BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE AIR - AF.mil

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BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE

AIR FORCE INSTRUCTION 10-401 7 DECEMBER 2006 Incorporating Through Change 3, 20 July 2010 AIR COMBAT COMMAND Supplement 21 FEBRUARY 2012 Certified Current 17 November 2016 Operations AIR FORCE OPERATIONS PLANNING AND EXECUTION

COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available for downloading or ordering on the ePublishing website at www.e-publishing.af.mil/. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication Certified by: AF/A5X (Brig Gen Gorenc) Pages: 368

OPR: AF/A5XW Supersedes:

AFI10-401, 25 April 2005 (ACC)

OPR: HQ ACC/A3OP Supersedes:

AFI10-401_ACCSUP1, 12 Aug 2009

Certified by: HQ ACC/A3 (Major General Charles W. Lyon) Pages:14

This instruction implements Air Force Policy Directive (AFPD) 10-4, Operations Planning: Air & Space Expeditionary Force Presence Policy (AEFPP). AFI 10-401 prescribes and explains how the Air Force participates in the Joint Planning and Execution Community (JPEC), including force presentation and Deliberate and Crisis Action Planning and Execution Segment (DCAPES), for the planning, deployment, employment, sustainment, redeployment and reconstitution of forces. It covers the procedures and standards that govern operations planning and execution throughout the Air Force. It also carries out the tenets of Executive Order (E.O.) 12861, Elimination of One-Half of Executive Branch Internal Regulations, September 11, 1993; and E.O. 12866, Regulatory Planning and Review, September 30, 1993. It applies to all Air Force, including Air Reserve Component (ARC) personnel, who participate in the JPEC, including the planning, deployment, employment, sustainment, redeployment and reconstitution of forces. If this publication is in conflict with DOD or Joint guidance, then the joint publication will take precedence. Refer recommended changes and conflicts between this and other publications to AF/A5XW,

2

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

1480 Air Force Pentagon, Washington, DC 20330-1480, on Air Force (AF) Form 847, Recommendation for Change of Publication; route AF IMT 847s from the field through the appropriate functional‘s chain of command. Any organization may supplement this volume. Major commands (MAJCOM), field operrating agencies (FOA), and direct reporting units (DRU) send one copy of their printed supplement to AF/ A5XW and an electronic copy to [email protected]; other organizations send one copy of each printed supplement to the next higher headquarters. Ensure that all records created as a result of processes prescribed in this publication are maintained in accordance with AFMAN 37-123, Management of Records and disposed of in accordance with the Air Force Records Disposition Schedule (RDS) located at http://afrims.amc.af.mil. Note: Any reference to MAJCOMs and FOAs also includes DRUs and Air Reserve Component (ARC). See Attachment 1 for a glossary of references and supporting information. The use of the name or mark of any specific manufacturer, commercial product, commodity, or service in this publication does not imply endorsement by the Air Force. Note: This volume references Air Force publications under the old publications scheme (Air Force regulations [AFR] and manuals [AFM]) that remain in force until converted to the new types of publications. (ACC) This document provides additional guidance for Air Combat Command (ACC) Wings and command functional managers and supplements AFI 10-401, 7 December 2006 w/IC3, 21 Jul 2010. It applies to Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC) Classic Associate units. It also applies to Air National Guard (ANG) members. Send comments and proposed changes to this publication on an AF Form 847, Recommendation for Change of Publication to HQ ACC/A3OP, 205 Dodd Blvd, Langley AFB VA 23665. Send information copies to the applicable Office of Collateral Responsibility. Ensure that all records created as a result of processes prescribed in this publication are maintained in accordance with Air Force Manual (AFMAN) 33-363, Management of Records, and disposed of in accordance with Air Force Records Information Management System (AFRIMS) Records Disposition Schedule (RDS) located at http://www.my.af.mil/afrims/afrims/afrims/rims.cfm. Contact supporting records managers as required. SUMMARY OF CHANGES This change modifies the AEF construct by eliminating the requirement for organizations whose primary responsibility is to carry out the SECAF Title 10 functions at the Air Force level (e.g. organize, train, equip, recruit, supply forces) to posture UTCs in UTC Availability and outlines associated processes and procedures to access individuals from these organizations; modifies the process for component headquarters to request authorization change requests (ACRs) and estimated tour lengths (ETLs) greater than 179 days; incorporates aspects of the Command & Control Enabling Concept with respect to Global Force Management; modifies and expands the procedures for UTC development and management; and modifies UTC posturing deviations with respect to substitution rules. A margin bar indicates newly revised material. (ACC) This document has been substantially revised and must be completely reviewed. Major changes include: Chapter 9 (Added) – Post Deployment down time; update to Chapter 10 includes additional guidance for the command shortfall/Reclama process; update to Chapter 12 additional guidance to MAJCOM/FAMs; Chapter 13 (Added) - an overview of ACC exercise

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

3

planning at all levels - describing procedures for building, processing, and monitoring the exercise Deployment Requirements and Manning Document (DRMD) and outlines responsibilities of all involved agencies. To include the Reclama process for ACC sponsored exercises It applies to ACC and ACC gained units who participate in the JPEC, including the planning, deployment, employment, sustainment, redeployment and reconstitution of forces; and Chapter 14 (Added) - Voluntary AEF Swapping – outlines command policy for informing ACC/CV. Chapter 1—AN OVERVIEW OF JOINT PLANNING

14

Section 1A—Purpose

14

1.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

Section 1B—Background

14 14

1.2.

Joint Planning. .......................................................................................................

14

1.3.

National Security Council System (NCSC). ..........................................................

14

1.4.

Joint Strategic Planning System (JSPS). ................................................................

14

Figure 1.1.

JSPS Components ..................................................................................................

16

1.5.

Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution (PPBE). ................................

16

Figure 1.2.

JSPS and PPBE System Linkage. ..........................................................................

17

1.6.

Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP). ...............................................................

18

1.7.

Joint Planning and Execution Community (JPEC). ...............................................

18

1.8.

Joint Operation Planning and Execution System (JOPES). ...................................

18

1.9.

Adaptive Planning. .................................................................................................

19

1.10.

Global Force Management (GFM). .......................................................................

20

Figure 1.3.

Request for Forces/Capabilities and the Joint Staff Process. .................................

21

Figure 1.4.

DELETED .............................................................................................................

22

Figure 1.4.1.

DELETED .............................................................................................................

22

Figure 1.4.2.

DELETED .............................................................................................................

22

Figure 1.5.

DELETED .............................................................................................................

22

Table 1.1.

Tasking Type Code (1 ............................................................................................

23

Figure 1.6.

DELETED .............................................................................................................

24

Chapter 2—OVERVIEW OF AIR FORCE PLANNING

26

Section 2A—Purpose

26

2.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

Section 2B—Background

26 26

4

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 2.2.

Function of the AEF. .............................................................................................

Section 2C—Guidance

26 26

2.3.

AEF Force Generation Construct. ..........................................................................

26

Figure 2.1.

AEF Capability Library. ........................................................................................

28

2.4.

AEF Schedule, Battle Rhythm, and Timeline. .......................................................

28

Figure 2.2.

AEF Schedule. .......................................................................................................

29

Figure 2.3.

AEF Battle Rhythm (Band ―A‖). ...........................................................................

31

Figure 2.4.

AEF Battle Rhythm (Band ―B‖). ...........................................................................

32

Figure 2.5.

AEF Battle Rhythm (Band ―C‖). ...........................................................................

33

Figure 2.6.

AEF Battle Rhythm (Band ―D‖). ...........................................................................

34

Figure 2.7.

AEF Battle Rhythm (Band ―E‖). ...........................................................................

35

Figure 2.8.

DELETED. ............................................................................................................

36

2.5.

AEF Vulnerability Period. .....................................................................................

36

2.6.

AEF Surge. .............................................................................................................

37

Table 2.1.

Decision Matrix for Emerging Requirements. .......................................................

37

2.7.

DELETED. ............................................................................................................

38

2.8.

AEF Composition. .................................................................................................

39

2.9.

Presentation and Command & Control (C2) of AEF Forces. ................................

39

2.10.

AEF Command and Control (C2). .........................................................................

40

2.11.

AETF Deployment. ................................................................................................

40

2.12.

(DELETED). ..........................................................................................................

40

2.13.

AEF Agile Combat Support. ..................................................................................

40

2.14.

The USAF War and Mobilization Plan (WMP). ....................................................

41

2.15.

Deliberate and Crisis Action Planning and Execution Segments (DCAPES). ......

44

2.16.

Packaging Air Force Capability. ............................................................................

45

2.17.

Training for Air Force Planners. ............................................................................

45

Chapter 3—OPERATIONS PLAN DEVELOPMENT AND EXECUTION

48

Section 3A—Purpose

48

3.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

Section 3B—Background 3.2.

Planning Processes. ................................................................................................

Section 3C—Types of Plans

48 48 48 49

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 3.3.

Types of Plans. .......................................................................................................

Section 3D—Planning

5 49 49

3.4.

DCAPES, Force Modules, and UTCs. ...................................................................

49

3.5.

Air Force Planning. ................................................................................................

50

Section 3E—Crisis Action Planning Orders 3.6.

Crisis Action Planning Orders. ..............................................................................

Section 3F—Air Force Planning and Crisis Execution

53 53 55

3.7.

Transition from Rotational Operations to Crisis. ...................................................

55

3.8.

Air Reserve Component (ARC) Utilization. ..........................................................

57

3.9.

Base Level Planning. .............................................................................................

59

3.10.

Sustainment Planning Responsibilities. .................................................................

59

Air Force Wartime Resupply Planning Factor Development. ...............................

59

3.11.

Non-unit Related Sustainment Planning. ...............................................................

63

3.12.

Sustainment Planning. ...........................................................................................

64

Table 3.2.

Logistics Sustainability Analysis (Materiel). .........................................................

64

Table 3.3.

Logistics Sustainability Analysis (Infrastructure). .................................................

65

Table 3.4.

Logistics Sustainability Analysis (Expeditionary Combat Support Forces). .........

65

Table 3.5.

Logistics Sustainability Analysis (Lift). ................................................................

65

Table 3.6.

Logistics Sustainability Analysis Stoplight Chart. ................................................

66

3.13.

Transition from Crisis Action Surge to Sustainable Operations. ...........................

66

3.14.

Establishing Contingency Organizations. ..............................................................

67

3.15.

AEF After Action Report (AAR). ..........................................................................

67

Table 3.1.

Chapter 4—PLANNING AND EXECUTION SYSTEMS

68

Section 4A—Purpose

68

4.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

Section 4B—Systems

68 68

4.2.

Overview. ...............................................................................................................

68

4.3.

Joint War Planning & Execution Systems and Applications .................................

69

4.4.

Air Force War Planning and Execution Systems (WPES) ....................................

71

Figure 4.1.

War Planning & Execution Systems (WPES). .......................................................

72

4.5.

Systems Management and Administration ............................................................

82

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

Chapter 5—UNIT TYPE CODE (UTC) DEVELOPMENT, REGISTRATION, AND MAINTENANCE

88

Section 5A—Purpose

88

5.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

Section 5B—Background

88 88

5.2.

UTC Definition. .....................................................................................................

88

5.3.

Types of UTCs .......................................................................................................

89

5.4.

UTC Attributes. .....................................................................................................

90

5.5.

Packaging of Air Force UTCs. ...............................................................................

91

5.6.

Manpower and Equipment Force Packages (MEFPAK). ......................................

92

5.7.

Personnel Manpower Force Packaging System (MANFOR) ................................

92

5.8.

Logistics Force Packaging Subsystem (LOGFOR). ..............................................

93

5.9.

Type Unit Characteristics (TUCHA). ....................................................................

95

5.10.

Type Unit Data Report (TYPREP). .......................................................................

95

5.11.

UTC Utilization. ....................................................................................................

95

Section 5C—Guidance 5.12.

97

Types of UTC Registration Requests. ...................................................................

97

DELETED. ............................................................................................................

98

5.13.

UTC Maintenance. .................................................................................................

103

5.14.

DELETED. ............................................................................................................

104

5.15.

UTC Development Duties & Responsibilities .......................................................

104

5.16.

Reporting ...............................................................................................................

119

5.17.

MEFPAK Biennial Review ....................................................................................

120

5.18.

LOGDET Development and Maintenance. ............................................................

121

5.19.

Tables .....................................................................................................................

133

Table 5.1.

UTC Functional Codes. .........................................................................................

133

Table 5.2.

UTC Title Format. .................................................................................................

134

Table 5.3.

Deployment Indicator (DEPID) Code Definitions. ................................................

135

Table 5.4.

Unit Level Codes2. ................................................................................................

138

Table 5.5.

MEFPAK Data Submission Table. ........................................................................

144

Table 5.6.

UTC Suffix Definitions. ........................................................................................

144

Table 5.7.

UTC Registration Codes (in DCAPES). ................................................................

145

Table 5.8.

Container Codes .....................................................................................................

145

Figure 5.1.

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

7

Chapter 6—FORCE MODULES AND OPERATIONAL CAPABILITIES PACKAGES

146

Section 6A—Purpose

146

6.1.

Force Module (FM)/Operational Capabilities Packages (OCP). ...........................

Section 6B—Background 6.2.

Force Presentation. .................................................................................................

Section 6C—Guidance

146 146 146 147

6.3.

AETF Force Modules. ...........................................................................................

147

Figure 6.1.

AETF FM Construct ..............................................................................................

148

Table 6.1.

Mission Platform Packages. ...................................................................................

153

Table 6.2.

AETF Force Module Identifiers. ............................................................................

154

Table 6.3.

AETF Force Module Identifiers (Generate the Mission, Mission Area). ..............

155

Table 6.4.

AETF Force Module Identifiers (Generate the Mission, Mission Platform Packages). 155

6.4.

Functional/Cross-Functional Area FMs. ................................................................

159

6.5.

AETF Support Force Modules. ..............................................................................

160

6.6.

OPLAN-Specific Force Modules. ..........................................................................

160

6.7.

Operational Capabilities Packages (OCPs). ...........................................................

160

Figure 6.2.

FM to OCP Relationship ........................................................................................

161

Chapter 7—UTC POSTURING

164

Section 7A—Purpose

164

7.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

Section 7B—Background

164 164

7.2.

Presentation of Forces. ...........................................................................................

164

7.3.

DELETED .............................................................................................................

164

7.4.

AEF Capability Library. ........................................................................................

164

Section 7C—Guidance and Procedures

164

7.5.

UTC Posturing Concept Overview. .......................................................................

164

7.6.

Overview of Different Types of UTCs. .................................................................

165

7.7.

Overview of UTC Posturing. .................................................................................

165

7.8.

Nondeployable UTCs. ...........................................................................................

166

7.9.

Posturing Standard Deployable UTCs. ..................................................................

166

7.10.

Posturing "Associate" UTCs (A-UTCs). ...............................................................

169

7.11.

DELETED .............................................................................................................

170

8

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 7.12.

UTC AEF Alignment Process. ...............................................................................

170

Table 7.1.

Deploy-to-Dwell Calculation Formula. .................................................................

175

Table 7.2.

Deploy-to-Dwell Calculation Mitigation Formula ................................................

176

Table 7.3.

Guideline for Realigning UTCs between Tempo Bands. ......................................

177

Table 7.4.

AEF Capability Library (AEFBN) Codes. .............................................................

178

7.13.

Posturing Codes (P-Code). .....................................................................................

179

7.14.

Procedures for P-Coding Standard Deployable UTCs. ..........................................

181

7.15.

Definitions for P-Coding Standard Deployable UTCs. .........................................

183

7.16.

Definitions for P-Coding Associate UTCs. ...........................................................

184

7.17.

Rule Sets and Posturing Checklist .........................................................................

185

7.18.

Sourcing UTCs in TPFDDs. ..................................................................................

188

7.19.

Multiple UTC Groups (MUGs), Mission Platform Packages (MPPs) and AETF Force Modules (FMs). ..................................................................................................... 188

Chapter 8—TIME-PHASED FORCE AND DEPLOYMENT DATA (TPFDD) MANAGEMENT 190 Section 8A—Purpose 8.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

Section 8B—Background

190 190 190

8.2.

TPFDD Overview. .................................................................................................

190

8.3.

Types of TPFDDs. .................................................................................................

191

8.4.

TPFDD Data Elements. .........................................................................................

192

Table 8.1.

Major Command and Reporting Designator Identity Codes 1. .............................

193

Table 8.2.

Component Codes. .................................................................................................

194

Section 8C—Guidance

195

8.5.

TPFDD Development Concept of Operation (CONOPs). .....................................

195

8.6.

TPFDD Initialization and Generation. ...................................................................

195

Table 8.3.

Commands and PID Allocations. ...........................................................................

196

8.7.

Permissions and Accessibility. ...............................................................................

197

8.8.

The Force Planning Process. ..................................................................................

197

8.9.

Force Requirements Determination. ......................................................................

197

Section 8D—Guidance

202

8.10.

TPFDD Sourcing Overview. ..................................................................................

202

8.11.

TPFDD Sourcing Methodologies and Direction. ...................................................

202

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

9

8.12.

TPFDD Sourcing Methodology Overview. ...........................................................

203

8.13.

Contingency Planning Processes, Requirements, and Sourcing. ...........................

204

8.14.

Crisis Action Planning: ..........................................................................................

209

Table 8.4.

MAJCOM/Base-level Codes .................................................................................

215

Table 8.5.

Verification Timeline (Calendar Days). .................................................................

215

Figure 8.1.

AFVC Verification Process. ..................................................................................

217

8.15.

Force Reporting. ....................................................................................................

218

8.16.

TPFDD Letter of Instruction. .................................................................................

218

8.17.

Transportation Feasibility of TPFDDs ...................................................................

219

8.18.

TPFDD Maintenance. ............................................................................................

219

8.19.

Contingency Plan TPFDD Maintenance. ...............................................................

220

Chapter 9—FORCE ROTATION MANAGEMENT

221

Section 9A—Purpose

221

9.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

Section 9B—Background

221 221

9.2.

Force Presence. ......................................................................................................

221

9.3.

Air Force Sourcing and Tasking Priority. ..............................................................

221

Section 9C—Guidance

221

9.4.

Force Rotation Planning. .......................................................................................

221

Table 9.1.

Command Remark Codes. .....................................................................................

223

Figure 9.1.

Authorization Change Request (ACR) Process. ....................................................

225

9.5.

AEF Pivot Date. .....................................................................................................

228

Figure 9.2.

CJCSI 1301. ...........................................................................................................

229

9.6.

AEF Sourcing Plans and Tasks Timeline. .............................................................

229

Figure 9.3.

AEF Rotation (4-Month) Planning Timeline. ........................................................

231

Figure 9.4.

AEF Pair Rotation (6-Month) Planning Timeline. .................................................

232

Figure 9.5.

(DELETED) ..........................................................................................................

232

9.7.

Aef Battle Rhythm. ................................................................................................

232

9.8.

Sourcing Considerations and Guidelines. ..............................................................

234

9.9.

UTC Sourcing Process. ..........................................................................................

234

9.10.

Line Remark Program. ...........................................................................................

245

9.11.

Estimated Tour Length (ETL). ..............................................................................

245

10

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 9.12.

DELETED. ............................................................................................................

247

9.13.

Tasking Notification Process. ................................................................................

247

9.14.

Employment. ..........................................................................................................

247

9.15.

Response Timing. ..................................................................................................

248

9.16.

Shortfall and Reclama Procedures. ........................................................................

248

9.17.

Retention Beyond Normal Tour Completion Date. ...............................................

249

9.18.

Recovery and Reconstitution. ................................................................................

250

9.19.

Volunteer Guidance. ..............................................................................................

250

9.20.

Voluntary Extension (Deployed Forces). ..............................................................

252

9.21.

Split Tours. .............................................................................................................

252

9.22.

AEF Debrief Concept. ...........................................................................................

253

9.23.

Executive Review Process. ....................................................................................

253

9.23.

(ACC) Command Newsgroup Discipline. .............................................................

253

9.24.

(Added-ACC) Post-Deployment Downtime Guidance Note: ................................

254

Chapter 10—DEVIATIONS, WAIVERS, AND RECLAMA PROCEDURES

255

Section 10A—Purpose

255

10.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

Section 10B—Deviations and Waivers

255 255

10.2.

AEF Operational Policy and Construct. .................................................................

255

10.3.

Comprehensive AEF Rotational Force Schedule. ..................................................

256

10.4.

ECS SIPT Target Base Alignment. ........................................................................

256

10.5.

CAF SIPT Consolidated Planning Order (CPO). ...................................................

256

10.6.

MAF Schedule. ......................................................................................................

257

10.7.

Two-Hit Policy and ECS Target Base Alignment Waiver (Band ―A‖ only). ........

257

10.8.

(DELETED). ..........................................................................................................

258

10.9.

Extended Estimated Tour Lengths (EETLs) ..........................................................

259

10.10. AEF Pivot Date. .....................................................................................................

259

10.11. TPFDD Line-level Detail/DRMD Waivers. ..........................................................

259

10.12. Non-Standard or Mid-Tour AEF Rotations (Active Component and Mobilized ARC only). ................................................................................................................................. 260 10.13. AETF Combat Wing Structure. .............................................................................

261

10.14. (DELETED). ..........................................................................................................

261

10.15. Posturing Tailored UTCs. ......................................................................................

261

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

11

10.16. Posturing Fragged UTCs. .......................................................................................

262

10.17. Posturing Manning Overages. ................................................................................

262

10.18. DELETED. ............................................................................................................

263

10.19. Dual Posturing Authorizations. ..............................................................................

263

10.20. Other Deviations or Changes. ................................................................................

263

Table 10.1.

Deviation/Change Approval Authority. .................................................................

Section 10C—Shortfall, Reclama and UIC Change Process. 10.21. The Shortfall/Reclama/UIC. .................................................................................. Table 10.2.

Reclama/UIC Change Submission Timelines (Calendar Days) ............................

264 264 264 266

Chapter 11—ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

276

Section 11A—Purpose

276

11.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

Section 11B—Background 11.2.

Background. ...........................................................................................................

Section 11C—Direction

276 276 276 276

11.3.

Secretary of Defense (SecDef). ..............................................................................

276

11.4.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) and the Joint Staff. ........................

277

11.5.

Commander, Joint Forces Command (CDRJFCOM) as the Primary Joint Force Provider(JFP) .........................................................................................................

278

11.6.

Unified Combatant Commands (UCCs) ................................................................

278

11.7.

Secretary of the Air Force (SECAF). .....................................................................

278

11.8.

Headquarters, United States Air Force ..................................................................

278

11.9.

Commander, Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC/CC) and Director, Air National Guard (NGB/CF). ............................................................................................................. 286

11.10. Component Headquarters. ......................................................................................

286

11.11. Commander, Air Combat Command (COMACC). ...............................................

287

11.12. AFPC Directorate of AEF and Personnel Operations (AFPC/DPW) (formerly AEF Center). ..................................................................................................................

288

11.13. Force Providers (Air Force Major Commands (MAJCOMs), Field Operating Agencies (FOAs), Direct Reporting Units (DRUs), and Air National Guard (ANG)). Note 290 11.14. Combat Air Forces Scheduling Integrated Product Team (CAF SIPT). ................

292

11.15. Air Mobility Command (AMC). ............................................................................

293

11.16. Air Force Material Command (AFMC)(OC-ALC/GBMUUB). ............................

293

12

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 11.17. Air and Space Expeditionary Force Battlelab (AEFB). .........................................

293

11.18. Wing and Base-Level Organizations. ....................................................................

294

Chapter 12—THE FUNCTIONAL AREA MANAGER (FAM)

297

Section 12A—Purpose

297

12.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

Section 12B—Background

297 297

12.2.

Functional Area Managers. ....................................................................................

297

12.3.

The Role of the FAM. ............................................................................................

297

12.4.

Where are FAMs? ..................................................................................................

298

Section 12C—Guidance

298

12.5.

FAM Appointment. ................................................................................................

298

12.6.

FAM Management. ................................................................................................

299

12.7.

General FAM Responsibilities. ..............................................................................

301

12.8.

Air Staff FAM Responsibilities. ............................................................................

303

12.9.

MAJCOM (to include AFRC and ANG) FAM Responsibilities. ..........................

306

12.10. Component Headquarters FAM Responsibilities. .................................................

311

12.11. FAM Training. .......................................................................................................

313

12.12. (DELETED) . .........................................................................................................

313

12.12. (ACC) ....................................................................................................................

313

Chapter 13—EXERCISE SOURCING PROCESS

314

Section 13A—Purpose

314

13.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

314

13.1.

(ACC) Purpose. ......................................................................................................

314

Section 13B—Background

314

13.2.

Planning Processes. ................................................................................................

314

13.2.

(ACC) Planning Processes. ....................................................................................

314

Section 13C—Guidance

314

13.3.

Roles and Responsibilities. ....................................................................................

314

13.4.

AEF Sourcing and Tasking Priority. ......................................................................

320

13.5.

AEF Sourcing and Tasking Process. ......................................................................

320

13.6.

DRMD Development. ............................................................................................

320

13.7.

Reclama Procedures. ..............................................................................................

321

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Table 13.1.

(Added-ACC) ACC Sponsored Exercises. ............................................................

321

13.8.

DELETED. ............................................................................................................

322

Chapter 14—*AEF AND THE INDIVIDUAL

323

Section 14A—Purpose

323

14.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

Section 14B—Background 14.2.

Force Presence. ......................................................................................................

Section 14C—Guidance

323 323 323 323

14.3.

Associating Individuals. .........................................................................................

323

Table 14.1.

Organization Type and Individual AEF Indicator .................................................

325

14.4.

Force Management of Individuals (Predeployment). ............................................

326

14.5.

Force Management of Individuals (Post-deployment). ..........................................

329

14.6.

Sourcing Individuals to Fulfill CCDR Requirements. ...........................................

329

Figure 14.1.

AFPC Sourcing Process. ........................................................................................

331

14.7.

Forms Adopted. .....................................................................................................

332

Attachment 1—GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION

333

Attachment 2—OPERATIONAL CAPABILITIES PACKAGE TEMPLATE PLAYBOOK

351

Attachment 3—DELETED

355

Attachment 4—UTC DEVELOPMENT INSTRUCTION

356

Attachment 5—(DELETED)

359

Attachment 6—(DELETED)

360

Attachment 7—(DELETED)

361

Attachment 8—JCS UNIT DESCRIPTOR CODES (UDCS

362

Attachment 9—(Added-ACC) SAMPLE ACC SPONSORED EXERCISE

366

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

Chapter 1 AN OVERVIEW OF JOINT PLANNING Section 1A—Purpose 1.1. Purpose. To provide an overview of the joint planning process and the interrelationships of the associated national level systems that produce national security policy, military strategy, force and sustainment requirements, and plans. The four major interrelated systems affecting the development of joint operational plans are the National Security Council System (NSCS), the Joint Strategic Planning System (JSPS), the Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution Process (PPBE), and the Joint Operations Planning and Execution System (JOPES). Subsequent chapters in this instruction will provide detailed planning guidance. Section 1B—Background 1.2. Joint Planning. A coordinated process used by commanders, decision-makers, and supporting staffs to determine the best method of accomplishing assigned tasks and missions. Joint planning is conducted within JOPES, but has its origins in and is related to the NSCS, JSPS, and PPBE. To provide decision makers with information to support these processes and systems, wartime deployment and in-place requirements are quantified and documented for the combatant commanders and compared to available resources. 1.3. National Security Council System (NCSC). The National Security Council (NSC), established by the National Security Act of 1947, is the principal forum for deliberation of national security policy issues requiring Presidential decision. The NSCS provides the framework for establishing national strategy and policy objectives, developing policy options, considering problems requiring interdepartmental consideration, developing recommendations for the President, and monitoring policy implementation 1.3.1. National Security Council (NSC). The President chairs the NSC. In addition to the President, its statutory members are the Vice President and the Secretaries of State and Defense. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) is the statutory military advisor to the Council, and the Director of National Intelligence is the intelligence advisor. The NSCS provides the institutional channels through which the CJCS discharges a substantial part of his statutory responsibilities. The CJCS regularly attends NSC meetings and presents the views, including dissenting and minority views, of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS). The NSCS generates Presidential Decision Directives (PDD), which are NSC documents established to inform US Government departments of presidential action. NSCS policy decisions provide the basis for military planning and programming. 1.3.2. National Security Strategy (NSS). The NSS is a broad document published by the President and the NSC, outlining the defense, economic, internal and international security objectives of the United States. 1.4. Joint Strategic Planning System (JSPS). As described in CJCSI 3100.01A, Joint Strategic Planning System, JSPS is the primary formal means by which the CJCS, in consultation

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with the other members of the JCS and the combatant commanders, carries out planning and policy responsibilities within the Department of Defense (DOD). These responsibilities include: 1.4.1. Providing advice and assistance to the President and Secretary of Defense (SecDef) as to the strategic direction of the Armed Forces and the preparation of policy guidance. 1.4.2. Preparing military strategy, strategic plans, and strategic assessments. 1.4.3. Providing advice to the SecDef on the effect that critical force capability deficiencies and strengths will have on accomplishing national security objectives, implementing policy, and executing strategic plans. 1.4.4. Providing advice on program recommendations and budget proposals to conform to priorities established for the combatant commanders and in strategic plans. 1.4.5. JSPS Components. The JSPS provides the means to systematically review the national security environment and United States (US) national security objectives, evaluate risks and threats, assess current strategy and existing or proposed programs and budgets, and propose military strategy, forces, and programs necessary to achieve our national security objectives in a resource-limited environment. Its components are shown in Figure 1.1 The Joint Strategy Review (JSR) is the principal mechanism for this study. During the JSR process, a series of papers and briefings (intermediate products) are developed by the Joint Staff, staffed with the Services and unified commands, and presented to the CJCS and the other members of the JCS. 1.4.5.1. National Military Strategy (NMS). A decision to modify the strategic direction of the Armed Forces based on the JSR would be reflected in the NMS. The NMS articulates the Chairman‘s recommendations on how the United States should employ the military element of power in support of the NSS. The NMS defines the national military objectives, establishes the strategy to accomplish these objectives, and addresses the military capabilities required to execute the strategy. The NMS also describes the strategic landscape and includes a discussion of the potential threats and risks. 1.4.5.2. Joint Planning Document (JPD) The JPD is one of the documents the Chairman uses to communicate advice to the SecDef. The JPD contains recommendations to the SecDef on the content of the SecDef‘s Strategic Planning Guidance (SPG) in terms of broad capabilities required to support the NMS. 1.4.5.3. Strategic Planning Guidance (SPG). The SPG is the plan for the development and employment of future forces. The SPG articulates the SecDef‘s defense strategy and force structure requirements. 1.4.5.4. Joint Programming Guidance (JPG). The JPG provides programming guidance to military and defense agencies to develop their Program Objective Memorandums (POM). It provides the SecDef‘s threat assessment, policy, strategy, force planning, and resource planning guidance within broad fiscal constraints. It is the link between the JSPS and the PPBE. This relationship is shown in Figure 1.2

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

Figure 1.1. JSPS Components

1.5. Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution (PPBE). The PPBE is the third major system related to the overall joint planning and execution process. Planning, Programming and Budgeting is an on-going process which enables senior leadership to assess alternative ways to achieve the best mix of force, requirements, and support attainable within fiscal constraints. A major goal is to strategically link any major decision for acquisition, force structure, operational concepts, and infrastructure, for example, both to the JPG and to program and budget development. The PPBE is concerned with allocating resources (force, equipment, and support) to meet the war fighting needs of the combatant commanders. It translates strategy and force requirements developed by the military in the NMS into budgetary requirements that are presented to Congress. Key products in the PPBE include the Program Objective Memorandum (POM), Budget Estimate Submission (BES), the President‘s Budget (PB), Program Change Proposal (PCP), and Budget Change Proposal (BCP). 1.5.1. Program Objective Memorandum (POM). DOD formulates 2-year budgets and uses the off year to focus on budget execution and program performance. In even-numbered years, the JPG kicks off development of the POMs. Each military department and defense agency prepares and submits its POM to the SecDef. The POM identifies total program requirements for the next six years and includes rationale for planned changes to the Future Years Defense Program (FYDP) baseline. It is based on the JPG‘s strategic concepts and guidance and includes an assessment of the risk associated with the current and proposed forces and support program. A key objective of POM development is to provide requisite capabilities and meet critical needs within a balanced program weighted by mission area needs.

