, capitalizing, and spelling, refer to the Government Printing Office (GPO) Style Manual. Most word processors eliminate the need to divide words. If correspondence is produced manually, use the Word Division Book, a supplement to the GPO Style Manual or your dictionary for help with dividing words. Use hyphens sparingly; a slightly uneven right margin is preferred over hyphenated words. Never hyphenate a word at the end of a page. Avoid separating words in close association such as a person’s name, abbreviated titles, and dates. If a full name must be split, do so after the first name when there is no initial, or after the initial. Never split the name of a ship. 19. Proofreading. Proofread correspondence several times and check it carefully to ensure it has been correctly prepared. A recommended method of proofreading is: a.

Check format first. Do not read for substance until you are sure everything else is right.

b.

Look at the framework of the correspondence: (1) Is letterhead correct/straight? (2) Are the margins 1 inch? (3) Are page numbers centered 1/2 inch from the bottom of the page? (4) Is there enough/too much room for the date? (5) Are paragraphs aligned/indented properly? (6) Are paragraphs sequentially numbered/lettered? (7) Are enclosure markings correct? (8) Are more than three lines hyphenated, and are successive lines hyphenated? (9) Is there enough room for the signature line? (10) Is the header margin 1 inch from the top of the page?

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June (11) Is the footer margin ½ inch from the bottom of the page? c. Next, look for typographical errors, misspelled words, improper punctuation, improper spacing, and incorrect grammar: (1) Read slowly. Look at each word separately. (2) Look up all hyphenated words you are not sure of. (3) When using a word processing program, use spell check and grammar check; however, never solely depend on this method. Utilize spell check and grammar check as an additional tool. d.

Lastly, read for content.

20. Typeface. For text, use 10 to 12 point font size. Times New Roman 12-point is the preferred font style and size for official correspondence, but Courier New may be used for informal correspondence. Bold, underline, script, and italics may be used for occasional emphasis, but not for entire letters. 21. Color of Ink. Suggested colors of ink for editing of correspondence: Activity Head (RED), Deputy/Executive Officer (GREEN), Heads of Administration (PURPLE), Heads of all other Departments (BLUE). Only use black or blue-black ink to sign correspondence. Photocopiers pick up these colors well.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

CHAPTER 3 Electronic Records 3-1 General. An electronic record is any information that is recorded in a form that only a computer can process and that satisfies the definition of a Federal record (SECNAV M-5210.1 Department of the Navy Records Management Manual, part I, paragraph 17) -- information made or received in connection with the transaction of public business and preserved or appropriate for presentation as evidence of the organization, functions, policies, decisions, operations, etc, or because of its information value. Electronic documents, including e-mails, are Federal records to the same extent as their paper counterparts would be. In practice, there is no difference between managing electronic and paper records. 3-2 Procedures 1. Creation. Before a document is created on an electronic records system that will maintain the official file copy, each document must be identified sufficiently to enable authorized personnel to retrieve, protect, and dispose of it. When feasible, create the electronic record within a DoD certified electronic Records Management Application (RMA), such as Hewlett Packard Total Records Information Management (TRIM) Context, or another DON approved RMA, using procedures established for record creation within the RMA. 2. Naming Files. Naming electronic files resembles labeling paper file folders. When naming subdirectories or “folders,” use the Standard Subject Identification Code (SSIC) (SECNAV M5210.2, Department of the Navy Standard Subject Identification Code (SSIC) Manual) and any logical combination of alphanumeric characters permitted by the operating system and descriptive of the series. For example, a subdirectory labeled 5240 would show “General Administration and Management” files containing correspondence on industrial methods that are destroyed after 5 years. Identifying information for each document may include the office of origin, the SSIC, key words for retrieval, addressee (if any), signature, originator, date, authorized disposition (coded or otherwise), and security classification (if applicable). Ensure that electronically maintained records can be correlated with related records on paper, microform, or other media. When creating within, or transferring to, an approved RMA, comply with specific naming, identification and tracking requirements established for the RMA. 3.

Maintenance

a. Electronic records that are not created within an approved RMA, or an Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) within the required RM functionality should be transferred to one as soon as practicable within 6 months of the record creation date. However, electronic records whose disposition schedule permits destruction within 6 months of the date the record was created need not be transferred to, or maintained within, an approved RMA if destroyed within that 6 month period. Once an electronic record is within an approved RMA, adhere to the maintenance requirements established for that RMA. Pending transfer into an approved RMA, or when an approved RMA is not available, adhere to the procedures in paragraphs 3b through 3d below to protect electronic records.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June b. Make backup copies of files at least once a week. Do not use removable media storage devices for long-term storage of permanent or unscheduled records because removable media storage devices are vulnerable to mishandling and data loss is common. When removable media storage devices are the only backup medium available, use them for temporary storage only. If possible, store the backup media in a separate area from the source data to provide additional insurance against data loss. As noted in the preceding paragraph, these backup procedures are not required for an electronic record maintained in an approved RMA. c. Equipment failure and power outages are additional causes of data loss. Save files frequently. When using a word processing program, set the auto save feature to every 5 minutes. d. Store frequently used files conveniently for immediate access. Store less frequently used files on disk or other media. e. Account, control, and destroy classified information under the guidelines contained in the DoDM 5200.01, Volume 3. Be sure the records you maintain are necessary and pertinent. Appropriately destroy non-essential records. 4.

Restrictions

a. FOIA. The FOIA allows any person to seek access to records held by a Government agency. See SECNAVINST 5720.42F, Department of the Navy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), for information on processing requests. b. Privacy Act. The purpose of the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. §552a) is to balance the Government’s need to maintain information about individuals with the rights of individuals to be protected against unwarranted invasion of their privacy stemming from Federal agencies’ collection, maintenance, use, and disclosure of personal information about them. As such, limit access to personal data and other restricted documents. c. Electronic Records as Evidence. Under the Federal Rules of Evidence (28 U.S.C. §1074), electronic records are acceptable to the courts as evidence; however, each judge is free to dismiss evidence on the basis of the court’s independent evaluation. 5.

Disposition

a. Identify and schedule electronic versions of official records for disposition. Refer to SECNAV M-5210.1. b. Erase electronic files used only as backup files or that only contain passing information once a hard copy has been generated or when the data is no longer needed.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

CHAPTER 4 Electronic Mail 4-1 General. E-mail allows individuals and activities to exchange information by computer. You may use it for informal communications in place of telephone calls or to transmit formal correspondence. The Defense Data Network must be used for long-haul data communications support, unless the host system is waived. Correspondence you send by e-mail must be for official Government business or for authorized purposes (as defined by the Joint Ethics Regulations section 2-301 (DoD 5500.7-R)). E-mails are subject to legal discovery, therefore, care should be taken to ensure e-mails are created and managed appropriately per SECNAVINST 5000.37. 4-2 Procedures 1. Managing E-mail. Activities shall establish procedures for accessing and managing e-mail. Among other things, they must: a.

Prohibit users from sharing mailboxes or passwords.

b.

Encourage users to check their mailboxes frequently, but at least twice a day.

c. If you are absent for more than 3 business days, ensure you annotate that in your automated e-mail response. Provide a point of contact for e-mails requiring immediate response. d.

Provide for periodic review of e-mail files to purge, retain, or file, as appropriate.

2. Formal Correspondence. Activity heads may authorize the use of e-mail to correspond formally. Your delegation of signature authority for correspondence is also your release authority for e-mail. When corresponding formally: a. Use standard DON correspondence formats including an SSIC, serial number, date, and signature authority. b.

Type in your letterhead information to identify the originating organization.

c. Complimentary Closing. The following list of suggested complimentary closings for email communication is not all inclusive: “Sincerely yours” or “With great respect” (Civilians) “Respectfully” (Junior in rank to signer), and “Very respectfully” (Senior in rank to signer). “Respectfully” and “Very respectfully” may be abbreviated in a reply to an initial e-mail (“V/r,” and “R/,”). d.

Use “/s/” in place of the signature.

EXAMPLE:

/s/ S. E. CHEEK By direction 4-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June e. f.

Follow your chain of command. Transmit only from your authorized e-mail address.

g. Request acknowledgement of receipt in the original communication when it is required. Acknowledgement may be via e-mail. h. Keep a copy of any formal correspondence sent by e-mail as your activity’s file copy (see paragraph 5 below). 3. Informal Correspondence. There are no specific guidelines for informal correspondence; however, keep it brief, use good taste, and observe traditional customs and courtesies. Do not use a complete signature line to identify the sender, but the sender must be fully identified. You may omit the signature line entirely if your computer automatically identifies the sender. 4.

Security and Privacy Issues

a. Do not send classified information by e-mail unless the system, including the network, is protected for the highest level of classified information you are sending. Refer to SECNAVINST 5239.3B, Department of the Navy Information Assurance Policy, and SECNAVINST 5211.5E, Department of the Navy Privacy Act (PA) Program, for additional guidance on automated information system security and DoDM 5200.01, Volume 2, DoD Information Security Program: Marking of Classified Information, for proper marking and DoDM 5200.01, Volume 3, DoD Information Security Program: Protection of Classified Information, for safeguarding. b. Follow established guidelines and exercise good judgment in transmitting sensitive information such as: (1) Government information that would be of value to an adversary. (2) Pre-award contractual information, budget information, or authorization data. (3) Non-government information such as trade secrets the Government agreed to keep confidential. (4) “For Official Use Only” information. (5) When transmitting Personally Identifiable Information (PII) via e-mail, the e-mail must be digitally signed and encrypted, all recipients must have an official need to know, and the e-mail must be marked in accordance with SECNAVINST 5211.5E. 5. Records Management. E-mail lacks the built-in records management controls of the Naval Computer and Telecommunications System (NCTS) and the Automatic Digital Network (AUTODIN). An e-mail can be considered a record (see chapter 3, section 3-1, of this manual

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June for the definition of an electronic record). Activities will control the creation, use, maintenance, and disposition of e-mail records. Follow chapter 3 of this manual and SECNAV M-5210.1. 6. Digital Signatures. DON policy for digital signatures continues to evolve. However, two uses of digital signature have been established. In accordance with SECNAVINST 5239.3B, commanders of DON organizations shall ensure e-mail messages requiring either message integrity or non-repudiation are digitally signed using DoD Public Key Infrastructure (PKI). All e-mail containing an attachment or embedded active content must be digitally signed. Per DoD guidance (USD P&R Memo, Policy for Digital Signature Functionality and Acceptance, of 12 December 2006), digital signatures will be recognized and accepted as valid for all human resource management documents.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

CHAPTER 5 Facsimile Transmission Services 5-1 General. Facsimile machines provide a rapid and reliable alternative to the various mail systems for the transmission of documents. Whatever you send by facsimile must be for official Government business or for authorized purposes (as defined by the Joint Ethics Regulations section 2-301 (DoD 5500.7-R.)). 5-2 Procedures 1.

Managing Facsimile Services

a. Limit transmissions requiring use of long distance services to time sensitive communications only. b. Send multiple documents that are going to the same location in batches rather than one at a time. c. Facsimile transmission cover sheets add to the cost of each transmission. Keep cover sheets as simple and functional as possible, with only essential information. Avoid graphics and heavy gray or black areas because they slow transmissions and increase costs. (1) Instead of using separate cover sheets when sending material via facsimile transmission, commands are encouraged to procure a rubber stamp (1 inch by 4 inches) formatted as follows: FROM:______________________

TO:________________________

ACTIVITY:___________________

ACTIVITY:___________________

PHONE #:__________________

PHONE #:__________________

# OF PAGES:_______________

# OF PAGES:_______________

Replace thermal paper facsimiles that are records with photocopies.

(2) Place the stamp at either the top, bottom, or side margin. This will eliminate the need for an extra page and save money, material, labor, energy, and time. 2.

Security and Privacy Issues

a. Do not transmit classified data via unsecured facsimile equipment. See DoDM 5200.01, Volume 3 and SECNAVINST 5211.5E, Department of the Navy Privacy Act (PA) Program, for more information regarding transmitting classified material via facsimile equipment. b. The use of fax machines to send information containing the SSN and other PII by DON personnel is prohibited except under the following circumstances: (1) When another more secure means of transmitting PII is not practical. 5-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June (2) When a process outside of DON control requires faxing to activities such as the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS), TRICARE, the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC), etc. (3) In cases where operational necessity requires expeditious handling. (4) When faxing PII related to internal government operations, i.e., office phone number, rank, job title, etc. (5) When sending a fax, utilize a Privacy Act Data Cover Sheet (DD Form 2923) and verify receipt by the correct addressee. (6) External customers such as Veterans, Air Force and Army personnel, dependents, and retirees may continue to fax documents containing the SSN to DON activities but shall be strongly encouraged to use an alternative means. Alternatives to the use of fax machines include: (a) Sending documents via the United States Postal Service. (b) Scanned documents transmitted using a secure means such as encrypted e-mails. c. Follow established guidelines and exercise good judgment in transmitting sensitive information. See page 4-2, paragraph 4. 3.

Records Management

a. Correspondence transmitted via a facsimile machine has the same authority as if it were the original. Normally the original is retained by the sending activity. The sender determines whether the correspondence is important enough to forward the original. If the original is forwarded, the advance copy may become non-record material or it may be part of a greater records “collection” or package and therefore must be managed accordingly. Non-record material may be destroyed by the receiving office once the original is received. b. Activities that receive many official documents via facsimile may need to procure a rubber stamp such as the one shown below to assist in identifying documents that are to be retained for record purposes.

ACTION COPY DO NOT DESTROY 5-2

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

CHAPTER 6 Postal Standards 6-1 General. This chapter includes U.S. Postal Service (USPS) standards, DoD and Navy policies pertaining to official mail. For additional information, refer to OPNAVINST 5218.7C, Navy Official Mail Management Instructions. 6-2 Procedures 1. Choosing the Right Size Envelope or Container. Use envelopes or mailing containers only slightly larger than the material being mailed and of sufficient strength to protect the contents during the mail handling process. Envelopes should be no smaller than 3 1/2 inches by 5 inches and no larger than 6 1/8 inches by 11 1/2 inches, if possible. Mail smaller than 3 1/2 inches by 5 inches cannot be mailed. You can send mail that is larger than 6 1/8 inches by 11 1/2 inches; however, it must bypass automated equipment and be processed through slower and less efficient methods. Reduce mailing expenses by following these steps: a. Use standard letter size (number 10) envelopes whenever possible. Generally, documents with six or less pages should be folded and mailed in a letter size envelope rather than a larger size envelope. See figure 6-1. The USPS automated processing equipment cannot handle envelopes thicker than 1/4 inch. b. Use large envelopes for material that cannot be folded (photographs, diplomas, negatives, and bulk material). c. Consolidate by class, all mail generated on the same day and destined for the same addressee. d. Check with your mailroom for activities/agencies within the local area that are serviced by couriers, as this requires no postage. 2. Sources of Address Information. Address official Navy mail to the command or activity addresses in: a.

SNDL (http://doni.documentservices.dla.mil/sndl.aspx)

b. Active Marine Link, Personal and Family Link, Military Personnel Services Link, Postal Link, under reference) (http://www.manpower.usmc.mil/portal/page/portal/M_RA_HOME) c. Department of Defense Activity Address Directory (DoDAAD), DLM 4000.25, Vol. 6 (http://www2.dla.mil/j-6/dlmso/elibrary/Manuals/DLM/V6/Volume6.pdf)

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 3. Delivery and Return Address Formats a.

Requirements (1) Be sure you have the correct address and use organizational codes whenever

possible. (2) Type, or print by other mechanical means, the delivery address in uppercase letters. Use no punctuation except for the hyphen in the ZIP+4 code. Use black or blue-black ribbon or ink. The return address may be preprinted, typewritten, or rubber stamped. (3) If available, use the ZIP+4 code and USPS acceptable abbreviations. Figure 6-2 is a listing of USPS acceptable abbreviations for streets and words that often appear in the names of places. A listing of acceptable USPS two-letter State and territory abbreviations appears in figure 6-3. (4) Do not use print styles that: (a) Incorporate proportional spacing, (b) Have characters that overlap, (c) Have highly styled characters such as script, italics, artistic, etc., or (d) Have dots that do not touch to form each letter (dot matrix styles). (5) Limit official mail addresses (both delivery and return) to five lines. Format with a uniform left margin and a maximum of 47 characters per line, including spaces. (6) Center the address and single-space each line, blocked one below the other. Do not indent lines. Leave at least a l-inch margin from the left and right edges of the envelope and at least 5/8 inch from the bottom of the envelope. The last line of the address should be no lower than 5/8 inch and the top line of the address should be no higher than 2 1/4 inches from the bottom of the envelope. Include all required information within addressee and return addressee areas. Do not type in the margins or clear area. Do not overlap the return address in the delivery address area. Be careful not to slant the address. The lines must be parallel to the top and bottom edges of the envelope. Refer to figure 6-4 for placement and format. b.

Mail Sent Within the DoD. Prepare the address as follows:

(1) Non-address Data Line - First Line (Optional). Use this to address official correspondence to the official in charge, such as commanding officer, director, commander, etc. (2) Information/Attention Line - Second Line (Optional). If known, place the name of the action officer, a specific individual, or section and code here.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June (3) Name of Recipient Line - Third Line. Place the activity short title (less the city and state) here. (4) Delivery Address Line - Fourth Line. Place either a street address or post office box number here. Use the word “SUITE” to designate locations within a building. See figure 6-2 for acceptable USPS street and places abbreviations. (5) Post Office Line - Fifth Line. Place the city, state, and ZIP+4 code (in that order) here. Use the standard two-letter abbreviations shown in figure 6-3. 4. Mail Classifications. Select the class of mail service that meets the security, accountability, and delivery requirements of the material being shipped at the most economical cost. See OPNAVINST 5218.7C for the definitions of classes of mail and special supplemental postal services. 5. Mail Markings. Mark all mail, except first-class mail in a standard letter size (number 10) envelope, with the class of mail service you desire. Place the marking, i.e., first-class, priority, etc., in the upper right corner, about 1/4 inch below the postage meter imprint, mail stamp, or permit imprint. Mailings without a class of mail marking, except those in a number 10 envelope, will be assumed to contain no first-class material and will be sent as the lowest possible class of service.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Number 6-3/4 Envelopes (3 5/8” X 6 ½”) ¼”

FIRST, FOLD LEAVING ¼” AT TOP

THEN, FOLD TWICE LEAVING ¼” AT RIGHT ¼”

¼”

Number 10 Envelope (4 1/8” X 9 ½”)

Window Envelope

FIGURE 6-1. FOLDING TECHNIQUES

6-4

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Academy Agency Airport Annex Arcade Avenue Bayou Beach Bend Bluff Bottom Boulevard Branch Bridge Brook Burg Bypass Camp Canyon Cape Causeway Center Circle Cliffs Club College Corner Corners Court Courts Cove Creek Crescent Crossing Dale Dam Deport Divide Drive East Estates Expressway Extension Fall Falls Ferry Field Fields Flats Ford Forest Forge Fork

ACAD AGNCY ARPRT ANX ARC AVE BYU BCH BND BLF BTM BLVD BR BRG BRK BG BYP CP CYN CPE CSWY CTR CIR CLFS CLB CLG COR CORS CT CTS CV CRK CRES XING DL DM DPO DV DR E EST EXPY EXT FALL FLS FRY FLD FLDS FLT FRD FRST FRG FRK

Fort Freeway Gardens Gateway Glen Green Grove Harbor Haven Heights High Highway Hill Hills Hollow Hospital Inlet Institute Island Islands Isle Junction Key Knolls Lake Lakes Landing Lane Light Loaf Locks Lodge Loop Lower Manor Meadows Mill Mills Mission Mount Mountain National Neck North Orchard Oval Park Parkway Pass Path Pike Piller Pines

FT FWY GDNS GTWY GLN GRN GRV HBR HVN HTS HI HWY HL HLS HOLW HOSP INLT INST IS ISS ISLE JCT KY KNLS LK LKS LNDG LN LGT LF LCKS LDG LOOP LWR MNR MDWS ML MLS MSN MT MTN NAT NCK N ORCH OVAL PARK PKY PASS PATH PIKE PLR PNES