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1.5.2. Budget Estimate Submission (BES). BES is the Service budget estimate that is submitted for joint review by the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) Comptroller and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) analysts. Within the Air Force, the BES cycle begins with preparatory analysis in the spring, but it goes into high gear with receipt of the Program Decision Memorandum (PDM) and BES guidance from OSD in late summer. It normally ends when the budget estimate is submitted. The entire budget is reviewed to ensure the requests are properly priced, program schedules are appropriate, and performance goals are in line with the objectives of the SecDef. Program Budget Decisions (PBD) document approval of the estimates for inclusion in the President‘s Budget. These decisions evaluate, adjust, and approve all resources in the budget request. If the Air Force appeals a PBD, the reclama is processed through the Deputy Secretary of Defense who makes the final decision. 1.5.3. President’s Budget (PB). Once all the final budget decisions are made, the DOD budget then becomes a part of the PB that will be submitted to the Congress. Once the President has signed Congress‘s appropriation act into law, OMB can begin apportioning funds to the federal departments. The Services execute the budget, new forces and capabilities are procured, and the combatant commanders update their operation plans (OPLAN), as required. 1.5.4. Program Change Proposal (PCP). During the off year, a PCP is submitted instead of a POM to accommodate real world changes, and as part of the continuing need to align the defense program with the defense strategy. 1.5.5. Budget Change Proposal (BCP). During the off year, a BCP is submitted instead of a BES. BCPs accommodate fact-of-life changes (e.g., cost increases, schedule delays, management reform savings, workload changes, etc.) as well as changes resulting from congressional actions. Figure 1.2. JSPS and PPBE System Linkage.

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1.6. Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP). CJCSI 3100.01F, Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP), provides guidance to the combatant commanders, Services Chiefs, and Defense agencies to accomplish tasks and missions based on near-term military capabilities. The JSCP implements deliberate planning guidance reflected in the Contingency Planning Guidance (CPG) and provides updated strategic guidance developed after publication of the CPG. 1.6.1. The JSCP Basic Volume: 1.6.1.1. Provides a strategic planning direction for contingency plans to be developed following JSCP distribution. The Joint Staff will coordinate the publication schedule and effective dates of plans. 1.6.1.2. Details planning guidance, force apportionment guidance, assumptions, constraints, and tasks. Supplemental instructions are issued separately. 1.6.1.3. Tasks the combatant commanders to prepare contingency plans by level of detail and apply security cooperation guidance. 1.6.1.4. Establishes synchronizing, supported and supporting relationships. 1.6.1.5. Supports and implements, through resultant combatant command OPLANs, the objectives of the National Security Strategy, the National Defense Strategy, and the National Military Strategy. 1.6.1.6. Serves as a coherent framework for providing military advice to the President and the Secretary of Defense and follows, implements, and augments the President and Secretary of Defense‘s guidance forwarded in the CPG and the Unified Command Plan (UCP), as well as the Secretary of Defense‘s Security Cooperation Guidance and Global Force Management Guidance. 1.6.2. JSCP Supplemental Instructions. Previous JSCP Annexes have been renamed supplemental instructions and are listed in Enclosure E to the JSCP. The supplements provide guidance that will result in plans balanced between the details necessary for specific contingencies tasked and the breadth and flexibility required for unknown or unforeseen contingencies that may be necessary during contingencies. CJCS instructions in the 3110 series (see Attachment 1) identify current supplements to the JSCP. 1.7. Joint Planning and Execution Community (JPEC). The JPEC consists of headquarters, commands and agencies involved in the training, preparation, movement, reception, employment, support and sustainment of military forces. 1.8. Joint Operation Planning and Execution System (JOPES). JOPES is the DOD directed single, integrated joint command and control system for conventional operation planning and execution (to include theater-level nuclear and chemical plans). It includes policies, procedures, reporting structures, and personnel, supported by the command, control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) systems and is used by the joint community to conduct joint planning during peace and crisis. Joint operation planning is a process coordinated through all levels of the national structure for joint planning and execution. The focus of the joint operation planning process is at the combatant commanders, who use it to determine the best method of accomplishing assigned tasks and direct the actions necessary to accomplish the mission. JOPES is designed to facilitate rapid building and timely maintenance of plans and rapid development of effective options through adaptation of approved operation plans during crisis. JOPES allows for

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the effective management of operations in execution across the spectrum of mobilization, deployment, employment, sustainment, redeployment and demobilization. JOPES is supported by a networked suite of Automated Data Processing (ADP) applications, tools, and databases, which reside on the Global Command and Control System (GCCS). JOPES ADP systems include the mechanisms to create and maintain time-phased force deployment data (TPFDD) and to submit CCDR movement requirements to USTRANSCOM. JOPES ADP is commonly referred to as JOPES, including throughout this AFI. All joint, conventional Time Phased Force Deployment Data (TPFDD) are developed by and reside in JOPES ADP. JOPES also assists in identifying shortfalls, which are converted to joint operation requirements to the PPBE. JOPES ADP is detailed in Chapter 4. The term "the use of JOPES is directed" in JOPES orders directs all tasked organizations to use JOPES in developing plans/order to accomplish the tasked mission(s). This means organizations must follow the guidance set out in Joint Pub 5.0 and well as all of the CJCS Instructions governing JOPES. There are various CJCS manuals (CJCSM) that govern JOPES: 1.8.1. CJCSM 3122.01A, JOPES Volume I (Planning Policies and Procedures), provides policy guidance and procedures for the peacetime and crisis action development, coordination, dissemination, review, approval and implementation of joint OPLANs and CONPLANs tasked by the JSCP or other CJCS directives. 1.8.2. CJCSM 3122.03B, JOPES Volume II (Planning Formats and Guidance), along with its classified supplement, CJCSM 3122.04A, JOPES Volume II Supplemental Planning and Execution Formats and Guidance, is functionally oriented. It prescribes standard formats and minimum content requirements for OPLANs and CONPLANs. CJCSM 3122.03B supplements JOPES Volume I with planning guidance and CJCSM 3122.04A provides formats for selected classified appendices and tabs. 1.8.3. CJCSM 3122.02C, JOPES Volume III (Crisis Action TPFDD Development and Deployment Execution), establishes procedures for the development of TPFDD and the deployment of forces within the context of JOPES in support of joint military operations. 1.8.4. CJCSM 3150.16A, JOPES Reporting Structure (JOPESREP) sets forth guidelines and standards to be used in the organization and development of information reporting to the JOPES database. This CJCSM encompasses only JOPES-related Joint Planning and Execution Community (JPEC) data. 1.8.5. JOPES Volumes I and III are reviewed periodically by the Joint Staff (JS) and Service headquarters. Recommended changes may be submitted at any time to the War and Mobilization Plans Division (AF/A5XW). Air Force component headquarters are required to send an information copy of these recommendations to their parent unified command. 1.9. Adaptive Planning. Adaptive Planning (AP) is now the process supporting contingency planning within DOD. AP represents a major departure from previous approaches and cuts across established functional areas. AP provides more and better options, establishes increased opportunities for consultation and guidance during plan development, triggers updates of existing plans, and promotes increased agility in plan implementation. 1.9.1. Adaptive Planning allows the combatant commander to develop a full range of flexible options and respond to rapidly changing strategic and military conditions. It

20

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 increases emphasis on ―front end‖ elements of planning threat analysis, mission analysis, assumption development, feasibility assessment, and concept of operations development. 1.9.2. DOD is using spiral development to implement AP through three transitional stages: an Initiation Stage, an Implementation Stage, and an Integration Stage. As AP is implemented, these three stages may overlap. 1.9.3. AP entered the Initiation Stage upon Contingency Planning Guidance (CPG) 05 approval. 1.9.4. Only top priority plans will use the AP process during the Initiation Stage. 1.9.5. At maturity, AP will create and revise plans rapidly and systematically, as circumstances require; they will be ―living‖ plans. Living plans will provide a foundation for transition to crisis planning. AP requires the regular involvement of senior leaders and will result in contingency plans containing a range of viable options. 1.9.6. Combatant commanders will use Adaptive Planning Technology to develop force and sustainment requirements, and Force Flows for the appropriate contingency plans tasked in the JSCP.

1.10. Global Force Management (GFM). GFM aligns force assignment, apportionment, and allocation methodologies in support of the National Defense Strategy (NDS), joint force availability requirements, and joint force assessments. GFM presents comprehensive insight into the global availability of U.S. military forces; and provides senior decision makers a vehicle to quickly and accurately assess the impact and risk of proposed allocation, assignment, and apportionment changes as outlined in the Global Force Management Implementation Guidance (GFMIG) as well as Joint Staff directives (i.e. Joint Staff Force Sourcing Business Rules and SecDef Orders Book (SDOB) Process). 1.10.1. Within GFM, the force allocation process allocates Service rotational forces to satisfy combatant commander operational requirements for military capabilities to support the defense strategy and President's NSS. The GFM allocation process consists of two specific processes --- rotational force allocation in support of combatant commander (CCDR) annual force needs and emergent force allocation in support of CCDR emerging or crisisbased requests for capabilities and forces. Unit emergent requirements are codified using the request for forces/capabilities (RFF/RFC) for units and out of cycle requests for Joint Task Force Headquarters individual augmentation manpower using the Joint Manning Document (JMD) process. 1.10.1.1. The CCDR initiates the GFM allocation process by identifying a requirement and submitting a RFF/RFC to the Joint Staff (see Figure 1.3.). The RFF/RFC provides CCDRs with a means to obtain required support not already assigned or allocated to the command. In accordance with CJCSM 3122.01A, Enclosure R, the Air Force component headquarters will review all RFFs/RFCs for USAF capabilities being requested and place the requirements(s) in the applicable TPFDD prior to the CCDR forwarding to the Joint Staff,. 1.10.2. The Global Force Management Allocation Plan (GFMAP) Annexes, approved by the SecDef, allocate specific rotational forces to combatant commanders. In the event of an emerging crisis, the allocation annex may be adjusted or suspended by the SecDef.

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1.10.3. Global Force Management Board (GFMB). The GFMB is charged with assessment of force allocation, apportionment, and assignment proposals in support of the GFM process. The GFMB consists of representatives from the Joint Staff, Office of Secretary of Defense agencies, Services and combatant commands and is chaired by a flag officer or equivalent representative. 1.10.3.1. The GFMB establishes strategic guidance prior to developing force management options and recommendations. 1.10.3.2. The GFMB prioritizes operational requirements globally and provides a prioritized list of rotational requirements for supplying trained and ready forces and capabilities to support combatant commander requirements. 1.10.3.3. The GFMB will assess and evaluate the continued allocation of rotational forces for incorporation into a revised rotational schedule. 1.10.4. Joint Force Provider (JFP). In accordance with the GFMIG, JFCOM, TRANSCOM, and SOCOM are the designated JFPs for conventional forces, mobility forces, and special operations forces, respectively. JFP roles and responsibilities are outlined in the current GFMIG as well as Joint Staff directives. The Joint Staff tasks JFPs to recommend global force sourcing solutions for global CCDR requirements; these sourcing solutions may be from assigned forces, forces assigned to other CCDRs, or Service-retained forces. Figure 1.3. Request for Forces/Capabilities and the Joint Staff Process.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 1.10.4.1. JFPs task their Service components to develop Service sourcing solutions. Air Force components to JFPs (ACC, AMC, and AFSOC) serve as the Air Force force providers (AF FP) to their respective combatant commands. In this role, these MAJCOMs provide global recommended sourcing solutions and risk analyses as defined by GFMIG and Joint Staff directives.

Figure 1.4. DELETED Figure 1.4.1. DELETED Figure 1.4.2. DELETED Figure 1.5. DELETED 1.10.4.1.1. DELETED 1.10.4.1.2. DELETED 1.10.4.1.3. AF FPs collect inputs from their respective functional area managers (FAMs) and AFPC/DPW to develop a recommended sourcing solution. If a standard Air Force capability can meet the requirement, then AF FPs recommend a standard sourcing solution. If a standard Air Force capability cannot meet the requirement, AF FPs in conjunction with applicable HAF FAMs evaluate the RFF/RFC for possible non-standard sourcing solutions. The Air Force internally refers to non-standard force sourcing solutions as Joint Expeditionary Taskings (JET) (reference section 1.10.4.2.). Standard and non-standard sourcing solutions are forwarded to the JFP per GFM guidance. 1.10.4.1.3.1. For emerging requirements, AF FP FAMs will notify applicable HAF FAMs of recommended sourcing solutions. HAF FAMs will obtain appropriate approval/notification in accordance with paragraph 3.7.5.2. and Table 2.1. and inform AF FP FAM of approval. The solution will be identified in the SecDef Deployment Order (DEPORD) and Supporting CCDR or AF DEPORD, as appropriate (see paragraph 1.10.4.1.10.). 1.10.4.1.4. DELETED. 1.10.4.1.5. DELETED. 1.10.4.1.6. DELETED. 1.10.4.1.7. DELETED. 1.10.4.1.8. The JFP coordinates with supporting CCDRs and Services for operational/sourcing risk assessments. Risk assessments will be in accordance with GFMIG criteria (see Appendix 3 to Section III of GFMIG). The JFP provides recommended sourcing solution and risk assessment for Joint Staff to submit to the SecDef for approval. 1.10.4.1.9. DELETED. 1.10.4.1.10. The Joint Staff forwards SecDef approved GFMAP to supporting CCDRs and Services. Supporting CCDRs will produce a DEPORD tasking

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component forces; ACC, on behalf of CSAF, will produce an AF DEPORD for unassigned forces that includes the following information: (1) List of unit type codes (UTCs) or Air Force specialty codes (AFSCs) and the total number of personnel; (2) Minimum rank and/or grade for positions when required; (3) If requested estimated tour length (ETL) is for greater than 179 days, include a job description (if available); (4) Tour length: routine rotations (120- or 179-day) or CSAF-approved extended ETL (EETL); (5) Predeployment training requirement; (6) Type and duration of training and specific location; (7) Any specialized equipment required; (8) AOR duty location / destination; (9) Command relationship; (10) Any agreed upon change in LAD from the RFF/RFC LAD; (11) Required security clearance and/or special experience identifier (SEI); (12) Tasking type, and (13) Notification that surge sourcing (if applicable) is authorized. AF FPs will forward their respective DEPORD to AF/A3O-AO, AFPC, affected MAJCOMs and supported Commander of Air Force Forces (COMAFFOR). 1.10.4.1.10.1. The Tasking Type included in the Air Force DEPORD (see Table 1.1) determines if the requirement should primarily be sourced from UTCs (see Chapters 8 and 9 for UTC sourcing process) or primarily sourced as individuals using Military Personnel Data System (MilPDS) sourcing procedures (see Chapter 14). The AF FP is responsible for identifying the tasking type code; the supported component command is responsible for updating the TPFDD with the identified code. ―Unit-like‖ requirements will be sourced via UTCs from combat/combat support/combat service support units. Individual requirements will be sourced via the MilPDS sourcing process. Although every effort will be made to task within the appropriate resource pool, there may be situations that require tasking to an alternate pool, in which case a risk assessment will determine final sourcing. Table 1.1. Tasking Type Code (1 Tasking Type Code (1st char) Code Deployment F Unit Rqmt G Unit Rqmt H Unit Rqmt J Unit Rqmt K Individual X ―Other‖ Z Unknown

Type Standard Force Solution Joint Force/Capability Solution (non-standard / JET) Ad Hoc Force Solution (non-standard / JET) In-Lieu-of (ILO) Forces (non-standard / JET) Augmentation (IA)

1.10.4.2. Joint Expeditionary Tasking (JET). If a standard force solution (i.e. a mission ready, Joint capable force with associated table of organization and equipment executing its core mission) cannot be made, the JFP may recommend a non-standard force solution. While the Joint Staff has defined three categories of non-standard force solutions, the Air Force collectively refers to its contribution to these as JET. A JET sourcing solution becomes a factor when the traditional force provider for the requested force or capability cannot fill the requirement or there is no traditional force provider. This type of solution will most likely not be requested in either USAF UTCs and/or AFSCs and will require

24

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 the requester to provide the necessary information to convert the requested force, capability, or military occupational specialty (MOS) into capabilities that identify what personnel and specific training are required to meet the tasking. The supported component headquarters will translate the request into potential UTCs and/or AFSCs, or closest organic Air Force capability. The process used to source JET solutions follows the same procedure as sourcing traditional forces but usually requires more staffing time. This time is used to understand the capability being requested, translate it into AFSCs or UTCs, and arrange for training, sourcing, equipping, mobilizing (if required), and deploying. 1.10.4.2.1. JET is the overarching methodology that provides alternative force sourcing when the preferred force solution is not an option. There are three JET sourcing categories: (1) Joint Force/Capability Solution, (2) In-Lieu-Of (ILO) Solution, and (3) Ad Hoc Solution. 1.10.4.2.1.1. Joint Force/Capability Solution. A Service providing a force/capability in place of another Service‘s core mission; however, the capability is performing its core mission (e.g. RED HORSE replacing an Army Combat Engineering Heavy Battalion, AF EOD Detachment replacing Army EOD Company). This JET solution requires no special training, outside of a functional area, beyond combat skills training. 1.10.4.2.1.2. ILO Solution. A standard force, including associated table of organization and equipment, deployed/employed to execute missions and tasks outside its core competencies (e.g. Direct Support Supply Company, filled by Army reserve Petroleum, Oil and Lubricant Unit. 1.10.4.2.1.3. Ad Hoc Solution. A consolidation of individuals and equipment from various commands/services forming a deployable/employable entity, properly manned, trained and equipped to meet the supported CCDR‘s requirements (e.g. Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) sourced with Navy & Air Force personnel). 1.10.4.2.2. DELETED.

Figure 1.6. DELETED 1.10.4.2.3. DELETED. 1.10.4.2.4. DELETED. 1.10.4.2.5. DELETED. 1.10.4.3. DELETED. 1.10.4.3.1. DELETED. 1.10.4.3.2. DELETED. 1.10.4.3.3. DELETED 1.10.4.3.3.1. DELETED. 1.10.4.3.3.2. DELETED

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1.10.4.3.3.3. DELETED. 1.10.4.3.3.4. DELETED 1.10.5. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3O is the focal point for Global Force Management/Joint Force Provider process.

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Chapter 2 OVERVIEW OF AIR FORCE PLANNING Section 2A—Purpose 2.1. Purpose. To provide an overview of the Air Force‘s force presentation and the planning policies, processes, and systems used to support the joint planning process. This includes the Air & Space Expeditionary Force (AEF), War and Mobilization Plan (WMP), Deliberate and Crisis Action Planning and Execution Segments (DCAPES), and the Air & Space Expeditionary Task Force (AETF) force modules. Section 2B—Background 2.2. Function of the AEF. The Air Force supports global combatant commander (CCDR) requirements through a combination of assigned, attached (rotational), and mobility forces that may be forward deployed, transient, or operating from home station. The AEF is the force generation construct used to manage the battle rhythm of these forces in order to meet global CCDR requirements while maintaining the highest possible level of overall readiness. Through the AEF, the Air Force establishes a predictable, standardized battle rhythm ensuring rotational forces are properly organized, trained, equipped, and ready to sustain capabilities while rapidly responding to emerging crises. Section 2C—Guidance 2.3. AEF Force Generation Construct. The Air Force‘s Total Force is part of the AEF. There are four major elements of the AEF structure: readily available force, Enabler force, in-place support, and Institutional Force. The first three elements are components that primarily constitute the Air Force‘s warfighting capability and are therefore postured in UTCs (see Chapter 7); the fourth element provides the Air Force‘s sustainment capability necessary to meet SECAF statutory functions outlined in 10 USC § 8013(b). 2.3.1. Readily Available Force. The readily available force is the primary pool from which the Air Force fulfills GFM Allocation Plan (GFMAP) rotational requirements. To meet these requirements, the Air Force aligns its warfighting capabilities into a baseline of 10 AEFs (5 pairs), each intended to contain an equivalent capability from which to provide forces. During periods of increased requirements, capability areas from these 10 AEFs may be realigned within the Global AEF construct to a Tempo Band that provides a deeper pool of capability, deploying that capability at a higher deploy-to-dwell rate (i.e. the ratio of time deployed in support of a contingency versus the time not deployed in support of a contingency). The baseline AEF (Band ―A‖) is organized to support a one-to-four ratio. The alternative Tempo Bands are organized to support an increasing deploy-to-dwell ratio with Bands ―C‖, ―D‖, and ―E‖ supporting one-to-three, one-to-two, and one-to-one ratios respectively. Band ―B,‖ like Band ―A,‖ supports a one-to-four ratio but with a 6 month vulnerability period vice 4 months; the vulnerability periods for Bands ―C,‖ ―D,‖ and ―E‖ are also 6 months. Two additional Tempo Bands are designed to support Air Reserve Component (ARC) forces in capability areas that might require mobilization. Tempo Bands

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―M‖ and ―N‖ are designed to support mobilization-to-dwell ratios of one-to-five and one-tofour respectively. When forces are realigned to a different Tempo Band, each block within the Tempo Band is intended to contain an equivalent capability. 2.3.1.1. (DELETED) . 2.3.2. Enabler Force. The Enabler force includes common user assets, such as global mobility forces, special operations (SOF) and personnel recovery forces, space forces, and other uniquely categorized forces that provide support to authorized organizations within and outside the Department of Defense (DOD). Most high demand/low supply (HD/LS) assets, National Air Mobility System, and Theater Air Control System (TACS) elements are postured as Enabler forces and will rotate as operational requirements dictate. Due to their unique nature, these forces cannot be easily aligned in one of the Tempo Bands; however, every effort must be made to develop a sustained plan. Enabler force details are in Chapter 7 (Note: ARC is not required to posture assets as Enablers). 2.3.3. In-place support. There are two types of in-place support -- those forces that almost exclusively employ in direct support of a Combatant Commander mission, and those that represent the minimum number of requirements to support critical home station operations. In-place support forces are also included in the AEF Tempo Bands. Details on in-place support forces are in Chapter 7. 2.3.4. Institutional Force. The Institutional Force consists of those forces assigned to organizations responsible to carry out the SECAF Title 10 functions at the Air Force level (i.e. organize, train, equip, recruit, supply, etc (see Table A8.2. for examples)). These organizations will not posture UTCs in the AEF Capability Library (unless a waiver is granted by AF/A3/5 (see paragraph 10.2)). Although these organizations as a whole do not represent a warfighting capability, the individuals assigned to these organizations are inherently deployable. Details on AEF association, sourcing, and employment of individuals in the Institutional Force are in Chapter 14. 2.3.4.1. (DELETED) . 2.3.5. AEF Capability Library. The blocks within the five primary and two ARC Tempo Bands, plus the Enabler force make up the AEF Capability Library as depicted in Figure 2.1 The AEF Capability Library consists of 100% of the USAF‘s postured capability and encompasses one iteration of each of the 41 AEF blocks plus the Enabler force. The AEF Capability Library contains a finite capability that at any given time identifies forces that constitute the total force that has been made available or allocated for scheduling and provides a composite of capabilities from which AETFs are task organized to meet mission requirements.

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Figure 2.1. AEF Capability Library.

2.4. AEF Schedule, Battle Rhythm, and Timeline. 2.4.1. AEF Schedule. The AEF Capability Library is the basis for the AEF Schedule (see Figure 2.2). The AEF Schedule operates on a 24-month life cycle that aligns with two GFM Cycles and coincides with fiscal years. Prior to the beginning of every GFM cycle, functional areas will revalidate the Tempo Band alignment of their respective capability areas and realign forces if necessary. It is the Air Force goal that functional areas align to the least strenuous band (ideally Band ―A‖) to minimize risk to the force. Every 12 months, a new 24-month AEF Schedule will be established. The various actions that lead up to the AEF Schedule are outlined in paragraph 2.4.3

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Figure 2.2. AEF Schedule.

2.4.2. AEF Battle Rhythm. The AEF operates on a 24-month life cycle. This cycle includes periods of normal training, preparation, and deployment vulnerability. However, each Tempo Band within the AEF construct operates under a different battle rhythm (see Figures 2.3.1 through 2.3.5). 2.4.2.1. For most forces (those other than Band ―E‖), the majority of the AEF battle rhythm is spent in normal training during which forces concentrate on unit missions and basic proficiency events in accordance with applicable Air Force directives and Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC) requirements. This may include Joint, Air Force, or MAJCOM exercise participation (exercises of less than 30 days duration) such as Red Flag and Silver Flag. Most contingency and deployment training should take place during this period. This training and exercise period is also used to fill CCDR requirements with forces that are employed from home station, filling contingency requirements for 30 days

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 or less and crisis response (including HUMRO and OPLAN) needs. For the baseline AEF (Band ―A‖) this period is approximately 14 months. For Bands ―B‖ through ―E,‖ the normal training period is approximately 22, 16, 10, and 4 months, respectively. 2.4.2.1.1. Post-deployment reconstitution is included in this period. During the month immediately after deployment, the unit is focused on recovery. PCS/PCA moves into and out of the unit will be deconflicted to the maximum extent possible to occur during the 3-month period immediately after the vulnerability period. 2.4.2.2. Prior to a unit‘s deployment, a 2to 3-month deployment preparation period focuses unit activities on specific deployment preparation activities and area of responsibility (AOR) specific events, if known. Exercises of less than 30 days may be supported if the training is appropriate to deployment preparation (e.g. Eagle Flag). 2.4.2.3. The 4-month (Band ―A‖) or 6-month (Bands ―B‖ through ―E‖) vulnerability period is the period of time the forces aligned in a specific AEF block are susceptible to initial deployment. Forces will not initially deploy outside of the vulnerability period except in cases of reach forward. Only one AEF block from each Tempo Band will be vulnerable at a time. Individuals and equipment must not participate in any activity that directly impacts their availability to deploy during their AEF vulnerability period unless specifically approved by applicable wing commander/equivalent. Exercise estimated tour lengths (ETLs) of 30 days or more are sourced from forces in their AEF vulnerability period. 2.4.2.4. Enabler forces do not operate within a 24-month life cycle/battle rhythm. The Enabler battle rhythm is provided by the HAF/MAJCOM FAM as a part of the Enabler nomination request package. For forces aligned in the Enabler force, unit commanders should develop a deployment schedule that provides a measure of predictability to associated Airmen. However, operational requirements may force deviations from the applicable battle rhythm. MAJCOM/CVs will ensure appropriate mechanisms are in place to ensure Airmen postured as an Enabler are provided a measure of predictability/stability and do not violate CSAFor SecDef-redlines with respect to dwell.

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 Figure 2.3. AEF Battle Rhythm (Band ―A‖).

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32 Figure 2.4. AEF Battle Rhythm (Band ―B‖).

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 Figure 2.5. AEF Battle Rhythm (Band ―C‖).

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34 Figure 2.6. AEF Battle Rhythm (Band ―D‖).

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Figure 2.7. AEF Battle Rhythm (Band ―E‖).