Place Plain Plains Plaza Point Port Prairie Radial Ranch Rapids Rest Ridge River Road Row Run Rural Saint School Shoal Shoals Shore Shores South Spring Springs Spur Square Station Stravenue Stream Street Suite Summit Terrace Trace Track Trail Trailer Tunnel Turnpike Union University Valley Viaduct View Village Ville Vista Walk Water Way Wells West

FIGURE 6-2. STANDARD ADDRESS ABBREVIATIONS 6-5

PL PLN PLNS PLZ PT PRT PR RADL RNCH RPDS RST RDG RIV RD ROW RUN R ST SCH SHL SHLS SHR SHRS S SPG SPGS SPUR SQ STA STRA STRM ST STE SMT TER TRCE TRAK TRL TRLR TUNL TPKE UN UNIV VLY VIA VW VLG VL VIS WALK WTR WAY WLS W

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas American Samoa California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Federated States of Micronesia Florida Georgia Guam Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Marshall Island Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri

AL AK AZ AR AS CA CO CT DE DC FM FL GA GU HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MH MD MA MI MN MS MO

Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Northern Mariana Island Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Palau Pennsylvania Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Virgin Islands Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

FIGURE 6-3. STATE/TERRITORY ABBREVIATIONS

6-6

MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND MP OH OK OR PW PA PR RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA VI WA WV WI WY

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ACTIVITY SHORT TITLE ATTN STREET ADDRESS CITY STATE XXXXX-XXXX

RETURN POSTAGE AREA

ADDRESS AREA

OFFICIAL BUSINESS ADDRESS AREA

1 inch

COMMANDING OFFICER ATTN MR SIMPSON CODE 10 ACTIVITY SHORT TITLE STREET ADDRESS SUITE # CITY STATE XXXXX-XXXX 2 inch

(a)

1 inch

USPS USE ONLY

5/8 inch CLEAR AREA 4 ½”

EXAMPLES: Ashore COMMANDING OFFICER ATTN LT JAY BREWER ACTIVITIY SHORT TITLE STREET ADDRESS SUITE # CITY STATE XXXXX-XXXX Afloat COMMANDING OFFICER ATTN FOOD SERVICE OFFICER USS GERMANTOWN LSD 42 UNIT 100123 BOX 1 FPO AP 96666 Afloat Official COMMANDING OFFICER ATTN YNC JAMES T SLOAN USS GERMANTOWN LSD 42 UNIT 100123 BOX 1 FPO AP 96666

(Title of Official in Charge) (Action Officer, Organizational Code) (Activity Short Title (less City & State) (Street Address, Suite Number) (City State ZIP+4) (Title of Official in Charge) (Action Officer, Organizational Code) (Name of Ship or Squadron) (Fleet Post Office and its number)

(Addressee’s Name) (Name of Ship or Squadron) (Box 1 will always be for Official Mail) (Fleet Post Office and its number)

Afloat Official Using Personal Address YNC CHRISTOPHER A BYARD USS GERMANTOWN LSD 42 UNIT 100123 BOX ___ (BOX NUMBER WILL BE ASSIGNED) FPO AP 96666 Personal/Business/Bldg Name MR STEVEN HOOD (Personal Name) AMERICAN AIRLINES CORP (Business Name) SKYSCRAPER BLDG 2 (Building Name and Number) 12345 S RUNWAY ST (Street Address) SKYLINE WA 54321-0123 (City State ZIP+4)

FIGURE 6-4. ENVELOPE ADDRESSING STANDARDS

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Standard Street Address MR BERNARD G WATSON 112 45TH AVE E APT 3 SAVANNAH GA 23456-5431

(Addressee’s Name) (Street Address, Apartment Number) (City State ZIP+4)

Foreign Addresses MRS ELAINE BOATWRIGHT 101 INTERNATIONAL CIR LONDON WIPGHQ ENGLAND

(Addressee’s Name) (Street Address) (City, Postal Delivery Zone (If any) (County Name)

FIGURE 6-4. ENVELOPE ADDRESSING STANDARDS 6-8

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

CHAPTER 7 Correspondence Formats 7-1 Requirements 1. Use the standard letter format or one of its variations to correspond officially within or outside the DoD. 2. The format of the standard letter, with slight variations, sets the pattern for joint letters, multiple-address letters, endorsements, directives, memoranda, etc. Refer to the two-page letter illustrations at figures 7-1 and 7-2. Figure 7-3 contains the formatting techniques to use when preparing a standard letter for use with a window envelope. Figure 7-4 is an example of a joint letter for joint release by two commands. 3. The person whose title appears in the “To:” line is the action addressee. Aside from its one action addressee, the standard letter may have any number of “Via” addressees, “Copy to” addressees, or both. See chapter 8 to prepare a letter with more than one action addressee. 7-2 Format 1. Margins. Allow l-inch top, bottom, left, and right margins on each page. On letterhead paper, typing starts more than 1-inch from the top when the letterhead is printed. Do not right, center, or full justify text or use proportional spacing. Per OPNAVINST 5215.17, directives headers are 1 inch and footers are .5 inches. 2. Font. Spacing and alignment of headings following the “From:” line will vary based upon the font utilized. The instructions and examples provided below are typed using the preferred font of Times New Roman. 3. Sender’s Symbols. If “in reply refer to” is printed on your activity’s letterhead paper, type the Standard Subject Identification Code (SSIC) on the next line. If “in reply refer to” is not printed on your activity’s letterhead paper, type the SSIC on the second line below the letterhead, starting 2 inches or more from the right edge of the paper. The longest line of the sender’s symbol should end close to the right margin. a.

Authorized Sender’s Symbols. A sender’s symbol for a standard letter has three parts:

(1) Standard Subject Identification Code. An SSIC is a four- or five-digit number which represent a document’s subject. They are used to categorize information by subject and are required on all Navy and Marine Corps messages, directives, forms, and reports. To find the SSIC that most closely represents the subject, refer to SECNAV M-5210.2. (2) Originator’s Code, By Itself or in a Serial Number. The originator’s code, with or without the serial number, is the originator's office symbol or the hull number of a ship. Each command or activity will determine makeup of the originator’s code.

7-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June (a) Originator’s Code Without Serial Numbers. Start the originator’s code immediately under the SSIC. Below are examples of two SSICs with only the originator’s code: EXAMPLE:

5216 Code 13

5800 N00J

(b) Originator’s Code With Serial Numbers. All classified correspondence created by your activity must be given a serial number. A serial number is not required on unclassified correspondence. Whether unclassified correspondence is serialized or not depends on local practice. Volume is the major criterion. An activity that produces little correspondence, and all of it is unclassified, probably does not need to use serial numbers. The added control must be weighed against the added complications of typing or stamping serial numbers. An activity that uses serial numbers shall start a new sequence of numbers at the beginning of each calendar year and assigns numbers consecutively beginning with 001. (c) Classified Markings. Start the originator’s code immediately under the SSIC followed by a forward slash with no spaces before or after the slash, the classification (if classified) (FOUO for For Official Use Only, C for Confidential, S for Secret, TS for Top Secret), and then the next unused serial number for the current calendar year. Below are two examples of a sender’s symbol using the originator’s code and serial number: EXAMPLE:

5216 Ser Code 13/271

5800 Ser N00J/S20

(3) Date. Date a letter on the same day it is signed. Do not type the date when preparing correspondence that will be signed on a later date. Use the abbreviated date format discussed in chapter 2, page 2-11. EXAMPLE:

5216 Ser Code 13/271 7 Sep 06

b. Exceptions to Requirements for Using Identification Symbols. Local practices determine how to use identification symbols in the following cases: (1) Letters to members of Congress or heads of Government agencies. (2) Letters of praise or condolence. c. Unauthorized Identification Symbols. Numbers assigned by word processing centers and the initials of writers and typists are unauthorized as identification symbols; however, they may be included on file copies as part of the drafter’s identification. 4. Classified Correspondence. You must have the appropriate security eligibility and access, and be trained as a derivative classifier on the marking/handling requirements prior to preparing

7-2

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June classified correspondence. An example of a classified letter is provided in figure 7-5. Refer to DoDM 5200.01, Volume 2 for additional information on marking and handling classified correspondence. 5.

For Official Use Only

a. For Official Use Only (FOUO) applies to information that is not classified, but which may be withheld from the public under the FOIA. b. Correspondence determined to contain FOUO information shall be marked per the requirements in DoDM 5200.01, Volume 4, Enclosure 3, Section 2.c. 6.

“From:” Line

a. General. Every standard letter must have a “From:” line, except a letter that will be used with a window envelope. To prepare a letter for a window envelope, follow figure 7-3. As a general rule, the “From:” line is composed of the activity head’s title and the activity’s name. Refer to the three publications listed below for the correct names and mailing addresses for DON and DoD activities. (1) SNDL (2) Active Marine Link, Personal and Family Link, Military Personnel Services Link, Postal Link under reference. (3) DoDAAD, DoD Manual 4000.25-6-M. b. Converting an SNDL Address to a “From:” Line Address. The “From:” line gives more than a title, but less than a full mailing address. Include enough information to distinguish your activity from other activities that may have the same name, but are in a different city or country. In some cases a one-of-kind title adequately identifies an activity and the location is unnecessary (e.g., “Secretary of the Navy”). The below examples show various way of converting SNDL addresses to “From:” line addresses. EXAMPLE: SNDL Entry

From Line

COMMANDING OFFICER NAVAL STATION NORFOLK VA 23511-6000

Commanding Officer, Naval Station, Norfolk

COMMANDING OFFICER USS CHUNG-HOON (DDG 93) FPO AP 96662-1302

Commanding Officer, USS CHUNG-HOON (DDG 93)

7-3

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June COMMANDING OFFICER VP 45 UNIT 60172 FPO AA 34099-5918

Commanding Officer, Patrol Squadron 45

c. Format. Type “From:” at the left margin on the second line below the date line. The text begins two spaces after the colon. If the entry is longer than one line, start the second line under the first word after the heading. EXAMPLE: From: Commanding Officer, USS BLUE RIDGE (LCC 19) From: Commanding Officer, Naval Recruiting District Minneapolis, 212 3rd Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55401-2592 d. Avoid Multiple Titles. If your commanding officer has more than one title, choose the title that corresponds with the content of the letter. 7.

“To:” Line

a. General. Address all correspondence to the activity head of an activity. Include the office code or person’s title that will act on your letter in parentheses, if known. If the office code is composed of only numbers, add the word “Code” before the numbers. Do not add the word “Code” before an office code that starts with a letter (e.g., “N” or “SUP”). Because frequent turnover in personnel can result in misrouted mail, avoid using the name of an individual in the “To:” line. You may use the complete mailing address and ZIP+4 code if you want the address for a record. If you will be using a window envelope, follow figure 7-3. b. Format. Type “To:” at the left margin on the first line under the “From:” line (do not skip a line). Six spaces follow the colon. EXAMPLE: From: Chief of Naval Operations To: Commanding Officer, USS JOHN C STENNIS (CVN 74) From: Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Financial Management and Comptroller) To: Chief of Naval Reserve From: Commanding Officer, Naval Station, San Diego (Code 10) To: Officer in Charge, Personnel Support Activity Detachment, China Lake, CA 93555-6001

7-4

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 8. “Via:” Line a. General. Use a “Via:” line when one or more activities outside of your activity should review a letter before it reaches the action addressee. The format for the “Via:” line is the same as for the “From:” line and “To:” line discussed in paragraphs 5 and 6 above. b. Format. Type “Via:” at the left margin on the first line below the “To:” line. Five spaces follow the colon. If the entry is longer than one line, start the second line under the first word after the heading. EXAMPLE: From: Chief of Naval Operations To: Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Via: Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet c. Numbering Via Addressees. Number “Via” addressees if two or more are listed. Follow the chain of command. Routing starts with the addressee listed first. EXAMPLE: From: Commander, Destroyer Squadron 23 To: Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Via: (1) Commander, Carrier Strike Group NINE (2) Commander, U.S. THIRD Fleet (3) Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (4) Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet d. When one or more activities outside of your activity should review a letter before it reaches the action addressee, and TV-5 Taskers is the mechanism being used for routing the correspondence, do not use a “Via:” line. Prepare the appropriate Action Memorandum as outlined on page 12-4 of this manual. 9.

Subject Line

a. General. The subject line consists of a sentence fragment that tells readers what the letter is about. Use normal word order and capitalize every letter after the colon. In correspondence, do not use acronyms in the subject line. If the subject appears elsewhere in the text of the letter, capitalize it using the “Title Case” format. When replying to a letter, repeat the subject of the incoming correspondence in the subject line, unless a change is essential for clarity. b. Format. Type “Subj:” at the left margin on the second line under the last line of the previous heading. Three spaces follow the colon. If the entry is longer than one line, align the second line under the first word after the heading.

7-5

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June EXAMPLE: Subj: PROGRAM ACQUISITION PROCESS FOR THE ADVANCED SEA-BASED TARGET PROFILING RADAR 10. Reference Line a. General. Use only those references that bear directly on the subject at hand. Avoid unnecessary or complicated references. Many letters may not need a reference, while others are complete with a reference to only the latest communication in a series. List references in the order they appear in the text. Always mention cited references in the text. Additionally, when citing a reference it is not necessary to include the subject of the reference. However, the subject may be included, following all other required elements, if it aids in clarifying or better identifying the reference. b. Avoiding Most NOTAL References. A not-to-all (NOTAL) reference is a document that some addressees neither hold nor need. Avoid NOTAL references whenever possible. If a NOTAL reference is unavoidable, follow the reference in the reference line with the term “NOTAL” in parentheses. The following paragraphs discuss various referencing situations and an appropriate action for each situation: (1) If it is known that the action addressee does not have a reference listed in your correspondence, include it as an enclosure to your correspondence or refer to it in the text. However, enclosing an existing, stand-alone document belonging to another Navy organization or another Service as an enclosure is now allowed in directives. If needed, include as a reference. EXAMPLE: (Referencing a NOTAL reference in the text of the correspondence.) “CNO WASHINGTON DC 121845Z Mar 07 directed all afloat Navy activities to provide statistical data on fuel usage. Request you provide the requested data by 1 June 2007.” (2) If you would like to provide a copy of a reference listed in your correspondence to a “Via” or “Copy to” addressee, annotate “w/ref (x)” in parentheses to the right of the addressee you send it to (Substitute the appropriate reference letter for x). Only include this annotation on the copy for the addressee you are sending the reference to. Do not include the distribution of a reference to “Via” or “Copy to” addressees on the original letter. EXAMPLE: From: Chief of Naval Operations To: Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Via: Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet (w/ref (c)) Copy to: COMNAVPERSCOM (w/ref (a))

7-6

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June c. Format. Type “Ref:” at the left margin on the second line below the subject line. Use a lowercase letter in parentheses before the description of every reference. If you have only one reference, list it as “Ref: (a)”. Four spaces follow the colon. References are listed in alphabetical order, a through z. If you have more than 26 references, continue with (aa), (ab), etc. If the entry is longer than one line, line the second line under the first word after the heading. EXAMPLE: Ref: (a) COMSUBGRU TWO ltr 7200 Ser N1/123 of 12 Mar 08 Ref: (ab) SECNAV M-5510.36 d.

Citing Various Types of References

(1) Naval correspondence requires (a) the SNDL originator short title, (b) the type of correspondence (“ltr” or “memo”), (c) the SSIC, (d) the originator’s code by itself or in a serial number, and (e) the date. If the reference was not dated, type “(undated)” as illustrated below. EXAMPLE: COMCARSTRKGRU NINE ltr 7200 Ser N00/124 of 17 Apr 15 USS PORTER ltr 5216 Ser DDG 78/437 of 7 Mar 06 (NOTAL) CNO memo 5216 Ser 09B33/6U317731 (undated) (2) A business letter requires (a) the company name, (b) the term “ltr”, and (c) the date. EXAMPLE: Smith Widget Co. ltr of 14 Oct 05 (3) An e-mail requires (a) the SNDL originator's short title, (b) the term “e-mail,” (c) the type of correspondence (“ltr” or “memo”), (d) the SSIC, (e) the originator’s code by itself or in a serial number, and (f) the date. EXAMPLE: OPNAV e-mail ltr 5216 Ser N4/158 of 21 Sep 06 (4) A message requires (a) the originator's Plain Language Address as shown in the “From:” line of the message (if listed, do not include the office code) and (b) the complete datetime-group. When referencing general messages, include in parentheses the general message type (All Navy (ALNAV), Naval Administrative (NAVADMIN), All Marine Corps (ALMAR), etc.) and number/year.

7-7

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June EXAMPLE: USS PORTER 071300Z Mar 15 NAS MERIDIAN MS 101300Z Mar 15 CNO WASHINGTON DC 111300Z Mar 15 (NAVADMIN 123/15) (5) Endorsements cite references depending on whether you want to mention them in passing or highlight a particular one. EXAMPLE: ENS Joe J. Mainville, USN, XXX-XX-6789/1105 ltr of 1 Apr 15 w/ends COMNAVSURFPAC THIRD ENDORSEMENT 1070 Ser N1/3124 of 22 Apr 15 to ENS Joe J. Mainville, USN, XXX-XX-6789/1105 ltr of 1 Apr 15 (6) A telephone conversation or meeting requires (a) “PHONCON” or “Mtg”; (b) the activity’s SNDL short title, the office code, the individual’s name, and (c) the date. Follow the information for the first individual with a forward slash and repeat the information for the second individual. EXAMPLE: PHONCON CNO (N09B2) Ms. Handy/COMNAVAIRLANT (N6) CDR Phillips of 17 Feb 15 Mtg CENSERVSUPP (N72C) YNCS(SCW/SW) Slaughter/NAVTECHTRACEN Meridian YNCS(SW) Fitzpatrick of 22 Apr 15 (7) A Navy instruction requires (a) the SNDL short title combined with the term “INST” and (b) the SSIC with the consecutive number and, if any, a revision letter. If referencing a large instruction, do not call out the chapter, section, or paragraph in the reference line, instead, identify them when using the reference in the text of the correspondence. EXAMPLE: SECNAVINST 7510.1 (identifying an enclosure, chapter, section or paragraph of a reference in the text) “Reference (a), enclosure (3), paragraph 11a(2) requires …” (8) A Navy notice requires (a) the SNDL short title of issuer combined with the term “NOTE” and the SSIC, (b) the serial number, (c) the date, and (d) the cancellation date enclosed in parenthesis (e.g., (Canc: Aug 08)). If referencing a large notice, do not call out the chapter, section, or paragraph in the reference line, instead, identify them when using the reference in the text of the correspondence.

7-8

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June EXAMPLE: OPNAVNOTE 5216 Ser 09B/6U709210 of 21 May 08 (Canc: May 09) (9) A DoD directive or instruction requires (a) the short title of issuer with either Instruction or Directive, (b) the SSIC with consecutive number, and (c) the date with the month spelled out. If referencing a large instruction or directive, do not call out the chapter, section, or paragraph in the reference line, instead, identify them when using the reference in the text of the correspondence. EXAMPLE: DoD Directive 2000.1 of 6 May 2006 DoD Instruction 1995.1 of 4 April 2008 (10) A DoD publication requires (a) the short title of issuer (b) the publication number, (c) the publication type, (d) the title, and (e) the date. EXAMPLE: DoDD 4000.25-R-1, DoD Logistics Data Element Dictionary/Directory, January 1990 DoDM 5200.01 Volume 3, DoD Information Security Program: Protection of Classified Information of 24 February 2012 (11) A form requires (a) the issuer, (b) the form number, and (c) the issue or revision date. EXAMPLE: NAVPERS 1236/13 (03-06) (12) A report that has a Report Control Symbol requires (a) the report title, (b) the issuer, and (c) the report number. EXAMPLE: Injury Report (NAVJAG 5800-19) (13) A Navy publication requires (a) the issuer and (b) the publication number. EXAMPLE: NAVPERS 15018 (14) Code of Federal Regulations requires (a) the title number, (b) the term “CFR”, (c) the part or chapter number, and (d) the section number (optional).