2.4.3. GFM Cycle and AEF Schedule Timeline. 2.4.3.1. Joint GFM Cycle Actions. Approximately 18-24 months prior to the start of each GFM cycle, Joint Staff will publish a planning order outlining various milestones necessary to staff and publish the associated GFMAP. The timing of these actions directly affects the timeline needed to develop and implement the AEF Schedule. 2.4.3.1.1. DELETED. 2.4.3.1.2. DELETED. 2.4.3.1.3. DELETED. 2.4.3.1.4. DELETED. 2.4.3.1.5. DELETED. 2.4.3.1.6. DELETED.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 2.4.3.2. AEF Schedule Preparation Timeline. The AEF Schedule timeline is required to meet the Joint Staff GFM Master Timeline. These milestones will be modified as necessary to meet the GFM Master Timeline. Prior to each 24-month AEF Schedule, Air Force leaders, planners, and Functional Area Managers (FAM) at every level review lessons learned, make assessments of significant force structure changes that have impacted the Air Force or a particular functional area, and consider initiatives that may impact the way we posture, schedule, present, or execute combat capability. A significant increase or decrease in combatant commander requirements will also warrant adjustment in the rotational battle rhythm of a particular functional area. AF/A3/5 will publish specific milestones to support the AEF Schedule timeline. As co-chairs of the AEF Steering Group, AF/A5X and AFPC/CC will monitor the tasks associated with planning for the upcoming AEF Schedule. Air Force planners and commanders, as well as HAF, MAJCOM, and component headquarters FAMs must ensure their actions are completed in accordance with published timelines. 2.4.3.2.1. DELETED. 2.4.3.2.2. DELETED. 2.4.3.2.3. DELETED. 2.4.3.2.4. DELETED. 2.4.3.2.5. DELETED. 2.4.3.2.6. DELETED. 2.4.3.2.7. DELETED. 2.4.3.2.8. DELETED. 2.4.3.2.9. DELETED. 2.4.3.2.10. DELETED.

Figure 2.8. DELETED. 2.4.4. (DELETED) . 2.4.4.1. (DELETED) . 2.4.4.2. (DELETED) . 2.4.4.3. (DELETED) . 2.5. AEF Vulnerability Period. At any given time, one AEF block/pair from each Tempo Band is in the AEF vulnerability period. Available forces postured in these AEF blocks/pairs will be used to meet known rotational expeditionary requirements and emerging operational requirements across the range of military operations (ROMO). Individuals assigned to institutional organizations, will also be associated to a specific AEF vulnerability period (see Chapter 14). 2.5.1. Forces aligned to the AEFs in the vulnerability period but not tasked to deploy will remain in an on-call status to reinforce forward-deployed forces or provide additional

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capability for the duration of the AEF vulnerability period (Note: ARC forces do not serve in an on-call status). If tasked, their deployment commitments may extend outside their vulnerability period. In such cases, AFPC/DPW will coordinate with supported component headquarters to synchronize deployments with AEF vulnerability periods (see Chapter 8). 2.5.2. Regardless of AEF vulnerability period, all AEF forces are vulnerable for OPLAN tasking at all times including the period immediately following redeployment. 2.5.3. All Airmen will be given an AEF Indicator (AEFI) (Note: Reserve components will determine component-specific AEFI policy). For individuals assigned to warfighting organizations, the AEFI will correspond to the same AEF block as the unit‘s UTCs; for individuals assigned to the Institutional Force, the AEFI will correspond to an AEF vulnerability period. Except in cases of reaching forward, individuals will deploy during their associated AEF block‘s vulnerability period. Changing an individual‘s AEFI will only be done under extenuating circumstances. See Chapter 14 for details on Airmen and the AEF. 2.6. AEF Surge. If requirements exceed forces available within the AEF vulnerability period, the AEF is designed to surge to meet increased requirements. Various methods of surging include reaching forward (using forces in the next AEF block/pair), reaching deeper (using forces in the current AEF block/pair that are not normally available not to exceed the unit's total deployable capability), rebanding capability area (an out-of-cycle realignment of the functional area into a different tempo band), and/or mobilization of ARC forces. Once a functional area realigns in a Tempo Band with a lesser dwell period and operates in that band for at least one full rotation (current rotation plus next), that functionality is not considered ―in surge.‖ The matrix at Table 2.1 and paragraph 3.7.5 outline the various trigger points, process, and approval levels for surge mechanics. Emerging requirements include, but not limited to, JET solutions, JMD-IA, and/or standard force (―blue-on-blue‖) solutions. Surging may require forces in their normal training and/or predeployment training periods to be deployed/employed for operational requirements. Table 2.1. Decision Matrix for Emerging Requirements. The And the Decision is to: capability area is operating Reach Forward 1, 4 ReNext Block Beyond Next in Tempo Source within Reach Band 3, Block 4 Band: current Block Deeper4 A HAF FAM DCS A3/5 N/A A3/5 B HAF FAM DCS A3/5 N/A A3/5 C HAF FAM A3/5 CSAF 2 DCS A3/5 2 2 CSAF D DCS CSAF DCS CSAF 2 N/A E DCS CSAF A3/5 N/A Note 1: Reaching forward should be used for ―initial increase‖ in requirements. If increase will be enduring, the capability area should re-band during the subsequent AEF Schedule Note 2: Need to consider mobilization/additional mobilization as a mitigation strategy Note 3: Assumes moving to more stringent Tempo Band (e.g. from Band ―C‖ to Band ―D‖)

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 Note 4: Reaching forward, deeper, or re-band requires HAF FAM coordination with the applicable MAJCOMs 2.6.1. Through surge operations, the Air Force can make available all AEF blocks plus available Enablers but will require a sustained period, following this level of effort, to reconstitute the force during which time Air Force capabilities will be severely curtailed. 2.6.1.1. Surge operations will not be used to support exercises or rotational presence, unless specifically directed by AF/A3/5. 2.6.1.2. Some capabilities may need to surge at different rates and durations to meet combatant commander requirements. 2.6.1.3. Enabler assets, except those coded for specific operations, (ref. paragraphs 7.12.8 and 9.9.1), are also used for sourcing. 2.6.2. An active component (AC) employment ratio of one deployment period followed by a dwell period of twice the deployment period (1:2) for all postured capabilities is considered the maximum sustainable utilization rate while maintaining total Air Force unit readiness at C1/C2. This ratio coincides with the SecDef deploy-to-dwell planning objective. 2.6.3. Functional areas aligned in Band ―D‖ experiencing demand that exceeds postured capabilities within the AEF vulnerability window should consider involuntary recall of ARC forces (see paragraph 3.8).

2.7. DELETED. 2.7.1. DELETED. 2.7.2. (DELETED) . 2.7.3. DELETED. 2.7.3.1. DELETED. 2.7.3.2. DELETED. 2.7.3.3. DELETED. 2.7.3.4. DELETED. 2.7.4. DELETED. 2.7.4.1. DELETED. 2.7.5. DELETED. 2.7.6. DELETED. 2.7.6.1. DELETED. 2.7.7. DELETED. 2.7.8. Unit and UTC readiness SORTS and ART reporting must be timely and accurate. 2.7.9. Airmen will be ready to immediately deploy during their AEF eligibility period. New CCDR requirements can be sourced any time during the AEF period.

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2.7.9.1. If deployed near the end of the AEF eligibility period, the Airman must be prepared to remain deployed through the end of the next AEF rotation. 2.7.10. If unable to fill AEF requirements, AEF reclama rule sets apply. See Chapter 10. Note: Reclamas will only occur under the most extenuating circumstances. Reclamas are minimized when UTC Availability and ART are properly maintained. Units will ensure UTC Availability and ART are accurate and up to date. 2.8. AEF Composition. The operations, command and control, and ECS elements required to task organize an AETF are resident in each AEF vulnerability period. Those capabilities may include aircraft-oriented and/or non-aircraft-oriented forces. A Numbered Expeditionary Air Force (NEAF) is the largest AETF and consists of multiple Air Expeditionary Wings (AEW) with subordinate Air Expeditionary Groups (AEG) and Air Expeditionary Squadrons (AES). An AEW is structured in accordance with the Air Force combat wing structure and is capable of establishing and operating an expeditionary base as well as exercising C2 of subordinate units at geographically separated locations. Normally, only one AEW will be at a single location. Subordinate units, regardless of size, will be organized as an AEG or AES. When an AETF is comprised of AEGs at multiple operating locations, each AEG will normally be attached to the nearest AEW in the same AETF. An AEG does not normally possess the capability to establish and operate a base; therefore AEGs are typically tenant units at a deployed location. 2.8.1. Each vulnerability period should have sufficient AC and ARC volunteer forces to support five AEWs and a mixture of eight AEGs. With mobilization, each vulnerability period should have sufficient forces to support an additional three AEWs and four AEGs. 2.8.1.1. Surging beyond the capability within an AEF vulnerability period will not necessarily yield an additional 5 AEWs and 8 AEGs (8 and 12 with mobilization) worth of capability. As capability areas are rebanded in a tempo band with lesser dwell periods, the flexibility to surge forces from the next AEF vulnerability period may be limited. 2.8.1.2. Determining the exact number of AESs, AEGs, and/or AEWs that can be generated is dependent on elements such as environment (permissive/non-permissive), available infrastructure, and duration of the requirement. Each AETF Force Module, in its entirety, may not be required for each location. 2.8.1.3. Critical enabling capabilities and/or ECS may be exhausted before the full capability within the AEF vulnerability period has been committed. The resulting residual capability can either be directed to support an existing location or can be added as a dependent element to support another operation. 2.9. Presentation and Command & Control (C2) of AEF Forces. The Air Force presents the full range of Air Force capabilities to the Joint Task Force (JTF) Commander via an Air & Space Expeditionary Task Force (AETF). The AETF is presented under the command of a single Commander of Air Force Forces (COMAFFOR). 2.9.1. AETFs are sized and tailored to meet the specific mission requirements. AETFs are sized as Air Expeditionary Groups (AEG), Air Expeditionary Wings (AEW) or Numbered Expeditionary Air Forces (NEAF). Reference AFPD 10-4 for further detail.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 2.9.2. The AETF commander (COMAFFOR) must be ready to quickly assume the C2 functions necessary to command, control and coordinate air, space and information operations (IO). 2.9.2.1. The component NAF is organized and trained to support the UCC across the full range of military operations, with a core C2 capability that can be readily adapted to a specific theater requirement. The component NAF headquarters with it‘s AOC weapons system will provide the required operational-level C2 capability, tailored for a specific AETF. 2.9.2.2. Due to the unique characteristics of air, space and information power (speed, range, flexibility, etc.), if there are multiple simultaneous JTF operations in a given theater, the AETF will normally be organized at the theater level, to optimize AF capabilities across all JTFs. 2.9.3. AETF forces (wings, groups, and/or squadrons) will be under the command of the COMAFFOR. 2.9.3.1. Administrative control (ADCON) and specified ADCON are Service responsibilities and will be detailed in the appropriate G-series orders. 2.9.3.2. Operational Control (OPCON) and Tactical Control (TACON) are combatant command authorities and will be delegated by the combatant commander (CCDR), as required, to the JTF commander and then to the COMAFFOR.

2.10. AEF Command and Control (C2). Air Force C2 operates under two central themes: the principle of unity of command and the tenet of centralized control and decentralized execution. Deployed active duty AEF force packages are operationally and administratively allocated to the COMAFFOR. Operational control of ARC forces is assigned to the theater command elements; however, administrative control of ARC forces remains with the National Guard Bureau and HQ/AFRC. Detailed C2 concepts are contained in the AFPD 10-4; AFDD 2, Operations and Organizations; and AFDD 2-8, Command and Control. 2.11. AETF Deployment. AETFs may deploy to meet known rotational, crisis response and combatant commander theater engagement and theater security cooperation (TSC) requirements. Unit readiness, proper positioning of air mobility assets, TPFDD development, deployment requirements manning document (DRMD) development, and expeditionary site planning for reception, beddown, and employment are keys to the process. 2.11.1. CJCS orders provide the mission and authority to task and deploy forces to support operations. MAJCOM/USAF component/unit supporting plans, installation deployment plans (IDPs), and expeditionary site plans (ESPs) provide procedural deployment details. 2.11.2. Although CJCS taskings will not always match the requirements established during the planning process, this prior preparation will enhance time-critical execution of AETF operations. 2.12. (DELETED). 2.12.1. (DELETED) . 2.13. AEF Agile Combat Support. Agile Combat Support (ACS) underpins the ability of the AEF to provide force capabilities that can rapidly respond by creating, sustaining, and protecting

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all air and space power capabilities to accomplish mission objectives. ACS produces the combat support capabilities critical to decisive air and space power. By focusing on the expeditionary capabilities of ACS, expeditionary combat support (ECS) concepts assure AEFs are supported and are able to operate with a small support footprint and streamlined infrastructure requirements. 2.13.1. ECS is the tailored ACS capability deployed to expeditionary sites, which supports AEFs employed in global operations. ECS functions include, but are not limited to the following: air traffic control and airfield management, chaplain, civil engineer (crash rescue, fire protection, explosive ordnance disposal (EOD), power production, and nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC)), communications and information, contracting, financial management and comptroller, historian, judge advocate, logistics readiness (logistics plans, supply, fuels, vehicle operations, vehicle maintenance, traffic management and aerial port operations), maintenance and munitions, manpower, medical, military equal opportunity, counterintelligence (AFOSI), personnel, postal services, protocol, public affairs, safety, security forces, and services. 2.14. The USAF War and Mobilization Plan (WMP). The WMP consists of five volumes and is the Air Force‘s supporting document to the JSCP. The five WMP volumes provide the Air Staff, Air Force planners, and Air Force commanders with current policies, planning factors, and CJCS apportioned forces for conducting and supporting operations. The WMP establishes requirements for developing mobilization and planning programs to support and sustain contingency operations of the programmed forces. It encompasses all basic functions necessary to match facilities, personnel, and materiel resources with planned wartime activity. 2.14.1. The WMP volumes, access instructions, and restrictions are available electronically using either the GCCS or the A5XW SIPRNet homepage at: http://c2www.af.pentagon.smil.mil/xoxw/. 2.14.1.1. AF/A5XW is the Air Staff agency responsible for maintenance and update of information contained in the classified WMP volumes. 2.14.2. Volume 1 (WMP-1), Basic Plan and Supporting Supplements. WMP 1 provides a consolidated reference source for general policies and guidance for mobilization planning and the support of combat forces in time of war. The Basic Plan addresses the general situation, mission, concept of operations, and execution tasks for Air Force forces in regional conflicts. WMP-1 functional supplements provide a more detailed guidance for near-term support forces to aid Air Force planners in developing war and contingency plans. It provides the basic guidelines, references, and considerations needed to develop Air Force plans and to conduct operations during war and contingencies. As a central reference source, WMP-1, along with this document, aids in standardizing Air Force plans and the planning process. 2.14.2.1. Logistics supplement to WMP-1 provides guidance for directing Logistics Sustainability Analysis (LSA) as directed by CJCSM 3122.03B and CJCSI 3110.03C, Logistics Supplement to the JSCP. The LSA anticipates combat support challenges and resolves them before they become showstoppers. The LSA addresses the areas of materiel, infrastructure, logistics support forces, and lift in detail. It identifies deficiencies, assesses the risk or impact on operations and any known get-well dates or alternative solutions, and assigns a level of risk associated with the deficiency. Only significant deficiencies requiring external assistance need addressing.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 2.14.2.2. Other Air Force providers of combat forces, resources and capabilities also provide their assessment of sustainability to the A-4. The entire intent of the LSA is to provide a broad assessment of key combat logistics support and enabler capabilities required to execute the combatant commander's planned operation. 2.14.2.3. It is the responsibility of functional areas managers (FAMs) and planners at all levels to analyze and review WMP-1 guidance for their respective functional areas. FAMs will work closely with Air Staff to ensure compliance with guidance, resolve any contentious issues, and ensure the most effective management of forces. 2.14.2.3.1. MAJCOM inputs to WMP-1 supplements will be submitted to the Air Staff FAM for revision. It is the MAJCOM/DRU/FOA staff FAMs‘ responsibility to ensure their respective units receive any new guidance pertaining to their functional areas. 2.14.3. Volume 2 (WMP-2), Plans Listing and Summary. W MP-2 is the single-source document that provides the listing of all active plans with TPFDDs. At a minimum, this list will include JSCP tasked plans and their associated "working slices" (the Air Force portion of the TPFDD). 2.14.3.1. The WMP 2 is made up of two parts. Part 1 consists of a listing of Combatant Commander plans required by the JSCP. This listing is provided and maintained by the Joint Staff/J7 directorate staff. 2.14.3.2. Part 2 consists of the supporting plans that are written by component headquarters in support of part 1. Component headquarters will provide WMP-2 updates by forwarding plan details (i.e., plan name, number, description, with or without TPFDD, office of primary responsibility (OPR), date, and classification) to AF/A5XW. AF/A5XW will maintain an updated listing on their Global Command and Control System (GCCS)/ Secret Internet Protocol Routing Network (SIPRNET) homepage at: http://c2www.af.pentagon.smil.mil/xoxw/. 2.14.4. Volume 3 (WMP-3), Combat and Support Forces. WMP-3 has four parts. Part 1 contains combat forces. Part 2 is the Air Force Unit Type Code (UTC) Availability and contains all postured UTC capability in the Air Force. Part 3 contains the Air Force Readiness Spares Package (RSP) authorization document. Part 4 is the Capability Annexes to the Air & Space Expeditionary Force Presence Policy (AEFPP). 2.14.4.1. WMP-3, Part 1, lists all available combat forces by type aircraft, unit identification, unit availability date, and scenarios or theaters for which they are apportioned in accordance with the CJCS force apportionment for contingency planning. The forces listed are a snapshot of available Air Force aircraft (current or programmed) apportioned to each combatant command as of the 1st quarter of each fiscal year (FY) as specified in the WMP-3 Part 1 database and that correspond to the CJCS force apportionment. 2.14.4.1.1. Once the JSCP has been finalized, combatant commands‘ force apportionment may change based on deactivation of units, conversion of units from one mission design series (MDS) to another, or additions to the Air Force's force structure. If there are differences between JCSP apportionment and WMP-3 Part 1, WMP will take precedence.

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2.14.4.1.2. The WMP-3 Part 1 is maintained by AF/A5XW with inputs on force structure from AF/A8P and input on specific data elements, wartime information, and unit selections from the MAJCOMs and component headquarters. 2.14.4.1.3. When building OPLAN/CONPLAN TPFDDs, component headquarters will use only the forces identified in the WMP-3 Part 1 for their apportioned theater/scenario. 2.14.4.2. WMP-3, Part 2, UTC Availability, is the official comprehensive data source for identifying all Air Force UTCs. It contains all postured UTC capability in the Air Force listed by UTC/ unit identification code (UIC)/Record Number. This UTC availability represents the Air Force's commitment to support CJCS requirements, combatant commander, and Service unique requirements, and documents all conventional and Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP) capabilities for all active, guard and reserve units. 2.14.4.2.1. The UTC Availability will be maintained by each force-providing organization 2.14.4.2.2. Each listed UTC contains the mission capability statement as well as deployment characteristics of the UTC in terms of personnel and cargo tonnage requiring transportation. 2.14.4.3. WMP-3, Part 3, formerly Mission Capability Statements (MISCAPs), is the RSP and contains the wartime spares authorized for aviation units for wartime contingencies. The type of RSP each aviation unit is authorized is identified in the WMP3 Part 1 database. 2.14.4.4. WMP-3, Part 4 (new) is the Capability Annexes associated with the AEFPP. The AEFPP Capability Annexes describe how the Air Force makes its forces available in the assignment, apportionment, and allocation to combatant commanders. 2.14.5. Volume 4 (WMP-4), Wartime Aircraft Activity (WAA). WMP-4 is governed by this instruction and AFI 25-101, War Reserve Materiel (WRM) Program Guidance and Procedure. WMP-4 documents the deployment, positioning, and employment of activity of Air Force aviation units for each geographical location (GEOLOC) having aircraft passing through or operation from it in support of all regional operation plans (OPLAN) and certain concept plans (CONPLAN). WMP-4 also contains Mission Oriented Items (MOI) and NonAircraft Unit Related Ration Requirements. 2.14.5.1. The WAA is presented in WMP-4, Parts 1 and 2. Part 1 (Current Year) and Part 2 (Outyear 1) correspond to the JSCP planning cycle. The WAA resides in the Wartime Aircraft Activity Report database that is updated using the Logistics Feasibility Analysis Capability (LOGFAC) system, which is accessible using GCCS. See Chapter 4. 2.14.5.2. The MOI is presented in WMP-4, Part 3. This portion of WMP-4 identifies missile preposition requirements by type and quantity in support of OPLANs/CONPLANs. 2.14.5.3. The Non-Aircraft Unit Related Rations Requirement is presented in WMP-4, Part 4. This portion of WMP-4 has the capability of identifying meals ready-to-eat (MRE) requirements at deployment and employment locations. It also includes MRE

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 requirements in support of personnel assigned to, and/or being deployed to missile sites. MRE requirements to support aircrews associated with wartime aircraft activity in Parts 1 and 2 are contained the War Consumables Distribution Objectives (WCDO). 2.14.5.4. As necessary, MAJCOMs will reproduce applicable portions of WMP-4 and distribute them to subordinate units, including Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC) and Air National Guard (ANG) units. 2.14.6. Volume 5 (WMP-5), Basic Planning Factors and Data. WMP-5 provides approved US Air Force planning factors by aircraft type and theater, serving as a basis for establishing worldwide support for programmed force levels. These factors, derived for aircraft apportioned in WMP-3 in support of the JSCP, are used to develop the WMP-4, providing the basis for planning and pre-positioning of war reserve material. They indicate the USAF position on supportable sustainment levels for USAF aviation assets, but are not intended to restrict employment options of Unified Combatant Command commanders. However, exceeding WMP-5 sortie rates/flying hours will shorten the sustainable duration below that prescribed in strategic planning guidance.

2.15. Deliberate and Crisis Action Planning and Execution Segments (DCAPES). DCAPES is the Air Force‘s war planning system and provides an Air Force feed to JOPES automated data processing (ADP). The objective of DCAPES is to enable improved and streamlined operations planning and execution processes which include associated policy and procedures, along with organizational and technology improvements. DCAPES provides standard data files, formats, application programs, and management procedures that are Air Force unique and joint guidance compliant and used primarily for force planning, sourcing equipment and personnel requirements, transportation feasibility estimation, civil engineering support, and medical planning. DCAPES is detailed in Chapter 4. 2.15.1. DCAPES supports all phases of operations planning and execution at the HAF, major command, component, and wing/squadron level. It provides data manipulation capability to Air Force planners to perform rapid OPLAN development, conduct feasibility and capability analyses, and support mobilization, deployment, sustainment, redeployment, demobilization, reconstitution, and personnel accounting of forces. 2.15.2. JOPES provides the joint architecture for establishing and communicating Air Force requirements supporting the JSCP and Air Force WMP. The primary means of communicating planning data among Air Force commands and agencies will be through the exchange of JOPES TPFDDs, DCAPES detailed plan requirements data, and Logistics Planning Files (LPF). 2.15.3. DCAPES and JOPES share common business rules and automated data processing (ADP) procedures and policies to plan and execute joint military operations. Air Force planners at all levels will use DCAPES to support the combatant commander‘s selected course of action (COA) in a timely manner. 2.15.4. DCAPES is CJCSM 3150.16 compliant, and supports JOPES ADP by establishing a standard Air Force support system in GCCS for joint operation planning and execution. DCAPES uses the JOPESREP for exchanging formatted data among the unified commands, Services, Service components, United States Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM),

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the JS, and DOD agencies. DCAPES transactions that support JOPES procedures are the mechanisms for submitting movement requirements to USTRANSCOM. 2.15.5. DCAPES supports accurate and timely sourcing which includes validation and verification. DCAPES also supports sourcing and tailoring of lower levels of detail beyond the JOPES level of detail. 2.16. Packaging Air Force Capability. The Air Force will use the AETF force modules (FM) and Operational Capability Packages (OCP) for standardized force packaging. Standardizing the planning and execution of how forces are presented will ensure a repeatable and effective process. The Air Force implements this requirement through the multiple AETF FMs. The AETF FMs incorporate a balance of required combat, ECS, and C2 UTCs required to accomplish the mission to open, establish, operate, and sustain an airbase. Currently, the AETF FMs consist of Open the Airbase, Command and Control, Establish the Airbase, Generate the Mission, Operate the Airbase, and Robust the Airbase. 2.16.1. Planning will be accomplished using the AETF FMs and OCPs. Air Force planners who build and submit TPFDD requirements will use the AETF FMs as a starting point for TPFDD development. The AETF FMs are discussed in detail in Chapter 6. 2.16.2. These are not the only FMs in JOPES. Planners will continue to use additional/different FMs to link capabilities together in contingency and operational plans. 2.16.3. The AETF FMs provide a baseline for Air Force planners. Variations to the force modules, to include capability to close an airbase, are contained in operational capability packages (OCPs). OCPs are discussed in detail in Chapter 6. 2.17. Training for Air Force Planners. War planners and functional area managers at all levels play a significant role in support of the operational planning process. They are responsible for supporting, developing, and managing planning and execution requirements to support all possible wartime contingencies. Continual involvement in the war planning process is essential to accomplishing the Air Force's wartime mission. There are several formal and informal courses available to provide individuals basic operational and wartime planning instruction. 2.17.1. Contingency Wartime Planning Course (CWPC). CWPC teaches the basic planning process to war planners at all levels. The depth of instruction is sufficient to bring students to a level of comprehension that enables them to carry out their duties more effectively and decrease the steep learning curve associated with war planning. CWPC is highly desired for individuals seeking fundamental knowledge as war planners. AF/A5XW is the Air Staff CWPC sponsor. 2.17.2. DCAPES Functional Training. This training is for DCAPES functional users (logistics, manpower, personnel, and/or operations planners) who currently use JOPES Editing Tool (JET) and/ or DCAPES on a regular basis. Additional users include data analysts from headquarters staff positions, and MAJCOM Manpower and Equipment Force Packaging (MEFPAK) System managers currently involved in the UTC MEFPAK management process. MAJCOM and HQ level DCAPES and JOPES functional managers are OPRs for scheduling DCAPES functional training. 2.17.2.1. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OX is the office of responsibility for Deliberate Crisis Action Planning and Execution Segments (DCAPES) Training.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 2.17.3. JOPES Editing Tool (JET) Users. Current JET users will preferably be graduates of the Joint Deployment Training Center (JDTC) courses (discussed below) or will have oneyear experience on JET at HAF, MAJCOM, or component level. Candidates and attendees should be CWPC graduates. Students who are not CWPC graduates but require this class may take the CWPC online primer available on the Air University CADRE CWPC website. http://www.cadre.maxwell.af.mil/warfarestudies/cwpc/cwpcprimer/crsmap.htm. As a minimum, students should accomplish the "Planning Systems and Tools" segment. All students must have basic computer skills (e.g., mouse, keyboard, and editing tools facility). MAJCOM and HQ level DCAPES and JOPES functional managers are OPRs for scheduling JET training. The JDTC at Fort Eustis, Virginia is the OPR for this course. 2.17.3.1. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OX is the office of responsibility for Joint Operations Planning and Execution System (JOPES) Training. 2.17.4. JOPES Support Personnel Course (JSPC). JSPC is a course designed for JOPES support personnel who use JOPES applications in the support of the Joint Planning and Execution Process. The course emphasizes the role and use of JOPES applications in support of the six Crisis Action Planning phases, with special emphasis on procedures and applications outlined in CJCSM 3122.02B. Students are taught to build, modify, and delete TPFDD requirements, participate in TPFDD validation, and then monitor the deployment execution. The JDTC at Fort Eustis, Virginia is the OPR for this course. 2.17.5. JOPES Action Officer Course (JAOC). JAOC is a course designed in response to the Joint Planning and Execution Community‘s request for JOPES training for action officers from all Services directly working in or in support of a unified command. Candidates use their working knowledge of JOPES systems in order to write and enforce sound TPFDD guidance, find and correct errors, perform update functions, perform all phases in the Validation and Movement process, and produce TPFDD-based decision support information. The JDTC at Ft Eustis Virginia is the OPR for this course. 2.17.6. COMAFFOR Senior Staff Course (CSSC). CSSC is a mentored seminar for Air Force colonels exercising executive responsibilities, recommending force application and movement, maintaining situational awareness, developing responsive courses of action and adaptive plans in command and control organizations above base level. COMAFFOR Special and A-Staff Directors are specifically targeted, as are Air Force colonels supporting combatant commander staffs. In a seminar setting, senior officers examine critical COMAFFOR and combatant commander situations and lessons learned thru case studies and mentor interaction. AF/A3O is the Air Staff CSSC sponsor. 2.17.7. Joint Air Operations Planning Course (JAOPC). JAOPC helps prepare individuals to serve on the staff of a Combined/Joint Force Air Component Commander (C/JFACC) and educates them in the fundamental concepts, principles, and doctrine required to develop the Air portion of a joint/combined Campaign Plan. JAOPC teaches the basic Air Estimate Planning process. While this process is the standard by which the C/JFACC plans the air war, it is also almost identical to the Joint Operational Planning Process (JOPP), by which the Joint Forces Commander plans the theater campaign. AF/A5XS is the Air Staff JAOP sponsor. 2.17.8. AFFOR Intermediate Staff Course (AISC). AISC trains selected intermediate staff officers with the roles and responsibilities of the AFFOR Staff across the full range of

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military operations from peacetime steady-state to major combat operations. AISC targets captains through lieutenant colonels and E-5 through Senior NCOs who may deploy to COMAFFOR Staffs. The course is conducted in a classroom environment to train students to perform duties in pre-deployment functions, planning functions, tools and systems, AFFOR processes, reach back operations (OSF, RAT), AOC integration, and exercise participation. ACC/A3Y is the Air Staff AISC sponsor.