7-9

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June EXAMPLE: 41 CFR 201-45.000 (15) Federal Register (FR) requires (a) the volume number, (b) the term “FR”, and (c) the page number. EXAMPLE: 21 FR 623 (16) A United States Code requires (a) the title number, (b) the term “U.S.C.”, (c) the section symbol (§) [Alt+0167], and (d) the section number. Do not include spaces in the term “U.S.C.” EXAMPLE: 28 U.S.C. §1498 (17) An Executive Order requires (a) the term “E.O.” and (b) the order number. EXAMPLE: E.O. 12564 (18) “My” and “Your” Optional. To cite an earlier communication between your activity and the action addressee, you may substitute a personal pronoun for the issuing activity. To prevent confusion, avoid “my” and “your” in the reference line of a letter that has more than one action addressee. EXAMPLES: My ltr 5216 Ser Code 10/049 of 2 Sep 09 Your msg 221501Z Aug 09 11. Enclosure Line a. General. List enclosures in the enclosure line in the order they appear in the text. Identify an enclosure using the same format as you would when identifying a reference. See paragraph 10 above. When identifying a document, cite its subject or title exactly. Never list an item in both the enclosure line and reference line of the same letter. b. Format. Type “Encl:” at the left margin on the second line below the last line of the previous heading. Three spaces follow the colon. Use a number in parentheses before the description of every enclosure, even if you have only one. One space follows the closing parenthesis. If the entry is longer than one line, start the second line under the first word after the heading.

7-10

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June EXAMPLE: Encl: (1) List of Reserve Officers Selected for Promotion to Colonel (2) CMC ltr 5216 Ser 00/451 of 5 Sep 09 c. Normal Distribution and When to Vary It. Normally, send one copy of the basic letter plus any enclosures to all addressees. Do not use the term “w/encl” to indicate that all addressees are being sent the enclosures. Avoid sending an enclosure if an addressee has it already or if its bulk or other factors make furnishing it impractical. d. Adding Copies of Enclosures for all Addressees. When sending more than one copy of an enclosure to all addressees (“To,” “Via,” and “Copy to”), note the quantity in parentheses after the enclosure's description. EXAMPLE: Encl: (1) OPNAV 5216/10 (10 Copies) e. Variations Affecting Only Copy To Addressees. In certain circumstances, it may be necessary to vary the normal distribution of enclosures to “Copy to” addressees. It is up to the originator of the correspondence to make this determination. There are two basic methods of varying distribution; all “Copy to” addressees are affected or only one or a few of the “Copy to” addressees are affected. (1) In these examples, all “Copy to” addressees are affected in the same way, so notes appear beside the “Copy to” heading. EXAMPLE: Copy to: (w/o encls) Copy to: (w/o encls (2) and (3)) Copy to: (w/2 copies of encl (1)) (2) In this example, only some of the “Copy to” addressees are affected, so notes appear beside the affected addressees. EXAMPLE: Copy to: COMNAVSURFPAC (N1) (w/o encls) USS MUSTIN (w/encl (2) only) USS VANDERGRIFT

7-11

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June f. Variations Affecting Only Via Addressees. When varying the normal distribution of enclosures to “Via” addressees, show the variation beside the affected addressee. One possible variation appears below. Others may be adapted for the examples in paragraph 11e above.

EXAMPLE: Via:

Commanding Officer, Naval Technical Training Center, Meridian (w/o encl)

g. Sending Enclosures Separately. When size, weight, or other factors prevent sending an enclosure with a letter, send it separately and type the term “sep cover” in parentheses after the enclosure's description. EXAMPLE: Encl:

(1) SECNAVINST 5211.5E (sep cover)

12. Text. Start the text on the second line down from the previous entry. The text shall be left justified. Make the content clear by using plain English. Do not use slang or jargon. Refer to chapter 12 for guidance on writing. Within the text, spell out all acronyms the first time used. After first use, acronyms shall be used throughout the rest of the correspondence. 13. Paragraphs. Start all continuation lines at the left margin. All paragraphs are single spaced and each paragraph or subparagraph begins on the second line below the previous paragraph or subparagraph. When using a subparagraph, the first line is always indented the appropriate number of spaces depending on the level of subparagraphing. All other lines of a subparagraph continue at the left margin. Do not indent the continuation lines of a subparagraph. If there is a paragraph 1a, there must be a paragraph 1b; if there is a paragraph 1a(1), there must be a paragraph 1a(2), etc. It is acceptable for a paragraph to break across pages, but do not begin a paragraph at the bottom of a page unless there is enough space for at least two lines of text on that page and at least two lines of text are carried over to the next page. A signature page must have at least two lines of text preceding the signature. a. Identifying Paragraphs or Subparagraphs. Identify all paragraphs or subparagraphs with a number or letter. See figure 7-8 for an example of paragraph and subparagraph structure and identification. b. Limit Subparagraphs. Documents rarely require subdividing to the extent shown in figure 7-8. Do not subdivide past the second level until you have exhausted all re-paragraphing alternatives first. Never subparagraph beyond the levels shown in figure 7-8. c. Citing Paragraphs. When citing a paragraph or subparagraph, write the numbers and letters without periods or spaces. Example: 2b(4)(a)

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June d. Paragraph Headings. Use paragraph headings in long correspondence with widely varying topics. Be brief but informative. Underline any heading and capitalize its key words using the Title Case format. Be consistent across main paragraphs and subparagraphs. If paragraph 1 has a heading, then paragraph 2 would need a heading; if paragraph 1a has a heading, then paragraph 1b would need a heading. 14. Signature Line a.

General

(1) Only the original, which goes to the action addressee, must be signed; however, the original and all copies must have typed or stamped signature line information below the signature. The last name appears in all capital letters with the exception of a last name beginning with a prefix. EXAMPLE: (last name beginning with a prefix) P. W. McNALLY (2) Start all lines of the signature line at the center of the page, beginning on the fourth line below the text. The preferred way to identify the signatory is by typing their first initial, middle initial, and last name. If the signatory does not have a middle name, use only their first initial and last name. Signature lines can be changed based on the signer’s preference. Do not include the signatory’s rank or a complimentary close. Add the signature line only when you are sure who will sign the correspondence. If you use a stamp, remember to mark all copies and avoid smeared or crooked impressions. Refer to chapter 2, page 2-4 for delegation of signature authority guidance. b.

Examples of Signature Lines

(1) When an activity head will sign the correspondence, the signature line is composed of only their name. EXAMPLE: J. K. JANICKI (2) When a principal subordinate authorized to sign by title, such as the chief of staff or deputy in a major command will sign the correspondence, include their title as the second line of the signature line. EXAMPLE: T. OPPEL Deputy

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June (3) When an individual has been formally appointed to temporarily replace the commanding officer or a subordinate who signs by title, include the term "Acting" as the last line of the signature line. EXAMPLES: V. E. WATSON Acting

S. V. MURPHY Deputy Acting

(4) Put the term "By direction" under the name of a subordinate formally authorized to sign official correspondence, but not by their title. EXAMPLE: I. K. WESLEY By direction (5) When the signatory is authorized to sign “By direction,” and the correspondence will affect pay and allowances, the signature line will include the signatory’s (a) name, (b) title, and (c) the phrase, “By direction of the [activity head].” (Insert the appropriate activity head title). EXAMPLE: C. COLLINS, JR Executive Officer By direction of the Commanding Officer 15. “Copy To:” Line a. General. Use this optional line to list addressees outside your activity who need to know a letter's content but do not need to act on it. If you use the “Copy to:” line, keep the number of activities to a minimum. b. Format. Type "Copy to:" at the left margin on the second line below the signature line. Identify addressees by their SNDL short title and/or SNDL numbers shown there. The SNDL number is an alpha-numeric number that is used to group commands or activities by classification. Do not list offices within the same activity individually, group them together in parentheses after the entry. c. Variations. “Copy to” addressees are normally listed in a single column at the left margin and single spaced below the “Copy to:” line. A long list of copy to addressees can be listed in columns, as a paragraph, or may be continued on the next page or placed entirely on a new page. If the signature line of the correspondence is at the bottom of the page and the “Copy to:” line will not fit on that page, type "Copy to: (see next page)" to indicate that the “Copy to:” line is on the next page. Use this format for the “Distribution:” lines as well.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June EXAMPLE: (Grouping of offices of an activity) Copy to: CNO (N1, N2, N3/5) COMNAVPERSCOM (PERS 313C, PERS 49) USS YORKTOWN (Code 01) EXAMPLE: (Large list in column format) Copy to: CNO (N1, N2, N3/5) COMNAVPERSCOM (PERS 313C) COMCARSTRKGRU ELEVEN

USS YORKTOWN (ADMIN) USS MUSTIN USS BLUE RIDGE

EXAMPLE: (Large list in paragraph format) Copy to: CNO (N1, N2, N3/5), COMNAVPERSCOM (PERS 313C), COMCARSTRKGRU ELEVEN, USS YORKTOWN (ADMIN), USS MUSTIN EXAMPLE: (Continuation to a second page) Copy to: (Cont'd) NAS Meridian USS YORKTOWN (ADMIN) USS MUSTIN 16. Identifying Second and Later Pages. Repeat the subject line at the top of each page of the basic letter. Start typing at the left margin on the sixth line from the top of the page or set margins to 1 inch. Continue the text beginning on the second line below the subject. 17. Page Numbering. Do not number a single-page letter or the first page of a multiple-page letter. Center page numbers 1/2 inch from the bottom edge, starting with the number 2. No punctuation accompanies a page number. See figure 7-2. Ensure the pages of a TOP SECRET document are numbered for compliance with the accountability requirements in DoDM 5200.01V2. 18. Correspondence Package Assembly. The basic letter, the enclosures, and the background material are assembled according to activity practices before they are presented for approval and signature. Figure 7-9 illustrates an assembled correspondence package that is ready for signature and mailing. 19. Tabbing a Correspondence Package. Tab the signature page (if not the first page), enclosures, and background material. Label the tabs as appropriate. Figure 7-10 illustrates an assembled correspondence package with tabs. Take care so tabs can be removed without defacing the document.

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAME OF ACTIVITY ADDRESS CITY STATE ZIP+4

SSIC Code/Ser 001 Date % From:..Activity head, name of activity, location when ……......... needed …… To: Title, name of activity (Code), location when needed Via:......(1).Title, name of activity (Code), location when needed …............ (2).Same as Via (1) above % Subj:....NORMAL WORD ORDER WITH ALL LETTERS ……......... CAPITALIZED AND NO PUNCTUATION % Ref:…..(a).Communication or document that bears ……................... directly on the subject at hand % Encl:....(1).Title of Material – enclosed with letter ................ (2).Title of Material (sep cover) – not enclosed with letter % 1...This example shows the first page of a two-page standard letter. Included are many of the elements that might appear on a standard letter. % 2...Start the “From:” line on the second line below the date line. The date may be typed or stamped. % 3...Arrange paragraphs as shown in figure 7-8. % ....... .. a. Do not start a paragraph at the bottom of the page unless at least two lines of text will remain on that page and at least two lines of text will carry over to the next page. % ....... .. b. Do not number the first page, number only succeeding pages. .

- Space % - Hard Return

FIGURE 7-1. STANDARD LETTER – FIRST PAGE 7-16

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

Subj:....REPEAT THE SUBJECT EXACTLY AS IT IS WRITTEN ON ……......... THE FIRST PAGE OF THE LETTER % ....... .. c. The second and succeeding pages of a standard letter look like this: % ............. (1).Start typing on the sixth line (1-inch top margin). Repeat the subject line. % ............. (2).Continue the text on the second line below the subject line. % 4...”Copy to” addressees appear on all copies. “Blind copy to” addressees, as well as the identity of the writer and typist, appear on internal copies only. 5...A standard letter uses no complimentary close. % % % NAME OF SIGNER By direction % Copy to: SNDL number and/or short title of information addressee SNDL number and/or short title of second information addressee

.

- Space % - Hard Return 2

FIGURE 7-2. STANDARD LETTER – SECOND PAGE

7-17

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVY PERSONNEL COMMAND 5720 INTEGRITY DRIVE MILLINGTON TN 38055-0130

5216 Ser 301/403 5 Jan 15 % COMMANDER NAVY PERSONNEL COMMAND (PERS-40) 5720 INTEGRITY DRIVE MILLINGTON TN 38055-0130 % % %

% Subj:..WINDOW-ENVELOPE FORMAT % 1...You may use a GSA general-purpose window envelope (overall size 91/2 by 4-1/8 inches and window, 4-3/4 by 1-1/4 inches, in lower left) if: % ....... .. a. The address has no more than five lines, and does not extend past the middle of the page. The complete address must appear in the window with at least a 1/8-inch margin, even if the letter shifts in the envelope. % ....... .. b. The letter and enclosures are all unclassified. % ....... .. c. Your letter does not have any “Via” addresses. % 2...Because this letter does not have a “From:” line, every copy that goes to addressees outside your activity must be on letterhead to show its origin. % 3...To fold the letter, first turn up the bottom edge so it just covers the subject, second, turn back the address portion so the upper fold also falls along the top of the subject. % % %

.

- Space % - Hard Return K. O. ALLISON By direction

FIGURE 7-3. STANDARD LETTER – WINDOW – ENVELOPE

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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVAL SEA SYSTEMS COMMAND (20362-5101) NAVAL SUPPLY SYSTEMS COMMAND (20376-5000) WASHINGTON DC

NAVSUP NAVSEA 5216 5216 Ser 02/318 Ser 07/207 9 Jan 15 16 Jan 15 % JOINT LETTER % From:..Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command ……......... Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command % To: Chief of Naval Operations % Subj:....HOW TO PREPARE A JOINT LETTER % 1...A joint letter may be used to establish an agreement between two or more activities or for other matters of mutual concern. To prepare a Joint Memorandum, replace JOINT LETTER with JOINT MEMORANDUM above the “From:” line. % 2...On plain bond paper, list the command titles in the letterhead so the senior is at the top. If the activities are in different cities or states, follow each title with its Standard Navy Distribution List address. % 3...Arrange signature lines so the senior official is at the right. Place the signature line of a third cosigner in the middle of the page. The senior official signs the letter last. % 4...If your activity is the last to sign, send copies of the signed letter to all cosigners. % . - Space % % - Hard Return % J. K. JANICKI A. N. PIDGEON Acting Deputy

FIGURE 7-4. JOINT LETTER 7-19

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June SECRET DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS 2000 NAVY PENTAGON WASHINGTON DC 20350-2000

5216 Ser DNS-3/S391 12 Jan 15 % From:..Vice Chief of Naval Operations To:.........Commander, U.S. Pacific Command % Subj:....(U) CLASSIFICATION MARKINGS % 1...(U).This is an example of a classified letter. Each paragraph shall be predicated with a portion marking. % ....... .. a. (S).Identify the classification of each paragraph. This subparagraph is marked as SECRET as indicated by the (S) portion marking. % ....... .. b. (C).Classification markings eliminate doubt as to which portions of a document contain or reveal classified information. % 2...(U).Stamp or type the letter’s highest classification of the information contained in the letter, in the center of the top and bottom margins, known as the banner lines. Assign a serial number bearing the initial of the highest classification. % 3...(U).On the first page of a letter that contains classified information, include the classification authority block (CAB). Comply with requirements in DoDM 5200.01, V-2, Enclosure 3, Section 8c, (1) and (2), when multiple sources are cited in the “Derived From” line of the CAB. This letter provides an example of a classified document derived from multiple sources. % 4...(U).There are numerous rules and requirements for properly marking classified correspondence. This figure is a basic example. Refer to DoDM 5200.01, V-2, for a detailed description of how to properly mark classified documents. . - Space % % - Hard Return Derived from:..Multiple Sources Declassify on:..20150108 SECRET (UNCLASSIFIED-CLASSIFIED MARKINGS FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY) FIGURE 7-5. STANDARD LETTER WITH CLASSIFICATION MARKINGS - FIRST PAGE 7-20

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June SECRET Subj:..(U) CLASSIFICATION MARKINGS % 5...(U).When typing an unclassified letter that has a classified enclosure the following basic requirements apply: % ....... .. a. (U).Stamp or type the banner line with the highest classification of information, in the center of the top and bottom margins of the letter of transmittal. % ....... .. b. (U).The transmittal document will contain a statement indicating it is unclassified when separated from classified enclosures. Stamp or type the statement in the center at the bottom of the page, below the banner line. % EXAMPLE: “UNCLASSIFIED when separated from classified enclosures” or “UNCLASSIFIED when Enclosure 2 is removed” % ....... .. c. (U).The unclassified transmittal document does not require portion marking or a CAB. % ....... .. d. (U).Refer to DoDM 5200.01, V-2, Enclosure 3, Section 15 for more specific requirements (e.g., warning or special notices, instructions for downgrading when enclosures are removed, etc.). DoDM 5200.01, V-2, Enclosure 3, Section 5c outlines specific requirements for the use of banner lines on interior pages of a document (i.e., highest level of classification and control markings). % . % - Space % % - Hard Return % C. C. TURNER By direction

2 SECRET (UNCLASSIFIED-CLASSIFIED MARKINGS FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY) FIGURE 7-6. STANDARD LETTER WITH CLASSIFICATION MARKINS-SECOND PAGE

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVY PERSONNEL COMMAND 5720 INTEGRITY DRIVE MILLINGTON TN 38055-0130

5216 Ser N09L/729 26 Jan 15 %

From:..Commander, Navy Personnel Command To: Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Europe %

Subj:....(FOUO) FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY MARKINGS %

1...(FOUO) This illustrates a letter that has “For Official Use Only” (FOUO) information, which is a category of Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI). Documents shall be marked “For Official Use Only” at the bottom of the outside of the front cover (if there is one), the title page, and the outside of the back cover (if there is one). Internal pages of the document that contain FOUO information shall be marked “FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY” at the bottom. Optionally, for consistency with classified systems, the document may be marked “UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY” or “UNCLASSIFIED//FOUO.” %

2...Subjects, titles, and each section, part, paragraph, and similar portion of an FOUO document shall be marked to show that they contain information requiring protection. Use the parenthetical notation “(FOUO)” (or optionally “(U//FOUO)”) to identify information as FOUO for this purpose. Place this notation immediately before the text. Transmittal documents that do not contain FOUO, but have FOUO enclosures or attachments shall be marked with the following statement or similar one, “FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY ATTACHMENT” at the bottom center of the first page of the document. %

3...For more information on designating and marking material FOUO or marking requirements for other categories of CUI, refer to DoDM 5200.01, Volume 4. % % %

S. M. JONES By direction

.

- Space % - Hard Return

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (UNCLASSIFIED-MARKINGS FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSE)

FIGURE 7-7. STANDARD LETTER WITH FOUO MARKINGS 7-22

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 1...Arrange paragraphs following the formats below. See chapter 2 for additional guidelines. % 2...If subparagraphs are needed, use at least two; e.g., a (1) must have a (2). % ....... .. a. Indent each new subdivision to align with the first letter of the paragraph above. % ....... .. b. Text % ............... (1).Documents rarely require subdividing to the extent shown below. % ............... (2).Text % ........................ (a).Do not subparagraph past this level until you have exhausted all re-paragraphing alternatives. % ........................ (b).Text % ................................ .. 1. Text % ....................................... .. a. Text % ............................................. (1).Text % ..................................................... (a).Never subparagraph beyond this level. % ..................................................... (b).Text % ............................................. (2).Text % ....................................... .. b. Text % ................................ .. 2. Text % 10...When using two digits, continue to indent each new subdivision (paragraphs will not line up). % ........ .. a. Text % ............... . (9) Text % ............... (10).Text

FIGURE 7-8. PARAGRAPH STRUCTURE FORMAT 7-23

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Here is a suggested way to assemble a standard letter for signature and mailing. If you use a folder rather than the single stack of papers shown, clip items 1 and 9 to the left side and 2 through 8 to the right side of the folder.

9.

Background material

8. Official file copy (with enclosure(s)) 7. Envelope or mailing label (if required) 6. Info addressee(s) copy(s) (with enclosure(s))

Tab signature page, enclosures, and background material.