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Chapter 3 OPERATIONS PLAN DEVELOPMENT AND EXECUTION Section 3A—Purpose 3.1. Purpose. Provide an overview of operational plan development and execution in support of the joint planning process. This chapter will provide a fundamental understanding of contingency, crisis action, and sustainment plan development, the hierarchy of plans, and the processes that support them. Section 3B—Background 3.2. Planning Processes. Planning is a continuous, iterative, and highly structured process that allows for an orderly transition from peace to war and post-hostilities operations. Planning enables proactive, risk-informed global force management decisions resulting in the timely allocation of forces/capabilities necessary to execute a combatant commander‘s mission. Planning ensures the systematic deployment, employment, sustainment, and redeployment of U.S. Forces to meet commander requirements across the Range of Military Options (ROMO). The Joint Planning and Execution Community (JPEC) utilizes two general planning processes: crisis action and contingency planning (formerly called deliberate planning). Crisis action planning is driven by current events in real time and normally occurs in emergencies and in the context of time-sensitive situations. Contingency planning is accomplished in the absence of an active crisis in response to scenarios and threats identified by combatant commanders and in national guidance such as the JSCP. Global Force Management (GFM) processes will increasingly govern the planning process. Currently, crisis action and contingency planning use different planning cycles. 3.2.1. The JPEC accomplishes planning. The JPEC includes the CJCS, Joint Staff and Services, the supported and supporting commands and their components, defense agencies, non-DOD departments and agencies, and Allied Commands and agencies. 3.2.2. The resulting plans are implemented through a series of universally understood orders. These orders provide the mechanism for bringing together the resources, equipment, and personnel needed in a military response. Both contingency and crisis planning are driven by joint processes and conducted within JOPES. 3.2.3. This chapter provides an overview of the planning process. CJCSM 3122.01A, CJCSM3122.03B, and CJCSM 3122.02C provide detailed guidance and instructions on the planning process. Subsequent chapters in this instruction augment the JOPES volumes with detailed Air Force guidance and instructions. 3.2.4. Future Planning Processes. The Joint Staff is leading the development of Adaptive Planning to replace crisis action and contingency planning processes with a single collaborative, responsive, flexible planning and execution process. This single process will yield contingency and crisis action plans. Adaptive Planning is scheduled to be complete in FY06-FY07. When Adaptive Planning is implemented, there will still be "on the shelf" contingency plans and the ability to conduct crisis action planning. The JPEC is also developing new tools to support Adaptive Planning (e.g., Collaborative Force Analysis,

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Sustainment and Transportation (CFAST)). This instruction will be updated as required to reflect changes in Air Force operations planning and execution requirements and processes. During the transition, some combatant commands will be using the new planning processes and the developing tools. Section 3C—Types of Plans 3.3. Types of Plans. Planning results in different types of plans depending on the level of detail required. These are operational plans (OPLANs), concept plans (CONPLANs), functional plans (FUNCPLANs), supporting plans and operation orders (OPORDS). 3.3.1. OPLANs. An OPLAN is a written description of the combatant commander's concept of operations to counter a perceived threat. An OPLAN includes all required annexes, appendices, and a supporting TPFDD. It may be used as the basis of a campaign plan (if required) and then developed into an operations order (OPORD). 3.3.2. CONPLANs. A CONPLAN is an operational plan in an abbreviated format that may require considerable expansion or alteration to convert it into an OPLAN. The objective of concept planning is to develop sound operational and support concepts that can be rapidly expanded into an OPORD if necessary. Unless specified in the JSCP, detailed support requirements are not calculated and TPFDD files are not prepared. A CONPLAN may or may not have an associated TPFDD. 3.3.3. Functional Plans (FUNCPLAN). Functional plans involve military operations in a peacetime or permissive environment. These types of plans are tasked by the JSCP for humanitarian assistance, disaster relief, peacekeeping, or counter-drug operations. Functional plans are written using the JOPES procedures and formats specified for a CONPLAN without a TPFDD. 3.3.4. Supporting Plans. Supporting plans are prepared as tasked by the supported combatant commanders in support of their contingency plans. They are prepared by supporting combatant commanders, subordinate joint force commanders, component commanders, or other agencies. These commanders may, in turn, assign their subordinates the task of preparing additional supporting plans. 3.3.5. Operation Order (OPORD). OPORDs are prepared under joint procedures in prescribed formats during crisis action planning. They appear in the form of a directive issued by a commander to subordinates to effect the coordinated execution of an operation (e.g. air operations, training exercises, etc.). Normally, a combatant commander issues OPORDs to the Service component headquarters to effect the coordinated execution of an operation. Section 3D—Planning 3.4. DCAPES, Force Modules, and UTCs. Air Force planners, regardless of organization, will use DCAPES, force modules, and UTCs during the planning process. DCAPES is the Air Force feeder to JOPES. DCAPES use is directed because it provides a variety of capabilities to Air Force planners and agencies not found in JOPES that are necessary for management and oversight of Air Force planning and execution. Force modules and UTCs are the building blocks

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of AEWs, AEGs, and AESs -the way the Air Force presents and sources capabilities to the JPEC. DCAPES, force modules, and UTCs are detailed in later chapters of this instruction. 3.5. Air Force Planning. Planning, whether legacy or Adaptive has contingency and crisis action components. 3.5.1. Contingency Planning (formerly referred as Deliberate Planning). Combatant commanders, their components, and supporting commands accomplish contingency planning during peacetime conditions. Planners use scenarios and threats identified in national guidance, such as the JSCP, along with the combatant commander's evaluation of their AOR, to develop a series of plans that span a wide range of operations. 3.5.1.1. This formal process develops responses to potential crises, determines forces required to achieve objectives, prepares deployment plans, and continually evaluates selected courses of action (COAs). This process results in a series of formal plans within each theater that contain lists of apportioned forces and their time-phased deployment schedules. 3.5.1.2. The process for contingency planning is cyclic and continual and is almost identical whether the resulting operation plan is a fully developed OPLAN, CONPLAN, or FUNCPLAN. Operations plans remain in effect until canceled or superceded by another approved plan. While in effect, they are continuously maintained and updated. 3.5.2. Crisis Action Planning. Crisis action planning is driven by current events in real time and normally occurs in emergencies and in the context of time-sensitive situations. Planners base their efforts on the actual circumstances that exist when crisis action planning occurs. Detailed guidance and instructions are located in JOPES Volumes I-III. 3.5.2.1. Ideally, an existing contingency plan addresses the crisis situation. If there is not a contingency plan that can be used or modified to respond to the crisis, planners must start from scratch. 3.5.2.2. Each MAJCOM must establish complementary procedures and must ensure adequate procedures exist for subordinate command and agency use. 3.5.2.3. These procedures must be periodically exercised during joint and unilateral command post exercises and field training exercises to ensure the required capability is available. 3.5.2.4. The JPEC‘s Global Force Management (GFM) process developed policy and procedures in support of Commander, U.S. Joint Forces Command (CDRUSJFCOM) as the DOD primary joint force provider (JFP). Commander, Air Combat Command (COMACC), as the Air Force component commander to USJFCOM, is the Air Force‘s primary Service force provider. MAJCOM and AEFC roles in sourcing crisis requirements will mature under GFM. The GFMB and CDRUSJFCOM will establish complementary procedures to determine sourcing recommendations and issues related to risk to sourcing other requirements, sustainability assessment and issues identified by other combatant commanders and JFCOM Service components. The AEFC and each MAJCOM must establish complementary procedures. MAJCOMs must ensure adequate procedures exist for subordinate command and agency use.

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3.5.2.5. The primary JFP, in coordination with other combatant commanders and Services: 3.5.2.5.1. Determines global joint combat and ECS (joint term: combat support and combat service support) sourcing solutions that satisfy validated combatant command requests for capability/forces (RFC/RFF) of conventional forces. The sourcing solutions are provided as a recommendation to the JCS for SecDef approval and include: capability substitution options, mobilization requirements, and an assessment of applicable military risk associated with the recommended sourcing options. 3.5.2.5.2. Coordinates and recommends actions to sustain the level of capabilities or globally available forces to respond to validated combatant commander requirements. 3.5.3. General tasks, roles and responsibilities for Air Force planners. 3.5.3.1. The Air Force Planning and Execution Community (AFPEC). The AFPEC is the Air Force complement to the JPEC. The AFPEC membership includes HAF, Air Force component headquarters, MAJCOMs, AEFC, and ARC. 3.5.3.2. Headquarters, U.S. Air Force (HAF): 3.5.3.2.1. HAF advises component headquarters planners, via the WMP-3 Parts 1-4, of the resources available to support joint requirements. 3.5.3.2.2. HAF Regional Plans and Issues (AF/A5XX) is the Air Force POC for contingency plan reviews. AF/A5XX tasks HAF and relevant Air Force component and MAJCOM OCRs to review plans and provide comments in accordance with CJCSM 3141.01C, Procedures for the Review of Operation Plans. Tasked HAF Agencies and OCRs determine whether the scope and concept of operations are sufficient to accomplish the task assigned; assess the validity of the assumptions; evaluate compliance with CJCS tasking, guidance, and consistency with joint and Air Force doctrine; and evaluate acceptability in regards to expected costs and military and political supportability. AF/A5XX tasks HAF OCRs to review plans in accordance with CJCSM 3141.01C. 3.5.3.3. Component Headquarters: 3.5.3.3.1. Component commanders, joint task force commanders, and subordinate unified commanders support concept development, COA development, and other tasks as directed by the supported command and the JFP. 3.5.3.3.2. Planners from various functional areas may be tasked to produce "estimates of the situation." These estimates help determine supportability of courses of action by appropriate staff directors. The format for the estimate of the situation may be tailored to suit the functional area and specific needs of the OPLAN being supported. 3.5.3.3.3. The commander's estimate and other planning guidance should be used by the planner as a reference document for drafting the functional area input to the plan. 3.5.3.3.3.1. CJCSM 3122.02B gives sample formats. 3.5.3.3.4. The combatant command and its components develop an executable operational plan in support of the concept of operations. The forces and capabilities

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 necessary to execute the plan are identified in a detailed transportation-feasible force flow (the TPFDD). 3.5.3.3.5. In contingency planning, the combat and support units, materiel and personnel are entered into the TPFDD using the AEFPP Capability Annexes (WMP 3, Part 4) as a baseline. The normal process consists of sequentially refining forces, logistics, and transportation data in a series of conferences to develop a TPFDD that supports a feasible and adequate plan. Under the adaptive planning construct, the supported CCDR may combine any of these Force Flow Conferences to meet planning timelines. Supporting commands and MAJCOMs will assist with TPFDD sourcing, verification and validation and supporting plan development (see Chapter 8). 3.5.3.3.5.1. Forces conference. Services source and tailor major combat forces for the plan. The Expeditionary Combat Support (ECS) capabilities (for Air Force forces) and combat support and combat service support forces (for other Services) are sourced next. AF/A5XW sources ECS requirements in the Air Force slice of contingency plans except for in-theater assets that are sourced by the component headquarters. 3.5.3.3.5.2. Logistics conference. Participants identify the quantities of supplies, equipment, and replacement personnel required to sustain the forces selected during force planning. 3.5.3.3.5.3. Transportation conference. Participants ensure the strategic movement of forces and supplies is transportation feasible. This includes adherence to diplomatic clearance requirements outlined in the DOD 4500.54-G, DOD Foreign Clearance Guide (FCG), as well as Joint doctrinal guidance and Host Nation agreements and arrangements. 3.5.3.3.5.4. The supported component headquarters planners develop the total force package required for the operation starting with the major combat forces selected from those apportioned for planning in the CJCS force apportionment and identified in the WMP-3 Part 1. 3.5.3.3.5.5. Planners will coordinate with their ARC counterparts to the maximum extent possible regarding the usage of ARC forces. 3.5.3.3.5.6. The supported component headquarters will ensure that contingency and crisis planning factors comply with HN agreements and DOD 4500.54-G. This planning must include deployment, employment and sustainment requirements across the regional combatant command area of responsibility (AOR), including en route countries as necessary. Ensure that US Embassy or US Defense Representative receive a copy of CJCS Orders to assure that U.S. Embassies have sufficient time, input and manpower to support coordination with HN. 3.5.3.3.6. For contingency planning, component headquarters planners identify requirements for all Air Force forces and sustainment. Requirements for contingency plans will be forwarded to A5XW for sourcing using procedures outlined in Chapter 8.

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3.5.3.3.7. In crisis action planning, potential supporting force providers monitor COA development and begin preliminary planning for providing forces, including necessary mobilization and sustainment. The supported component headquarters will use TPFDDs developed during the contingency planning process, if available, as a starting point to refine force requirements. If a contingency TPFDD is unavailable, component headquarters planners will use the Military Decision Making Process in Joint Pub 5.0 to determine the force, support, and transportation requirements to build, deploy, and support the AETF required to complete the tasked mission. 3.5.3.3.8. In execution, the supported component headquarters directly aids the combatant commander‘s OPORD execution, force flow scheduling and monitoring, and force employment. 3.5.3.3.9. In execution, the supporting Air Force force providers execute their supporting plans, providing forces and movement visibility within DCAPES. 3.5.3.3.10. Supported component headquarters complete a CRM code review 180 days prior to each AEF pair. CRM codes are changing on a routine basis as they accommodate changing deployed command ACR requests. 3.5.3.4. MAJCOMs: 3.5.3.4.1. Supporting MAJCOMs will submit supporting plans according to the instructions of the component headquarters with primary planning responsibility. The component headquarters will review the submitted OPLANs and advise the MAJCOMs if the OPLANs require changes. MAJCOMs will adjust supporting plans as required. Necessary planning guidance is published in this instruction, JOPES Volume I-III, and the U.S. Air Force WMP. 3.5.3.4.2. Supporting MAJCOMs providing supplemental guidance to this instruction will include guidance and procedures for command-gained units to review OPLAN and identify discrepancies between taskings and actual unit capabilities/authorizations. Mission-limiting discrepancies are to be identified to the MAJCOM OPLAN OPR and appropriate functional area managers through command channels. Such reviews are commonly referred to as unit supportability estimates or feasibility studies. Section 3E—Crisis Action Planning Orders 3.6. Crisis Action Planning Orders. Several orders are used to direct preparations, planning, deployment, and execution of plans in response to crises. A brief discussion of each order follows. See CJCSM3122.01A for a more detailed discussion. 3.6.1. The Warning Order (WARNORD). The CJCS Warning Order initiates COA development and applies to the supported command and supporting commands. It is normally published by the CJCS during Phase II planning. The WARNORD establishes command relationships (designating supported and supporting commanders) and provides the mission, objectives, and known constraints. It establishes a tentative C-day and L-hour. It may apportion capabilities for planning purposes or task the combatant commander to develop a list of forces required to confront the crisis. A warning order does not authorize

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 movement of forces unless specifically stated. If the crisis is progressing rapidly, a planning order or alert order may be issued instead. 3.6.1.1. When a WARNORD is issued, the Air Force component headquarters commander prepares a TPFDD in DCAPES for the Air Force portion of the supported commander‘s TPFDD in JOPES in accordance with CJCSM 3122.01A and CJCSM 3122.02B. The AEFC sources for Air Force requirements. . See Chapter 8 for details. 3.6.2. The Planning Order (PLANORD). The CJCS can send a PLANORD to the supported commander and JPEC to direct execution planning before a COA is formally approved by the SecDef and President of the United States (POTUS). If the PLANORD is used in lieu of a WARNORD, the PLANORD will include a COA, provide combat forces and strategic lift for planning purposes, and establish a tentative C-day and L-hour. The PLANORD will not be used to deploy forces or increase readiness unless approved by the SecDef. 3.6.2.1. When a PLANORD is issued, the Air Force component headquarters commander prepares a TPFDD in DCAPES for the Air Force portion of the supported commander‘s JOPES TPFDD in accordance with CJCSM 3122.01A and CJCSM 3122.02B. The AEFC sources Air Force requirements. See Chapter 8 for details. 3.6.3. The Alert Order (ALERTORD). The SecDef approves and transmits an ALERTORD to the supported commander and JPEC announcing the selected COA. This order will describe the COA sufficiently to allow the supported commander and JPEC to begin or continue the detailed planning necessary to deploy forces. If the ALERTORD is used in lieu of a WARNORD, the PLANORD will include a COA, provide combat forces and strategic lift for planning purposes, and establish a tentative C-day and L-hour. In a timesensitive crisis, an Execute Order may be issued in lieu of an ALERTORD. 3.6.4. The Execute Order (EXORD). This order is issued by the authority and direction of the SecDef and directs the deployment and/or employment of forces. If the EXORD was preceded by a detailed Alert Order or PLANORD, then the EXORD simply directs the deployment and employment of forces. If nature of the crisis results in an EXORD being the only order dispatched, then the EXORD must include all the information normally contained in the warning, alert, and planning orders. The goal of the crisis action planning system is to reserve the EXORD solely for initiating or terminating the employment of U.S. military forces. The DEPORD is the appropriate instrument to change force structure during an operation. 3.6.5. The Prepare to Deploy Order (PTDO), Deployment Order (DEPORD) and Redeployment Order. Issued by the SecDef, these orders are used to prepare forces to deploy or deploy forces without approving the execution of a plan or OPORD. Prior to issuance, JFCOM develops a draft DEPORD with recommended sourcing solutions. The Joint Staff coordinates the draft DEPORD with agencies and OSD then forwards the proposed DEPORD to SecDef for approval. 3.6.5.1. When a PTDO or DEPORD is issued, the AEFC, through ACC, sources Air Force requirements. See Chapter 8. 3.6.6. Upon receipt of the CJCS Orders, the HAF Crisis Action Team (AFCAT) (or Air Force Operations Group (AFOG) if the CAT is not stood up) will transmit an order to all

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U.S. Air Force components and commands. This order will delineate all Air Force assets and taskings as well as relationships and tasking authority between the supported component headquarters and supporting Air Force commands and agencies. Section 3F—Air Force Planning and Crisis Execution 3.7. Transition from Rotational Operations to Crisis. A thorough understanding of the AEF alignments, sustainable force levels, and surge trigger points is essential for all Air Force planners. Armed with this information, Air Force planners can meet crisis action requirements while minimizing the impact on current operations. 3.7.1. DELETED. 3.7.2. DELETED. 3.7.3. Crisis Action TPFDD Development. Supported combatant commander planners have two options in Crisis Action TPFDD development: create a Crisis Action TPFDD by using or modifying an existing TPFDD, or develop a new TPFDD (no-plan scenario). Supported component headquarters should request AEFC participation in Crisis Action TPFDD development or modification prior to execution, for supportability or feasibility assessment, and to maximize the use of forces presented in the on-call AEF pair. See Chapter 8. 3.7.4. Sourcing Crisis Action and Rotational Requirements. Per AFPD 10-4, tasking authority for the SECAF rests with the CSAF. The CSAF through the AF/A3/5 develops a single Air Force position and directs MAJCOMs, in coordination with AFPC/DPW, to source capabilities to meet requirements. AFPC/DPW sources and the applicable MAJCOM/FOA or designee verifies sourcing solutions to meet crisis action requirements using a hierarchical progression (see paragraph 9.9.1) that first examines whether there are suitable and capable residual forces in the current vulnerability period or through ARC volunteerism. When emerging requirements exceed capabilities in the on-call AEFs and available Enablers, then the Air Force either surges (see Table 2.1) or submits a reclama if SecDef redlines are met. 3.7.4.1. AEF lead wings. When designated in the approved AEF sourcing, lead wings provide forces and AEW/AEG leadership. All expeditionary wing and group commanders deploying for less than 365 days will be selected from current "sitting" or graduated wing/group commanders. For a 365 day deployment, a current command list Airman approved by the gaining COMAFFOR can fill the wing/group commander requirement. The designated lead wings will fill AEW/AEG senior leadership positions from their wing‘s current commanders, Command CMSgt, and group superintendants unless permanent party leadership is in place at the deployed location. For example, the lead Wing/CC will be the AEW/CC and subordinate group commanders/superintendants from the lead wing will fill the AEW Operations Group, Maintenance Group, and Mission Support Group commander/superintendant positions (Note: Medical Group command and control elements will typically not be sourced using the lead wing construct). 3.7.4.1.1. Non-aligned Expeditionary Air Support Operations Group (EASOG) command rotations of less than 365 days will be filled by sitting/graduated ASOG commanders. 365-day EASOG rotations (both aligned and non-aligned) will be filled

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 from the current ASOG command list. Aligned EASOG commanders will dual-hat as the Corps Air Liaison Officer (ALO) and be selected early enough to meet aligned pre-deployment training requirements with the Corps they will deploy with (i.e. Predeployment academics, MRX, etc). 3.7.4.2. Expeditionary squadron commanders should be selected from sitting commanders, then graduated commanders. MAJCOM vice commanders (or equivalent) may select a qualified officer from the MAJCOM Squadron Commander Selection List if there are no other qualified and available sitting or graduated commanders. 3.7.5. Surge Operations and Trigger Points. When combatant commander requirements (to include those requirements filled by assigned forces) exceed those forces readily available in the on-call AEF block/pair, the trigger point is passed and the force may need to enter surge operations. High Demand/Low Supply (HD/LS) assets are managed under the HD/LS Force/Capability Management Process (formerly Global Military Force Policy (GMFP)) as outlined in the GFM Implementation Guidance (GFMIG). 3.7.5.1. Specific functional areas will enter surge operations or surpass trigger points at different times. If the new requirements are enduring, the functional area should re-band capability during the next AEF Schedule evaluation. 3.7.5.2. Identifying when a functional area is required to enter surge is a HAF FAM responsibility. To ensure surge entry is a deliberate decision approved by senior leadership, the following process will be followed. 3.7.5.2.1. HAF FAMs, through applicable MAJCOM AEF cell (or designated agent, e.g. CAT Team, OFAMO, etc) will notify MAJCOM FAMs of the need to surge. MAJCOM FAMs may provide HAF FAM a risk assessment if ―forced to source‖ and/or mitigation strategy for sourcing forces not normally available (e.g. UTCs coded DP*/DX*, forces in the next AEF block/pair, forces assessed as other than ‗Green‘ in ART, etc). MAJCOMs will develop internal procedures to provide the HAF FAM risk assessments within 48 hours. 3.7.5.2.2. The HAF FAM will provide a surge recommendation to HAF senior leadership in accordance with the matrix at Table 2.1. Within 72 hours of receipt of MAJCOM risk assessment, HAF FAM will notify applicable AF FP of HAF senior leadership approval for inclusion in AF DEPORD. 3.7.6. Disengagement. Entering a surge period requires an analysis of all Air Force commitments in order to determine if the Air Force can disengage from other commitments to minimize surge operations or its effects. This information must flow rapidly to the AFCAT (AFOG), which is responsible for notifying senior leaders. When required, the CSAF will address the issue of disengagement from rotational commitments with the theater combatant commander and the CJCS. If disengagement is not an option, CSAF may order currently deployed forces to remain in-place. History has shown that as one theater escalates into a crisis response, other theater combatant commanders may increase their rotational requirements to offset potential increased risks. 3.7.7. Rotation of Crisis Forces. The AEF structure allows the Air Force to maximize its available combat and ECS capability for the warfighter. Standardized AEF rotations are a key component of the AEF. Even during crisis operations, Air Force capabilities rotate

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within the applicable AEF battle rhythm to the maximum extent possible while still meeting SecDef-approved GFMAP requirements. In cases where forces are stressed, the HAF FAM, in coordination with AFOG, will ensure appropriate approval/notification is obtained. See Table 2.1 Rotations at a less stringent battle rhythm will resume at the beginning of the next GFM cycle in order to maximize the Air Force‘s total combat potential. The supported component headquarters, in coordination with AFPC/DPW, will plan the rotation of crisis forces and build replacement ULN requirements in an operational TPFDD using the AEF battle rhythm. See Chapter 9. 3.7.8. Sourcing Crisis Action Capability Requirements. Support for a crisis is based on established SecDef, CJCS, and AF/A3/5 directives. In response to the supported combatant commander‘s request for capability/forces and the component headquarters‘ identification of requirements, the AEFC sources capabilities/forces to fill requirements in support of crisis operations using the comprehensive AEF rotation schedule. Owning MAJCOMs will verify the sourcing solution and the supported component headquarters will validate the sourcing matches the requirement. Finally, the supported combatant commander will validate the requirements and transportation plan after which the United States Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM) plans the necessary strategic lift. The gaining MAJCOM may use mobilized or volunteer Air Reserve Component (ARC) forces in accordance with the procedures outlined in paragraph 3.8 and AFI 10-402, Mobilization Planning. See Chapter 8 for detailed sourcing guidance. 3.7.9. Shortfalls and Reclamas. When a sourced capability becomes unavailable or cannot meet the capability required, the unit/MAJCOM/FOA must initiate the reclama/shortfall process only in the event that they cannot sustain or do not have the requirement. Ultimately, if the Air Force cannot provide the capability requested, then the Air Force submits a reclama to the Joint Staff. See Chapter 10. Note: Reclamas will only occur under the most extenuating circumstances and require MAJCOM/CV approval (Category 5) unless the unit does not have the capability (Category 1 4). See Section 10C. Reclamas are minimized when UTC Availability and ART are properly maintained. Units will ensure UTC Availability and ART are accurate and up to date. 3.7.10. Sourcing Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard Forces. Air Reserve Component (ARC) forces are available for tasking in accordance with this instruction, AFI 10-402 and the AFPD10-4. See Chapter 8. 3.8. Air Reserve Component (ARC) Utilization. A substantial part of the Total Air Force capability resides in the Air Force Reserve and the Air National Guard. As such, the Air Force relies on its Total Force to meet its taskings. While they may seamlessly operate alongside the active US Air Force, they are subject to different levels of activation and different degrees of operational and administrative control. The two types of activation are ―volunteerism‖ and ―involuntary recall to Active Duty.‖ 3.8.1. Volunteerism : The Secretary of the Air Force (SECAF) is allowed to place a member of a reserve component under SECAF jurisdiction on active duty, or retain Airman on active duty, with the consent of that member. However, a member of the Air National Guard of the United States may not be ordered to active duty under this authority (10 USC 12301(d)) without the consent of the governor or other appropriate authority of the State concerned.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 3.8.2. Mobilization Planning. When UTC requirements exceed, or are forecast to exceed, the AC and ARC volunteer capability within the on-call AEF block for those capabilities postured in Tempo Band ―C,‖ the HAF FAM in coordination with the MAJCOM and ARC FAMs, will develop a Two-Year Utilization Plan using SecDef planning guidance of a 1:5 mobilization-to-dwell ratio (Tempo Band ―M‖). This plan will help provide predictability, enhance planning and meet SecDef mobilization approval timelines if mobilization is required. 3.8.2.1. Unique UTC capabilities with a limited supply or which reside substantially in the ARC may necessitate different mobilization trigger points. 3.8.3. Mobilization Sequence. When available postured AC and volunteer ARC UTCs are inadequate to sustain a 1:2 deploy-to-dwell (Tempo Band ―D‖), the HAF FAM should initiate the mobilization process in accordance with the Two-Year Utilization Plan. Due to the lead time in acquiring ARC mobilization approval, the mobilization process must be initiated 1 year prior to the scheduled employment period. Utilization of AC/ARC UTCs is based on the assumption mobilization authorization will be made available at the appropriate time (may vary within different functional areas) and accomplished in the following order when involuntary activation is authorized. 3.8.3.1. When requirements exceed available AC postured in Tempo Band ―D‖ to include volunteer ARC UTCs, AFRC/CV and/or NGB/CF, if not previously accomplished, will approve the re-aligning of affected ARC UTCs into Tempo Band ―M.‖ . 3.8.3.2. The SECAF may approve the utilization of ARC UTCs up to a 1:4 mobilizationto-dwell ratio (Band ―N‖), if required. When UTC requirements exceed postured AC UTCs in Tempo Band ―E‖ and RC UTCs in Tempo Band ―M‖ applicable ARC UTCs will be realigned into mobilization Band ―N‖ in accordance with the ARC utilization plan upon approval of AFRC/CV and/or NGB/CF as appropriate allowing assured ARC access at a 1:4 mobilization-to-dwell ratio. The SecDef is approval authority for a mobilization-to-dwell rate less than 1:4. 3.8.3.3. Should UTC requirements exceed the capability inherent within the Selective Reserve category (Unit, Active Guard/Reserve, and Individual Mobilization Augmentees), other Reserve Component categories (e.g. Individual Ready Reserve, Retired Regular, Retired Reserve, etc.) can be accessed in accordance with AFI 10-402, Mobilization Planning and Personnel Readiness. 3.8.4. Mobilization Reassessment. When AC UTCs can sustain known requirements at or above a 1:2 deploy-to-dwell, the requirement for continued mobilization will be assessed and ARC UTCs may be re-postured into Tempo Band ―A.‖ 5.2.4.1. Specialized, combat-oriented organizations that deploy as a cross-functional, self-sustaining team must design their UTCs to be cross-functional rather than a grouping of functional UTCs to ensure that the entire organizational capability is aligned together. For example, a Materiel Management authorization in an Aircraft Maintenance Squadron should be included in a maintenance (H-series) UTC vice a supply (JF-series) UTC. 3.8.5. When mobilization is required, the mobilization processes, procedures and systems outlined in AFI 10-402 apply.

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3.9. Base Level Planning. Base level planning is required for contingency and crisis action planning. As a minimum, base-level plans must address mobility, mobilization (if appropriate), reception, employment, deployment, sustainment, and redeployment planning required for the combat forces to accomplish its mission. All installations with a wartime mission, regardless of size or location must develop base support plans according to AFI 10-404, Base Support and Expeditionary Site Planning. 3.10. Sustainment Planning Responsibilities. HQ AFMC/A4R validates all logistics planning factors developed by Air Force and other DOD organizations. HAF DCS Installations, Logistics and Mission Support (AF/A4/7) reviews these planning factors to ensure they are consistent with policy guidance. Table 3.1 identifies OPRs for determining materiel consumption rates and developing factors for specific JOPES classes and subclasses of supply. Table 3.1. Air Force Wartime Resupply Planning Factor Development. CLASS/ SUBCLASS I

ITEM

RESPONSIBLE AGENCY

Subsistence

OPR

HQ AFSVA/SVOHF 9504 IH 35 North, Suite 320, San Antonio, TX 78233-6635

IW

Water

OPR

Air Force Civil Engineering Support Agency HQ AFCESA/CEX 139 Barnes Drive, Suite 1 Tyndall AFB, FL 324035319 AF/A4RM 1260 Air Force Pentagon Washington, DC 203301260 HQ AFMC/A4R 44375 Chidlaw Rd, Rm B113 Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-5006 HQ AFMC/A4R 44375 Chidlaw Rd, Rm B113 Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-5006 Air Force Civil Engineering Support Agency

OCR

II

General Support Items

OPR

III

Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricants

OPR

IV

Construction and Barrier Material

OPR

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OCR

V (A)

Ammunition (Air)

V (W)

Ammunition (Ground) (1) Security Forces Air Base Defense Requirements (2) Engineering Prime BEEF and RED HORSE) ground defense requirements

HQ AFCESA/CEX 139 Barnes Drive, Suite 1 Tyndall AFB, FL 324035319 AF/A4RM 1260 Air Force Pentagon Washington, DC 203301260 (See Paragraph 3.11.4.)

OPR

HQ AFSFC/SFX 1517 Billy Mitchell Blvd. Lackland AFB, TX 782360119

OPR

Air Force Civil Engineering Support Agency HQ AFCESA/CEX 139 Barnes Drive, Suite 1 Tyndall AFB, FL 324035319

OCR

AF/A4RM 1260 Air Force Pentagon Washington, DC 203301260 HQ Army and Air Force Exchange Service HQ AAFES/PL 3911 S. Walton Walker Blvd Dallas, TX 75266-1598 HQ AFMC/A4R 44375 Chidlaw Rd, Rm B113 Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-5006 (See Para 3.11.4.)

VI

Personal Demand Items

OPR

VII

Major End Items

OPR

VIIJ

TRAP

OPR

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 VIIX

Aircraft Engines

OPR

VIII

Medical Materiel

OPR

VIIIA

OCR

VIIIB

Blood

OCR

IX

Repair Parts (less medical peculiar repair parts)

OPR

O

Mail

OPR

61 HQ AFMC/A4R 44375 Chidlaw Rd, Rm B113 Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-5006 Headquarters United States Air Force AF/SGXR 170 Luke Avenue, Suite 400 Bolling AFB, Wash DC 20332-5113 Air Force Medical Logistics Office AFMLO/ FOCW 1423 Sultan Street Fort Detrick, MD 217025006 Headquarters United States Air Force AF/SGXR 170 Luke Avenue, Suite 400 Bolling AFB, Wash DC 20332-6188 HQ AFMC/A4R 44375 Chidlaw Rd, Rm B113 Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-5006 Secretary of the Air Force, SAF/XCIFO, 1030 Air Force Pentagon, Washington DC 203301030

3.10.1. HAF Director of Logistics Readiness (AF/A4R) Responsibilities: 3.10.1.1. Approves changes to US Air Force supply data files. 3.10.1.2. AF/A4RM provides policy and guidance for managing wartime resupply planning factors, coordinating proposed sustainment policy changes at HAF, maintaining liaison with the Joint Staff, and coordinating proposed changes in joint operation planning concepts with affected Air Force agencies. 3.10.1.3. The Director of Logistics Readiness, Materiel Management Division (AF/ A4RM) approves changes to US Air Force supply data files.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 3.10.2. HQ AFMC Responsibilities. The Chief, Logistics Readiness Division, Director of Logistics and Sustainment is the Air Force central manager for Logistics Sustainability Analysis (see paragraph 3.12), development, validation and dissemination of wartime resupply planning factors. This office provides planners with approved wartime resupply planning factors for determining logistics support strategic lift requirements based on force structure, length of generation, and other scenario conditions. HQ AFMC/A4R: 3.10.2.1. Provides functional guidance relative to use, development, computation, validation, and management of wartime resupply planning factors. 3.10.2.2. Coordinates wartime resupply planning factor policy decisions. 3.10.2.3. Keeps affected agencies informed on proposed planning factor program changes. 3.10.2.4. Maintains liaison with the respective Air Force collateral managers of classes and subclasses of supply (see Table 3.1) and other military Services and DOD agencies involved in development and use of wartime resupply planning factors. 3.10.2.5. Documents lessons learned and maintains audit trails on methods, rationale, and data sources used for development of planning factors. 3.10.2.6. Functions as the lead Air Force activity for updating wartime resupply planning factors. 3.10.2.7. Validates all Air Force wartime resupply planning factors prior to their inclusion in the Logistics Factors File (LFF) in JOPES. 3.10.2.8. Transmits sustainment planning data for the Air Force. 3.10.2.9. Develops new methods and ADPS capabilities to improve data collection and computation of wartime resupply planning factors. 3.10.2.10. Interacts with other military Services, DOD organizations, Air Force MAJCOMs, and agencies for data exchange to support existing and improved methods for sustainment planning factor development. 3.10.2.11. Acts as the focal point for developing the capability to link sustainment requirements with wholesale item asset availability. 3.10.2.12. Verifies consumption factor updates to the JOPES Logistics Factors File (LFF). 3.10.3. MAJCOM/ARC Responsibilities. The MAJCOMs: 3.10.3.1. Assist the HQ AFMC/A4R in computing Air Force wartime resupply planning factors, in logistics data collection, ADPS development for wartime resupply planning factors, and interface of ADPS with existing MAJCOM logistics capability assessment models. 3.10.3.2. Provide information to the HQ AFMC/A4R on factor use during field training and command post exercises, operational readiness exercises, JOPES processes, and realworld deployments and employments.

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3.10.3.3. Provide quantified rationale for changing Air Force factors during TPFDD refinements. 3.10.3.4. Keep the HQ AFMC/A4R apprised of anticipated changes in environmental conditions, theater policies, operational concepts, or mission requirements that may influence planning factors. 3.10.3.5. Provide annual theater multiplier updates to the HQ AFMC/A4R as requested. 3.10.4. Offices of Primary Responsibility. Each DOD agency and Air Force activity which develops wartime resupply planning factors: 3.10.4.1. Develop methods for logistics data collection and factor computation. 3.10.4.2. Coordinate all sustainment planning factor improvement efforts with the HQ AFMC/ LGR. 3.10.4.3. Provide annual updates with computational methodologies, rationale, and supporting documentation to the HQ AFMC/A4R by the end of July. After validation, HQ AFMC/A4R inputs the updated factors to the LFF become CJCSM 3150.23B, Joint Reporting Structure (JRS) Logistics Factors Report. 3.10.4.4. Inform the Air HQ AFMC/A4R on proposed policy changes relative to commodity management, authorization tables, and wartime consumption factors affecting wartime resupply planning factors. 3.11. Non-unit Related Sustainment Planning. JOPES sustainment planning is used to develop information to estimate materiel movement requirements generated during the operation. This process is used to determine the feasibility of the planned concept of operations and to show the size of the logistics effort required 3.11.1. Wartime resupply planning factors are used solely for transportation feasibility analysis. They are used to assess strategic lift requirements when actual requirements cannot be determined. They are not to be considered standards to be used in accomplishing actual movement of materiel in the execution of any plan. 3.11.2. Sustainment is distinguished by two categories: actual sustainment and JOPES notional sustainment. Actual sustainment begins as soon as forces arrive at employment bases. JOPES notional sustainment, however, is artificially constrained to provide sustainment only after PWRMS are depleted. The PWRMS cutoff day depends on the prepositioning policy for a given class of supply. 3.11.3. Wartime resupply planning factors are based on anticipated wartime consumption rates for each class of supply. If actual wartime requirements and sourcing data can be developed by class of supply for a given OPLAN, estimated wartime consumption rates and notional factors are not used. An example of the approach to development and use of actual requirements in lieu of notional factors is presented in paragraph 3.11.4 below which addresses sustainment planning for air munitions, tanks, racks, adapters, and pylons (TRAP). 3.11.4. Air munitions and TRAP planning has been facilitated through the use of the wholesale supply system capability to support actual time-phased requirements. To quantify movement requirements of an OPLAN, specific air munitions and TRAP requirements are separately developed by the applicable component headquarters. When specific air munitions

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 and TRAP requirements are developed by required delivery date, information necessary to source the munitions and TRAP is provided to the appropriate commodity manager (ACP Hill), in the proper format, by the component headquarters. Since actual time-phased air munitions and TRAP requirements can be forecasted, notional factors are not used for air munitions and TRAP sustainment classes VA and VIIJ, respectively. 3.11.5. Air munitions requirements computation methodologies are outlined in the Nonnuclear Consumables Annual Analysis, Part Two, Section II. 3.11.6. The Precision Engagement Division (AF/A5RW) is the OPR for questions about planning strategic lift of air munitions and TRAP in wartime.

3.12. Sustainment Planning. ACS sustainment planning is a crucial element of crisis action and contingency planning. The Air Force accomplishes this planning via a Logistics Sustainability Analysis (LSA). LSA is an analytical process used to predict ACS operational capability requirements, gaps and priorities. The process and methodology support Defense Planning Guidance and major theater OPLAN assessments, Crises Action Planning, Supplemental Budgeting estimates. Air Force Material Command AFMC/ A4R validates all logistics planning factors developed by Air Force and other DOD organizations. HAF Deputy Chief of Staff (DCS) Installations, Logistics and Mission Support (AF/A4/7) reviews these planning factors to ensure they are consistent with policy guidance, ACS CONOPS Objectives, Capability Review and Risk Assessment (CRRA) scenarios and priorities. This assessment provides a broad assessment of key ACS support and enabler capabilities required to execute the DPG and combatant commander‘s plans. As a general rule, the Air Force uses the supported component headquarters‘ directorate of logistics, or equivalent, as its agent for analysis. 3.12.1. The LSA is accomplished in accordance with JSCP, CJCSI 3110.03C, and CJCSM 3122.03B. 3.12.2. The LSA must be submitted to the supported commander for inclusion in the theater LSA for the OPLAN. 3.12.3. Air Force supporting commands are also required to accomplish an LSA and submit results to supported COMAFFOR. 3.12.4. The LSA addresses the four pillars of ACS sustainability (Materiel, Infrastructure, Expeditionary Combat Support (ECS) Forces, and Lift). It highlights deficiencies and their associated risk to supporting the warfighting air component. 3.12.4.1. Supporting the four pillars are sustainment elements that need to be examined for sustainability. Those include, but are not limited to the following: Table 3.2. Logistics Sustainability Analysis (Materiel). Materiel. The assessment must examine the initial availability, long term sustainment, and availabilityof host nation support of the following: Fuel WRM and pre-positioned assets Ammunition BEAR assets Medical support WRM spares Repair part availability for major end items UCC Critical Items deemed appropriate Major end items vehicles, HME, etc.

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Engines Table 3.3. Logistics Sustainability Analysis (Infrastructure). Infrastructure. Examine theater facilities and installations capabilities: Ports NEO and refugee handling facilities Airfields POL storage and distribution Warehouses Utility production and capability CONUS depot resupply using reachback Munitions Storage Maintenance facilities Communication facilities Concept of Repair Lines of communication Weapon System Support Main supply routes Medical facilities BEAR assets Beddown capabilities Identify en route support infrastructure deficiencies. Table 3.4. Logistics Sustainability Analysis (Expeditionary Combat Support Forces). Expeditionary Combat Support (ECS) Forces. The assessment must take into account the ability toperform (Joint) Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration (RSOI) of forces and equipment in the operational area. At a minimum, assess: Sea port opening and handling for munitions Hospitalization, tactical and strategic evacuation, class VIII resupply, host-nation Aerial port, air cargo handling, expeditionary support, and elements of force health airfield operations, and en route support protection. (strategic mobility). Water production and distribution, laundry, Tactical fixed wing airlift, rail assets, dry bath, food, shelter, mortuary, and cargotrucking, container handling capability, decontamination services. POLstorage/ distribution. Aircraft availability, general support theater Military heavy construction, specialized maintenance, intermediate maintenance (i.e. military construction, airfield and port Centralized Intermediate Repair Facilities operations support, real estate acquisition (CIRFs), and CONUS depot capability. teams, contract construction and engineering services, environmental units, topographic Degradation of the Aerial Ports of units, and maintenance and munitions support Debarkation (APODs) and Sea Ports of structures. Debarkation (SPODs), impact on Host Nation (HNS), and contractor support based on Security Forces, airfield force protection, joint Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC) security area (JSA), and port security. defense Billeting and force beddown Table 3.5. Logistics Sustainability Analysis (Lift). Lift. Assess lift in terms of resources engaged in the movement of forces and associated supplies. The assessment must take into account the ability to perform (Joint) Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration (RSOI) of forces and equipment in the operational

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area and link the JRSOI assessment with other portions of the LSA to assist in determining adequacy of JRSOI and transportation feasibility of the plan. Strategic air Battlefield Distribution Global Reach Laydown Land transport Theater air Sea lift 3.12.4.2. Each of these areas is assessed individually as well as synergistically to obtain an accurate sustainability picture. Criteria will normally be provided by the unified combatant commander and should be followed. If criteria are not specified then the following may be used: Table 3.6. Logistics Sustainability Analysis Stoplight Chart.

3.12.5. In addition, risk must be assigned to each evaluation area that is less than supportable. Use the definitions of Unacceptable, High, Moderate, or Low, defined in CJCSI 3110.03C. 3.13. Transition from Crisis Action Surge to Sustainable Operations. The component headquarters and the AEFC must continuously and adaptively assess and plan for forces necessary to meet current and future operations. When conditions allow, the Air Force objective is always to return to a lower, sustainable operations tempo in order to ensure our readiness to respond to the next crisis. Forces may require reconstitution and the combatant commander may require long-term capabilities supported by rotational forces. Because transitioning to a sustainable reduced operations level may not occur over a timeframe that allows for the systematic drawdown of deployed forces and the reconstitution of returning forces, LSA best practices require reconstitution planning to occur at the same time ACS planning is done to support crises action support assessments. This planning enables the ACS community to more accurately fuse business and warfighting domain demands with the ability to forecast and respond to supplemental funding requests, predict equipment stress, and adaptively adjust global supply chain activities which reach back into production. 3.13.1. Reconstitution. Functional areas that entered surge operations must be reconstituted. Reconstitution is the restoration of combat capability following operations. Reconstituting capability to meet future threats sets the force and presents a tremendous challenge; one that must be met within the constraints of budgetary realities with an eye

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toward our transformational force and the demands of ongoing deployed operations. The Air Staff FAM, MAJCOM, ARC, and AEFC will develop and execute a reconstitution plan. In cases where reconstitution is necessary for multiple functional areas or across the AEF construct, AF/A5XW will work with the AEFC to provide the AFCAT (AFOG) an overall assessment and COA for CSAF approval. Response to crises and expeditious reconstitution (when necessary) to a rotational posture with the least possible impact on the AEF schedule remains critical to the AEF concept. See 9.17 and Chapter 12, for further guidance. 3.13.1.1. Several agencies are invaluable to the component headquarters, AEFC, and MAJCOM staffs in evaluating reconstitution plans (e.g., for CAF aviation, the CAF SIPT; for CONUS-based MAF aviation, HQ AMC/A3 in association with AFRC and ANG; for ECS, the ECS IPT and AEFC functional schedulers). 3.13.1.2. Planners must balance post-crisis or post-contingency redeployment requirements with the need to repopulate the AEFs. Planners should attempt to execute a first-in, first-out replacement plan while continuing to meet combatant commander mission requirements (e.g., one unit/ UTC may have been first to deploy to a crisis, but because its capability is still required or due to its position in the AEF schedule, may redeploy after a unit/UTC that arrived later in the crisis). In coordination with AF/A3O, MAJCOMs and ARC, the AEFC will monitor residual AEF capability, and AEF UTC Reporting Tool (ART) assessments, to measure the impact on AEF forces. 3.13.1.3. Air Staff, MAJCOM, ARC FAMs and the AEFC will monitor current and emerging requirements to ensure anticipated rotational requirements are supportable. 3.13.2. Establishing Standing Rotational Operations. A component headquarters should identify requirements that necessitate sustained rotation support to the AEFC, AFCAT (AFOG) and AF/A3/5. Missions not previously supported by the AEF require AFCAT confirmation that the SecDef order (e.g. DEPORD, EXORD) or modification to the order allows the support with AEF scheduled forces. The AEFC will work with the component headquarters to incorporate new requirements into the requisite PID. The component headquarters must provide reporting and funding instructions. See Chapter 9. 3.14. Establishing Contingency Organizations. Planners will use existing organizational structures. Organizational structures at each employment location will parallel peacetime structures. Provisional units will be identified during planning by the component headquarters to expedite their use during contingency execution. Refer to AFI 38-101. 3.15. AEF After Action Report (AAR). AEF commanders will submit After Action Reports in accordance with supported component headquarters guidance.

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Chapter 4 PLANNING AND EXECUTION SYSTEMS Section 4A—Purpose 4.1. Purpose. This chapter provides basic information on war planning and execution information technology (IT) systems used by in the U.S. Air Force. It provides an overview of IT management and administration, including information on system access and training. Section 4B—Systems 4.2. Overview. 4.2.1. Definitions 4.2.1.1. Family Of Systems (FOS) – A set or arrangement of independent (not interdependent) systems that can be arranged or interconnected in various ways to provide different capabilities. The mix of systems can be tailored to provide desired capabilities dependent on the situation. Under today's warfighting, assembly of forces for contingencies is primarily ad hoc, based on a generic set of requirements rather than preplanning that designates specific forces for a particular contingency. Thus, interoperability of the independent platforms is a key consideration in the ad hoc deployment of a "family-of-systems". 4.2.1.2. System of Systems (SOS) – A key principal to the understanding of a "systemof-systems" is the notion that a system performs a function not possible with any of the individual parts acting alone. A "system-of-systems" may be physically bounded in a single platform or consist of a collection of separate, but interdependent, interconnected platforms performing different functions. Thus, a system can be viewed as any organized assembly of resources and procedures united and regulated by interaction or interdependence to accomplish a set of specific functions. In this context, a "system-ofsystems" can be viewed as a set or arrangement of interdependent systems that are related or connected to provide a given capability. The loss of any part of the system will degrade the performance or capabilities of the whole. 4.2.1.3. Umbrella Systems – System providing a single interface to access, interpret, and/or manipulate data from multiple functionally independent systems. This use of the term can be viewed as the "front end" of a SoS as defined above. 4.2.1.4. Applications - Programs written to perform a specific task or function, i.e. a word processor or spreadsheet. This is in contrast to the operating system, a generalpurpose program to control the computing environment. 4.2.1.5. Support Tools – A specific module of capability programmed into an application. 4.2.1.6. Reference Files - Present data created and maintained outside the umbrella system for use by the system in interpreting and presenting native data to the user. For example, these files specify codes for locations, readiness status of units, movement

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details for UTCs or individual equipment items and are available to translate those codes to "plain English." 4.2.2. Architecture. Global Command and Control System (GCCS) is the DOD‘s automated system that integrates the strategic command, control, communications, and intelligence functions (See Figure 4.1). GCCS is based on strict compliance with the Defense Information Infrastructure Common Operating Environment (DII COE) and Configuration Management. GCCS is a secret level system that makes planning information available at all levels (including base level). Access to GCCS is provided through the SIPRNET, the secret layer of the Defense Information Systems Network (DISN). GCCS supports planning for mission areas such as operations, mobilization, deployment, employment, sustainment, and intelligence. It enables joint force commanders to synchronize the actions of air, sea, land, space, and special operations forces. Its flexible range enables operational use from actual combat to humanitarian assistance. GCCS is a standard platform for a large group of software applications. These software applications provide senior-level decision makers and their staffs with enhanced capability to plan and conduct joint military operations. They also provide unique capabilities and functions to assist planners in retrieving, assessing, sharing, and transmitting information. The JOPES, DCAPES, and WMP System applications are available through GCCS. GCCS provides a single integrated Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (C4I) application environment on which JOPES resides. GCCS is the joint data sharing/collaborative system supporting both secret (GCCS) and top secret (GCCS-TS) information. GCCS supports the Common Operational Picture, Global Status of Resources and Training System (GSORTS), GCCS Newsgroups, JOPES related data and other systems. 4.3. Joint War Planning & Execution Systems and Applications 4.3.1. Joint Operational Planning and Execution System (JOPES) Automated Data Processing (ADP) 4.3.1.1. Overview. The JOPES ADP mission applications and files described below are used for joint command and control. These applications interface with Service applications for essential joint planning data. The Air Force interface is accomplished by DCAPES, which will be discussed later in this chapter. These systems reside on GCCS. 4.3.1.2. Major Capabilities 4.3.1.2.1. Time Phase Force Deployment Data (TPFDD). The TPFDD is the database used to coordinate the movement of forces into their operational locations. The TPFDD includes forces from all Services and their movement requirement. These forces compete for the limited available lift to have their assets in-place first. JOPES Volume III establishes the methods and procedures the JPEC will follow to coordinate its efforts to develop a TPFDD. 4.3.1.2.2. JOPES Edit Tool (JET). JET provides a capability for the planner to create and modify a TPFDD file and build a force list. JET provides the means for planners to build the force list in the TPFDD. Planners use JET to define the force requirements by unit type codes (UTC), associate these UTCs with tasked units, routing from origin to destination, and route UTC into the theater.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 4.3.1.2.3. Rapid Query Tool (RQT). RQT provides a capability for the planner to query and produce reports from a TPFDD file. RQT provides the means for planners to produce relevant time phased force deployment listings (TPFDL). These TPFDLs are used to coordinate the deployment flow and ensure each UTC‘s movement is in the proper sequence. A TPFDL can be sorted by different data fields. Common data sorts used by planners are by Service, UTC, dates (ALD, LAD, RDD, etc.), destination, origin, transportation mode, and functional area. 4.3.1.2.4. Scheduling and Movement (S&M). S&M enables the planner to report and track movement of TPFDD requirements. 4.3.1.2.5. Medical Analysis Tool (MAT). MAT provides medical planners with a means of determining the overall medical feasibility of an existing or proposed OPLAN. This is a JOPES direct support tool. 4.3.1.2.6. Joint Engineer Planning and Execution System (JEPES). Provides the planner a means to analyze facility, material, and force level support requirements for civil engineering personnel. This is a JOPES direct support tool. 4.3.1.2.7. Web Hoc Query (WHQ). WHQ provides users with a means to develop, save, and print tailored queries extracting data from the JOPES core database via the SIPRNET. 4.3.1.2.8. Airfield Information. Airfield information is provided via access to the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency website. (JOPES direct support tools) 4.3.1.2.9. Standard Reference Files. These standard reference files specify codes for locations, cargo and passenger movement details for UTCs or large equipment items, movement details for UTCs or individual equipment items. 4.3.1.2.9.1. Geographic Location File (GEOFILE). The GEOFILE provides codes for specific locations. Properly used, these codes aid force movement planning. Planners must be careful they use the correct code to ensure the required location is listed. For example, Charleston seaport, airport, and military airport each have different geographic codes. 4.3.1.2.9.2. Type Unit Characteristics (TUCHA) file. The TUCHA file contains the deployment data for all approved DOD UTCs, including the number of passengers and the cargo increments and the weights and dimensions. This standard reference file is used when planners develop the TPFDD. When a planner enters a UTC in a TPFDD, the information from this file is copied into the TPFDD. This cargo data is the level four information needed to plan the forces movement. 4.3.1.2.9.3. Type Unit Equipment Detail File (TUDET). The TUDET contains the dimensional and weight data for large pieces of equipment. It may be looked up using the nomenclature or national stock number. 4.3.2. Global Status of Resources and Training (GSORTS). The GSORTS database record provides unit readiness status and current location. The GSORTS database record reflects the readiness level of selected units in terms of training, equipment, and personnel

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against the level required to undertake assigned missions. Planners may review the data in this database while selecting units to support an operation 4.3.3. Joint Flow and Analysis System for Transportation (JFAST). While not a JOPES tool, JFAST complements JOPES by assisting the planner with analyzing OPLAN feasibility in terms of intertheater movement. It also provides a capability to generate non-unit-related cargo (CIN) and personnel (PIN) requirement estimates based on the forces to be supported and the duration of the planned operation. 4.3.4. Collaborative Force Analysis Sustainment Transportation (CFAST). CFAST is a web-enabled suite of applications designed to aid in quickly developing a "transportation feasible" TPFDD. It is a candidate tool for inclusion in the Adaptive Planning construct. Although CFAST is not a system of record it is fielded and accredited for operations on SIPRNET. Selected combatant commands use CFAST to build TPFDDs for Contingency (Deliberate) Plans. 4.4. Air Force War Planning and Execution Systems (WPES) 4.4.1. Deliberate and Crisis Action Planning and Execution Segments (DCAPES). 4.4.1.1. Overview. The Air Force planning and execution community supports JOPES by feeding Air Force unique data through DCAPES. DCAPES is the standard automated data processing (ADP) system designed to provide communication of OPLAN requirements and resource monitoring capability by integrating planning data with operations, logistics, manpower, and personnel processes to enable planners to develop and access near-real time data from Service and joint systems.

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Figure 4.1. War Planning & Execution Systems (WPES).

4.4.1.2. Major Capabilities. The supported component headquarters will communicate the employment resource requirements to the supporting commands and wings/bases using DCAPES. Communication with units at base level is necessary to ensure unit deployment planning supports the component headquarters‘ requirements and identifies and compensates for shortages. Air Force planners and readiness offices use DCAPES at various command levels to translate contingency planning, JCS exercise, real world crisis execution, or local exercise taskings into detailed unit requirements down to the AFSC and tool box level. Air Force planners, readiness personnel, FAMs, and unit deployment managers (UDMs) use the data in DCAPES to prepare resources for movement and accomplish force accountability at the deployment and employment locations. Command or base-level unique systems may be used only if a request for incorporation of the system into DCAPES is evaluated, approved, and filed at AF/A5XW. If the request is rejected, use of the unique system must be terminated. As depicted in Figure 4.1, DCAPES is the cornerstone system and will migrate to the Air Force‘s WPES under increment 2b. Additionally, many of the systems depicted in the diagram are discussed in greater detail in this chapter.

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4.4.1.2.1. Manpower and Equipment Force Packaging (MEFPAK). The Manpower And Equipment Force Packaging (MEFPAK) is the process for developing and describing standard, predefined manpower and equipment force capabilities and determining the deployment characteristics of these capabilities in support of JOPES and DCAPES, LOGMOD, AND MANPER. These standard descriptions of the units and elements are used for wartime, contingency, and force planning to all levels of command. MEFPAK operates within the DCAPES software on GCCS. 4.4.1.2.1.1. Standard force capabilities are uniquely identified in MEFPAK by UTCs, which are integral parts of contingency and crisis action planning. UTCs are the data records identified in TPFDDs that identify what forces are deploying. 4.4.1.2.1.2. UTCs depict a force capability with personnel and/or equipment requirements. The unique five-character UTC designator is controlled by the Joint Staff. A UTC becomes standard when it‘s registered in MEFPAK and entered in the TUCHA with complete movement characteristics. These standard unit descriptions/force capabilities are collected in two components of the MEFPAK: the MANFOR and the LOGFOR. UTC packages are the basic building blocks for determining detailed planned manpower and equipment requirements data. 4.4.1.2.1.3. The MANFOR is a component of DCAPES. Standard UTCs are used in DCAPES and JOPES to identify manpower and logistics requirements for deployment, movement planning, and plan execution. UTCs are available through UTC Availability and maintained in the WMP-3, Part 2 by AF/A5XW. 4.4.1.2.1.4. The MEFPAK summary report reflects standard Air Force UTC personnel and cargo movement characteristics used by Air Force planners for general war planning. 4.4.1.2.1.5. DCAPES supports MEFPAK and provides the capability to update GCCS files containing personnel/logistics deployment capabilities available for deployment. DCAPES specifically provides unit type management functions to the Air Staff. These functions allow selected Air Staff users to aggregate data related to Air Force standard unit types, create summary products, and feed the data to joint systems. 4.4.1.2.1.6. DCAPES assimilates data from MEFPAK, converting the data into a format needed by JOPES. 4.4.1.2.1.7. The process starts when UTCs are registered in the Headquarters Air Force (HAF) Manpower Force Packaging System (MANFOR) system. Next the manpower and logistics detail are built by the MEFPAK responsible agency in DCAPES and LOGMOD. 4.4.1.2.1.8. MEFPAK generates summary information for the JCS in the Type Unit Data Report (TYPREP) file. The JCS distributes the TYPREP as the TUCHA to the Combatant commanders for use in JOPES for developing the TPFDD and in determining OPLAN transportation feasibility. Note: Joint planning above the component level doesn‘t require the personnel and equipment detail contained in the MEFPAK.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 4.4.1.2.2. Manpower Force Packaging System (MANFOR) 4.4.1.2.2.1. MANFOR is a component of MEFPAK and DCAPES. It‘s a database containing the UTC and title, MISCAP, and manpower detail for each applicable UTC. The MANFOR subsystem automates creating and maintaining manpower details for the Manpower Force Elements (MFE) associated with UTC packages. 4.4.1.2.2.2. MANFOR passes UTC data to the master Air Force file maintained by the Air Force Manpower Agency Readiness Branch. It interfaces with the Manpower and Personnel Module base-level (MANPER-B) module to permit unit involvement in the UTC manpower requirements development process. 4.4.1.2.2.3. Objectives of the MANFOR: 4.4.1.2.2.3.1. Provide joint and Air Force planners with standardized force capabilities documenting manpower requirements for execution, operations, and deployment planning documents. 4.4.1.2.2.3.2. Provide a means to communicate standard wartime, force planning, and contingency manpower requirements to all levels of command within the Air Force. 4.4.1.2.2.3.3. Provide Air Force input to the JOPES TUCHA database. 4.4.1.2.2.3.4. Establish a baseline for communication among the MEFPAK responsible commands. 4.4.1.2.2.3.5. Serve as the foundation for individual documentation by operations planners at all levels.

requirements

4.4.1.2.2.3.6. The objective of MANFOR is achieved through the development of an Air Force-level approved, standard master database of force capabilities available in joint and Air Force command and control systems. 4.4.1.2.3. Logistics Forces (LOGFOR) 4.4.1.2.3.1. LOGFOR is used to collect and store the material requirements (called the logistics detail (LOGDET)) for UTCs. The LOGDET defines the standard equipment requirements for each UTC. The LOGDET is provided at the national stock number (NSN) level. LOGFOR functions include: 4.4.1.2.3.1.1. Providing equipment planning data for deploying units. 4.4.1.2.3.1.2. Providing the foundation for individual force capability strategic airlift requirements estimates for planning. 4.4.1.2.3.1.3. Providing inputs to the JOPES TUCHA database. 4.4.1.2.3.1.4. Equipment planning data for use by Air Force units in their deployment plans. Standard UTC LOGDET data is developed and maintained by pilot units in the LOGFOR module of LOGMOD. UTC suffix zero denotes standard equipment requirements for all like units and serves as a baseline for non-pilot units when initially developing and maintaining their LOGPLAN files based on OPLAN/CONPLAN and AEF tasking.