5. Envelope or mailing label (if required) 4 Via addressee(s) copy(s) (with enclosure(s))

Check or arrow the intended addressee on each copy. Prepare envelopes or mailing labels according to local practice. Your activity might not require them for addressees listed in the SNDL.

1

3. Courtesy copy (with enclosure(s)) 2. Original letter (with enclosures) to be signed

Brief sheet if required

BEFORE SIGNATURE 1. Briefing sheet as prescribed locally, usually omitted if letter is short or self-explanatory. 2. Original letter to be signed (signature tabbed if not on first page), pages in normal order, with enclosures. 3. Courtesy copy with enclosures, rarely used except with responses to congressional inquiries. 4. Copies for via addressees, if any, each with enclosures. 5. Envelope or mailing label, if required. 6. Copies for “Copy to:” addressees, each with enclosures. 7. Envelope or mailing label, if required. 8. Official file copy of letter with enclosures. Expose the left margin so reviewers can initial and date there. 9. Background material.

AFTER SIGNATURE File

Mail

File

FIGURE 7-9. ASSEMBLY OF A STANDARD CORRESPONDENCE PACKAGE USING STACKING METHOD

7-24

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June The example on the right illustrates tabbing correspondence packages when correspondence is in the natural order using the stacking method. 1 Tab 1 - Signature Tab Tab 2 - Enclosure Tabs Tab 3 - Background Material

2 3

FIGURE 7-10. TABBING CORRESPONDENCE PACKAGES

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

CHAPTER 8 Multiple-Address Letter 8-1 General. Use a multiple-address letter when you have more than one action addressee. The multiple-address letter is the same as the standard letter, except in handling addresses. Separate standard letters may be used in place of a multiple-address letter, but they require much more work. 8-2 Listing Addressees. There are three ways to list addresses: 1. Using a “To:” Line Only. When you have four addresses or fewer, use the “To:” line by itself as shown in figure 8-1. 2. Using a “Distribution:” Line Only. When you have more than four addresses, use the “Distribution:” line by itself as shown in figure 8-2. 3. Using Both a “To:” Line and “Distribution:” Line. Use both the “To:” line and the “Distribution:” line in the same letter when you show a group title whose distribution is relatively unknown. Place the group title (“Area Records Officers,” for example) in the “To:” line and identify each member in a “Distribution:” line. See figure 8-3. 8-3 Preparing and Signing Copies. Every action addressee must receive a letter that has a letterhead and signature. The letterhead may be printed, typed, stamped, or photocopied. The signature must be original or photocopied. To meet these requirements, make copies the following way: Type original on letterhead paper. After the original has been signed, make the necessary photocopies. Keep the original signed copy in the official file and send out photocopies. 8-4 Assembly of Multiple-Address Letters. Figure 8-4 shows a suggested way to assemble a multiple-address letter for signature and mailing.

8-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY COMMANDER SUBMARINE GROUP TWO NAVAL SUBMARINE BASE NEW LONDON GROTON CT 06349-5100

5216 Ser N3/258 26 Jan 15 From: Commander, Submarine Group TWO To: Commander, Submarine Squadron TWO Commander, Submarine Squadron FOUR Commander, Submarine Squadron TWELVE Subj: USING A “TO:” LINE ONLY 1. If you have four addressees or fewer, list all of them in the “To:” line, starting one beneath the other. If you have more than four addressees, list all of them in a “Distribution:” lines as shown on the next page. 2. Use only long titles in the “To:” line.

C. A. BYARD By direction Copy to: COMNAVSEASYSCOM (SEA-06)

FIGURE 8-1. MULTIPLE-ADDRESS LETTER USING “TO:” LINE

8-2

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY COMMANDER SUBMARINE GROUP TWO NAVAL SUBMARINE BASE NEW LONDON GROTON CONNECTICUT 06349-5100

5216 Ser N3/260 28 Jan 15 From: Commander, Submarine Group TWO Subj: .. .USING A “DISTRIBUTION:” LINE ONLY 1. ..Omit the “To:” line and add a “Distribution:” line if you have more than four action addressees or if you vary the number of copies to any of the addressees. Addressees shown in a “Distribution:” line are action addressees. 2. ..You may list addressees in the “Distribution:” line by: .......

a. ..SNDL short titles

.......

b. ..Collective titles, or

.......

c. ..Both collective and SNDL short title.

3. ..Usually list “Distribution:” and “Copy to:” addressees in single columns. Addressees may be listed in paragraphs or columns to keep a letter from going to another page.

C. B. GUYTON By direction Distribution: COMSUBFOR NORFOLK (4 copies) USS ENTERPRISE USS SCRANTON USS FRANK CABLE Copy to: COMNAVSEASYSCOM (SEA-06)

FIGURE 8-2. MULTIPLE-ADDRESS LETTER USING “DISTRIBUTION:” LINE

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY COMMANDER NAVAL COMPUTER AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMAND 4401 MASSACHUSETTS AVE N W WASHINGTON DC 20394-5000

5216 Ser 00C/1760 12 Feb 15 From: Commander, Naval Computer and Telecommunications Command To: Standard of Conduct Coordinators Subj:....USING A “TO:” LINE AND “DISTRIBUTION:” LINE 1. Use both the “To:” line and “Distribution:” line in the same letter when you show a group title whose distribution is relatively unknown. Place the group title in the “To:” line and identify each member in a “Distribution:” line.

A. N. WALTER By direction Distribution: NAVCOMTELSTA WASHINGTON DC NAVCOMTELSTA PENSACOLA NAVCOMTELSTA SAN DIEGO NAVCOMTELSTA SAN FRANCISCO

FIGURE 8-3. MULTIPLE-ADDRESS LETTER USING A “TO:” LINE AND “DISTRIBUTION:” LINE

8-4

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 9.

Background material

Here is a suggested way to assemble a multiple-address 8. Official file copy (with letter for signature and mailing. If you use a folder enclosure(s)) 7. Envelope or mailing label (if rather than the single stack of papers shown, clip required) items 1 and 9 to the left side and 2 through 8 to 6. Info addressee(s) copy(s) (with enclosure(s)) the right side of the folder. 5. Envelope or mailing label (if required)

Tab signature page, enclosures, and background material. Check or arrow the intended addressee on each copy.

4 Second letter (with enclosures) to be signed 3. Envelope or mailing label (if required) 2. Original letter (with enclosures) to be signed 1

Brief sheet if required

Prepare envelopes or mailing labels according to local practice. Your activity might not require them for addressees listed in the SNDL.

BEFORE SIGNATURE AFTER SIGNATURE 1. Briefing sheet as prescribed locally, usually File omitted if letter is short or self-explanatory. 2. Original letter to be signed (signature tabbed if not on first page), pages in normal order, with enclosures. 3. Envelope or mailing label, if required. 4. Second letter to be signed (signature tabbed if not on first page), pages in normal order, with Mail enclosures. 5. Envelope or mailing label, if required. 6. Copies for “Copy to:” addressees, each with enclosures. 7. Envelope or mailing label, if required. 8. Official file copy of letter with enclosures. Expose the left margin so reviewers can initial File and date there. 9. Background material. FIGURE 8-4. ASSEMBLY OF A MULTIPLE-ADDRESS LETTER

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

CHAPTER 9 Endorsements 9-1 General. When a letter is transmitted via your activity, use an endorsement to forward comments, recommendations, or information. While an endorsement is mostly used to transmit correspondence through the chain of command, you may also use it to redirect a letter. Do not use an endorsement to reply to a routine letter. Additionally, a “Via” addressee may alter the order of any remaining “Via” addressees or add others. The length of the endorsement and the amount of space that is available on the basic letter or on the preceding endorsement determines if you should use a same-page or new page endorsement. If it will completely fit on the signature page of the basic letter or the preceding endorsement, you may add it to that page. If not, use a new-page endorsement. 9-2 Format 1.

Endorsement Line

a. Start the endorsement line at the left margin on the second line below the date line. If the correspondence is classified, start the endorsement line on the second line below the classification line. When preparing a same-page endorsement, as long as the entire page will be photocopied, you may omit the SSIC, subject and the basic letter’s identification symbols. b. Number each endorsement in the sequence in which it is added to the basic letter. Indicate the numbers of the endorsement by using ordinal numbers such as FIRST, SECOND, THIRD, etc. Following the number, type “ENDORSEMENT on” and identify the basic letter using the same style as a reference line. When the heading exceeds one line, start the succeeding line with the word “on”. Example: FIRST ENDORSEMENT on USS SCRANTON ltr 3000 Ser SSN 756/001 of ............................................................... 5 May 96 2. “Via:” Line. When preparing your endorsement, include in the “Via:” line any remaining “Via” addressees, if any. If there is only one via addressee remaining, do not number it. If there is more than one remaining, number the remaining addresses starting with the number (1) in parenthesis and consecutively number the rest. 3. Adding References. Do not repeat a reference in the reference line of your endorsement that has already been identified in the reference line of the basic letter or a previous endorsement. Identify only the references that you add. Assign a letter to all references you add by continuing the sequence of letters from the basic letter and previous endorsements. For example, if the basic letter and previous endorsements had references identified up to letter “f,” the first reference of your endorsement would be letter “g.”

9-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 4. Adding Enclosures. Do not repeat an enclosure in your enclosure line that has already been identified in the enclosure line of the basic letter or prior endorsements. Identify only the enclosures that you add. Assign a number to all enclosures that you add by continuing the sequence of numbers from the basic letter and previous endorsements. For example, if the basic letter and previous endorsements had enclosures identified up to number “5,” the first enclosure of your endorsement would be number “6.” 5. “Copy To:” Addressees. If your endorsement is significant and not routine, each activity that endorsed the basic letter before you and the originator of the basic letter shall be included as a copy to addressee on your endorsement. Additionally, all copy to addressees from the basic letter and previous endorsements shall be included as a copy to addressee. Significant endorsements include “forwarded, recommending disapproval,” “readdressed and forwarded,” and those with substantive comments. Routine endorsements include “forwarded,” “forwarded for consideration,” and “forwarded, recommending approval.” 6. Forwarding Your Endorsement and Copies. When forwarding your endorsement to the next via addressee or to the action addressee, you must also do the following: a. Attach any enclosure you identified in your endorsement to the original for forwarding to the action addressee. b.

Forward one copy of your endorsement to each remaining addressee.

c. Forward one copy of your endorsement to each copy to addressee. Include a copy of any enclosure you added. If a copy to addressee will be receiving the basic letter and previous endorsements for the first time from you, to the right of each of these addressees, type the word “complete” in parentheses to show that your endorsement includes the basic letter, enclosures, and prior endorsements. 7. Assembly of an Endorsement. Figure 9-2 shows a suggested way to assemble an endorsement for signature and mailing.

9-2

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVAL AIR STATION MERIDIAN MS 39305-1000

5216 Ser 11/273 22 Apr 15 % From:..Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station, Meridian To:........Commander, Fleet Forces Command Via:......(1).Commander, Sea Based Anti-Submarine Warfare Wing, Atlantic ................. (2).Commander, Naval Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet % Subj:....HOW TO PREPARE AN ENDORSEMENT % Encl: ....(1).Example of New-Page Endorsement % 1...An endorsement may be added to the bottom of a basic letter, like this one, or to a previous endorsement if: (a) All of the endorsement will fit on the page, and (b) it is sure to be signed without revision. % % % G. L. SLAUGHTER, JR ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ser 019/870 23 Apr 15 % FIRST ENDORSEMENT % From:..Commander, Sea Based Anti-Submarine Warfare Wing, Atlantic To:........Commander, Fleet Forces Command Via:......Commander, Naval Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet % 1...A same-page endorsement may omit the SSIC, subject, and the basic letter’s identification if the entire page will be photocopied. However, these elements are required on all new-page endorsements, such as the one on the next page.

R. L. GABEL

Copy to: NAS Meridian (Code 11)

*Prior endorser included because second endorsement is significant.

FIGURE 9-1. SAME PAGE ENDORSEMENT

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVAL AIR FORCE ATLANTIC NORFOLK VA 23511-2494

5216 Ser N72/420 28 Apr 15 % SECOND ENDORSEMENT on NAS Meridian ltr 5216 Ser 11/273 of 22 Apr 15 % From:..Commander, Naval Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet To:........Commander, Fleet Forces Command % Subj:....HOW TO PREPARE AN ENDORSEMENT % Encl:....(2).SECNAV M-5216.5 % 1...Start an endorsement on a new page. Number each page of your endorsement and continue the sequence of numbers from the previous endorsement or from the basic letter if you are the first endorser. % 2...Every “new page” endorsement must repeat the basic letter’s SSIC, identify the basic letter in the endorsement line, and use the basic letter’s subject as its own. % % % J. T. CHILDRESS By direction % Copy to: NAS Meridian (Code 11) *Prior endorser included because second endorsement is significant.

2

FIGURE 9-2. NEW PAGE ENDORSEMENT

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June This is a suggested method way to assemble an endorsement for signature and mailing. If you use a folder rather than the single stack of papers shown, clip items 1 and 11 to the left side and 2 through 10 to the right side of the folder. 8.

Tab signature page, enclosures, and background material.

1

Background material

10. Official file copy with enclosure(s) 9. Envelope(s) or mailing label(s) for copy to addressee(s) Copy(s) of your endorsement

7. Envelope or mailing label for your endorsement (if required) 6. Copy(s) of endorsement for additional Via addressees, if any

Check or arrow the intended addressee on each copy. Prepare envelopes or mailing labels according to local practice. Your activity might not require them 2. for addressees listed in the to SNDL.

11.

5. Enclosure(s) from previous endorsements 4.

Basic letter

3. Previous endorsement(s) with most recent on top Endorsement (with enclosures) be signed

Brief sheet (if required)

BEFORE SIGNATURE AFTER SIGNATURE 1. Briefing sheet as prescribed locally, usually omitted if letter is File short or self explanatory. 2. Your endorsement. Mail to next 3. Earlier endorsements, most recent on top. via addressee 4. Basic letter. or to the action 5. Earlier enclosures, plus any you added on top. addressee 6. Copies of your endorsement for remaining Via addressees. 7. Envelope or mailing label, if required. 8. Copies of your endorsement for copy to addressees. Mail 9. Envelope or mailing label, if required. 10. Official file copy of letter with enclosures. Left margin exposed so reviewers can initial and date there. File 11. Background material, such as incoming letter, referenced documents. FIGURE 9-3. ASSEMBLY OF AN ENDORSEMENT

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

CHAPTER 10 Memorandums 10-1 General. A memorandum provides a less formal way to correspond within an activity/command. Subordinates within that activity or command may use a memorandum to correspond directly with each other on routine official business or as an informal means of communication. 10-2 Formats. There are several memorandum formats. All DON activities shall use the appropriate memorandum that suits the subject, occasion, and audience. The following paragraphs discuss the different types of memorandums: 1. Memorandum for the Record. Use a Memorandum for the Record (MFR) as an internal document to record supporting information in the record that is not recorded elsewhere. Examples include such things as documenting the results of a meeting, an important telephone conversation, or an oral agreement. Type or handwrite these most informal memorandums. See figure 10-1. A full signature line and identification symbols are not required; however, it should be dated, signed, and show the organizational position of the signer. If it is only two or three lines, include it on the file copy of your document. Leave out the subject line if you add your MFR to the file copy. 2. From-To Memorandum. Use OPNAV 5215/144A DON Memo (8-1/2 X 11) or OPNAV 5215/144B DON Memo (8-1/5 X 5-1/2) for the “from—to” memorandum. Memorandum may be directed to one or more addressees. If very informal, it may be handwritten. If the subject is insignificant, a file copy is not required. See figure 10-2. 3. Plain-Paper Memorandum. Use plain-paper memorandums for informal communications within your activity. It is no more formal than the memorandum form, but it is more flexible when there are multiple addressees, via addressees, or both. a. Identification Symbols. The only identification symbol you need is the date, unless local practice calls for more. b. Format. Prepare on white bond paper. Type the date on the sixth line so it ends flush with the right margin, unless it is used as part of the senders symbol. See figures 10-3 and 10-4. 4. Letterhead Memorandum. The letterhead memorandum may be used within your activity and provides more formality than the printed form or plain-paper memorandum. When direct liaison with individuals outside of your activity is authorized, the letterhead memorandum may be used to correspond on routine matters that neither make a commitment nor take an official stand. A full signature line is not required because the “From:” line identifies the signer. See figure 10-4. For example: You have been appointed chairperson of a committee and need to correspond with other members of the committee outside your activity.

10-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 5. Decision Memorandum. When only requesting an approval/disapproval decision from a single addressee, it is appropriate to type a decision block at the left margin, two lines below the signature line in the following format: COMMANDING OFFICER DECISION: _____________________ Approved _____________________ Disapproved _____________________ Other 6.

Memorandum of Agreement or Memorandum of Understanding

a. Use. The Memorandum of Agreement or Understanding may be used to document mutual agreements of facts, intentions, procedures, limits on future actions, and areas of present or future coordination, or commitments, etc. If a Memorandum of Agreement or Understanding is initiated by a non-DoD activity, DON activities are authorized to use their format. b. Format. Center “MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT” on the second line below the date line. Center “BETWEEN” on the next line and follow with the names of the agreeing activities (centered). To prepare a “Memorandum of Understanding”, substitute those words for “Memorandum of Agreement,” and follow the same format as shown in figures 10-5 and 10-6. Number and letter paragraphs and subparagraphs the same as other correspondence. The basic text may contain, but is not limited to, the following titled paragraphs: (1) Purpose. This paragraph defines or states in as few words as possible, the purpose of the agreement. (2) Problem. Present a clear, concise statement of the problem, to include a brief background. (3) Scope. Add a short statement specifying the area covered by the agreement. (4) Agreement, Understanding. Spell out the agreement or understanding and responsibilities of and between each of the parties involved. (5) Effective Date. Enter the date the agreement will take effect. c. Letterhead. On plain bond, type the command titles so the senior is at the top. If the activities are in different cities or states, follow each title with its address. d. Signatures. Arrange signature lines so the senior official is at the right. Place the signature line of a third cosigner in the middle of the page. Precede all signature lines by over scoring as shown in figures 10-5 and 10-6. The senior activity should sign the agreement after the junior activity(ies). e.