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4.4.1.2.3.1.5. A baseline for communication among the MEFPAK responsible commands. 4.4.1.2.3.1.6. LOGDET is generic and capable of worldwide deployment. 4.4.1.2.3.1.7. Detailed logistics force definition data are available in the DCAPES LOGFOR subsystem and LOGPLAN system of each MAJCOM. 4.4.1.2.3.1.8. Detailed manpower force definition data for standard UTCs are available in the DCAPES MANPER MANFOR located in each MAJCOM and base with a MANPER system. Force definition data for specific plans, reflecting the actual use of standard UTC data as well as tailored and nonstandard requirements, are contained in the plan requirements database prepared for each plan either at the supported component headquarters, intermediate headquarters or employment base. 4.4.1.2.4. Air Force JOPES Editing Tool (AFJET). AFJET provides the United States Air Force with the ability to view or edit OPLAN related data from the JOPES Level 2 data down to the personnel Line Level Detail (LLD) and the Increment, Item and Suffix cargo detail. The DCAPES Increment I AFJET User‘s Guide, located on the DCAPES main window, is an authoritative description of the DCAPES AFJET functions that are available to DCAPES users. 4.4.1.2.5. Air Force Query Tool (AFQT). The AFQT module provides the United States Air Force with a user-friendly, fast and efficient user interface to accomplish the following capabilities: 4.4.1.2.5.1. Dynamic Query Tool (DQT). JOPES and DCAPES core database query creation, report generation. 4.4.1.2.5.2. Storing, execution and maintainability of user-defined queries coupled with any associated retrieval parameters. 4.4.1.2.5.3. Scheduling and Movement retrieval and reporting capability. 4.4.1.2.5.4. Predefined reports generation. 4.4.1.2.5.5. Management and control of deferred job scheduling. 4.4.1.2.5.6. Creation, generation and maintainability of user defined ad-hoc and tabular reports. 4.4.1.2.6. Scheduling and Movement (S&M). S&M is the JOPES application that handles command and control information on deployment activity and status. It functions as a vehicle for reporting and tracking movement of TPFDD requirements. S&M allows you to review, update, schedule, and create manifests for both Transportation Component Command (TCC) carrier and organic movement before and during deployment. It provides the capability to review and analyze an extensive variety of requirement and movement data. 4.4.1.2.7. Unit Type Management (UTM) Module. The UTM is the DCAPES module for managing UTCs. The module has three tools, one for registration, one for UTC maintenance, and one for reports. The UTC Registration Tool allows users to request a new UTC, request a change to an existing UTC, or request that an existing

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 UTC be cancelled. When a request is approved, the registration of that request creates or changes the title record for that UTC. UTM allows users to add a new UTC or change a working copy of an existing UTC. This tool also allows selected users to import and view logistics data from the Logistics Module (LOGMOD) Logistics Force Packaging System (LOGFOR) system, create or maintain manpower data, and create or maintain MISCAPS. 4.4.1.2.8. The Analysis and Feasibility Tool (AFT). AFT provides the Air Force with the ability to perform analysis of operational requirements and comparisons of operational requirements to the various Manpower and Personnel resources available to the Air Force planner. The DCAPES Increment I AFT User's Guide document is an authoritative description of the DCAPES AFT functions that are available to DCAPES users. 4.4.1.2.9. Air Force System Services (AFSS). AFSS provides importable and exportable data in standalone files. This includes LOGMOD, TUCHA, WMP, and MANPER-B. Other features include Purge Data Utility (PDU), toggle to external systems, throttle user accounts and roles, and User Account Maintenance (UAM). 4.4.2. War and Mobilization Planning (WMP). 4.4.2.1. Overview. While the WMP documents were discussed earlier in this instruction, the WMP system is an automated planning tool which includes an integrated database containing WMP-3 Part 1 (Combat Forces), WMP-3 Part 2 (UTC Availability (formerly AFWUS) and Multiple UTC Groups (MUG), WMP-3 Part 3 (RSP), WMP 4, (NSAU and MISPRO), WMP-5 (Rates & Factors), and a TPFDD Development tool. In addition, it contains a capability to create a data file that uses the WMP-3 Part 1 apportionment and MUGs that can be imported into a DCAPES/ JOPES TPFDD. The WMP System also includes sourcing methodology that supports the AF‘s contingency planning process. The WMP-1, WMP-2, and WMP–3, Part 4 are stand-alone documents. 4.4.2.2. Major Capabilities. Planning Guidance in the WMP Volumes: Volumes 1, 3, and 5 provide planning policy/guidance, forces, and planning factors/data, respectively, to assist the Air Force planner in developing supporting OPLANs, CONPLANs, or FUNCPLANs. Volumes 2 and 4 are products of plans. They are produced and managed by the Air Staff but usually maintained or developed at the MAJCOM and/or air component command level. 4.4.2.2.1. WMP Volume 1 is not a system and is discussed in detail in Chapter 2. 4.4.2.2.2. WMP Volume 2 is not a system and is discussed in detail in Chapter 2. 4.4.2.2.3. WMP Volume 3 lists the combat and support UTC availability and is the reference for forces planning. It is produced in four parts: Combat Forces, Support Forces, Readiness Spares Package (RSP) Authorization Document, and AEFPP Capability Annexes. Note: The current WMP-3 Part 2is the UTC Availability (Formerly Air Force Wide UTC Availability System (AFWUS)), which will be integrated into DCAPES. 4.4.2.2.3.1. WMP-3 Part 1. As mentioned earlier, the WMP-3 Part 1 is the Air Force‘s supporting plan to the JSCP. WMP-3 Part 1 converts the CJCS force

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apportionment, listed by number of squadrons, elements and/or primary mission aircraft inventory (PMAI) into the specific units that will support the combatant commanders. The units identified in the WMP-3 Part 1 for each combatant commander must be the same units utilized in each combatant commander‘s TPFDD. Due to the dynamic nature of force structure changes, budget revisions, and combatant commander requirements, the WMP-3 Part 1 data is constantly updated. The WMP-3 Part 1 module consists of 4 main functions; edit, command updates, HQ review, and modify PPBES/FY. 4.4.2.2.3.1.1. The edit function provides the capability to add, delete and modify records in the database, a function accomplished by AF/A5XW. The programmed force structure, obtained through the "force tabs" from AF/A8P, is provided for the POM, BES and PB for an eight year period and is used to update the WMP-3 Part 1 force structure. 4.4.2.2.3.1.2. The command update function enables the MAJCOMs and component headquarters to provide "recommended" changes to individual data elements in the WMP-3 Part 1 database. In addition, users are able to provide "general comments" concerning any record/unit within the database. Requests for WMP-3 Part 1 review are sent out by AF/A5XW on a regular basis, but mainly during a new JSCP update cycle. Recommended changes to WMP-3 Part 1 are encouraged at any time. 4.4.2.2.3.1.3. The HQ review module enables AF/A5XW to review the commands‘ ―recommended‖ changes. These ―recommended‖ changes are either ―accepted‖ or ―rejected‖ and those that are ―accepted‖ are automatically updated in the database. 4.4.2.2.3.1.4. The modify PPBES/FY function allows AF/A5XW to copy one PPBES to another and either add or delete FYs for any PPBES. 4.4.2.2.3.2. WMP-3 Part 2 UTC Availability. The corresponding owning force provider maintains all UTC availability records. The MUGs are maintained by AF/A5XW; however, the owning force provider may have access to update. The goal is to maintain a current listing of all Air Force UTCs available to rapidly support combatant commander requirements and other contingencies. For specific guidance on UTC availability and posturing, see Chapter 7. 4.4.2.2.3.2.1. Overview. The single-source official, master database that lists Air Force capability, in terms of UTCs, for use in contingency and crisis action planning 4.4.2.2.3.2.2. Major Capabilities. UTC Availability provides the users with the following capabilities and functions: 4.4.2.2.3.2.2.1. Capability to view any/all database records regardless of MAJCOM or Component (Active/ANG/AFRC). 4.4.2.2.3.2.2.2. Capability to add single or multiple records with the same UTC/ UIC. 4.4.2.2.3.2.2.3. Capability to delete individual or multiple records with the

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 same UTC/UIC. 4.4.2.2.3.2.2.4. Capability to modify individual data element cells or a single data element for multiple records. 4.4.2.2.3.2.2.5. Capability to add new "FRAGGED" records using the fragmentation code (FRAG) function. 4.4.2.2.3.3. WMP-3 Part 3 RSP. The WMP-3 Part 3 identifies the authorizations for Readiness Spares Packages (RSP) for airborne assets. The WMP System generates an RSP report that includes authorizations and computations. The report is used to generate the RSP Authorization Document, commonly referred to as the Blue Book. 4.4.2.2.3.4. WMP-3 Part 4 – AEFPP Capability Annexes is not a system and is discussed in detail in Chapter 2. 4.4.2.2.4. WMP Volume 4 WAA. This five-part document reflects the most current MAJCOM planning, positioning, and employment activity of aviation forces tasked in support of OPLANs and CONPLANs with TPFDDs. It shows planning, positioning, and employment of programmed Air Force aircraft by OPLAN/CONPLAN, base, MDS, and mission. 4.4.2.2.5. WMP Volume 5- Basic Planning Factors. It is a programming document comprised of planning factors and data. It includes the only U.S. Air Force-approved wartime sortie rates, attrition rates, sortie duration, and crew ratio rates by MDS used for War Reserve Materiel (WRM) planning. It provides approved US Air Force wartime planning factors, (e.g., sortie rates and sortie duration) from which the expenditure of many war consumables (e.g., fuel, oil, lubrication, chaff, flares, operational rations (Meals Ready to Eat, MRE), etc.) can be estimated. 4.4.2.2.5.1. The WMP-5 module consists of the WMP-5 Calculation Program and the WMP-5 sortie rates and factors modifications function. The WMP-5 calculation program combines WMP-3 Part 1 force structure and the WMP-5 rates and factors to produce flying hours and sorties for wartime assets determination. The WMP-5 rates and factors are maintained by AF/A5XW and are the source for the WMP-5 document. The WMP-5 calculation program is normally run by AF/A5XW; however, if other users need calculations, access may be granted upon request. 4.4.2.2.5.2. AF/A5XW will maintain the WMP-5 database and the WMP-5 system tables that support the WMP-5 Calculation Program. 4.4.2.2.5.3. MAJCOMs will verify that the rates are supportable by their aviation units. 4.4.2.2.6. TPFDD Data File Creation. This process provides users the ability to build a data file in the appropriate TPFDD format using apportioned forces from the WMP-3 Part 1 or specific units desired for an exercise or contingency. Expeditionary Combat Support (ECS) requirements are inserted into the data file using the support UTCs in the aviation MUGs, base operating support (BOS) MUGs, Functional MUGs

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and BDR MUGs. Once all MUGs are placed in the data file, the requirements can be adjusted as necessary. 4.4.3. Logistics Module (LOGMOD). 4.4.3.1. Overview. A logistics-planning program that receives and maintains the cargo and personnel details for UTCs and taskings. It maintains detailed cargo records as well as personnel records (levy file positions and the personnel to fill them) and provides a command and control capability through the Deployment Schedule of Events (DSOE) module. 4.4.3.2. Major Capabilities. There are four modules: Logistics Force Packaging (LOGFOR), Logistics Planning Module (LOGPLAN), Deployment Schedule of Events (DSOE), and Unit Deployment Management. LOGMOD-Stand Alone (LSA) is used as a back up to LOGMOD. This system is a unit level program that manages personnel and cargo data in an off-line mode. LSA contains similar capabilities as LOGMOD and is a tool available when LOGMOD is not. LOGMOD operates in unclassified mode. There is no direct interface between LOGMOD and DCAPES. 4.4.3.2.1. The Logistics Force Packaging Subsystem (LOGFOR) provides the capability to create and maintain the standard logistics details consisting of supplies and equipment for each UTC in the Air Force. The product of LOGFOR is called the Logistics Detail (LOGDET). 4.4.3.2.2. The Logistics Planning Subsystem (LOGPLAN) provides the capability to tailor or customize the plan unique UTC database of equipment and supplies for each tasking (OPLAN/CONPLAN) that includes Air Force assets. Tailored UTC information developed in LOGPLAN must be manually transferred to DCAPES to ensure TPFDD includes correct movement requirements data. This database is called the Logistics Plan File (LPF). LOGPLAN subsystem capabilities: 4.4.3.2.2.1. The Deployment Schedule of Events (DSOE) module provides users with an automated capability to plan, schedule, and monitor the deployment actions that support the movement of forces. 4.4.3.2.2.2. The Unit Deployment Management module is used by the UDM in preparation for and execution of deployment taskings. 4.4.4. Manpower Personnel – Base Level (MANPER-B). 4.4.4.1. Overview. A manpower and personnel program application on GCCS that allows base level personnel access to manpower and personnel tasking requirements. It is currently scheduled to be replaced by DCAPES software increments 4.0.2.0 and 4.0.3.0 scheduled for FY06. 4.4.4.2. Major Capabilities 4.4.4.2.1. It operates within the SECRET environment on the GCCS platform. 4.4.4.2.2. It can be accessed through the GCCS platform at both the home station unit by PRF/ MO or by deployed PERSCO teams. 4.4.4.2.3. It manages force package (UTC) data at Base Level.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 4.4.4.2.4. It provides requirements/ personnel data to LOGMOD 4.4.4.2.5. It exports files to CMOS and GATES for automated passenger manifest. 4.4.4.2.6. It compiles and routes requirements and personnel data at all levels of Air Force military personnel deployment tracking. 4.4.4.2.7. It maintains requirements/ tasking by TPFDD and ULN and automates selection and reporting of personnel data for deployments. 4.4.4.2.8. It creates TDY Mini-records. 4.4.4.2.9. It produces TDY Orders: Automates Travel Orders (TDY and NATO). 4.4.4.2.10. It tracks duty status for personnel accountability/reporting for all military/civilian personnel (All Air Force components, U.S. Services, and other countries) and provides duty status update files for the Military Personnel Data System (MilPDS). 4.4.5. Military Personnel Data System (MilPDS). 4.4.5.1. Overview. As highlighted in Figure 4.1, MilPDS feeds DCAPES with all personnel information required to support the War Planning and Execution process. MilPDS supports over 250 processes throughout the life cycle that incorporates personnel transactions at the squadron, wing, MAJCOM, and Air Force Personnel Center level. 4.4.5.2. Major Capabilities. MilPDS is used in the management of every aspect of an Airman‗s career. It collects, processes, and provides personnel data through relational databases to reduce data redundancy and ensure that data is current, accurate, and available. It contains an AEF Association data field for documenting a member‗s aligned AEF (Note: Reserve components will determine component-specific AEFI policy). 4.4.6. AEF UTC Reporting Tool (ART). 4.4.6.1. Overview. CSAF-directed system at the AEF Center that was developed to measure AEF readiness. It is a secure, web-based tool that resides on the SIPRNET. It addresses readiness at the UTC level. 4.4.6.2. Major Capabilities. ART enables commanders to report the ability of a standard UTC to perform its Mission Capability Statement (MISCAP) anywhere in the world at the time of the assessment and identify capability through the next AEF pair. It highlights missing resources and helps to quantify missing requirements for additional justification when submitting budgets. It also provides the ability to evaluate a UTC prior to tasking, picks the UTC with the best capability to meet the tasking, and helps to forecast shortfalls. Unlike SORTS, ART is the only assessment system that goes down to the UTC level. Note: ART does not measure a UTCs availability to deploy, only its ability to meet its MISCAP should it be tasked. 4.4.7. Enhanced Contingency-Rotational AEF Scheduling Tool (ECAST). 4.4.7.1. Overview. ECAST is a functionality based, UTC management and scheduling system. It provides the AEF Center with a tool to "schedule" or "initiate sourcing of" rotational or contingency requirements and manage AEF Library linkage. ECAST manages residual forces, supports scheduler ‘s decision making, and meets deployed

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commander ‘s missions. It is a permission-based, role-oriented application residing on the SIPRNET. 4.4.7.2. Major Capabilities. ECAST is an automated tool enabling AEFC Functional Schedulers to schedule UTCs for contingency/exercise, links scheduled UTCs to AEF Library resources, and manages residual lists of full and partial UTCs. It also accesses ART data for decision-making and provides access to links and lookup tables. ECAST can also handle shortfall/reclama processing data and maintain visibility of new requirements. It keeps track of daily transaction reports for verification of updates and allows users to look up requirements and scheduling status. ECAST also uses data and reports for analytical needs and management of processes. It receives data from DCAPES, maintains history of scheduling actions, and maintains detailed notes about scheduling decisions. 4.4.8. Predictive Readiness Assessment System (PRAS). 4.4.8.1. Overview. The Air Force is currently concluding the third year of development for a Predictive Readiness Assessment System (PRAS) capable of assessing and predicting future Air Force unit combat readiness. The system will provide the Air Force with a tool to predict the readiness implications of combat and combat support forces as they change and respond to taskings. 4.4.8.2. Major Capabilities. Key input variables will include demand for forces, funding, logistics, personnel, infrastructure, and readiness reporting indicators. Final development will result in a tool that analyzes leading readiness indicators and provides the Air Force with a set of interrelated impacts to help us make future operational and resource allocation decisions. 4.4.9. Logistics Feasibility Analysis Capability (LOGFAC). 4.4.9.1. Overview. Logistics Feasibility Analysis Capability (LOGFAC) supports logistics and operational planning staffs at Headquarters United States Air Force (HAF), Major Command, and unit level. LOGFAC enables users to develop assessments of the capability of available stocks to support contingency operations. Users can develop the command War Consumable Distribution Objective, answer "what-if" materiel requirement and supportability questions, develop cost analysis of various support options, and monitor WRM stock levels. LOGFAC also provides MAJCOMs the capability to develop their respective inputs to the WMP-4. 4.4.9.2. Major Capabilities. 4.4.9.2.1. War Consumables capability is used to generate the War Consumables Distribution Objective (WCDO). The WCDO is a report printed by base identifying how much fuel, munitions, bullets, and other consumables are required for storage to support the planned aircraft activity identified in the WMP-4 at each base. 4.4.9.2.2. Force Supportability capability is used to "what if" the war/scenario. Using this capability, a MAJCOM can decide if they have enough munitions, bullets, fuel, and other consumables on hand to support a given TPFDD force or operations plan. 4.4.9.2.3. Assets and Material Rating (AMR) capability provides asset visibility. This capability is used much like SORTS to provide information on the status of

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 consumables and BEAR Assets. The AMR capability provides reports showing onhand versus required quantities for war consumables and reports showing the incommission status of Basic Expeditionary Airfield Resources (BEAR) sets such as the 550i and 550f. 4.4.9.2.4. Wartime Aircraft Activity Reporting capability is used to update the WMP-4 Wartime Aircraft Activity (WAA) that displays for each planned operating base the wartime aircraft activity by major command and Operations Plan. 4.4.10. AeroSpace Planning and Execution Network (ASPEN). 4.4.10.1. Overview. The AeroSpace Planning and Execution Network (ASPEN) is an enterprise-wide architecture for conducting dynamic, distributed and collaborative planning and execution. ASPEN is designed to deliver effects-based capabilities across the full spectrum of air and space operations and all phases of conflict by integrating all tasks and echelons. 4.4.10.2. Major Capabilities. Current capabilities consist of a mobilization module used by Air Staff and Force Providers to request, staff, and track Presidential Recall Mobilization authorizations. Future capabilities will include an interface between ASPEN and MilPDS, which will link the authorizations with the mobilized individual actually fulfilling the requirement. Additional capability planned is force module creation, staffing, and tracking of capability packages in standardized formats to support the combatant commander.

4.5. Systems Management and Administration 4.5.1. Joint 4.5.1.1. Oversight. The responsible agent for the Joint Operational Planning & Execution System(JOPES) Automated Data Processing is the Joint Staff J3 directorate. 4.5.1.2. Access. The website for access to JOPES training can be viewed on the SIPRNet at http://www.jdtc.jfcom.smil.mil. For any other joint application training requirements, you must contact the applicable joint agency. 4.5.2. Air Force 4.5.2.1. Oversight. The responsible functional communities for the War Planning and Execution Systems that are depicted in this chapter are primarily AF/A5XW, AF/A4RX, AF/A1PR and AF/ A1MR. 4.5.2.1.1. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OX provides DCAPES access establishing accounts with appropriate roles and responsibilities.

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4.5.2.2. Access. Initially, individuals must obtain a GCCS account through the local GCCS Terminal Area Security Officer (GTASO). Second, individuals must request a DCAPES account (associated with the GCCS account ID) through their MAJCOM Functional Readiness POC and System Administrator. The process for obtaining account access is: 4.5.2.2.1. MAJCOMs will ensure all users attend in-residence DCAPES user training prior to receiving write permissions to the DCAPES database. The in-residence training consists of a traveling team or the formal AETC DCAPES Planners and

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DCAPES FAM Course. These are technical training courses that focus on the utilization of DCAPES applications. If a user has not completed in-residence DCAPES training, MAJCOMS can give users read-only privileges provided a user has completed the respective Computer-Based Training (CBT) for their area of responsibility. Information on applying to the schoolhouse or gaining access to the CBTs will be posted on http://www.a3a5.hq.af.smil.mil/a5x/a5xw/index.htm as it becomes available. 4.5.2.2.2. Write permission must be limited to trained users whose duties justify the level of access. 4.5.2.2.3. Under no circumstance should an untrained or novice user be given unmonitored access to an account with write capabilities. 4.5.2.2.4. Each Service, combatant commander, or MAJCOM is responsible for determining access request procedures for that portion of GCCS under their operational control. 4.5.2.2.5. The SIPRNET web page of the applicant‘s parent command typically provides the appropriate procedures or point of contact for requesting a GCCS account. 4.5.2.2.6. Air Staff and 11th Wing personnel must fill out the user access request form linked to the drop down menu at the bottom of the GCCS-AF SIPRNET homepage, http://c2www.af.pentagon.smil.mil. Instructions for completion and routing are included as the last page of the form. 4.5.2.2.7. All MAJCOM or combatant headquarters requests for Headquarters Air Force level permissions must be submitted via SIPRNET email to [email protected] 4.5.3. Key DCAPES Roles And Responsibilities. The following details key roles and responsibilities in support of DCAPES functional management. 4.5.3.1. MAJCOM, Component Headquarters, and ARC Roles and Responsibilities in DCAPES. 4.5.3.1.1. Will designate a DCAPES Functional Manager (FM) to manage allocated "08" series Plan IDs (PIDs) and respective user accounts. 4.5.3.1.2. Will designate a DCAPES Sub Functional Manager (Sub-FM) to assist the FM in managing allocated "08" series Plan IDs (PIDs) and respective Userids. 4.5.3.1.2.1. FMs may designate specific User Account Managers (UAMs) to assist and facilitate the management of user accounts in DCAPES. 4.5.3.1.3. Component headquarters DCAPES FM will manage the air component portions of their respective combatant commander‘s PIDs. 4.5.3.2. DCAPES Super User. A super user is an individual that understands and has the ability to apply knowledge in cross-functional areas (e.g., Operations and Logistics, Logistics and Personnel, Personnel and Operations).

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 4.5.3.2.1. To be designated as a Super User, the individual will possess the following qualifications and knowledge and accomplish the following as a minimum: 4.5.3.2.1.1. Expertise in at least two functional areas in DCAPES (AFJET and AFQT, AFQT and AFT, UTM and AFQT, etc) 4.5.3.2.1.1.1. Expertise is primarily from Operations Planning or a similar Capabilities/Requirements Planning Section 4.5.3.2.1.2. Super users will perform the duties of FM/Sub-FM as prescribed in this instruction. 4.5.3.2.1.3. Manages/oversees "08" series PID maintenance. 4.5.3.2.1.4. Manages/oversees user id maintenance. 4.5.3.2.1.5. Participates in and provides inputs to the DCAPES User Advisor Group (UAG). 4.5.3.2.1.5.1. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OX DCAPES/JOPES Sub Functional Manager (FM) or designated MAJCOM super users. 4.5.3.2.1.6. Participates in DCAPES system testing as requested. 4.5.3.2.1.6.1. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OX DCAPES/JOPES Sub FM or designated MAJCOM super users. 4.5.3.3. Functional Manager (FM) & Sub Functional Manager (Sub-FM) Roles and Responsibilities 4.5.3.3.1. Manage the applicable "08" series PIDs as prescribed in this instruction. 4.5.3.3.2. Liaison for User ID requirements (such as access to other PIDs) from their organization to other agencies such as: 4.5.3.3.2.1. Headquarters, U.S. Air Force 4.5.3.3.2.2. JOPES FMs 4.5.3.3.2.3. Other DCAPES FMs 4.5.3.3.2.4. HQ AFSOC 4.5.3.3.3. Coordinate the security verification of each user with respective GTASO and security manager. 4.5.3.3.3.1. Ensure time line (72 hours) for security verification is met. 4.5.3.3.4. Coordinate and validate with respective user and functional area the specific roles and permissions. 4.5.3.3.4.1. Ensure time line for roles and permissions verification is 72 hours. 4.5.3.3.5. Interpret and support this instruction‘s responsibilities. 4.5.3.3.6. Assisting in determining user-training requirements. 4.5.3.3.7. Finding, researching, and discovering Regulatory and security violations in DCAPES and taking appropriate actions against suspected users.

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4.5.3.3.8. Providing reports to HAF User Account Manager, DCAPES UAG, and HHQ as needed. 4.5.3.3.9. Above responsibilities can be delegated to the DCAPES UAM. 4.5.3.4. User Account Manager (UAM) Roles and Responsibilities. 4.5.3.4.1. Validate account access. 4.5.3.4.1.1. Ensures the request for access is valid and needed prior to inputting in DCAPES. 4.5.3.4.2. Create JPERMS User ID. 4.5.3.4.2.1. Manage the respective User id in JPERMS. 4.5.3.4.3. Create User IDs in DCAPES. 4.5.3.4.3.1. Manage the respective User ids in DCAPES (roles and permissions). 4.5.3.4.4. Perform daily account maintenance. 4.5.3.4.5. Assist in finding, researching, and analyzing user security violations and taking appropriate actions. 4.5.3.4.6. Providing reports to HAF User Account Manager, DCAPES UAG, and HHQ as needed. 4.5.4. DCAPES/JPERMS Account Set-Up Process. The following is the standard process that will be utilized by the Air Force Planning and Execution Community. This process is designed to ensure standardization of user access yet allows MAJCOMs the flexibility to adapt to their unique processes (e.g. MAJCOMs are authorized to utilize and adapt a classified electronic method for account set up as long as the steps below are adhered to). 4.5.4.1. The user will request access from ISSO/GTASO. 4.5.4.1.1. User completes MAJCOM GCCS Security Briefing/Training 4.5.4.2. ISSO/GTASO will verify user‘s security clearance with security manager. 4.5.4.3. ISSO/GTASO/User (respectively) will fill out the GCCS Access Request Letter. The Access Request Letter is available at HQ GCCS SIPERNET Website (http://c2www.af.pentagon.smil.mil). 4.5.4.3.1. MAJCOMs are authorized to utilize their DAA approved electronic version of generating request (e.g. ACC WAM). 4.5.4.3.2. ISSO/GTASO will ensure the DCAPES/JPERMS permissions are properly requested and justified. 4.5.4.4. ISSO/GTASO will transmit (i.e. fax, mail, or e-mail) the GCCS Access Request Letter to the DCAPES Functional Manager (FM) or Sub-FM for verification/validation. 4.5.4.4.1. MAJCOMs are authorized to utilize their DAA approved electronic version of transmitting request (e.g. ACC WAM).

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 4.5.4.5. FM/Sub-FM validates the user‘s requested roles and permissions to ensure the user can only accomplish what they are assigned to do; FM/Sub-FM will ensure users are properly trained. 4.5.4.5.1. Special Access procedures. FM/Sub-FM approves special access to DCAPES. 4.5.4.5.1.1. Examples of this include: Special Ops permission to view "0V" records, AEFC permissions to utilize "0N" HQAF permissions, and access to the WMP data. 4.5.4.5.2. FM/Sub-FM will ensure utilization of DCAPES user list and creation of a DCAPES Global Access List that captures all users assigned to their respective agency. 4.5.4.5.2.1. This user list will be used to send out messages/information (via email, etc.) to all DCAPES users managed by the respective FM/Sub-FM dealing with any GCCS/ DCAPES issues (i.e. database unavailable, communication out, database maintenance, etc.). 4.5.4.5.2.2. The list facilitates in userid reconciliation. For example, if e-mail distribution lists are used, "undeliverable" e-mails identify a user who has moved from one location to another, and identifies personnel who may no longer need GCCS/DCAPES access. 4.5.4.5.3. FM/Sub-FM will notify ISSO/GTASO verification is complete or needs to be re-accomplished. 4.5.4.5.4. ISSO/GTASO will notify the User Account Manager (UAM) that verification process is complete or needs to be re-accomplished. 4.5.4.5.4.1. The FM/Sub-FM and UAM may be the same individual. However, there are many instances in the AFPEC that they are not, therefore requiring this level of coordination 4.5.4.5.5. UAM builds an account for the user in DCAPES/JPERMS. 4.5.4.5.5.1. UAM also coordinates with appropriate Work Group Manager (WGM) to ensure user has a profile (USERID and password) built on the PC client (Windows). 4.5.4.5.6. Once User ID is built, FM to FM/Sub-FM to Sub-FM will coordinate for user access to applicable OPLANs from respective war-fighting combatant commander. 4.5.4.5.7. Sub-FMs will notify UAMs permission has been granted. 4.5.4.5.8. UAM notifies ISSO/GTASO that account set-up process has been complete. 4.5.4.5.9. UAM provides the User ID and default password to the ISSO/GTASO via secure communications. 4.5.4.5.10. ISSO/GTASO notifies user and directs user to change password upon initial Login.

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4.5.4.5.10.1. If user doesn‘t change password, UAM or GTASO will disable account. 4.5.4.5.10.2. User secures and stores default password for future use. 4.5.4.5.10.3. If the user‘s account is disabled, the UAM/WGM resets the account password. 4.5.4.5.11. User will ensure password is marked with proper security classification. 4.5.4.5.12. User will ensure password is stored in the appropriate classification storage container/facility/electronic medium. 4.5.4.6. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OX provides DCAPES access oversight, establishing accounts with appropriate roles and responsibilities.

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Chapter 5 UNIT TYPE CODE (UTC) DEVELOPMENT, REGISTRATION, AND MAINTENANCE Section 5A—Purpose 5.1. Purpose. The purpose of this section is to provide the background, guidance and procedures for the development, registration, maintenance, and reporting of UTCs. 5.1.1. Air Force Planners and FAMs will use the DCAPES module, Unit Type Management (UTM) for all UTC development, registration, and maintenance activities. Users with DCAPES UTM permissions can find specific instructions in the UTM User‘s Guide. Section 5B—Background 5.2. UTC Definition. A UTC is a potential capability focused upon accomplishment of a specific mission that the military Service provides. It can consist of manpower force element (MFE) only, equipment (LOGDET) only, or both manpower and equipment. 5.2.1. UTCs are represented by a 5-character alphanumeric code. The assignment of a UTC categorizes each type organization into a class or kind of unit having common distinguishing characteristics, controlled by the Joint Staff and AF/A5XW. The first character of the UTC and the function it represents are provided in CJCSM 3150.24B Vol I and II, Type Unit Characteristics Report (TUCHAREQ). For some functional areas, the Air Force further defines the first two or three character in order to identify distinct capabilities within that functional area (see Table 5.1). 5.2.2. War planners use UTCs to document total Air Force manpower and logistics requirements needed to support the national military strategy during operational planning and execution activities. These requirements are documented in a JOPES/DCAPES TPFDD (See Chapter 8 for details) in support of an OPLAN, CONPLAN or OPORD. 5.2.3. The Mission Capabilities Statement (MISCAP) associated with a UTC defines the basic mission the UTC is capable of accomplishing. More information on MISCAPs is detailed later in this chapter. 5.2.4. UTCs by definition define capabilities. Generally, one and two person UTCs are discouraged unless they represent a stand-alone capability essential to support the warfighter. One and two person UTCs will be carefully evaluated during the Manpower and Equipment Force Packages (MEFPAK) approval process to ensure the stand-alone standard is met before approval is granted. 5.2.5. Right Sized. A right-sized UTC is one that provides a generic building block capability. This provides greater flexibility to planners and enables optimal support to the warfighting combatant commander or component. 5.2.6. Modular/scalable. UTCs can be used across the range of military operations (ROMO), whether for peacekeeping operations, humanitarian relief operations (HUMRO), rotational operations, small-scale contingencies, or combined with additional UTCs to meet OPLAN requirements. Small UTCs that build upon each other may be necessary to provide greater capability at a given location. A key element in modular/scalable UTCs is that the resources

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that make up a UTC are mutually exclusive of each other, in other words, no authorization is in more than one UTC. There are exceptions such as aviation and maintenance UTCs that support USSTRATCOM requirements (formerly known as SIOP), which could be dual postured; these are not mutually exclusive. 5.2.7. A UTC is usable when it has been registered in DCAPES with MFE and/or equipment estimates. It is considered complete when it is registered in TUCHA, with all MFE and/or equipment detail. Once the UTC has been registered in the manpower and equipment force packaging (MEFPAK), the UTC can then be postured by an organization in the UTC Availability and with the exception of A-UTCs, can be used in a TPFDD for planning and execution purposes. (See Chapter 7) 5.2.8. A cross-functional UTC is one made up of MFE from different functional areas. A cross-functional force module (See Chapter 6) is one made up of standard UTCs from different functional areas. 5.3. Types of UTCs 5.3.1. There are two types of UTCs standard and non-standard 5.3.1.1. Standard 5.3.1.1.1. A standard UTC is a UTC in the MEFPAK and Type Unit Characteristics (TUCHA) data file that has complete movement characteristics in both files. Such UTC would be of fixed composition. 5.3.1.1.2. Standard UTCs are used in JOPES/DCAPES to identify manpower and logistics requirements for deployment, movement planning, and plan execution. 5.3.1.1.3. The Deployment Indicators (DEPIDS) for this UTC are generally E, P, 1, 2, or 3. (See Table 5.3) 5.3.1.1.4. A deployable UTC is one in which the MFE and/or equipment can be deployed to another location. 5.3.1.1.5. A non-deployable UTC is one that is inherently not deployable, i.e. moveable to another location, generally ends in AAA, AA or A and has a DEPID of 9. 5.3.1.1.5.1. There is no MISCAP, MFE, or equipment for these UTCs. 5.3.1.1.5.2. These UTCs generally end with "AA". Examples are PFAAA, 1DAAA, and 7FSAA 5.3.1.1.5.3. A unit is assigned a non-deployable UTC when the unit is created and documented in the Personnel Accounting Symbol (PAS) file. 5.3.1.1.5.3.1. Staffs responsible for establishing UICs will review the MEFPAK list of DEPID 9 UTCs and select the one best describing the type of organization. 5.3.1.1.5.3.2. The DEPID 9 UTC defines the organization type and allows each type organization to be categorized into a kind or class with common distinguishing characteristics. They are important to SORTS and appear as the Unit UTC on AF Form 723, SORTS DOC Statement. Unit UTCs facilitate the

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 rapid categorization of like units by filtering. For example: filtering for UTC 3FAAA will produce all tactical fighter units. 5.3.1.1.5.4. Non-deployable UTCs are used when units create the Basic Identity Data Element (BIDE) data necessary for registration in SORTS. 5.3.1.1.5.5. DEPID 9 UTCs will not be placed in TPFDD or in UTC Availability to indicate in place requirements/capabilities. 5.3.1.2. Non-Standard. 5.3.1.2.1. A non-standard UTC is a UTC in the MEFPAK and TUCHA file that does not have complete movement characteristics. The two types of non-standard UTCs are "Z99" and "Associate" UTCs. Examples are 3FZ99 and QFZZZ. 5.3.1.2.2. There are occasions when a planner does not have a standard UTC in which to move his manpower and/or equipment. A "Z99" non-standard UTC in the TUCHA will allow a planner to enter the UTC "shell" into a TPFDD. The planner can then build specific detailed requirements in the TPFDD using DCAPES. NonStandard UTCs should never be used to define cross-functional requirements. Planners should always use the appropriate functional "Z99" UTC. 5.3.1.2.3. Unit manpower that cannot be captured in a standard UTC will be postured into an "Associate" UTC (A-UTC). A-UTCs are placeholders for all funded military authorizations that cannot be described or do not fit into an existing standard UTC. Each functional area has an A-UTC to represent that functional area. The Associate UTCs themselves are not deployable, but the individuals filling the authorizations that are associated with the UTC are deployable (See Chapter 7 for UTC utilization and posturing guidance). 5.3.1.2.4. An A-UTC is a placeholder for deployable capability. In other words, the UTC itself is not deployable and cannot be put into a TPFDD. This type of UTC is used during the UTC posturing process to indicate authorizations that an organization has and cannot posture in a standard UTC or to posture above base level staff authorizations not in standard UTCs 5.3.1.2.5. A-UTCs have DEPID of 6. There is no MISCAP, MFE, or equipment for these UTCs in the MEFPAK. 5.3.1.2.5.1. The MEFPAK Responsible Agency (MRA) for all Associate UTCs is AF/ A5XW. AF/A5XW will ensure Air Staff FAMs are involved in the development process.

5.3.1.2.5.2 These UTCs end with a ZZZ, ZZ, or Z, such as 3BZZZ, 9ACZZ, or 9ACPZ. The current list of approved A-UTCs can be obtained through DCAPES or AF/A5XW website ( http://www.xo.hq.af.mil/xox/xoxw/index.htm). 5.4. UTC Attributes. UTCs have many attributes, which provide the description, status, responsible organization, type, and transportation requirements. 5.4.1. MEFPAK Responsible Agency (MRA) – Formerly known as the MEFPAK Responsible Command, is an organization designated by a HAF FAM to develop and maintain detailed data on a UTC for use throughout the Air Force.

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5.4.2. Deployment Indicator (DEPID) DEPID is a code identifying the deployment status of a UTC. (Table 5.3) 5.4.3. Unit level code (ULC) The ULC indicates the relative organizational level of the unit or element (Table 5.4). 5.4.4. Authorized Personnel (AUTH) AUTH is the sum of the specific manpower required to perform the mission defined in the MISCAP. 5.4.5. Passengers (PAX) PAX is the portion of AUTH that requires transportation. Generally, it differs from AUTH only for 3-series UTCs (aviation) in which aircrew fly the aircraft to the deployed location, hence requiring no separate transportation. 5.4.6. Total Short Tons (ST) Total weight of the equipment in the UTC in short tons. A short ton equals 2000 pounds. 5.4.6.1. Bulk ST Total weight of the bulk equipment in the UTC in short tons. Cargo suitable for a 463L pallet. 5.4.6.2. Oversized ST Total weight of the oversized equipment in the UTC in short tons. Cargo that exceeds the usable dimension of a 463L pallet. 5.4.6.3. Outsized ST Total weight of the outsized equipment in the UTC in short tons. Cargo requiring wide-bodied aircraft. 5.4.6.4. Non-Air Transportable ST Total weight of the equipment in the UTC that is not air transportable in short tons. Cargo too large for airlift. 5.4.6.5. Table Of Allowance Total ST Total weight of the Table of Allowance equipment in the UTC in short tons. 5.4.6.6. Organic ST Total weight of the equipment in the UTC that is moved organically, i.e., carried in the aircraft in the UTC, in short tons. 5.4.7. The MISCAP is used by War planners to determine which UTCs can fill their requirements. (See paragraph 5.12.3.1.7 for details). 5.4.8. Pilot Unit A pilot unit is responsible for developing and maintaining standard manpower and or logistics detail for each UTC for which it has been assigned responsibility by the MRA. Each and every UTC that has been approved and registered in the MEFPAK and TUCHA will have a Pilot Unit assigned. This is a change from previous guidance where UTCs with LOGDETs were the only UTCs with an assigned Pilot Unit. 5.4.9. Aviation UTC information will include Primary Mission Aircraft Inventory (PMAI), Mission Prefix, Mission Basic, Design Number, and Design Series. 5.4.10. Title Description The title of a UTC consists of a brief description and is constructed using the instructions in Table 5.2 below and is standardized for data automation purposes. For aviation and maintenance UTCs, the title description usually includes the PMAI, Mission Design Series (MDS), component, etc. 5.5. Packaging of Air Force UTCs. These standard unit descriptions/force packages are collected in MEFPAK through its two components: the Manpower Force Packaging System (MANFOR) and the Logistics Force Packaging System (LOGFOR). These are described in paragraphs 5.7 and 5.8 below.

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5.6. Manpower and Equipment Force Packages (MEFPAK). The MEFPAK supports the Air Force in developing and describing standard, predefined manpower and equipment force capabilities and determining the deployment characteristics of these force capabilities in support of JOPES and DCAPES, Logistics Module (LOGMOD), and Manpower and Personnel Module –Base (MANPER-B). MEFPAK operates within the DCAPES software on GCCS. DCAPES supports MEFPAK and provides the capability to update GCCS files containing personnel/logistics deployment capabilities available for deployment. DCAPES specifically provides unit type management functions to the Air Staff. These functions allow selected Air Staff users to aggregate data related to Air Force standard unit types, create summary products, and feed the data to joint systems. 5.6.1. MEFPAK was established to provide standard descriptions of the units and elements to be used for wartime, contingency, and force planning at all levels of command. Force packages are uniquely identified in MEFPAK with a 5-character alphanumeric designator called a UTC. Full UTC capability is not reached until a UTC is made available in the UTC Availability. A UTC becomes usable when it appears in the MEFPAK. Because MEFPAK data are distributed Service-wide, using a pre-coordinated UTC, at any stage in its development, reduces the amount of detailed planning and coordination needed during OPLAN development, review, and execution. This process should greatly reduce the use of "Z99" non-standard UTCs. The UTC will be considered complete only when registered in the Joint Type Unit Characteristics (TUCHA). 5.7. Personnel Manpower Force Packaging System (MANFOR) 5.7.1. The MANFOR is a component of MEFPAK and DCAPES. It is a database containing the UTC, UTC title, mission capability statement (MISCAP), and manpower detail for each applicable UTC. The MANFOR provides Air Force planners with standardized force capability outlining manpower requirements for operations planning, execution documents, and readiness measurement. It also provides an easy way to communicate standard planning manpower requirements to all Air Force units. MANFOR lists the specific manpower required to perform the mission defined in the UTC‘s MISCAP. 5.7.2. UTCs are generally built to accommodate 30-days of sustained capability before having to be augmented with new supplies or personnel. Personnel UTCs are generally built to accommodate 30-days of sustained capability before having to be resupplied or augmented with new supplies or personnel. Sustaining capability is based on 30-days of consumable supplies to support personnel working the wartime sustaining Manpower Availability Factor of six (6) 10-hour shifts. Surge operations typically last the first 30 days of an operation and entail (6) 12-hour shifts. Consumable supplies to support surge may be above and beyond normal UTC configurations. In developing UTCs, the FAM must ensure they have considered the difference between 24-hour availability and 24 hour coverage. The distinction is whether or not the mission requires personnel to be present around the clock vice mission accomplishment by recalling personnel when they are technically off-shift. The difference can mean tremendous costs in personnel resources to meet the capability. The Manpower plans function should assist in making these determinations and will help compute actual manpower costs. 5.7.2.1. Manpower Force Element (MFE). Manpower detail contains the following elements:

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5.7.2.1.1. Standard AF Functional Account Code must be reflective of the employment function (mandatory). 5.7.2.1.2. AFSC (mandatory) 5.7.2.1.3. Grade (mandatory for officer and civilian requirements; enlisted may be omitted) 5.7.2.1.4. Special Experience Identifier (if necessary) 5.7.2.1.5. Command Remarks (if applicable) 5.7.2.1.6. Quantity (mandatory) 5.7.2.2. The objectives of MANFOR are achieved through the development of Air Force-level approved, force packages, built in DCAPES, and available to joint and Air Force command and control systems. MANFOR: 5.7.2.2.1. Provides joint and Air Force planners with standardized force capabilities documenting manpower requirements for execution, operations, and deployment planning documents. 5.7.2.2.2. Provides a means to communicate standard wartime, force planning, and contingency manpower requirements to all levels of command within the Air Force. 5.7.2.2.3. Provides Air Force input to the JOPES TUCHA database. 5.7.2.2.4. Establishes a baseline for communication among the MEFPAK responsible agencies. 5.7.2.2.5. Serves as the foundation for individual requirements documentation by operations planners at all levels. 5.7.2.3. The Air Force Manpower Agency (AFMA) provides the updated MANFOR file. 5.8. Logistics Force Packaging Subsystem (LOGFOR). LOGFOR is a component of MEFPAK and resides in LOGMOD. LOGFOR is updated by the LOGMOD system. It is used to collect and store the materiel requirements (called the logistics detail (LOGDET)) for UTCs. The LOGDET defines the standard passenger and equipment movement requirements for each UTC. Pilot units develop and maintain UTCs for 30-days of sustainment, bare base capability, generic to all like units, using the UTC MISCAP, Weapon/Non-Weapon System Allowance Standard mobility-coded (Use Code "A") assets, Equipment Supply List (ESL), direction from HAF FAMs and/or MAJCOM UTC FAMs, and non-pilot unit inputs. The only time UTCs will be developed with less than 30-days of sustainment; (bare base capability) is when the situation is identified in the MISCAP. The UTC MISCAP, Allowance Standard, HAF FAM direction, and/or MAJCOM UTC FAM approval may authorize additional UTC requirements (such as general/special purpose vehicles, aircraft fire bottles, Meals Ready-to-Eat, bottled water, weapons, and mobility bags) in standard Air Force LOGDETs. The ESL is the primary source document used by Civil Engineering to establish equipment requirements in LOGDET. For further guidance see AFI 10-209, RED HORSE Program and AFI 10-210, Prime Base Engineer Emergency Force (BEEF) Program. 5.8.1. LOGFOR functions include: 5.8.1.1. Providing passenger and equipment planning data for deploying units.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.8.1.2. Serving as a UTC standard for communications among MEFPAK responsible agencies(those commands designated with pilot unit responsibility). 5.8.1.3. Providing the foundation for individual force capability strategic airlift requirements estimates for planning. 5.8.1.4. Providing inputs to the JOPES TUCHA database. 5.8.1.5. LOGFOR is used to collect and store logistics detail (LOGDET) for UTCs. LOGFOR provides equipment-planning data for use by Air Force units in their mobility plans. 5.8.1.6. Standard UTC LOGDET data is developed and maintained by pilot units in the LOGFOR module of LOGMOD. 5.8.1.6.1. Non-Pilot units are required to procure and maintain the UTC equipment and supplies authorizations in order to provide the sustained 30 days of bare base capabilities required to support contingency and wartime missions. 5.8.1.7. LOGMOD UTC suffix. LOGMOD systems at both the MAJCOMand base-level include a suffix to the UTC, which denotes various stages of development for the UTC. Definitions of UTC suffixes are in Table 5.6 5.8.2. Following are descriptions of the levels of detail contained within LOGMOD. 5.8.2.1. Aggregate (Level 1) includes total number of personnel, total short tons, total measurement tons, and total square feet. 5.8.2.2. Summary (Level 2) includes total number of authorized personnel and number of passengers requiring transportation, total short tons, measurement tons (including barrels), and total square feet of bulk, oversize, outsize, and non-air-transportable cargo (by UTC and cargo increment number (CIN)). 5.8.2.3. Cargo Category Code (Level 3) includes total number of authorized personnel by Officer, Enlisted, and Civilian (by UTC), total short tons and/or measurement tons (including barrels), total square feet of cargo as identified by the UTC, or CIN threeposition cargo category code. 5.8.2.4. Increment (Level 4) includes total number of passengers by Service specialty code (i.e., AFSC), by UTC, individual dimensional data (expressed in length, width, and height in number of inches) of cargo by equipment (as defined by individual national stock number) by UTC, and further defined as a group of equipment (consolidated) or single piece of cargo planned for shipment. 5.8.2.5. Item Number (Level 5) includes total number of passengers by Service specialty code (i.e., AFSC) in deployment sequence (by line number), individual weight (in pounds) and dimensional data (expressed in length, width, and height in number of inches) of equipment in deployment sequence number by line number. Further defined as a piece of cargo on an increment. An item is normally a single piece of equipment, or loaded container of equipment, that is loaded on an increment. 5.8.2.6. Level 6. Increment includes total individual weight (in pounds) and dimensional data (expressed in length, width, and height in number of inches), as defined by individual national stock number of equipment in deployment sequence number by ULN.

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5.8.2.7. Level 7. Item Number further defines pieces of cargo on an increment. An item is normally a single piece of equipment, or loaded container of equipment, that is loaded on an increment. 5.8.2.8. Suffix Item (Level 8) includes something loaded in an item (when the item is a container) and placed on an increment. 5.8.3. LOGDET is the Air Force logistics input to the TUCHA. Upon completion by pilot units and approval by the MEFPAK responsible agency (MRA) and Air Staff UTC FAM, standard UTC equipment requirements (as reflected in suffix zero LOGDET) are captured via the Type Unit Data Report (TYPREP) file and given to joint planners as the Air Force‘s input to the TUCHA file. AF/A4LX (HAF LOGDET Manager) provides Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA)/Joint Staff Support Center (JSSC) with Air Force inputs for inclusion in the joint TUCHA database. MRAs submit LOGFOR updates to AF/A4LX in accordance with this AFI. MRAs will review LOGDETs at least biennially (see paragraph 5.17). 5.8.4. Air Force logistics input to the TUCHA. The TUCHA is used to update Joint Operations Planning and Execution System (JOPES) using personnel strength and short ton information developed by the pilot unit. Without these movement characteristics, the United States Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM) cannot determine or validate accurate airlift requirements for units identified within the Time Phased-Force Deployment Data (TPFDD) development/refinement process. 5.9. Type Unit Characteristics (TUCHA). Using DCAPES, MEFPAK updates occur continuously in real time and the TUCHA is updated as often as the joint community allows. Currently this is done quarterly; however, with the flexibility of the DCAPES/MEFPAK process, it is possible, and the goal is, to update the TUCHA seamlessly. There could be some delay before a UTC that is useable in DCAPES becomes visible in the joint TUCHA. The MEFPAK Summary Report, able to be produced on demand in DCAPES, reflects standard Air Force UTC personnel and cargo movement characteristics used by Air Force planners for general war planning. 5.9.1. UTCs with DEPID codes of 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, E, or P and required detail data are registered in TUCHA. UTCs that fail critical edit checks will not be reported in TUCHA until the error is corrected. 5.9.2. UTCs registered in MEFPAK without required detail data will be canceled if detail data is not received within the time frames stated in Table 5.5 5.10. Type Unit Data Report (TYPREP). Joint planning above the component level does not require the amount of personnel and equipment detail contained in the MEFPAK. The Air Force provides UTC level 1, 3, and 4 details to the Joint Staff (JS) in the TYPREP. The Joint Staff distributes the TYPREP as the TUCHA to the combatant commanders for use in JOPES for developing the TPFDD and in determining OPLAN transportation feasibility. 5.11. UTC Utilization. UTCs are the primary means for identifying forces described in JOPES and DCAPES. They are also used for Air Force support of Status of Resources and Training System (SORTS) reporting, AEF UTC Reporting Tool (ART) reporting, Air National Guard (ANG) and Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC) force structuring, and as building blocks to task organize AETFs.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.11.1. As stated earlier, joint and Air Force war planners use UTCs to document total Air Force manpower and logistics requirements needed to support the national military strategy during contingency planning. These requirements are documented in JOPES TPFDDs and within DCAPES. The TPFDD listing is identified in Annex A, Appendix 1, of the OPLAN and lists total requirements (expressed in UTCs) and units tasked to fill those requirements represented as UICs. Chapter 8 and Chapter 9 of this manual provide instructions on how UTCs are used in OPLAN and TPFDD development. As a rule, only UTCs with a DEPID of 1, 2, 3, E, or P are used in TPFDD files. UTCs with a DEPID 6 (Z99) may be used in a TPFDD if no standard UTC provides the required capability (see 5.3.1.2.2). However, AUTCs (DEPID 6) will not be used in TPFDD development for contingency planning until: 5.11.1.1. DELETED. 5.11.1.2. DELETED. 5.11.2. UTCs cannot be utilized in TPFDDs until they are registered in MEFPAK via the UTC Registration application in DCAPES. UTC Registration, a part of the UTC Management (UTM) module of DCAPES, provides the users with the capability to ADD, CHANGE, or CANCEL UTCs. The ADD function is also referred to as ―UTC Development.‖ 5.11.2.1. When performing any of the functions in UTC Registration, the users must initially place a UTC in a particular ―state‖ or ―status‖ (Table 5.7). 5.11.2.1.1. The "Working" state indicates that a UTC request is in its initial stage of development and has not yet been staffed for coordination beyond its developer, however all UTC functions must be vetted through the corresponding HAF FAM prior to submission. If UTCs need to be ―approved‖ by the HAF Functional Area leadership, then ―approval‖ needs to be accomplished at this point in the process. All UTCs requiring HAF Functional Area leadership ―approval‖ need to be coordinated with the HAF Functional Manager‘s leadership prior to ―submitting‖ in the UTC Management, Registration module. 5.11.2.1.2. The "Published" state indicates that the UTC request has been published by the initiator for coordination and all agencies with access to UTM can review the UTC and provide inputs to the corresponding MRA prior to submission. AF/A5XW can view a ―published‖ UTC but can‘t make any direct corrections to the UTC. 5.11.2.1.3. The "Submitted" state indicates that the UTC request has been submitted to the HAF MEFPAK Manager (AF/A5XW) for review, HAF FAM coordination and final AF/A5XW approval. UTCs requiring HAF Functional Area leadership ―approval‖ must have this approval prior to ―submitting‖ and must state approval completion in the ―Rationale/Justification‖ (―HAF Functional Area leadership has approved this UTC request‖). UTCs requiring HAF Functional Area leadership ―approval‖ that lack this information will be sent back to the MRA as ―Incomplete‖. 5.11.2.1.4. The "Coordinated" state indicates that the HAF MEFPAK Manager (A5XW) has initiated actions on the HAF to gain approval of the UTC request. This usually means that a "UTC Coordination Report" has been e-mailed to the HAF FAM or other approving agency.

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5.11.2.1.5. The "Incomplete" state can mean several things. First, it can indicate that a problem was discovered with the UTC request and it has been sent back for resolution. Second, a request may be determined to be invalid if rejected by the HAF FAM or if the request is a duplicate of a previous request. Third, this could mean that the UTC requires HAF Functional Area leadership approval prior to submission and the justification is missing the required statement. It is the responsibility of the requesting agency to take action to "clean up" (remove) the "Incomplete" UTCs in the UTM system. 5.11.2.1.6. The "Approved" state indicates that all coordination activities at the HAF have been completed. The HAF MEFPAK Manager (A5XW) is the agency that places the request in this state. 5.11.2.1.7. The "Disapproved" state indicates that the UTC request has been disapproved. This state ensures that the UTC and its five character designation will never be used again. This is a very dangerous state since the five characters may need to be used at a later time. The "Incomplete" state is often the better selection. The HAF MEFPAK Manager (A5XW) is the agency that places the request in this state. 5.11.2.1.8. The "Registered" state indicates that the UTC request has been approved by AF/A5XW and registered into the MEFPAK. The HAF MANFOR Manager (AFMA) usually places the request into this state. This will now allow MFE and LOGDET activities to take place for "New" UTC requests. At this point, the UTC can be used for planning and execution purposes and can be postured in the UTA. 5.11.2.1.8.1. Once a "new" UTC has been registered in the MEFPAK, the Pilot Unit/MRA has 90 days to update the MFE and LOGDET. Section 5C—Guidance 5.12. Types of UTC Registration Requests. UTC Registration requests are accomplished in the UTM module utilizing the UTM registration function in DCAPES. This function provides three Actions; ADD (see paragraphs 5.12.1. through 5.12.5.), CHANGE (see paragraph 5.12.6.), and CANCEL (see paragraph 5.12.7.). The choice button defaults to the "ADD" option. 5.12.1. UTC Development (ADDs). UTC development is the process of adding a UTC to the MEFPAK, building the manpower and or logistics detail, and getting the UTC added to the TUCHA. New UTCs will be requested when a desired capability does not exist in a standard UTC. In addition, the following guidelines will help determine when a UTC must be developed: 5.12.1.1. New equipment types enter the inventory. 5.12.1.2. Deployable units experience a significant change in either operational concept or mission. 5.12.1.3. Significant program changes occur in manpower or equipment. 5.12.1.4. Significant program or operational changes occur. 5.12.1.5. Air Force organization requires a change in the way an existing capability functions.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.12.2. A HAF FAM, MAJCOM, ANG, FOA, or DRU usually initiates the development of a UTC. Using the guidelines in paragraph 5.12.1.1 through 5.12.1.5, request new UTCs as soon as you know, at least 120 days prior to initial operational capability (IOC) or if a capability has been deployed during at least two AEF rotations without an existing UTC. Requests for new UTCs will be submitted to AF/A5XW via DCAPES. Following AF/A5XW review, AF/A5XW will forward the UTC request to the appropriate Air Staff FAM, or equivalent, for concurrence/non-concurrence. The MRA will ordinarily be assigned to the command making the UTC request; however, this is not always the case. MRA assigns a pilot unit to develop the UTC and again, it may not always be from the same command. In this case, coordination between the two commands must take place. See paragraph 5.15 for process details and Attachment 4, UTC Development Instructions.

Figure 5.1. DELETED. 5.12.3. New UTC requests are created in the Unit Type Management (UTM) module utilizing the UTM registration function in DCAPES. In the UTM Registration function, the "Action" choice button gives the user the option of "ADD", "CHG", or "CNX". 5.12.3.1. "ADD" is the default option for a new request. The user will be prompted to supply and enter all of the following mandatory information: 5.12.3.1.1. Proposed UTC designation. The proposed UTC designation can include the full five positions or any part thereof; e.g., 3F, 3FG, 3FGA5. 5.12.3.1.2. Proposed UTC title. The title is constructed using the instructions in Table 5.2 and is standardized for data automation purposes. It is built using the Aviation, or Non-Aviation templates in the UTM tool in DCAPES. 5.12.3.1.3. Deployment indicator code (DEPID), which identifies the deployment capability and composition of the UTC (Table 5.3). 5.12.3.1.4. Unit level code (ULC), which indicates the relative organizational level of the unit or element (Table 5.4). 5.12.3.1.5. Approximate authorized strength. Include hours of operation if not included in MISCAP. 5.12.3.1.6. Summary level logistics data (approximate number of short tons). 5.12.3.1.7. Proposed MISCAP. The MISCAP defines the mission the UTC is capable of accomplishing. If applicable, clearly define substitution rules (e.g. AFSC, skill level requirement, grade, SEIs, equipment), to include thresholds on the maximum number of positions that could be substituted; if functional AFIs define substitution rules, these should be included (or at a minimum cross-referenced) in the MISCAP. Spell out all acronyms and abbreviations used in the title and MISCAPs. Include any other pertinent information. Aviation UTCs must reference the WMP-5 for sortie and attrition rates and durations. Crew ratios are unclassified and may be placed in the MISCAP, but the authoritative source is AFI 65-503. Every MISCAP is required to have the UTC point of contact and date of the last UTC review. This is the last item in the MISCAP and the format is: MAJCOM POC: OFFICE SYMBOL, DSN xxxxxxx. REVIEWED MMM YY. This is required for all UTCs to include new ADDs.