Copies. The activity signing last should send copies of the agreement to all cosigners. 10-2

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

17 Feb 15 % MEMORANDUM FOR THE RECORD % Subj:....MEMORANDUM FOR THE RECORD % 1...Use an MFR to record information in the record that is not recorded elsewhere. Examples include such things as results of a meeting, telephone conversations, oral agreements, and other relevant information. % 2...Type or handwrite these most informal memorandums. If it is only two or three lines, include it on the file copy of your document. Leave out the subject line if you add your MFR to the file copy. % 3...A full signature line and identification symbols are not required; however, it should be dated, signed, and show the signer’s organizational code. % % % E. S. HOWARD N11

FIGURE 10-1. MEMORANDUM FOR THE RECORD

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

SAMPLE

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

Memorandum DATE: FROM: TO: SUBJ: ----------------The area above this line is preprinted. Fill in as appropriate.---------------

% Ref:......(a).SECNAV M-5216.1 % Encl:....(1).Printed Form % 1...This printed form is used for corresponding between individuals and offices of the same activity. Very informal memorandums may be hand written. % 2...The memorandum form comes in two sizes: % ........ .. a. OPNAV 5216/144A (8-1/2 by 11 inches): % ........ .. b. OPNAV 5216/144B (8-1/2 by 5-1/2 inches): % 3...The only identification symbol you need is the date, unless local practice calls for more. % 4...Use names, titles, or codes in the “From:” and “To:” lines. % 5...Type reference and enclosure headings under the printed headings. Note the headings for reference (a) and enclosure (1). Allow a 1-inch left margin. % 6...The writer signs his or her name without the organizational titles. % % % Signature OPNAV 5216/144A (Rev. AUG 1981)

FIGURE 10-2. PRINTED "FROM-TO" MEMORANDUM

10-4

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June % % % % %

9 Feb 15 % MEMORANDUM % From:.. Head, DON Records Management Branch (N161) To:........ Head, Technical Library Branch (N21) ................. Head, Mail and Files Branch (N13) Via:...... Head, Office Services Division (N1) % Subj:....PLAIN-PAPER MEMORANDUM % 1...The plain-paper “from-to” memorandum may be used within your activity. It is no more formal than the memorandum form, but it is more flexible when there are multiple addressees, via addressees, or both. % 2...The only identification symbol you need is the date, unless local practice calls for more. Start typing the date on the sixth line, flush with the right margin. % 3...Prepare a plain-paper memorandum on white bond. % % % V. J. BURKS

FIGURE 10-3. PLAIN-PAPER "FROM-TO" MEMORANDUM

10-5

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND RADM WILLIAM A. MOFFETT BUILDING 47123 BUSE ROAD, BLDG 2272 PATUXENT RIVER, MARYLAND 20670-1547

5216 Memo 00/83 5 Jan 15 % MEMORANDUM % From: Commander, Naval Air Systems Command, U.S. Atlantic Fleet To:.........Commander, Naval Intelligence Command % Subj:.....LETTERHEAD MEMORANDUM % 1...When used within an activity, the letterhead memorandum provides more formality than the printed memorandum form or the plain-paper memorandum. % 2...A letterhead memorandum may be sent outside your activity if: % ....... .. a. Direct liaison is authorized, % ....... .. b. The matter is routine, and % ....... .. c. The memo neither makes a commitment nor takes an official stand. % 3...Generally follow the standard letter format, but type “MEMORANDUM” as shown here. % % % E. S. HOWARD

FIGURE 10-4. LETTERHEAD MEMORANDUM

10-6

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND RADM WILLIAM A. MOFFETT BUILDING 47123 BUSE ROAD, BLDG 2272 PATUXENT RIVER, MARYLAND 20670-1547

% NAVAIRSYSCOM 5216 Ser N02/234 20 Jan 15 %

NAVINTCOM 5216 Ser N7/702 23 Jan 15

MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT BETWEEN COMMANDER, NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND AND COMMANDER, NAVAL INTELLIGENCE COMMAND % Subj:..MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT % 1...This example shows a one page “Memorandum of Agreement” (MOA). % 2...On plain bond, type the command titles so the senior is at the top. If the activities are in different cities or states, follow each title with its address. % 3...Center “MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT” on the second line below the date line. Center “BETWEEN” on the next line and follow with the names of the agreeing activities. To prepare a “Memorandum of Understanding” substitute those words for “Memorandum of Agreement.” If your agreement is two or more pages long, number and letter paragraphs and subparagraphs the same as a standard letter. % 4...Arrange signature lines so the senior official is at the right. Type a signature line above the signature lines. % 5...If your activity is the last to sign, send copies of the signed agreement to all cosigners. % % % ________________ __________________ M. L. SIMPSON K. O. ALLISON Acting Deputy

FIGURE 10-5. MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT

10-7

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND RADM WILLIAM A. MOFFETT BUILDING 47123 BUSE ROAD, BLDG 2272 PATUXENT RIVER, MARYLAND 20670-1547

% NAVSEASYSCOM 5216 Ser N02/234 12 Jan 15 %

NAVAIRSYSCOM 5216 Ser N7/702 15 Jan 15

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN COMMANDER, NAVAL SEA SYSTEMS COMMAND AND COMMANDER, NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND % Subj:....MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING % Ref: ......(a) SECNAV M-5216.5 % 1...Purpose. This example shows the first page of a two-page “Memorandum of Understanding” (MOU). This paragraph defines or states, in as few words as possible, the purpose of the agreement or understanding. Use the MOU or MOA to informally document mutual agreements of: % ....... .. a. Facts. % ....... .. b. Intentions. % ....... .. c. Procedures. % ....... .. d. Limits of future actions either or both will take. % ....... .. e. Present or future coordination. % ....... .. f. Present or future commitments. % 2...Problem...Present a clear, concise statement of the problem, to include a brief background. Mention reference (a) and any other references in the text. % 3...Scope...Add a short statement specifying the area covered by the agreement.

FIGURE 10-6. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING – FIRST PAGE 10-8

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

Subj:....MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING % 4...Agreement/Understanding. Spell out the agreement or understanding and responsibilities of and between each of the parties involved. % 5...Effective Date. Enter the date the agreement will take effect. % % % _______________ _______________ C. PEREZ K. SMITH Acting

2

FIGURE 10-7. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING - SECOND PAGE

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SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

CHAPTER 11 Business Letters 11-1 General. Use the business letter to correspond with agencies, businesses, or individuals outside DoD, who are unfamiliar with the standard letter. It also may be used for official correspondence between individuals within DoD, when the occasion calls for a personal approach. Before reading further, review figures 11-1, 11-2, and 11-3. 11-2 Parts of a Business Letter and Format 1. Identification Symbols. Include the following three identification symbols in the upper left corner, blocked one below the other: a.

SSIC;

b.

Originator’s code; and

c. Date. Write the date in month-day-year order. The month is written out in full, followed by the day in Arabic numerals, a comma, and the full year also in Arabic numerals, e.g., May 23, 2014. 2. Inside Address. Place the inside address two to eight lines below the date, blocked flush with the left margin. Placement of the inside address may be adjusted depending on the length of the letter or local policy. Refer to figure 11-4 for proper placement of the inside address when preparing a letter for use with a window envelope. a.

If your letter is directed to a particular individual, include the: (1) Addressee’s courtesy title (Mr., Mrs., Ms.) and full name; (2) business title (Vice President, Accounting), if appropriate; (3) business name; (4) street address; and

(5) the city, state, and ZIP+4 code on the last line. Note new requirement for only one space between state and ZIP code vice two to five spaces. b.

If your letter is directed to a business in general, include the: (1) Business name; (2) full street address; and (3) the city, state, and ZIP+4 code on the last line. 11-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 3. Attention Line. An attention line is optional. Use it to direct your letter to a business in general and to also bring it to the attention of a particular person or department at the same time. Start typing two lines below the last line of the inside address, blocked flush with the left margin, and two lines above the salutation. See figure 11-5. Refer to figure 11-4 for proper placement of the attention line when preparing a letter for use with a window envelope. 4. Salutation Line. Capitalize the first letter of the first word of the salutation as well as the first letter of the addressee’s courtesy title and surname such as “Dear Mr. (or Ms., Mrs., Miss, Dr., Captain, Lieutenant) Jones,” followed by a colon. a.

If your letter is addressed to: (1) An all male organization, use a salutation such as “Gentlemen” or “Dear Sirs.” (2) An all female organization, use a salutation such as “Ladies” or “Mesdames.”

(3) A mixed gender organization, or if you are not sure of the gender mix, use a collective salutation such as “Ladies and Gentlemen” or “Dear Sir or Madam.” (4) A business in general, but directed to the attention of a particular person or department, use a collective salutation such as “Ladies and Gentlemen.” b. If you cannot determine the gender of the addressee from previous communications, omit the courtesy title (Mr., Mrs., Ms., etc.) and address the individual by first name or initial(s) and last name such as “Dear Lee Doe” or “Dear L. Doe.” c. Refer to appendices A and B for models of address and salutations. Start typing on the second line below the last line of the inside address or attention line, flush with the left margin. 5. Subject Line. Use of a subject line is optional and may replace the salutation. The subject line should be very brief, to the point, and not be more than one line in length, if possible. Capitalize every letter in the subject line. See figure 11-2. a. If the subject line is replacing the salutation, start typing on the second line below the last line of the inside address or attention line, flush with the left margin. b. If the subject line is in addition to the salutation, start typing on the second line below the salutation line. 6. Body of the Letter. Single-space within paragraphs and double space between paragraphs. Indent main paragraphs four spaces (or set margin at half inch) and start typing on the fifth space. Do not number main paragraphs. The first lines of subparagraphs should be indented, and lettered or numbered in standard letter fashion. See figure 11-1. A business letter that is likely to run eight lines or less, may be double-spaced. Figure 11-6 is an illustration of a short business letter.

11-2

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 7. References and Enclosures. Refer to previous communications and enclosures in the body of the letter only, without calling them references or enclosures. 8. Complimentary Close. Use “Sincerely” followed by a comma for the complimentary close of a business letter starting at the center of the page on the second line below the text. 9.

Signature Line

a. Start all lines of the signature line at the center of the page, beginning on the fourth line below “Sincerely.” Type or stamp the following information: (1) Signer’s name in all capital letters, with the exception of a last name starting with a prefix, which would appear like this: EXAMPLE: P. W. McNALLY (2) Military grade (if any) spelled out, (3) Functional title, and (4) Authority line. The authority line may be omitted on a routine business letter that neither makes a commitment nor takes an official stand. b. Women’s names may begin with “Miss,” “Mrs.,” or “Ms.” One exception to this would be when using “Mrs.” plus the writer’s husband’s name, which would appear like this: “MS. ALBERT B. SEAY” or “MRS. A. B. SEAY.” 10. Enclosure Line a. Type “Enclosure” on the second line below the signature line, number and describe them briefly. EXAMPLE: Enclosures: 1. GPO Style Manual 2. Webster’s Dictionary b. If the enclosures are insignificant, you do not have to describe them in the enclosure line. Type “Enclosures” and the number of enclosures within parentheses: Enclosures (2). 11. Separate Mailing. When an enclosure is to be sent separately, type “Separate Mailing” and a brief description like this: EXAMPLE: Separate Mailing: SECNAV M-5216.5 11-3

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 12. “Copy To:” Line. If everyone should know that a particular addressee will receive an information copy, show that addressee by using a copy notation. Type “Copy to:” at the left margin on the second line below the enclosure line, if any, or the signature line. List addressees at the left margin or following “Copy to:”. Use long titles for activities listed in the SNDL: EXAMPLE: Copy to: Chief of Naval Operations (N96) 13. Outgoing Copies. Because the business letter does not have a “From:” line, every copy that goes to addressees outside your activity must have a letterhead copy (printed, typed, stamped, or reproduced from the original) to show its origin. 14. Identifying Second and Succeeding Pages. Repeat the identification symbols, from the first page, on the sixth line from the top at the left margin. Continue the text beginning on the second line below the identification symbols. See figure 11-3. 15. Numbering Pages. Do not number a single-page letter or the first page of a multiple-page letter. Center page numbers 1/2 inch from the bottom edge, starting with the number 2. No punctuation accompanies a page number. (To number the pages of a Top Secret document, see DoDM 5200.01-V2.)

11-4

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

........

Main paragraph format.

% ................

a.**Indent each new subdivision eight spaces and start typing at the ninth space. % ................ b.**Text. % ........ ........ ........ (l)*Documents rarely require subdividing to the extent shown below. % ........ ........ ........ (2)*Text. % ........ ........ ........ ........ (a)*Text. % ........ ........ ........ ........ (b)*Text. % ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ (1)*Text. % ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ (2)*Text. % ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ (a)*Text. % ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ (b)*Never subparagraph beyond this level. % ........ Text. % ................ a.**Indent each new subdivision eight spaces and start typing at the ninth space. % ................ b.**Text. % ........ ........ ........ (9)*Text. % ........ ........ ........ (10)*When using two digits, continue to indent each new subdivision (paragraphs will not line up).

FIGURE 11-1. BUSINESS LETTER PARAGRAPH FORMATS

11-5

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY USS NEW HAMPSHIRE (SSN 778) FPO AE 09579-2305

5216 Ser SSN 778/28 January 5, 2015 % Mr. A. B. Seay Vice President, Accounting Widgets Unlimited, Inc. 1234 Any Street Baltimore, MD 21085-1234 % Dear Mr. Seay: % SUBJECT: PREPARATION OF A BUSINESS LETTER % ........ This example shows the first page of a two-page business letter. A subject line is optional, but if used may replace the salutation. Phrase the subject line in normal word order. Make it very brief, to the point, and not longer than one line. Capitalize every letter in the subject line. % ........ Refer to previous communications and enclosures in the body of the letter only, without calling them references or enclosures. Do not number main paragraphs. Subparagraphs are numbered and lettered the same as a standard letter. % ........ Start a paragraph near the end of a page only if that page has room for two lines or more. Continue a paragraph on the following page only if two lines or more can be carried over. A signature page must have at least two lines of text. % ........ Do not number the first page of a single page letter or multiple page letter. The first page is assumed to be page 1. Center page numbers 1/2 inch from the bottom edge, starting with the number 2. No punctuation accompanies a page number.

FIGURE 11-2. BUSINESS LETTER – FIRST PAGE

11-6

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

5216 Ser SSN 778/28 January 5, 2015 % ........

This example illustrates second and final page of a business letter. Start typing on the sixth line flush with the left margin. Repeat sender symbol from the first page. Continue the text from the first page on the second line below the date. % ........ Be sure to mention any enclosed documents in the body of your letter and list them as enclosures on the second line below the signature line. Type “Enclosures:” and follow with a number and a brief description of the enclosures (do not number when you have only one enclosure). When the enclosures are of little importance, instead of listing them with a description, you may indicate the number of enclosures in parentheses without the description; e.g., Enclosures (2). Materials, referred to in the letter, that are being mailed separately should be noted as shown below. % ........ To send an addressee an information copy or a courtesy copy, type “Copy to:” flush with the left margin, two lines below the signature line or two lines below any preceding notation, such as the enclosure or separate mailing notation. % Sincerely, % % % E. SCOTT HOWARD Executive Officer By direction of the Commander % Enclosures:..1...Sample Business Letter ........................... . .. 2. SECNAV M-5216.5 Separate Mailing:..Secretarial Handbook % Copy to:..Chief of Naval Operations (N61)

2

FIGURE 11-3. BUSINESS LETTER - SECOND PAGE

11-7

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY USS MOMSEN (DDG 92) FPO AP 99672--1307

5216 Ser 303/405 January 8, 2015

Line 16

ATTN: RECORDS MANAGER C & A TOOL COMPANY 505 FRANKLIN STREET BELVIEW, VA 22812-1234

Line 25

SUBJECT: SUBJECT LINE AND WINDOW-ENVELOPE FORMAT [C & A Tool Company,] In this example the subject line is used in place of the salutation. This is allowed on routine administrative letters. The first sentence serves as a greeting to the reader as shown above in [ ]. Start typing the identification symbols on line 10, just below the seal. Always start the address on line 16; the salutation or subject line on line 25. You may use a number 10 window envelope if the entire address takes no more than five lines, it does not extend past the middle of the page, and the letter and all enclosures are unclassified. The full address must appear in the window no matter how the letter may shift in the envelope. To fold the letter, turn up the bottom edge so it just covers the subject and then turn back the address portion so the upper fold falls along the top of the subject. Sincerely,

ANN C. PHILLIPS Commander, U.S. Navy Executive Officer By direction of the Commanding Officer

FIGURE 11-4. BUSINESS LETTER FOR WINDOW ENVELOPES

11-8

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY USS ENTERPRISE (CVN 65) FPO AE 09543-2810

5216 Ser 945/321 February 7, 2015 National Widget Company 6543 W. Hobson Street New York, NY 12345-6789 Attention: H. Jones Ladies and Gentlemen: When writing to a company, but directing your letter to a particular person or office, use an attention line. The attention line is placed two lines below the last line of the inside address; type “Attention:” and then a name or title. The salutation must agree with the first line of the address. If the first line is a business, division, or organization collectively, a collective salutation such as “Ladies and Gentlemen” is used even if the attention line directs the letter to an individual. Note the inside address and salutation in this letter. Sincerely,

N. GAMIZ Commander, U.S. Navy Commanding Officer Acting

FIGURE 11-5. BUSINESS LETTER WITH AN "ATTENTION" LINE

11-9

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS 2000 NAVY PENTAGON WASHINGTON DC 20350-2000

5216 Ser 301/789 March 7, 2015 Ms. Jane Ryan J. M. Corporation 287 Duke Street Newton, CA 93333-4321 Dear Ms. Ryan: This is an illustration of a short business letter. There are several techniques you may use to balance the appearance of a letter containing 100 words or less: a. Start the inside address up to eight lines below the date. b. Use side margins of up to two inches. c. In a letter containing eight lines or less, you may double-space throughout the text. {Note proper use of Ms. in parentheses in signature line.} Sincerely,

(Ms.) S. JONES Head, Management Services

FIGURE 11-6. SHORT BUSINESS LETTER

11-10

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

CHAPTER 12 Executive Correspondence 12-1 General. This section provides specific guidance on the internal and external written communication particular to the Headquarters, Department of the Navy (HqDON). When forwarding correspondence to offices of flag/general officers and senior civilian officials within HqDON, every effort should be made to strictly adhere to prescribed formats, as deviation could unnecessarily delay processing for administrative action or complete restaffing. 12-2 Processes 1. Correspondence Management. HqDON correspondence is safeguarded and electronically routed, reviewed, and edited through the DON Correspondence Management System. Taskers 5 is a Web-based computer tracking system that is utilized as a contexts manager for all official action and information correspondence (referred to as “taskers”) for HqDON and selected echelon 2 commands. Refer to OPNAVINST 5222.1 for detailed guidance on the Correspondence Management System. 2. Assigning Action to Incoming Correspondence. All action or information correspondence received in HqDON is analyzed and routed to the appropriate office by the tasking authority for chop, action, coordination, or information. a. Office of the Secretary and Under Secretary of the Navy. All action or information correspondence for the Office of the Secretary of the Navy, Administrative Office (1000 Navy Pentagon, Room 4D652, Washington, DC 20350) is controlled, routed, and safeguarded. (1) Upon receipt, general and Congressional correspondence shall be routed to an executive civilian or staff assistant per SECNAVINST 5430.7Q, Assignment of Responsibilities and Authorities in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy, and assigned as the action office to facilitate coordination and review via SECNAV or Under Secretary of the Navy (UNSECNAV) signature. (2) Operational correspondence shall be assigned to the Director, Navy Staff or the Director, Marine Corps Staff, as appropriate, for action or coordination to prepare proposed responses for SECNAV or UNSECNAV signature. (3) When coordination is required by both Navy and Marine Corps, the Office of the Secretary of the Navy will determine who shall be the appropriate lead action office. b. Office of the Chief and Vice Chief of Naval Operations. All action or information correspondence for the CNO and Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) signature is controlled, routed, and safeguarded by the Office of the Director, Navy Staff, Attn: Executive Secretary (2000 Navy Pentagon, Room 4E563, Washington, DC 20350).

12-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June c. Office of the Commandant and Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps. All action or information correspondence for the CMC or Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps (ACMC) signature is controlled, routed, and safeguarded by the Office of the Director, Marine Corps Staff (3000 Marine Corps Pentagon, Room 4E448, Washington, DC 20350). 3. Routing Changes. Changes to action office assignment shall be made within 48 hours of initial assignment. If the package requires transfer to another agency or office after that time, the original action office shall coordinate with the receiving office. Prior to transferring action, provide tasking authority with the name, organization, and telephone number of the new action office. 4. Due Dates a. General Correspondence. All general correspondence should be responded to within 10 working days of being entered into the Central Management System (CMS) for taskers. If additional time is required, an interim letter and/or an approved extension are mandatory. b. Congressional Correspondence. All Congressional correspondence should be responded to within 5 working days of being entered into taskers. If additional time is required, an interim letter will be sent. A copy of the interim letter shall be forwarded to the SECNAV Congressional Liaison Office (CLO) for their files. All extensions must be coordinated with SECNAV CLO. 5. Extensions. To request an extension of an OSD tasker, the action office must provide the necessary information and prepare an official extension request with a SD Form 391, Secretary of Defense Correspondence Action Report (see figure 12-1). The action office will also need to provide a copy of the proposed interim that will be sent to the correspondent. All documents shall be placed in the working documents area of the assigned tasker. 6.

Interims a. HqDON Correspondence

(1) An interim response shall be provided in the event the tasker cannot be answered within the allotted time. It shall be used to acknowledge receipt of the tasker or letter, but more importantly, to signal the desire to be responsive. The interim response will provide an overview of the information available; the reason for the delay, along with a reasonable anticipated date that the final reply shall be provided. (2) It is the responsibility of the action office to ensure timely planning in the preparation of interim responses. There shall be no extensions given in order to complete an interim letter. The action office concerned shall forward a copy of all interim responses to SECNAV Admin for retention. Subsequent interims shall be approved by the Administrative Aide to the Secretary of the Navy (AASN).

12-2

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June b. OSD Correspondence. An interim response shall be prepared in accordance with paragraph 6a. The interim response shall be signed out at the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (ASN) level. c. Congressional Correspondence. An interim response is required in the event the tasker cannot be answered within the allotted time. It shall be used to acknowledge receipt of the tasker or letter, but more importantly to signal the desire to be responsive (refer to figures 12-2, 12-3, and 12-4). 7.

Distribution

a. A signed/dated copy of the correspondence with a copy of the action memo, references, and background materials shall be returned to the action office. Only a signed copy of the response shall be forwarded to the coordinating offices. b. Envelopes and labels for all correspondence are the responsibility of the action office and shall be included in all SECNAV/UNSECNAV or OSD signature packages. If packages are missing labels, completed and signed correspondence shall be returned to the action office for distribution. 12-3 General Guidelines for Preparing a Letter. Use letters for correspondence with individuals outside the U.S. Government and for formal correspondence with officials of other Federal agencies. 1. Stationery. Prepare all outgoing correspondence for SECNAV, CNO, or designated official signature on the following letterhead: a. Use SECNAV flag stationery (refer to figures 12-7 and 12-8) for personal correspondence. Use plain bond for successive pages. b. Use SECNAV/UNSECNAV letterhead with DoD seal (refer to figure 12-2) for official correspondence (i.e., SECNAV addressed letters, business and personal, or official responses to outside government officials). Use plain bond paper for successive pages. Additionally, use the DON, Office of the Secretary of the Navy (refer to figure 12-6) when authorized to sign on behalf of SECNAV (i.e., SECNAV instructions, notices and “reply direct” action responses). 2.

Format. Prepare all correspondence using 13 point, Times New Roman Font.

a. Salutations. All salutations shall be formal. The following guidance can be used to prepare salutations, text for the body of the letter, closing lines, complimentary close and signature line: b.

Opening Lines

(1) “Thank you for your letter of (date – November 6, 2005 – only use date if response is timely) concerning...”

12-3

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June (2) “Thank you for your recent letter(s) concerning...” (3) “I am responding on behalf of...” c.

Body of the Letter (1) Limit the use of “I" and "we." (2) Each paragraph must be indented ½ inch. Do not number the paragraphs. (3) Limit response to one page whenever possible. Use enclosures if necessary.

(4) An acronym may be used after it is spelled out (be consistent throughout the document), except in the subject line or title. (5) Spell out percent (instead of using the sign “%”). (6) In replying to more than one member of Congress, you may use either: (a) “A similar response has been sent to Senator(s) (last name) and Congressman(s) (last name).” (b) “A similar response has been sent to each of your colleagues who also expressed an interest in this issue.” d.

Closing Lines (last paragraph) (1) “Thank you for bringing this matter to my attention.” (2) “I appreciate you taking the time to share your thoughts on this issue.”

(3) “As always, if I can be of any further assistance, please let me know.” (Preferred on Congressional responses.) e.

Signature Lines

(1) Leave out the signature block on memorandums for SecDef, DepSecDef, SECNAV, and UNSECNAV signature, unless otherwise directed by the aforementioned principal. (2) Correspondence prepared for the signature of other officials should contain standard closing and signature lines. (3) The following is a sample of the signature line:

12-4

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June (a) Type the name at the center of the page on fourth line below the last line of text or complimentary close. (b) Type the official title on the line below his/her name commencing at the center of the page as well.

EXAMPLES: Senior Civilian

Military

S. E. Cheek Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Financial Management & Comptroller)

V. J. BURKS Captain, U.S. Navy Senior Military Assistant to the Secretary of the Navy

NOTE: Title/position is not required if reflected in the letterhead. (Principals Only) f. Copy To. When writing a member of Congress in the capacity of Committee Chairman, send a courtesy copy to the Committee ranking minority member (see figures 12-4, 12-5, and 126). Indicate the “Copy to” addressee at the bottom left of the letter (two lines after signature line).

EXAMPLE: Copy to: The Honorable ________________ Ranking Minority Member 3. Date Line. Do not type the date on correspondence to be signed. Correspondence will be dated by SECNAV Admin once the signature has been obtained. 4. Complimentary Closing. Use “Sincerely,” followed by comma for the complimentary close for routine and congressional correspondence. Start the complimentary close at the center of the page on the second line below the text. Also use “Sincerely,” for complimentary close of a flag personal letter. The following list of suggested complimentary closings for personal correspondence is not all inclusive: “Respectfully,” (Flag/General Officers junior in rank to signer), “Very respectfully,” (Flag/General Officers senior in rank to signer), “Warm regards” (Thank You, Birth announcements and condolences, etc), “Sincerely yours,” or “With great respect,” (High ranking civilians, Senators, Congressmen/women, Governors, etc), and “Sincerely,” or “All the best, (All others). 5. Page Numbering. Number second and succeeding pages at the bottom center of the page allowing at least a double space below the last line of text and 1/2 inch from the bottom of the page. 6. Congressional Committees or Subcommittees Correspondence. Responses addressed to chairpersons of Congressional committees or subcommittees are of particular importance and

12-5

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June require additional guidance. Address the response to the chairperson with a courtesy copy to the ranking minority member. The closing paragraph will specify other chairpersons receiving a similar response. Examples of acceptable closing paragraphs are provided in this chapter. SECNAV will sign all correspondence addressed to the chairpersons of Congressional committees or subcommittees except for routine reports to Congress. Correspondence addressing significant or high profile issues will also be signed by SECNAV. Deviation from this policy must be requested and approved through the CLO. 12-4. General Guidelines for Preparing a Memorandum. Use memoranda for correspondence within the President and White House staff, DoD, Office of the Secretary of the Navy, and Chief of Naval Operations and to send routine material to other Federal agencies. Standard memorandums are used for routine correspondence within the DON. 1.

Action or Information (“Info”) Memorandum

a. The following procedures shall be used for the preparation of SECNAV action (figure 12-9) or info memorandums (figure 12-10): (1) Limit to one page, unless issue is complex and requires greater explanation. (2) Use short, concise and clear bullet statements (use of black dot bullet preferred). (3) Use 13 point, Times New Roman font. (4) Page setup: 1-inch margins, top and bottom, right and left. (5) Double space between headings. (6) Double space between bullets. (7) Number pages at bottom center starting on page 2. (8) If the document is classified, annotate the appropriate security classification markings outlined in DoDM 5200.01, Volume 2. (9) Do not staple or use clam clips to assemble. (10) An acronym may be used after it is spelled out the first time. b. Lead offices must also prepare an action memo for the following types of correspondence: (1) Prepare reply for Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) signature (PRS). (2) Prepare reply for Deputy Secretary of the Defense (DEPSECDEF) signature (PRD).

12-6

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June (3) Answer SECDEF note (ASN). (4) Answer DEPSECDEF note (ADN). (5) Answer military assistant note (AMAN). (6) An action memo signed by a principal or deputy of the lead office must be prepared for submission to the SECDEF, DEPSECDEF via SECNAV and UNSECNAV. 2.

Package Assembly

a. The lead office will submit the proposed response to SECNAV Admin after assembling the package for signature. The package will include an action memo or info memo and be set up as follows: (1) An action or info memo is required when forwarding documents to SECNAV. The action/info memo shall be the top page on the right side of the package. (2) All tabs must be identified in the action/info memo and shall be placed on the right side of the folder under the memo. Use the following procedures to identify the contents of each tab. (a) TAB A. The action item (e.g., item for signature or approval). If a similar letter is going to multiple addresses, all letters can go at TAB A. If there are different items for signature or approval, they should be separated at TAB A-1, A-2, etc. (b) TAB B. Incoming correspondence (if applicable). (c) TAB C. Background information. If more than one tab is needed, tab accordingly. If substantive or lengthy background information is forwarded, provide a one-page executive summary of the information. (d) TAB D (or last tab in package). Coordination information. Provide the SECNAV a coordination page to identify a list of coordinating offices/activities (figure 12-11). All coordination shall be provided or listed on one page and should be the last tab. Include office/department, point of contact, phone number and date the package was processed or coordinated. Concurrences must be obtained from heads of the SECNAV components involved, or, in their absence, the principal deputy. List non-concurrence and provide comments at the coordination tab. If the package did not require coordination, state “none” on the action or info memo. When providing coordination, list principles, deputies or executive assistants as points of contact for all correspondence to be signed by the SECNAV or UNSECNAV. Approval/credibility of an action memo often depends on the coordination efforts. b.

Folder Assembly (1) The package shall be assembled as follows:

12-7

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Left side Route Slip/Buck Slip Incoming Letter Drafts

Right Side Action or Info Memo TAB A (action) TAB B (reference) TAB C (summary/chops) TAB D (coordination)

Left Side

Right Side

Action or Info Memo

Drafts Incoming Letter Copy of Tasker

i. Drafts ii. Action or iii. C Info Memo o p y o f

ActionTAB orA Info Memo TAB B TAB C TAB D

(2) Tabs are required to be typed and displayed in consecutive order on the far right T to see all tabs at once. hand side on a separate plain tab paper. The reviewer should be able a s k e r

12-8

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

FIGURE 12-1. SD FORM 391– DOD CORRESPONDENCE ACTION REPORT

12-9

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS WASHINGTON DC 20350-1000

March 3, 2015 Mr. or Ms. ( ) 1234 Anywhere Street Everywhere, NV 89701 Dear Mr. or Ms. (

):

This is to acknowledge your letter of (April 2, 2007) (Use “recent” letter) to (addressee) concerning (subject). (If not addressed to CNO, then insert the following: Your letter has been forwarded to the Chief of Naval Operations for reply). Your letter has been referred to (lead office). I am responding on behalf of (name). We are gathering the information necessary to provide you a substantive response and will reply further upon completion of our investigation into this matter. You can expect a final response by (specify date) (up to 30 days from original due date). In the interim, if you require further assistance or have additional information to provide, you may contact (name, phone number), who is coordinating the response. Sincerely,

J. W. GREENERT [Title/Position] (Not required when replicated on letterhead)

FIGURE 12-2. SAMPLE INTERIM RESPONSE FOR INCOMING CORRESPONDENCE

12-10

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY WASHINGTON DC 20350-1000

July 20, 2015

The Honorable ( ) (United States Senate) (House of Representatives) Washington, DC (20510) (+ (4 digit code) Dear (Senator or [Mr., Mrs., or Ms.]) (Last Name): This is an interim response to your correspondence of (April 2, 2007) (Use "recent" letter if response is not timely) on behalf of your constituent, (Full Name), concerning (Subject). We are currently gathering information necessary to provide you a substantive response to address your inquiry. The issue(s) addressed in your letter raised several questions concerning (Subject). You can expect our final reply by (date – December 6, 2015). If you should need any further assistance regarding this matter, please contact (Action Officer, E-mail address, and Phone Number). Sincerely,

Ashton Carter [Title/Position] (Not required when replicated on letterhead)

FIGURE 12-3. SAMPLE INTERIM RESPONSE FOR CONGRESSIONAL CORRESPONDENCE 12-11

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 1000 NAVY PENTAGON WASHINGTON DC 20350-1000

August 15, 2015 The Honorable (Full Name) Chairman, Committee on Armed Services House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515

Note: This letterhead should be used only by Principles who are responding on behalf of The Secretary of the Navy and have been directed via Tasker, verbal, or delegation.

Dear Mr. or Madam Chairman: Thank you for your letter of (July 31, 2015), concerning (Subject). I am responding on behalf of the Secretary of the Navy. (Response). Again, I appreciate you taking the time to share your thoughts on this issue. If I can be of further assistance, please let me know. Sincerely,

Sean J. Stackley Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) [Title/Position] (required when not replicated on letterhead) Enclosure (if applicable) Note: If a Senator or Congressman/woman uses letterhead paper that lists him/her as Chairperson, the response should be in the above format. Otherwise, address should be: The Honorable (Full Name) United States Senate Washington, DC 20510

The Honorable (Full Name) House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515

Dear Senator (Last Name):

Dear Mr., Mrs., Ms.(Last Name):

A similar letter has been sent to Chairman ( assistance, please let me know.

). As always, if I can be of further

Copy to: The Honorable (Last Name) Ranking Minority Member

FIGURE 12-4. CONGRESSIONAL RESPONSE, ONE CHAIRPERSON

12-12

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF THE NAVY (RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ACQUISITION) 1000 NAVY PENTAGON WASHINGTON DC 20350-1000

August 25, 2015 The Honorable (Full Name) Chairman, Committee on Armed Services House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515 Dear Mr. Chairman: Thank you for your letter of (July 31, 2015), concerning (Subject). (Response). Again, I appreciate you taking the time to share your thoughts on this issue. If I can be of further assistance, please let me know. Sincerely,

Sean J. Stackley [Title/Position] (Not required when replicated on letterhead) Enclosure (if applicable) Note: If a Senator or Congressman/woman uses letterhead paper that lists him/her as Chairperson, the response should be in the above format. Otherwise, address should be: The Honorable (Full Name) United States Senate Washington, DC 20510

The Honorable (Full Name) House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515

Dear Senator (Last Name):

Dear Mr., Mrs., Ms.(Last Name):

A similar letter has been sent to Chairman ( assistance, please let me know.

). As always, if I can be of further

Copy to: The Honorable (Last Name) Ranking Minority Member

FIGURE 12-5. CONGRESSIONAL RESPONSE, TWO CHAIRPERSONS

12-13

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 1000 NAVY PENTAGON WASHINGTON DC 20350-1000

August 6, 2015 Note: This letterhead should be used only by Principles who are responding on behalf of The Secretary of the Navy and have been directed via Tasker, verbal, or delegation.

The Honorable (Full Name) Chairman, Committee on Armed Services House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515 Dear Mr. Chairman:

Thank you for your letter of (July 31, 2015), concerning (Subject), I am responding for the Secretary of the Navy. (Response). Again, I appreciate you taking the time to share your thoughts on this issue. If I can be of further assistance, please let me know.

Sincerely,

Thomas W. Hicks Under Secretary of the Navy [Title/Position] (Not required when replicated on letterhead) Enclosure (if applicable) Note: If a Senator or Congressman/woman uses letterhead paper that lists him/her as Chairperson, the response should be in the above format. Otherwise, address should be: The Honorable (Full Name) United States Senate Washington, DC 20510

The Honorable (Full Name) House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515

Dear Senator (Last Name):

Dear Mr., Mrs., Ms.(Last Name):

A similar letter has been sent to Chairman (Full Name). As always, if I can be of further assistance, please let me know. Copy to: The Honorable (Last Name) Ranking Minority Member

FIGURE 12-6. CONGRESSIONAL RESPONSE, TO A CHAIRMAN OF A SELECT COMMITTEE 12-14

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY

12 February 2015 Chief of Naval Operations 2000 Navy Pentagon Washington, DC 20350-2000 Dear Admiral Greenert, Thank you for speaking on my behalf at this year’s Navy League luncheon. Your inspiring words received many compliments. Secretary Carter expressed his appreciation and asked me to pass on many thanks. I appreciate your valuable time. Again, thank you. Warm Regards,

Ray Mabus

FIGURE 12-7. FLAG STATIONERY (7 x 9) – SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 12-15

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

FIGURE 12-8. FLAG STATIONERY (5 x 7) – CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS 12-16

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June [USE APPROPRIATE LETTERHEAD] CLASSIFICATION (if required) ACTION MEMO February 20, 2015 UNSECNAV _________

FOR: SECRETARY OF THE NAVY FROM: Paul L. Oostburg Sanz, General Counsel of the Navy (Full Name, Title) SUBJECT: Action Memo Format (Use Title Case and Do Not Use Acronyms, i.e., DON, DoD)  What the Secretary should do? This bullet explains what action is required. This is different from the entry for recommendation (TAB A).  Due date for action. This bullet is used for incoming correspondence at TAB B. Do not enter “I would like to have this done by” due date.  Why it is necessary and/or acceptable for the Secretary to approve or sign the recommended action? This bullet identifies additional key points/contentious issues and any problem areas (TAB C). RECOMMENDATION: SECNAV approve or sign (TAB A). NOTE: The recommendation supports the first bullet of the Action Memo. Use this example if there is a document for signature. If no document for proposal/ signature at TAB A use below recommendation:

RECOMMENDATION: That SECNAV release funds by initialing as appropriate: Approve_________ Disapprove_______ COORDINATION: [TAB D] (or as applicable – last tab) or [None] Attachments: As stated Classification/Declassification Authority and Instructions (if required) Prepared By: Name, Organization, Phone (1 inch from the bottom) CLASSIFICATION (if required)

FIGURE 12-9. ACTION MEMORANDUM 12-17

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June [USE APPROPRIATE LETTERHEAD] CLASSIFICATION (if required)

INFO MEMO February 6, 2015

UNSECNAV _______

FOR:

SECRETARY OF THE NAVY

FROM: Dennis McGinn, Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Installations and Environment) (Full Name, Title) SUBJECT: Info Memo Format Reference: SECNAV M-5216.5



The first bullet will identify what information is being forwarded and why. If forwarding a document, identify as TAB A.



The second and subsequent bullets will provide additional key points, as required: background at TAB A.



When using a reference line, you would annotate it as shown above. A single reference does not get assigned a letter. Multiple references are assigned (a), (b), etc. The “R” in reference is the only letter capitalized. You would use the reference line like this in all types of Executive Correspondence.

COORDINATION: [TAB D] (or as applicable – last tab) or [None] Attachments: **If there is more than one reference the reference line would look like the following: As stated References: (a) SECNAV M-5216.5 (b) SECNAV M-5510.36

Prepared By: Name, Organization, Phone

FIGURE 12-10. INFORMATION MEMORANDUM 12-18

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June [USE PLAIN BOND PAPER] COORDINATION PAGE Office/Dept

Point of Contact/Title

Phone

Date

OPNAV (N44)

RDML Jones Director

(703) 555-1212

07 Jan 15

OPNAV (N4B) Mrs. A. Whittemore ADCNO

(703) 556-1111

12 Jan 15

DMCS

Col Jones SGS

(703) 697-1668

20 Jan 15

DNS

VADM Fitzgerald Director

(703) 555-1213

29 Jan 15

ASN I&E

Mr. B.J. Penn ASN

DSN 225-2222

02 Feb 15

DASN (I&E)

Mr. Wayne Arny DASN

(703) 555-1215

10 Feb 15

FIGURE 12-11. COORDINATION PAGE 12-19

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY WASHINGTON DC 20350-1000

March 6, 2015

MEMORANDUM FOR SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEPUTY SECRETARY OF DEFENSE SUBJECT: Preparing a Memorandum for the Office of the Secretary of Defense Use memoranda for correspondence within the Department of Defense, to the President and White House staff, and to send routine correspondence to other Federal Agencies. Memos may be sent to multiple addresses. Prepare memos on letterhead appropriate to the signing official. Set a twoinch top margin and one-inch side and bottom margin on first pages. Use plain paper for succeeding pages with one-inch margins on all sides. Single-space paragraphs and double–space paragraphs between them. Indent paragraphs a half-inch from the left margin. Indent subparagraphs an additional half- inch and identify them with bullets, numbers, and lower case letters. Double space between subparagraphs. Do not date memos the Secretary or Deputy Secretary of Defense will sign. The date shall be added when signed. Also omit the signature line on memos the Secretary or Deputy Secretary of Defense will sign. For other officials, the signature line may be typed or stamped leaving four blank lines below the text, beginning at the center of the page. Run-over lines should be indented two spaces. The title in the signature line may be omitted if the signer’s position is reflected in the letterhead. Normally attachments shall be identified in the text of the memo. When this is the case the notation “Attachments: As stated” shall be typed at the left margin a double space below the signature line. When attachments are not identified, list all of them in the order they appear in the text.

Ray Mabus Attachments: As stated cc: General Counsel

FIGURE 12-12. STANDARD MEMORANDUM FOR

12-20

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

APPENDIX A MILITARY MODELS OF ADDRESS Addressee

Letter and Envelope

Salutation

Navy and Coast Guard Officers Admiral Vice Admiral Rear Admiral (Upper Half) Rear Admiral (Lower Half) Captain Commander Lieutenant Commander Lieutenant Lieutenant Junior Grade Ensign Chief Warrant Officer

Warrant Officer

ADM VADM RADM RDML CAPT CDR LCDR LT LTJG ENS CWO5 CWO4 CWO3 CWO2 WO

Dear Admiral (surname): “ “ Dear Captain (surname): Dear Commander (surname): “ Dear Lieutenant (surname): “ Dear Ensign (surname): Dear Chief Warrant Officer (surname): Dear Chief Warrant Officer (surname): Dear Chief Warrant Officer (surname): Dear Chief Warrant Officer (surname): Dear Warrant Officer (surname):

Marine Corps, Air Force, and Army Officers General Lieutenant General Major General Brigadier General Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Major Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Chief Warrant Officer 5 Chief Warrant Officer 4 Chief Warrant Officer 3 Chief Warrant Officer 2 Warrant Officer

Marines Gen LtGen MajGen BGen Col LtCol Maj Capt 1stLt 2ndLt CWO5 CWO4 CWO3 CWO2 WO

Air Force Gen Lt Gen Maj Gen Brig Gen Col Lt Col Maj Capt 1st Lt 2nd Lt

Army GEN LTG MG BG COL LTC MAJ CPT 1LT 2LT CW5 CW4 CW3 CW2 WO1

Dear General (surname): “ “ “ Dear Colonel (surname): “ Dear Major (surname): Dear Captain (surname): Dear Lieutenant (surname): “ Dear Chief Warrant Officer (surname): “ “ “ Dear Warrant Officer (surname):

Navy and Coast Guard Enlisted Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard Master Chief Petty Officer Senior Chief Petty Officer Chief Petty Officer

MCPON MCPOCG MCPO SCPO CPO

A-1

Dear Master Chief (surname): “ “ Dear Senior Chief (surname): Dear Chief (surname):

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Addressee Petty Officer First Class Petty Officer Second Class Petty Officer Third Class Airman (includes Apprentice and Recruit) Constructionman (includes Apprentice and Recruit) Fireman (includes Apprentice and Recruit) Hospitalman (includes Apprentice and Recruit) Seaman (includes Apprentice and Recruit)

Letter and Envelope

Salutation

PO1 PO2 PO3 AN or AA or AR

Dear Petty Officer (surname):

CN or CA or CR

Dear Constructionman (surname):

FN or FA or FR

Dear Fireman (surname):

HN or HA or HR

Dear Hospitalman (surname):

SN or SA or SR

Dear Seaman (surname):

Dear Airman (surname):

Marine Corps Enlisted Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Sergeant Major Master Gunnery Sergeant First Sergeant Master Sergeant Gunnery Sergeant Staff Sergeant Sergeant Corporal Lance Corporal Private First Class Private

SgtMaj SgtMaj MGySgt lstSgt MSgt GySgt SSgt Sgt Cpl LCpl PFC Pvt

Dear Sergeant Major (surname): “ Dear Master Gunnery Sergeant (surname): Dear First Sergeant (surname): Dear Master Sergeant (surname): Dear Gunnery Sergeant (surname): Dear Staff Sergeant (surname): Dear Sergeant (surname): Dear Corporal (surname): “ Dear Private First Class (surname): Dear Private (surname):

SMA CSM SGM 1SG MSG PSG SFC SSG SGT CPL PFC PVT SP7 SP6 (etc)

Dear Sergeant Major (surname): “ “ Dear First Sergeant (surname): Dear Master Sergeant (surname): Dear Sergeant (surname): “ “ “ Dear Corporal (surname): Dear Private (surname): “ Dear Specialist (surname): “

Army Enlisted Sergeant Major of the Army Command Sergeant Major Sergeant Major First Sergeant Master Sergeant Platoon Sergeant Sergeant First Class Staff Sergeant Sergeant Corporal Private First Class Private Specialists (all grades)

A-2

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Addressee

Letter and Envelope

Salutation

Air Force Enlisted Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Chief Master Sergeant Senior Master Sergeant Master Sergeant Technical Sergeant Staff Sergeant Senior Airman Airman First Class Airman Airman Basic

CMSAF CMSgt SMSgt MSgt TSgt SSgt SrA A1C Amn AB

Dear Chief (surname): “ Dear Sergeant (surname): “ “ “ Dear Airman (surname): “ “ “

Other Military All retired military

(rank) (full name), (USN, Dear (rank) (surname): USMCR or other branch) (Ret)

Chaplain

Chaplain (full name) (rank), CHC, USN

A-3

Dear Chaplain (surname):

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

APPENDIX B CIVILIAN MODELS OF ADDRESS 1. The following examples of civilian models of address, salutation, and complimentary close are used in the preparation of Navy business-format letters. They may be varied depending on circumstances. 2. Use “The Honorable (Name)” in the address of Presidential appointees as well as Federal and state elected officials. Avoid “The Honorable” in addresses of county and city officials, except for mayors. 3. Use the title “Madam” in the salutation of a letter to a high-level woman diplomat or government official, such as the United States Ambassador to the United Nations. Use the title “Madam” in salutations of letters destined for women foreign heads of state and diplomats. 4. Use the title “Ms.” when addressing a woman by her surname (Ms. Jones). However, “Ms.,” like “Mr.,” indicates nothing with regard to a person’s marital status. Therefore, use “Miss” or “Mrs.” in the salutation when an incumbent or correspondent has indicated this preference. Never use “Ms.” with a woman’s full married name; e.g., “Ms. John E. Doe” is incorrect. Use “Mr.” with a position or surname if you don’t know the addressee’s gender and can’t find out readily.

B-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June MODELS OF ADDRESS AND SALUTATION Addressee

Letter and Envelope

Salutation and Complimentary Close

The White House The President

The President The White House Washington, DC 20500-0001

Dear Mr. (or Madam) President: Respectfully yours,

Husband (or Wife) of the President

Mr. (or Ms.) (full name) The White House Washington, DC 20500-0001

Dear Mr. (or Mrs.) (surname): Sincerely,

Assistant to the President

The Honorable (full name) Assistant to the President The White House Washington, DC 20500-0001

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Secretary to the President

The Honorable (full name) Secretary to the President The White House Washington, DC 20500-0001

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Secretary to the President (with military rank)

(full rank) (full name) Secretary to the President The White House Washington, DC 20500-0001

Dear (rank) (surname): Sincerely,

The Vice President The White House Washington, DC 20500-0001 Mr. (or Ms.) (full name) The White House Washington, DC 20500-0001

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Vice President: Sincerely,

The Honorable (full name) President of the Senate Washington, DC 20510-0001

Dear Mr. (or Madam) President: Sincerely,

The Chief Justice

The Chief Justice of the United States The Supreme Court of the United States Washington, DC 20543-0001

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Chief Justice: Sincerely,

Associate Justice

Mr. (or Madam) Justice (surname) The Supreme Court of the United States Washington, DC 20543-0001

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Justice: Sincerely,

Retired Justice

The Honorable (full name) (local address)

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Justice: Sincerely,

Presiding Justice

The Honorable (full name) Presiding Justice (name of the court) (local address)

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Justice: Sincerely,

Judge of a Court

The Honorable (full name) Judge of the (name of court; if a U.S. district court, give district)

Dear Judge (surname): Sincerely,

The Vice President As Vice President

Husband (or Wife) of the Vice President

As Senate President

Dear Mr. (or Mrs.) (surname): Sincerely,

The Judiciary

B-2

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Salutation and Complimentary Close

Addressee

Letter and Envelope

Clerk of a Court

Mr. (or Ms.) (full name) Clerk of the (name of court; if a U.S. district court, give district). (local address)

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Attorney

Mr. (or Ms.) (full name) Attorney at Law (local address)

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

President pro Tempore of the Senate

The Honorable (full name) President pro Tempore of the Senate United States Senate Washington, DC 20510-0000

Dear Senator (surname): Sincerely,

Committee Chairman, U.S. Senate

The Honorable (full name) Chairman, Committee on (name of committee) United States Senate Washington, DC 20510-0000

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Sincerely,

Subcommittee Chairman U.S. Senate

The Honorable (full name) Chairman, Subcommittee on (name of subcommittee) (name of parent committee) United States Senate Washington, DC 20510-0000

Dear Senator (surname): Sincerely, OR Dear Mr. (or Madam) Chairman: Sincerely, (When incoming correspondence is so signed and pertains to subcommittee business)

United States Senator (Washington, DC office)

The Honorable (full name) United States Senate Washington, DC 20510-0000 OR The Honorable (full name) United States Senator (local address)

Dear Senator (surname): Sincerely,

The Honorable (full name) Majority (or Minority) Leader United States Senate Washington, DC 20510-0000 OR The Honorable (full name) Majority (or Minority) Leader United States Senate (local address)

Dear Senator (surname): Sincerely,

The Honorable (full name) United States Senator-elect United States Senate Washington, DC 20510-0000 OR Mr. (or Ms.) (full name) United States Senator-elect (local address, if given)

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

The Senate

(Away from Washington, DC)

Senator, Majority (or Minority) Leader (Washington, DC office)

(Away from Washington, DC)

United States Senator-elect (Washington, DC office)

(Away from Washington, DC)

B-3

Dear Senator (surname): Sincerely,

Dear Senator (surname): Sincerely,

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Salutation and Complimentary Close

Addressee

Letter and Envelope

Office of a deceased Senator

Mr. (or Ms.) (Secretary’s full name, if known) Secretary to the Late Honorable (full name) United States Senate Washington, DC 20510-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Former Senator

The Honorable (full name) (local address)

Dear Senator (surname): Sincerely,

Secretary of the Senate

The Honorable (full name) Secretary of the Senate Washington, DC 20510-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Secretary or Administrative Assistant to a Senator

Mr. (or Ms.) (full name) Secretary/Administrative Assistant to the Honorable (full name) United States Senate Washington, DC 20510-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

The Honorable (full name) Speaker of the House of Representatives

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Speaker: Sincerely,

House of Representatives Speaker of the House of Representatives

Washington, DC 20515-0000 Committee Chairman

The Honorable (full name) Chairman, Committee on (name of committee) House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515-0000

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Chairman: Sincerely,

Subcommittee Chairman

The Honorable (full name) Chairman, Subcommittee on (name of subcommittee) (Name of parent committee) House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515-0000

Dear Representative (surname): Sincerely, OR Dear Mr. (or Madam) Chairman: Sincerely, (When incoming correspondence is so signed and pertains to subcommittee’s business)

United States Representative (Washington, DC office)

The Honorable (full name) House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515-0000 OR The Honorable (full name) Member, United States House of Representatives (local address)

Dear Representative (surname): Sincerely,

The Honorable (full name) Representative-elect House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515-0000 OR Mr. (or Ms.) (full name) Representative-elect (local address, if given)

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

(Away from Washington, DC)

Representative-elect

B-4

Dear Representative (surname): Sincerely,

Dear Representative (surname): Sincerely,

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Salutation and Complimentary Close

Addressee

Letter and Envelope

Office of a deceased Representative

Mr. (or Ms.) (Secretary’s full name, if known) Secretary to the Late Honorable (full name) House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Former Representative

The Honorable (full name) (local address)

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Resident Commissioner

The Honorable (full name) Resident Commissioner from (name of area) House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Delegate of the District of Columbia

The Honorable (full name) House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Comptroller General (Head of the General Accounting Office)

The Honorable (full name) Comptroller General of the United States Washington, DC 20548-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Public Printer (Head of the U.S. Government Printing Office)

The Honorable (full name) U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, DC 20401-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Librarian of Congress

The Honorable (full name) Librarian of Congress Washington, DC 20540-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Members of the Cabinet (if addressed as ‘Secretary”)

The Honorable (full name) Secretary of (name of department)* Washington, DC 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Secretary: Sincerely,

Attorney General (Head of the Department of Justice)

The Honorable (full name) Attorney General Washington, DC 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Attorney General: Sincerely,

Under Secretary of a Department

The Honorable (full name) Under Secretary of (name of department) Washington, DC 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Deputy Secretary of a Department

The Honorable (full name) Deputy Secretary of (name of department) Washington, DC 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Assistant Secretary of a Department

The Honorable (full name) Assistant Secretary of (name of department) Washington, DC 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Legislative Agencies

Executive Departments

*Titles for Cabinet Secretaries are: Secretary of Agriculture, Secretary of Commerce, Secretary of Defense, Secretary of Education, Secretary of Energy, Secretary of Health and Human Services, Secretary of Homeland Security, Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Secretary of Interior, Secretary of Labor, Secretary of State, Secretary of Transportation, Secretary of Treasury, and Secretary of Veterans Affairs.

B-5

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Addressee

Letter and Envelope

Salutation and Complimentary Close

Independent Organizations Director, Office of Management and Budget

Honorable (full name) Director, Office of Management and Budget Washington, DC 20503-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Head of a Federal Agency,

The Honorable (full name) (title), (name of agency) Washington, DC 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Head of a major organization within an agency (if appointed by the President)

The Honorable (full name) (title ) (organization) (name of agency) Washington, DC 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

President of a Commission

The Honorable (full name) President, (name of commission) Washington, DC 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Chairman of a Commission

The Honorable (full name) Chairman, (name of commission) Washington, DC 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Chairman: Sincerely,

Chairman of a Board

The Honorable (full name) Chairman, (name of board) Washington, DC 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Chairman: Sincerely,

Postmaster General

The Honorable (full name) Postmaster General Washington, DC 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Postmaster General: Sincerely,

American Ambassador

The Honorable (full name) American Ambassador American Embassy (city), (country)

Sir (or Madam): (formal) Dear Mr. (or Madam) Ambassador: . (informal) Sincerely,

American Ambassador (with military rank)

(full rank) (full name) American Ambassador American Embassy (city), (country)

Sir (or Madam): (formal) Dear (rank) (surname): (informal) Sincerely,

American Minister

The Honorable (full name) American Minister (city), (country)

Sir (or Madam): (formal) Dear Mr. (or Madam) Minister: (informal) Sincerely,

American Minister (with military rank)

(full rank) (full name) American Minister (city), (country)

Sir (or Madam): (formal) Dear (rank) (surname): (informal) Sincerely,

American Missions

B-6

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Addressee

Letter and Envelope

Salutation and Complimentary Close

Foreign Government Officials Foreign Ambassador in the United States

His (or Her) Excellency (full name) Ambassador of (country) (local address) 00000-0000

Excellency: (formal) Dear Mr. (or Madam) Ambassador: (informal) Sincerely,

Foreign Minister in the United States

The Honorable (full name) Minister of (country) (local address) 00000-0000

Sir (or Madam): (formal) Dear Mr. (or Madam) Minister: (informal) Sincerely,

Foreign Charge d’Affaires in the United States

Mr. (or Madam) (full name) Charge d’Affaires of (country) (local address) 00000-0000

Sir (or Madam): (formal) Dear Mr. (or Madam) Charge d’ Affaires: (informal) Sincerely,

King or Prince of Foreign Country

His Excellency (King/Prince) (full name) King/Prince of (country) (Address)

Your Royal Highness Your Excellency Sincerely,

Governor of State

The Honorable (full name) Governor of (state) (city), (state) 00000-0000

Dear Governor (surname): Sincerely,

Acting Governor of a State

The Honorable (full name) Acting Governor of (state) (city), (state) 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Lieutenant Governor of a State

The Honorable (full name) Lieutenant Governor of (state) (city), (state) 00000-0000

Dear Governor (surname): Sincerely,

Secretary of State of a State

The Honorable (full name) Secretary of State of (state) (city), (state) 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of a State

The Honorable (full name) Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of (state) (city), (state) 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Chief Justice: Sincerely,

Attorney General of a State

The Honorable (full name) Attorney General of the State of (state) (city), (state) 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Madam) Attorney General Sincerely,

Treasurer, Comptroller, or Auditor of a State

The Honorable (full name) State Treasurer (Comptroller or Auditor) of the State of (state) (city), (state) 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

State and Local Government

B-7

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Salutation and Complimentary Close

Addressee

Letter and Envelope

President of the Senate of a State

The Honorable (full name) President of the Senate of the State of (state) (city), (state) 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

State Senator

The Honorable (full name) (state) Senate (city), (state) 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

State Representative, Assemblyman or Delegate

The Honorable (full name) (state) House of Representatives (Assembly or House of Delegates) (city), (state) 00000-0000

Dear Mr. (or Ms.) (surname): Sincerely,

Mayor

The Honorable (full name) Mayor of (city) (city), (state) 00000-0000

Dear Mayor (surname): Sincerely,

Cardinal

His Eminence (Christian name) Cardinal (surname) Archbishop of (Archdiocese) (local address) 00000-0000

Your Eminence: (formal) Dear Cardinal (surname): (informal) Sincerely,

Archbishop

The Most Reverend (full name) Archbishop of (Archdiocese) (local address) 00000-0000

Your Excellency: (formal) Dear Archbishop (surname): (informal) Sincerely,

Bishop

The Most Reverend (full name) Bishop of (diocese) (local address) 00000-0000

Your Excellency: (formal) Dear Bishop (surname): (informal) Sincerely,

Monsignor

The Reverend Monsignor (full name) (local address) 00000-0000 (informal)

Reverend Monsignor: (formal) Dear Monsignor (surname): Sincerely,

Priest

The Reverend (full name) (initials of the order, if any, after name) (local address) 00000-0000

Reverend Father: (formal) Dear Father (surname): (informal) Sincerely,

Superior of a Sisterhood

The Reverend Mother Superior (name of institution) (local address) 00000-0000 (informal)

Dear Reverend Mother: (formal) Dear Mother (name): Sincerely,

Sister

Sister (full name) (name of organization) (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Sister (full name): Sincerely,

Ecclesiastical Organizations Roman Catholic Church

B-8

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Salutation and Complimentary Close

Addressee

Letter and Envelope

Superior of a Brotherhood

Brother (name) Superior of (institution) (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Brother: Sincerely,

Member of a Brotherhood

Brother (full name) (name of organization) (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Brother (full name): Sincerely,

Bishop

The Right Reverend (full name) (local address) 00000-0000 (informal)

Right Reverend: (formal) Dear Bishop (surname): Sincerely,

Archdeacon

The Venerable (full name) Archdeacon of (name) (local address) 00000-0000

Venerable Sir (or Madam): (formal) Dear Archdeacon (surname): (informal) Sincerely,

Dean

The Very Reverend (full name) Dean of (church) (local address) 00000-0000

Very Reverend: (formal) Dear Dean (surname): (informal) Sincerely,

Canon

The Very Reverend (full name) Canon of (church) (local address) 00000-0000

Very Reverend: (formal) Dear Canon (surname): (informal) Sincerely,

Rector

The Reverend (full name) The Rector of (name) (local address) 00000-0000

Reverend: (formal) Dear (Dr., Mr., or Ms.) (surname): (informal) Sincerely,

Methodist Bishop

The Reverend (full name) Methodist Bishop (local address) 00000-0000

Reverend: (formal) Dear Bishop (surname): (informal) Sincerely,

Mormon Elder

Elder (or Brother) (full name) Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Elder (surname): Sincerely,

Presbyterian Moderator

The Moderator of (name) (local address) 00000-0000 OR The Reverend (full name) Moderator of (name) (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Reverend: (formal) Dear (Dr., Mr., or Ms.) (surname): (informal) Sincerely,

Rabbi

Rabbi (full name) (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Rabbi (surname): Sincerely,

Anglican/Episcopal Church

Clergy of Other Denominations

B-9

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Salutation and Complimentary Close

Addressee

Letter and Envelope

Seventh-Day Adventist Elder

Elder (full name) General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Elder (surname): Sincerely,

Minister, Pastor or Rector (with doctorate)

The Reverend (full name) (title, name of church) (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Dr. (surname): Sincerely,

Minister, Pastor or Rector (without doctorate)

The Reverend (full name) (title, name of church) (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Reverend: (surname):

Eastern Orthodox Archbishop/ Metropolitan

His Eminence (Christian Name) Archbishop of (city) (local address) 00000-0000

Your Eminence: (formal) Dear Archbishop (surname) Sincerely,

Eastern Orthodox Bishop

The Right Reverend (Christian name) Bishop of (city) (local address) 00000-0000

Your Grace: (formal) Dear Bishop: (informal) Sincerely,

Eastern Orthodox Priest

The Reverend (name) (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Reverend Father: (formal) Dear Father (Christian name): (informal) Sincerely,

President of a College or University

Dr. (full name) President, (name of institution) (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Dr. (surname): Sincerely,

Dean of a University or College

Dean (full name) School of (name) (name of institution) (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Dr. (surname): (“Dear Dean” if without doctoral degree) Sincerely,

Professor

Professor (full name) Department of (name) (name of institution) (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Dr. (surname): (“Dear Professor” if without doctoral degree) Sincerely,

An Unmarried Woman

Ms. (or Miss) (full name) (local address) 00000 -0000

Dear Ms. (or Miss) (surname): Sincerely,

A Married Woman or Widow

Ms. (or Mrs.) (husband’s full name) (local address) 00000-0000

Dear Ms. (or Mrs.) (surname): Sincerely,

Two or More Unmarried Women

Mses. (surname) and (surname) (local address) 00000-0000

Ladies (or Mesdames): OR Dear Msess. (or Misses) OR (surname) and (surname): Sincerely,

Educational Institutions

Other Addressees

Ms. (or Miss) (full name) and Ms. (or Miss) (full name) (local address) 00000-0000

B-10

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Addressee

Letter and Envelope

Two or More Men

Messrs. (surname) and (surname) (local address) 0000-0000 OR Mr. (full name) and Mr. (full name) (local address) 00000-000

B-11

Salutation and Complimentary Close Gentlemen: OR Dear Mr. (surname) and Mr. (surname): Sincerely,

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

APPENDIX C STATIONERY REQUIREMENTS 1. Preprinted Letterhead a. Printing. Preprinted letterhead may be produced by letterpress, or offset lithography, whichever is more economical. Embossing or engraving processes, including thermographic processes are prohibited unless approved by the local Defense Logistics Agency Document Services. b. Seal. All “official” letterhead stationery of the DON shall bear a 1-inch diameter of the DoD seal 1/2 inch from the upper left and top edge of the sheet. c. Other Emblematic Devices. Other seals, emblems, insignia, decorative, or emblematic devices shall not be incorporated. d. Preprinted Letterhead Language, Typography, and Printing. All components of the DON and Headquarters United States Marine Corps shall comply with the following. (1) First Line. DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY centered horizontally 5/8 of an inch from the top edge of the sheet in 10 to 12 point type. Try to match the following font styles: Copperplate BT, Copperplate 32, Univers 55 (Roman) or Helvetica Roman. Marine Corps activities shall print UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS. (2) Individual Activity Name. Six to nine point matching font. (3) Address and Zone Improvement Plan (Zip) Code. Six-point capital letters. Center horizontally. Do not use building numbers as part of the zip code, i.e. 17055-0791. (4) Leading. (space between lines) should be 13 points. (5) Spacing. The bottom of the printing shall be 1 and 1/16 inch from the top of the trimmed sheet. (6) Color of Ink. Blue, Pantone Matching System (PMS) 288 or equivalent. Black ink is an acceptable substitute but shall not be used for letterhead to be signed by the senior officials identified in the following paragraph. (7) Paper Stock. Letterhead stationery and continuation sheets for the SECDEF or DEPSECDEF; the SECNAV, Deputy Secretary, UNSECNAV, and ASNs; the CNO and VCNO; and the CMC and ACMC are not to exceed 20-pound basis weight (per 1000 sheets) 100 percent white bond, JCP G80; all other official letterhead stationery is not to exceed 20-pound basis weight (per 1000 sheets) 25 percent white bond, JCP G40. (8) Trim Size. Eight and one-half inches by eleven inches. C-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June 2. Computer Generated Letterhead is an acceptable substitute for preprinted letterhead. The format standards and specifications for preprinted letterhead shall be applied to computer generated letterhead to the extent practicable. Digital or electronic signatures may be used to sign computer generated letterhead. Adhere to the DON Chief Information Office guidance for use of digital and/or electronic signatures (refer to paragraph 6 of chapter 4). The following font and format guidance will assist in maintaining professional looking letterhead within the DON. a. Font. Recommended fonts for computer generated letterhead are Times New Roman, (10 point bold for the DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY line and 8 point for the address lines). Try to match the layouts shown. Century Schoolbook, Courier New, Helvetica, Arial or Univers

b. Spacing. The first line of the letterhead shall be centered on the fourth line from the top of the page. 3. Optional Features a. The phrase IN REPLY REFER TO may be printed in 5 point capital letters. b. Marking to indicate address area for window envelopes. c. Fold markings to indicate business letter folds. d. A 1/2 point rule, 1 1/2 picas (approximately 3/4 inch long) placed 1 1/2 inches from the bottom. e. Slogans, when approved by the Office of the Secretary of the Navy, printed in the bottom margin approximately 1/2 inch from the bottom of the page. 4. Letterhead Envelopes and Mailing Labels shall conform to USPS standards and OPNAVINST 5218.7B. a. First Line. Navy activities and Headquarters, Marine Corps shall print DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY horizontally 3/8 inch from the top margin in 10 point capital letters. Marine Corps activities shall print UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS. b. Individual Activity Name. Use 6 point capital letters. c. Official Business. OFFICIAL BUSINESS is printed two lines below the last line of the address text in 6 point capital letters. d. Ancillary Services Endorsement. Endorsements such as “Forwarding Service Requested” or “Return Service Requested” are optional. When added to the envelope or label it should be placed two lines below the OFFICIAL BUSINESS phrase in 6 point capital letters. C-2

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June e. Leading. Should be 13 points between each line. Center 3 pica hairline rules 6 points apart under DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY and above OFFICIAL BUSINESS. f.

Borders, Markings, Slogans, or Designs. Shall not be imprinted or affixed.

g. Labels, Label size shall be no smaller than 5 inches by 3 inches. Margins for marginally punched labels may be adjusted as required to allow necessary edge punching. h. Colors of Ink. Labels shall be printed in black. Envelopes shall be printed in either black or blue (PMS 288 or equivalent).

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 1000 NAVY PENTAGON WASHINGTON DC 20350-1000

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS 2000 NAVY PENTAGON WASHINGTON DC 20350-2000 IN REPLY REFER TO

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY HEADQUARTERS, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS 3000 MARINE CORPS PENTAGON WASHINGTON DC 20380-1775

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY HEADQUARTERS BATTALION CAMP PENDLETON CA 92055-5006

C-3

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June

APPENDIX D FORMS AND ENVELOPES 1. The following forms are available for download from GSA Forms Web site: http://www.gsa.gov/Portal/forms/type/TOP?utm_source=OAS&utm_medium=printratio&utm_term=form&utm_campaign=shortcuts FORM OF 363 Memorandum of Call NAVMC 10274 Administrative Action (AA)

2. The following forms are available from Naval Forms Online (NFOL): http://navalforms.documentservices.dla.mil/web/public/home OPNAV 5211/7 Correspondence/Documents Control Card OPNAV 5216/144A DON Memo (8-1/2 x 11)

PDF Format

OPNAV 5216/144B DON Memo (8-1/2 x 5-1/2)

PDF Format

OPNAV 5216/158 Routine Reply, Endorsement Transmittal or Information Sheet

PDF Format

3. The following forms are available for purchase from GSA Global Supply: http://www.gsa.gov/globalsuppy or (800) 525-8027, option 3: FORM

STOCK NUMBER

UI

QTY

OF 65A U.S. Government Messenger Envelope (Large, 4-1/8 x 9-1/2)

7540-00-117-8424

BX

200

OF 65B U.S. Government Messenger Envelope (Medium. 9-1/2 x 12)

7540-00-222-3467

BX

250

OF 65C U.S. Government Messenger Envelope (Small, 12 x 16)

7540-00-222-3468

BX

250

4. The following envelopes are available from GSA: ENVELOPE

STYLE NO.

STOCK NUMBER

UI

QTY

Plain, white #10 (4-1/8 x 9-1/2) Plain, brown (12 x 9-1/2) Plain, brown (16 x 12)

192 84 104

7530-00-198-5876 7530-01-316-6584 7530-00-286-6903

BX BX BX

500 500 500

5. SD 391, DoD Correspondence Action Report, can be downloaded at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/forms/eforms/sd0391.pdf.

D-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015

APPENDIX E INDEX Page

Page

A Abbreviations Of addresses Of classified references Of dates Of military ranks Of NATO correspondence Of states/territories Overuse prohibited Acronyms Acting Addressing Civilian Personnel (See Models of Address – Civilian) Addressing Military Personnel (See Models of Address – Military) Advance Air Force Personnel Enlisted models of address Officer models of address Assembly for signature Endorsement Multiple-address letter Standard letter Tabbing correspondence

6-5 7-2 2-11; 7-2 2-8; A-1-A-3 2-1 6-6 2-11 2-11 2-5

11-8 11-1 11-4 11-4 11-3 11-2 11-4 11-3 11-7 11-2 2-4 11-7 7-14

2-2 C A-3 A-1 9-3; 9-4 8-1; 8-5 7-16; 7-24 7-25

B “Blind copy to:“ line With congressional inquiries Business letter Address on Attention line Body of letter Complimentary close “Copy to:” line Dates Enclosures Examples of First page Second page Paragraph formats Short business letter

Window-envelope format Identification symbols Outgoing copies Page numbers References Salutation Second and succeeding pages Separate mailing Signature Subject line optional By direction letter Delegating authority for In business letter In standard letter

2-6 11-1 11-2; 11-8; 11-9 11-2 11-3 11-4 2-11; 11-1 11-3 11-6 11-7 11-5 11-10

E-1

Chain of command Corresponding through Rushed routing through Classified correspondence Pagination if Top Secret Security marking on Serial number of Coast Guard Personnel Enlisted models of address Officer models of address Codes As sender’s symbol “To” address Complimentary close In business letter Not in standard letter Congressional inquiries Blind copy to OLA Courtesy copy to Congress Reply deadlines Controls Incoming correspondence Outgoing correspondence Reply deadlines Tracking correspondence

2-1 2-2 7-15 7-2; 7-20; 7-21 7-2 A-1 A-1 7-1 7-4 11-3 7-13 2-6 2-6 2-6 2-5 2-6 2-6 2-7

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 Page Coordinating efficiently Copies Coordination Courtesy Limit of Of multiple-address letter “Copy to:” line In business letter In standard letter Correspondence Management

Page

2-3

Enclosures In business letter In endorsement In standard letter For copy-to addressees Format for heading For via addressees General Increasing the quantity of Marking on Normal distribution of Page numbers of Under separate cover Endorsements Adding enclosures Basic-letter identification Complete Page number Reference line Remaining addressees numbered Sample of Assembled endorsement New-page endorsement Uses Where to send copies Envelopes Addressing of Models of address Ordering States abbreviated on Window envelopes Encouraged Typing business letter for Typing standard letter for Executive Correspondence Assigning action to incoming correspondence Assigning action to outgoing correspondence Complimentary close Congressional committees or subcommittee correspondence Correspondence action report (SD Form 391) Correspondence management Coordination

2-3 2-6 2-1 8-1 11-4 7-14 1-1

D Dates In business letter In standard letter As sender’s symbol In heading In text (see also due dates) Digital signature “Distribution:” line Drafter’s identification With WPC codes Due dates Normal time allowed for Realistic setting of

11-1 7-2 2-11 2-11 4-3 8-1; 8-3 7-2 2-6 2-6

E Electronic Mail Digital signature Formal correspondence General Informal correspondence Managing E-mail Records management Security and privacy Electronic records As evidence Disposition General Identification of Management of Restrictions/security/privacy issues Records management considerations

4-3 4-1 4-1 4-2 4-1 4-2 4-2 3-2 3-2 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-2 3-1; 3-2

E-2

11-3 9-1 7-10 7-11 7-10 7-12 7-10 7-11 2-10 7-11 2-10 2-10; 7-12 9-2 9-1; 9-3 9-2 9-1 9-1 9-2 9-5 9-4 9-1 9-2 6-1; 6-2; 6-7 A-1; B-1 D-1 6-2; 6-6 2-3 11-8 7-18 12-1 12-1 12-5 12-5 12-9 12-1 12-7; 12-19

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 Page Date line Distribution Due dates Extensions Format Body of letter Closing lines Copy to Opening line Reference line Salutation Signature line General Interim responses Congressional correspondence HqDON correspondence OSD correspondence Memoranda (preparation of) Action or information memo Package assembly Page numbering Preparing a reply Routing changes Sample of Action memorandum Congressional response One Chairperson Two Chairpersons Chairman of a select committee Coordination page Flag stationery Chief of Naval Operations Secretary of the Navy Information memorandum Interim response for Congressional correspondence Memorandum for

Page

12-5 12-3 12-2 12-2 12-3; 12-4 12-4 12-4 12-5 12-3 12-18 12-3 12-4 12-1 12-2 12-3 12-2 12-3 12-6 12-6 12-7; 12-8 12-6 12-3 12-2

For official use only Freedom of Information and Privacy Act requests “From:” line In joint letter In standard letter Format General Multiple title

7-1; 7-19 7-4 7-3 7-4

G Guide and Form letters

2-3

H Headings, paragraphs

7-12; 7-13

I Identification symbols Authorized Exceptions Unauthorized Identifying later pages Pages numbered Subject repeated Identifying military personnel Marine Corps Navy Indenting (see paragraphing) Ink Color of

12-17 12-12 12-13 12-14 12-19 12-16 12-16 12-15 12-18 12-11

7-1 7-2 7-2 7-15 7-15 2-8 2-7

2-13; C-3

J 12-20 Joint letter Justifications, margins

F Facsimile machines General Records management Security and privacy issues File copy Samples of Form letters Forms used in correspondence Font sizes and styles

7-3; 7-22 2-6; 3-2

2-3; 5-1 5-1 5-2 5-1

7-19 7-1

L Letterhead Computer generated In business letter Preprinted requirements Stationery requirements List of Marine Corps Activities information

2-3 D-1 2-13; C-2

E-3

2-9; C-1 C-2 11-4 C-1 C-1 6-1; 7-3

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 Page

Page Models of address – Military Air Force enlisted Air Force officers Army enlisted Army officers Coast Guard enlisted Coast Guard officer Marine Corps enlisted Marine Corps officers Navy enlisted Navy officers Other military Multiple-address letter Copies How to assemble Listing of addressees Normal use Normal used varied Sample of letter assembled With “Distribution:” line With “To:” line With “To:” line and “Distribution:” line

M Margins In short business letter In standard letter Marine Corps Personnel Enlisted models of address How to fully identify Officer models of address Writing to higher authority Memorandum Decision File copy Format From/to Letterhead memorandum Memorandum for the record Memorandum of agreement Memorandum of understanding Plain-paper memorandum Sample of Letterhead memorandum Memorandum for the record Memorandum of agreement Memorandum of understanding Plain-paper memorandum Printed memorandum Models of address – Civilian Adjusting for gender American missions Ecclesiastical Educational institutions Executive departments Foreign government officials House of Representatives Independent organizations Judiciary Legislative agencies Missions, of U.S. Other addressees Senate State and local governments The Honorable Vice President White House

11-10 7-1 A-2 2-7; 2-8 A-1 2-4 10-2 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-2 10-8 10-1 10-6 10-3 10-7 10-8; 10-9 10-5 10-4

A-3 A-1 A-2 A-1 A-1 A-1 A-2 A-1 A-1; A-2 A-1 A-3 8-1 8-1; 8-5 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-1; 8-5 8-3 8-2 8-4

N Navy Personnel Enlisted models of address How to fully identify Officer models of address Writing to higher authority NOTAL references discouraged

B-1 B-6 B-8 B-10 B-5 B-7 B-4 B-6 B-2 B-5 B-6 B-10 B-3 B-7 B-1 B-2 B-2

A-1; A2 2-7; 2-8 A-1 2-2 7-6

O Organizer’s code Exceptions Format In serial number Required

E-4

7-2 7-1 7-2 7-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 Page

Page Mail markings Sources of address Within DoD Privacy Act requests Proofreading Punctuating, capitalizing, spelling, hyphenation, and separating words

P Page numbers On enclosures On endorsements On standard letters Paperwork management Coordinating efficiently Due dates Finished products for signing Form and guide letters General Limiting information copies New office technology Photo copies Prompt replies urged Prompt signing Tracers Unnecessary file copies Updating distribution lists Window envelopes encouraged Writing discouraged Paragraphing Headings encouraged In business letter In classified letter In standard letter Subparagraphing limited Personal pronouns Allowed in references Personnel matters Congressional inquiries Military fully identified Social Security numbers Writing to higher authority Photo copies Authorized For multiple-address letters Limit copies Postal standards Delivery and return address format Folding techniques Mail classifications

2-10 9-1; 9-3 7-15 2-3 2-6 2-4 2-3 2-1 2-10 2-3 2-10 2-6 2-6 2-7 2-10 2-10 2-3 2-1

6-3 6-1 6-2 2-6 2-12 2-12

R References In business letter In endorsement In standard letter Examples Format General Mentioned in text if listed My and your allowed in NOTAL discouraged Paragraphs Replies Due dates for Promptness of Tracing late

7-13 11-2 7-2; 7-20 7-12; 7-23 7-12

11-3 9-1 7-7 7-7; 7-10 7-6 7-6 7-6 7-10 7-6 7-12 2-6 2-6 2-7

S Salutation Civilian models of address Military models of address Sample of Continuation pages “Copy to:” line Dates Enclosures Following channels “From:” line Ink Joint letter Letter assembled Margins

7-10 2-6 2-8 2-7 2-3 2-10 8-1 2-10 6-2 6-4 6-3

E-5

B-1 – B-10 A-1 – A-3 7-15 7-14 7-2 7-10 2-1 7-3 2-13 7-19 7-24 7-1

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 Page Originator’s code Page numbers Paragraph format References Security markings Sender’s symbol Serial number Signature SSIC Standard letter Stationery Subject Text “To:” line Tabbing correspondence Packages Typeface “Via:” line Window-envelope format Sender’s symbols Exceptions Required Unauthorized Separate cover Serial numbers Format Of classified references When to use Signature Business letter Delegation of authority Examples Electronic Signature Facsimile stamps Signature line in general Standard letter Submitting for What commanding officers sign Sincerely Social security numbers SSIC Signature stamps Standard letter Standard Naval Distribution List Business letter Converting “To:”/From:” lines

Page

7-1; 7-2 7-15 7-23 7-6 – 7-10 7-20 – 7-22 7-1 7-1 7-13 7-1 7-16 2-8; C-1 7-5 7-12 7-4 7-25 2-13 7-5 7-18 7-2 7-1 7-2 2-10; 7-12

Multiple-address letter Standard letter Stationery

8-3 7-3 2-8; C-1

T Tabbing correspondence Telephone For coordination Instead of writing letters Text Of business letter Of standard letter (also see paragraphing) Time Expressing military time “To:” line Codes encouraged Format For window envelope Top secret documents Page numbering in Serial numbers required Tracers Typeface

7-1 7-2 7-1

7-25 2-4 2-1 11-2 7-12

2-11 7-4 7-4 7-18 7-15 7-1 2-7 2-13; C3

U USPS – postal standards

11-3 2-4 2-5; 7-13 2-5; C-2 5-1 2-4 7-12 2-4 2-4 11-3 2-7 7-1 2-5 7-1 6-1 11-4 7-3

6-1

V “Via:” line Follow chain of command Examples Format With window envelopes Numbering addresses in Routing when rushed

7-5 2-2 7-5 – 7-10 7-4 7-18 7-5 2-2

Z Zip codes

E-6

6-2

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correspondence manual - Navy BMR

SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CORRESPONDENCE MANUAL SECNAV M-5216.5 JUNE 2015 June Table of Issuances and Revisions/Changes SEC...

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