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5.12.3.1.7.1. The MISCAP is the only part of the UTC that could be classified. Air Force UTCs are generally not classified, but if they must be classified, MISCAPs containing monthly flying hour utilization must be classified at least CONFIDENTIAL. Classification of MISCAPs must not exceed SECRET. Executive Order (EO) 12958 requires originator data to be contained in all classified MISCAPS. 5.12.3.1.7.2. Pilot units will ensure secure transmission (i.e. SIPRNET, classified FAX, etc) of UTC detail with classified MISCAPs when transmitting from base to MRA. Although many aviation MISCAPs are classified, the manpower detail (MANFOR) is not. If classified MISCAPs are combined with the UTC MANFOR in a single document or transmission, both will be marked according to the level of classification of the UTC MISCAP. UTC LOGDETs will never be classified, as pilot units develop them in an unclassified system (LOGMOD). 5.12.3.1.8. For aviation UTCs, indicate the number of crew members that must be subtracted from authorized personnel to obtain an accurate passenger count. 5.12.3.1.8.1. DELETED. 5.12.3.1.9. Rationale or justification for UTC development (see Attachment 4, Item 14). 5.12.3.1.10. Proposed pilot unit. A pilot unit is responsible for developing and maintaining standard manpower and logistics detail for each UTC it has been assigned. The goal is a uniform capability for all units that will use the UTC. Refer to paragraph 5.15.12 of this instruction for more details about Pilot Unit Responsibilities. Ensure you inform the proposed pilot unit of your intentions. 5.12.3.1.11. HAF FAM office symbol and phone number with whom the requirement was coordinated or the HAF agency directing the development. 5.12.3.1.12. Office symbol and phone number of the Command FAM/Agency POC who is responsible for the request and can answer specific questions concerning request activities. 5.12.3.1.13. Listing of all points of contact at the command for cross-functional UTCs. 5.12.3.1.14. Impact on AETF force modules (FMs), if any. If there are none, so state. If the UTC is in an FM (See Chapter 6 for details), then indicate the FMID. 5.12.3.2. DELETED 5.12.3.2.1. DELETED. 5.12.3.2.2. DELETED. 5.12.3.2.3. DELETED. 5.12.3.2.4. DELETED. 5.12.3.2.5. DELETED. 5.12.3.2.6. DELETED.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.12.3.2.7. DELETED. 5.12.3.2.8. DELETED. 5.12.3.2.8.1. DELETED. 5.12.3.3. New UTCs and changes to UTCs automatically send a message to the DCAPES news group: c2news.af.pentagon.smil.mil-hqaf.mefpak.updates.

5.12.4. Validated manpower and logistics detail data must be submitted within 90 days of UTC registration in MEFPAK. Based on amount of anticipated LOGDET, MAJCOM LOGDET Manager may set a suspense of less than 90 days. If there are fewer than 90 days until that update, manpower and logistics detail will be included in the following update. See Table 5.5 5.12.4.1. A UTC registered in the MEFPAK can be used at any stage of development. This allows the Air Force to minimize the use of "Z99" non-standard UTCs while taking advantage of any initial UTC development actions already underway. To ensure JOPES acceptance of this level of data is achieved, the standard indicator code in the TPFFD will reflect an "8" indicating Unit reported data. For specific details, see Chapter 7. 5.12.5. Rule sets for building UTCs: 5.12.5.1. UTC Right Sizing. A right-sized UTC is one that provides a generic building block capability. This provides greater flexibility to planners and enables optimal support to the warfighting combatant commander or component. When integrated with other right-sized UTCs, it provides greater mission capability needed to support an AEG, AEW, or AETF. Right-sized UTCs will minimize the need for fragging and tailoring in both the contingency and crisis action planning processes. In order for a UTC to be considered right sized, it must meet the following criteria: 5.12.5.1.1. Modular/Scalable. UTCs will be modular/scalable. They can be used across the range of military operations (ROMO), whether for peacekeeping operations, humanitarian relief operations (HUMRO), rotational operations, smallscale contingencies, or combined with additional UTCs to meet OPLAN requirements. Small UTCs that build upon each other may be necessary to provide greater capability at a given location. A key element in modular/ scalable UTCs is that the resources that make up a UTC are mutually exclusive of each other. For aviation units, squadrons will be tasked with a lead element and one to three followon elements depending on number and type of aircraft. Unless specifically designed otherwise, a UTC can be deployed to any AOR and originate from a unit from any MAJCOM. 5.12.5.1.2. UTCs should be developed so that the entire UTC can be tasked from a single organization. This will eliminate the need to fragment the UTC across multiple units. For aviation UTCs, it will still be necessary to task resources from other key organizations (e.g., maintenance, intelligence, supply, etc.). 5.12.5.1.2.1. The single organization rule also applies to blended units, Reserve/Guard associate or Active -associate units, and other future total force organizational initiatives. For these units, separate UTCs must be developed for the Active component and the Air Reserve component portions of the unit.

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5.12.5.1.2.2. Specialized, combat-oriented organizations that deploy as a crossfunctional, self-sustaining team must develop UTCs that encompass all functions necessary to carry out the entire organizational capability. 5.12.5.1.3. Unless specifically designed otherwise, UTCs must be capable of standalone operations within their functional area. The UTC should be able to perform its mission from a bare base or established main operating base or, if designed to meet main operating base requirements, must be able to combine with additional UTCs to meet requirements of bare base operations. 5.12.5.2. Parent/Child UTCs. Parent/child UTCs will not be approved and should no longer be postured; however, to understand this concept, the following is provided. UTCs are considered to be parent/child UTCs when the same manpower position is in more than one UTC in the UTC Availability. A funded Air Force manning position will be aligned to no more than one UTC. When posturing additional UTCs, it is imperative not to create parent/child relationships. The following definitions are provided to avoid the creation of parent/child UTCs: 5.12.5.2.1. A UTC is a parent if any of the authorizations in the larger parent UTC are also aligned to one or more corresponding subset or children UTCs. 5.12.5.2.2. Child UTCs are UTCs that provide a partial capability of the parent and in which all the authorizations in the child UTC are also found in the parent UTC. 5.12.5.2.3. A UTC is also considered to be a child if, when combined with other child UTCs, the compilation of all authorizations and capability in the child UTCs approximates the authorizations and capability of the parent. 5.12.5.3. As stated earlier, oneand two-person standard deployable UTCs should be avoided unless the UTC represents the logical team or package size to support combatant commander TPFDD requirements (i.e., chaplains, historians, comptrollers, public affairs, PERSCO teams, aircraft battle damage repair, etc.) These types of UTCs will be scrutinized to determine if they are necessary. 5.12.5.4. Creation of cross functional UTCs should be avoided unless they comprise a unique mission capable "team" that depends on the integrated use of several functional disciplines. Members of cross-functional team UTCs work together and represent their functional expertise towards a common mission goal. Note: MAJCOM FAMs must coordinate with all applicable FAMs when building cross-functional UTCs and this coordination will be included in the UTC submission. 5.12.5.5. 3-Level limitations. The establishment of an apprentice level deployable "requirement" in UTCs is discouraged except where AFSC specific technical skills can be applied in the deployment environment. While the use of 3 Levels for deployments is not common, the Air Force does utilize them, e.g., Third Country National (TCN) escort or postal augmentation UTC requirements during rotational operations. In addition, it is also important to point out additional limitations: 5.12.5.5.1. Trainee practice on combat ready equipment may have a negative impact. Asset(s) may become operationally unusable.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.12.5.5.2. The need to forward deploy an infrastructure to ensure trainees meet testing gates. 5.12.5.5.3. Procedures to disqualify trainees who do not pass training requirements under hostile environments. 5.12.5.5.4. Time off from the work center to accomplish CDCs. Note: They are already in10-hour sustainment duty days. Web access constraints and consumption of bandwidth needed for operational purposes make downrange training of 3-levels impractical. 5.12.5.5.5. The potential to increase UTC manning because every 3 skill level requires direct supervision that limits supervisors from duties they were there to perform in the first place. 5.12.5.5.6. A few functional areas have postured 3 Levels in A-UTCs (see Chapter 7) that are nondeployable by definition and do not represent a deployable capability by policy. 5.12.5.5.7. Establishing a UTC requirement for a 3 level resource means the person tasked to deploy can be anywhere on the training timeline. They could be fresh out of school or nearing award of their journeyman AFSC. It also impacts the decisionmaking authority of the commander in assessing qualifications of individual personnel to deploy. Additional guidance can be found in AFI 10-403, Deployment Planning and Execution for deployment policy. 5.12.5.6. Vehicles should not be included in functional area UTCs. All vehicles will be postured in UF-series UTCs only. A waiver for this policy may be requested through AF/A4/7. Exception: special units (e.g. RED HORSE, Combat Comm, ASOS/ASOG, CRC) postured in Enabler libraries may have vehicles imbedded within their functional UTCs. 5.12.5.7. When all the details of a UTC are developed (personnel data and/or logistics data), the UTC is then registered in the TUCHA file maintained by the Joint Staff. The UTC is registered in the TUCHA and provides standard planning data and movement characteristics for personnel, cargo, and accompanying supplies associated with type units. Since the Air Force utilizes the Pilot Unit concept above, the TUCHA updates JOPES using personnel strength and short ton information developed at pilot unit level in most cases. Without these movement characteristics, USTRANSCOM cannot determine or validate accurate airlift requirements for units identified within the TPFDD development/refinement process.

5.12.6. UTM Changes. "CHG" allows the user to change any of the UTC attributes (but not LOGDET). Once a ―Working Copy‖ of the UTC is generated and the UTC is identified, the following data elements will automatically be provided: MRA, Updated Date, Created Date, Status, DEPID, ULC, Pilot Unit, UTC Title and MISCAP. To place the UTC into ―Published‖ status, no additional data elements need to be filled in. Once the UTC is ready to be placed into ―Submitted‖ status, the following are mandatory data elements that need to be provided to modify the UTC: 5.12.6.1. Pilot Unit Phone Number.

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5.12.6.2. HQ FAM Office Symbol and Phone Number with whom the modification was coordinated or the HAF agency directing the modification. 5.12.6.3. Command FAM Office Symbol and Phone Number of the Command FAM/Agency POC who is responsible for the request and can answer specific questions concerning the modification. 5.12.6.4. Rationale/Justification. Submitting MRA must provide the rationale for the modification. 5.12.6.5. Impact of Core UTCs. Submitting MRA should provide information in regard to the impact on any of the AETF force modules. 5.12.7. UTM Cancels. "CNX" provides the capability to submit a UTC for cancellation. 5.12.7.1. When a UTC is no longer needed, the MRA can request that the UTC be canceled. Since this is a registration action, it must be coordinated with other commands that are using the UTC. 5.12.7.2. If a UTC is submitted for cancellation by one MRA, but in fact is used by other commands, a formal request can be made to that other command to assume MEFPAK responsibility for the UTC. The request is submitted to the HAF MEFPAK Manager (AF/A5XW). Once it has been coordinated with the HAF FAM it will be ―approved‖ and then ―registered‖ by AFMA under the new MRA. 5.12.7.3. When a MRA builds the ―Working Copy‖ for a UTC to be cancelled and the UTC is identified, the following data elements will automatically be provided: MRA, Updated Date, Created Date, Status, DEPID, ULC, Pilot Unit, UTC Title and MISCAP. To place the UTC into ―Published‖ status, no additional data elements need to be filled in. Once the UTC is to be placed into ―Submitted‖ status, the following are mandatory data elements that need to be provided to modify the UTC: 5.12.7.3.1. HAF FAM Office Symbol and Phone Number with whom the cancellation was coordinated or the HAF agency directing the cancellation. 5.12.7.3.2. Command FAM Office Symbol and Phone Number of the Command FAM/Agency POC who is responsible for the request and can answer specific questions concerning the cancellation. 5.12.7.3.3. Rationale. cancellation.

Submitting MRA must provide the rationale for the

5.12.7.3.4. Impact of Core UTCs. Submitting MRA should provide information in regard to the impact on any of the AETF force modules. Need the UTC/UTCs that may be replacing the cancelled UTC in the AETF force modules. 5.12.7.4. UTCs that are canceled will remain in the MEFPAK (as a DEPID 0) and in TUCHA for one year. This should provide sufficient time for the TPFDD to be updated with the current UTC and, if the details are needed, they will still be available. The deletion action from the MEFPAK will be automatic after one year. 5.13. UTC Maintenance. The Maintenance module within DCAPES allows the user to view all UTC information: UTC, CMD (Major Command), UTC Title, DEPID (Deployment Indicator), ULC (Unit Level Code), MISCAP Class (Mission Capability Classification), Last Reg Update,

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Last MFE Updated, and Last Log update. In addition, the MISCAP, LOGDET, and MFE details can be viewed from this tool. 5.13.1. With the appropriate roles and permissions in the UTM tool, changes to the UTC can be accomplished in this module. This level of permission is reserved for HAF and MRA MEFPAK Managers. It is important to note that LOGDET changes are currently accomplished via LOGMOD with the intent to incorporate this function into DCAPES. 5.13.2. The end result of this maintenance is a changed UTC, but without electronic coordination. It is possible, with "appropriate roles and permissions", to change any UTC. 5.14. DELETED. 5.14.1. DELETED. 5.14.2. DELETED. 5.14.2.1. DELETED. 5.14.2.1.1. DELETED. 5.14.2.1.2. DELETED. 5.14.2.1.3. DELETED. 5.14.2.1.4. DELETED. 5.14.2.2. DELETED. 5.15. UTC Development Duties & Responsibilities 5.15.1. This section lists responsibilities of major players in the UTC development process: AF/ A5XW (HAF MEFPAK Manager), AF/A4RX (HAF LOGDET Manager), AFMA (HAF MANFOR Manager), Air Staff FAMs, MEFPAK Responsible Agencies (including, command FAMs, Manpower Function, Supply, and Logistics Plans offices), Pilot/Non-Pilot Units, and using MAJCOMs. 5.15.2. AF/A5XW: 5.15.2.1. Acts as reviewing, coordinating and approving agency for all UTC requests. 5.15.2.1.1. Reviews all UTCs submitted via UTC Registration to ensure UTC designations and UTC titles comply with Table 5.1. Reviews MISCAPs to ensure accuracy and makes corrections as necessary, ensures that all necessary data is provided, DEPID designations are correct and Rationale/Justification and Impact on Core UTCs are logical and valid. 5.15.2.1.2. Forwards all submitted UTCs to the appropriate HAF FAM for review and coordination. Ensures timely responses. 5.15.2.1.3. Once HAF FAM provides concurrence, AF/A5XW will ―approve‖ UTC. If HAF FAM nonconcurs, coordinates with MRA to alleviate and solve problem and requests resubmission of UTC. 5.15.2.2. Acts as the HAF MEFPAK Manager for the Air Force. 5.15.2.3. Missing, incomplete, erroneous UTC data ―Submitted‖ will be sent back to the submitting organization as ―Incomplete‖. Errors will be identified in the memo.

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5.15.2.4. In coordination with AF/A4RC, AFMA/MASR and the JS (JOSC), determine when Air Force will request the next TUCHA update. 5.15.2.5. Tracks all UTCs that have surpassed the 90-day suspense for having incomplete manpower and/or logistics detail. AF/A5XW will notify corresponding MRA MEFPAK Manager of discrepancies. After 180 days, A5XW division chief will notify senior AF leadership for further action. Further delays in completion will result in UTC being cancelled unless satisfactory rationale is provided. 5.15.3. AF/A4RX (Plans and Integration Division): 5.15.3.1. Acts as LOGFOR OPR for the Air Force. 5.15.3.2. Receives, updates, and reviews LOGDET data from MEFPAK Responsible Agency. 5.15.3.3. Provides TYPREP submission to Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA)/Joint Staff Support Center (JSSC) for updating TUCHA. 5.15.3.3.1. Type Unit Data Report (TYPREP). Joint planning above the component level does not require the amount of personnel and equipment detail contained in the MEFPAK. The Air Force provides UTC level 1, 3, and 4 details to JS in the TYPREP. JS distributes the TYPREP as the TUCHA to the combatant commanders for use in JOPES for developing the TPFDD and in determining OPLAN transportation feasibility. UTCs with DEPID codes of 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, E, or P and required detail data are registered in TUCHA (DEPID 6 & 9 do not have detailed data). UTCs that fail critical edit checks will not be reported in TUCHA until the error is corrected. 5.15.3.4. Conducts review of accuracy of LOGFOR data submitted by MEFPAK responsible agencies and identifies critical edit errors for timely correction. 5.15.3.5. Approves Air Force standard LOGDET. 5.15.3.6. Updates the MEFPAK with LOGFOR data on a monthly basis. 5.15.4. HAF FAMs: 5.15.4.1. Act as Air Force validator of all new, changed, and canceled UTCs. Coordinate with AF/ A1MR and AF/A4RX and forward UTC action requests to AF/A5XW. 5.15.4.2. Conduct a biennial review of MEFPAK data to ensure manpower and logistics detail are at least the minimum needed to fulfill the MISCAP. Ensure that data is accurately recorded in MANFOR and LOGFOR. 5.15.4.3. Assign a MEFPAK Responsible Agency (MRA) to develop UTC detail data. 5.15.4.4. If HAF FAM requires functional area leadership to approve any UTC add, change or cancellation, ensure this coordination is completed prior to MRA ―submitting‖ UTC in UTM. Completion of this FAM functional area leadership coordination must be addressed in the Rationale/Justification portion of the UTC submission. 5.15.4.5. Once AF/A5XW has requested HAF FAM UTC coordination, provide expedient response; no longer than 30 days.

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5.15.5. AFMA: 5.15.5.1. Acts as MANFOR OPR for the Air Force. 5.15.5.2. Reviews and registers new UTC data in the MANFOR database. 5.15.5.3. Updates, and reviews MANFOR data from MEFPAK Responsible Agencies for administrative accuracy. 5.15.5.4. Reviews UTC update dates periodically to ensure all UTCs are being revalidated on a regular basis. 5.15.5.5. Creates MANFOR file in conjunction with AF/A4RX who creates the LOGFOR file for submission to TUCHA file. 5.15.5.6. Provides MANFOR updates as needed; data provided for MANPER-B users and posted to the REDMINI, a classified file server located at AFPC to distribute Data Pattern Traffic (DPT) packages to the appropriate MANPER system(s). 5.15.5.7. Notifies MEFPAK Responsible Agencies, Air Staff FAM, AF/A5XW/A1MR/A4RX, HQ ANG, HQ AFRC, and other interested commands and agencies of completion of each update of the MANFOR data in DCAPES. 5.15.5.8. Processes HAF updates. 5.15.5.9. Is responsible for working changes and updating UTCs for the following commands: AFESA, 11WG, USAFA, HQ USAF, and AFOSI. 5.15.5.10. Updates MISCAPs and manpower detail based on coordinated inputs of MEFPAK Manager, FAM, and pilot unit. 5.15.5.11. Analyzes specific manpower detail of UTCs submitted by FAMs and /or pilot units for UTC/UMD mismatches and accuracy. 5.15.5.12. Provides UTC manpower detail to FAMs, to include HAF and MAJCOM FAMs for review. 5.15.6. MEFPAK Responsible Agency (MRA) 5.15.6.1. A MEFPAK Responsible Agency is an organization designated by a HAF FAM to develop and maintain detailed data on a UTC for use throughout the Air Force. 5.15.6.2. Appoints a MEFPAK Manager, usually either the command plans or Manpower office, as a single point of contact for UTC actions. 5.15.6.3. Coordinates fully on proposed UTCs within its headquarters and with any commands possessing forces that could be represented by the proposed UTC, including HQ AFRC and ANG, to ensure UTC meets all user requirements. If a coordinated position cannot be reached, forwards issue to appropriate HAF FAM and AF/A5XW/A1MR/A4RX for resolution. 5.15.6.4. Submits requests for proposed UTCs through DCAPES to AF/A5XW and appropriate HAF FAM. 5.15.6.5. Provides a proposed implementation date for new UTCs to the FAM.

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5.15.6.6. Reviews and certifies accuracy and currency of its UTCs at least biennially. This review must include all elements of the UTC. 5.15.6.7. Coordinates fully all proposed force changes with any command possessing force availability, including ANG and AFRC. This will ensure all posturing commands agree and have adequate time to communicate changes to their units. If a coordinated position cannot be reached, forwards issue to appropriate HAF FAM and AF/A5XW/A1MR for resolution. 5.15.6.7.1. HQ AFRC and ANG can and should be appointed MRA for their respective UTCs. However, coordination with other MAJCOMs, such as ACC and AMC is necessary when those MAJCOMS are affected by any UTC actions. MRA responsibility for gaining command UTCs will be decided between HQ AFRC, ANG, and the gaining command. 5.15.7. The MRA MEFPAK Manager: 5.15.7.1. Submits requests for new, changed, or canceled UTCs in DCAPES. 5.15.7.2. Notifies MRA FAM of UTC designation for new UTCs. 5.15.7.3. Reviews and analyzes MANFOR and LOGFOR updates to determine UTC accuracy and ensures corrective actions are taken during the next update. 5.15.7.4. In coordination with the appropriate FAM(s), reviews and analyzes TUCHA data for UTCs the command uses but is not the MEFPAK responsible agency; and provides feedback to the responsible MRA to ensure inaccuracies are corrected. 5.15.7.5. Reviews MISCAPs at least biennially or as required with MRA FAMs. 5.15.7.6. Develops and provides guidance and assistance to MRA FAMs in UTC development and maintenance. 5.15.7.7. Oversees development for and submits the following data: 5.15.7.7.1. Planned Passenger and Equipment Detail. These data are used for a deploying unit. The supported component headquarters tailors these data, if necessary, based on asset and facility status in receiving theater at execution time. 5.15.7.7.2. LOGDET, which must be coordinated among the using commands and approved by the MRA. 5.15.7.7.3. Manpower Detail. 5.15.7.8. Conducts, in coordination with OFAMO, initial and annual MRA FAM training to all assigned MRA FAMs. Training will include MRA duties such as manpower and logistics detail development, MISCAP development, and UTC review procedures. 5.15.7.9. Ensures coordination between supporting MEFPAK offices (MANFOR/LOGFOR) regarding registration actions affecting their portions of the system. For example, UTC delete actions currently require a separate set of processes to remove the UTC from the LOGFOR. 5.15.7.10. Coordinate FAM UTC deletion requests with the appropriate plans office to accomplish TPFDD screening and update as well as corrections to the UTC Availability.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.15.7.11. Establish a risk mitigation process to address the utilization of 3-skill level requirements in MEFPAK responsible UTCs. The process should, at a minimum address risk reduction and require leadership approval. 5.15.7.12. Ensure UTCs that require HAF Functional Area leadership ―approval‖ are approved at the HAF level prior to ―submitting‖ in UTM Registration. Once ―approved‖ by HAF Functional Area leadership and UTC is ―submitted‖, ensure approval statement is included in the Rationale/Justification (―HAF Functional Area leadership has approved this UTC request‖).

5.15.8. The MRA Supply: 5.15.8.1. Approves/disapproves AF Form 601/TACR, Equipment Action Request and/or allowance change request via the TACR screen in the Air Force Equipment Management System (AFEMS), and informs pilot unit equipment management (EM) element of approval or disapproval. 5.15.8.2. Coordinates AF Form 601/TACR action with appropriate MRA agencies which forward AF Form 601/TACR to the Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) depot for approval. 5.15.8.3. Updates applicable Allowances Standards (AS). 5.15.9. MRA Manpower Office: 5.15.9.1. Updates MISCAPs and manpower detail based on coordinated inputs of MEFPAK Manager, FAM, and pilot unit. 5.15.9.2. Analyzes specific manpower detail of UTCs submitted by FAMs and /or pilot units for UTC/UMD mismatches and accuracy. Ensures all aviation maintenance UTCs are built based on the command implementation of the Logistics Composite Model (LCOM) standards. However, there are other planning factors involved in the development of maintenance UTCs. 5.15.9.3. Provides UTC manpower detail to FAMs for review. 5.15.9.4. Ensures the UTC concept for manpower requirements does not exceed funded authorizations 5.15.9.5. Ensures MANFOR data are processed and input to MEFPAK in accordance with Table 5.5 5.15.9.6. Reviews and validates manpower requirements in MEFPAK responsible UTCs on a biennial basis with the FAM. 5.15.9.7. Performs AFSC and functional account code (FAC) indirect conversions in accordance with applicable conversion guidance. 5.15.10. MRA LOGDET Manager (usually Logistics Plans office): 5.15.10.1. Assists MRA FAM in designating a pilot unit to develop standard logistics detail for new UTCs. MEFPAK Responsible Agencies will work closely with NGB/A4RX or HQ AFRC/ LGX any time an ANG or AFRC unit needs to be designated as a pilot unit.

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5.15.10.1.1. MRA FAMs and NGB/A4RX will work with ANG FAMs to select a candidate for pilot unit appointment. NGB/A4RX will coordinate, in writing, all requests for UTC registrations, cancellations, transfers, and title/DEPID changes with the MRA MEFPAK Manager. 5.15.10.1.2. NGB/A4RX will accomplish internal ANG coordination prior to pilot unit appointment, including obtaining written concurrence of The Adjutant General (TAG) of the unit‘s state. When coordination is complete between ANG and the MEFPAK-responsible command, NGB/A4RX will release a message appointing the pilot unit, info copying the MEFPAK Responsible LOGDET Manager and UTC FAM. 5.15.10.2. Notify Pilot Unit that UTC has been registered and the 90-day clock has started. Based on amount of anticipated LOGDET, the LOGDET manager may set suspense less than 90 days. 5.15.10.3. Monitors pilot unit's progress in developing LOGDET in accordance with Table 5.5 MRA Logistics Plans/LOGMOD and LOGMOD Stand Alone Manager are responsible for the command‘s UTCs requiring logistics detail. Units (both pilot and nonpilot) requiring LOGMOD/ LOGMOD Stand Alone procedural or technical assistance will contact the MRA LOGMOD/ LOGMOD Stand Alone Manager as their first line of defense prior to requesting assistance from the Operations and Sustainment Systems Group (OSSG) Field Assistance Branch (FAB). If the MRA LOGMOD/LOGMOD Stand Alone Manager cannot provide adequate assistance, base-level units will be directed to the FAB for resolution. LOGMOD/LOGMOD Stand Alone Training will be provided to units by the appropriate agency (see AFI 10-403). Active Duty units will contact the MRA LOGMOD Manager. ANG units will contact NGB/A4RX. (See AFI 10-403 for more details). 5.15.10.4. Reviews the pilot unit data transfer file on the HQ USAF central file server. Provides a copy of LOGDET for MRA FAM to review prior to submission to AF/A4RX. MRA LOGDET Managers will notify pilot units (i.e., telephone or electronic mail) if their LOGDETs have been disapproved and will provide appropriate information (e.g., LOGMOD Database Verification listings) to pilot units when the aforementioned discrepancies require corrective action. Command LOGDET Managers will disapprove LOGDETs when: 5.15.10.4.1. LOGMOD database verification errors exist. 5.15.10.4.2. Incorrect LOGMOD increment types exist. 5.15.10.4.3. LOGDET pallet increments do not list 463L pallet, top net, side nets and dunnage as items 1-4. 5.15.10.4.4. Incorrect or missing Special Handling Indicator (SHI) codes exist. 5.15.10.4.5. Incorrect or missing hazardous codes exist. 5.15.10.4.6. Incorrect deployment echelons codes exist. 5.15.10.4.7. Incorrect cargo category codes exist.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.15.10.4.8. Internal Slingable Units (ISUs), Cadillac Bins, or Brooks and Perkins containers exist. 5.15.10.5. Forwards LOGFOR data to AF/A4RX quarterly, or as changes occur. Upon review and approval by the MRA and applicable ANG and AFRC UTC FAMs, MRA LOGDET Managers will immediately "approve" UTC LOGDETs to AF/A4RX for inclusion in the next quarterly update cycle. 5.15.10.6. Provides LOGFOR data to MRA FAM at least biennially or as changes occur. 5.15.10.7. Provides results of quarterly LOGFOR updates to MRA MEFPAK Manager. Upon update release, identify UTC LOGDET discrepancies, as reflected in the MEFPAK Summary listing, to the MEFPAK Manager and MRA, ANG and AFRC FAMs. Upon completion of each quarterly UTC update cycle, administered by, MRA LOGDET Managers will conduct a thorough review of the most current MEFPAK Summary listing and identify their respective UTCs that are marked with an asterisk. An asterisk in the MEFPAK Summary denotes that one or more UTC data elements (MANFOR or LOGFOR) are in error or were not available at the time of TYPREP creation. Pilot units who have not developed and reported standard equipment UTC requirements (LOGDET) to the MRA UTC FAM for review and approval will be identified to the MRA Manager and the MRA UTC FAM for immediate resolution. Failure to comply with these directives will result in UTC cancellation unless otherwise directed by the MRA UTC FAM. ANG/ AFRC-unique UTCs will be identified to NGB/A4RX and HQ AFRC/A4X, respectively, for immediate resolution. 5.15.10.8. Provides quarterly MANFOR/LOGFOR UTC updates to base-level Manpower and Logistics Plans offices, advising them of UTC changes. This update will identify all of the commands newly registered, cancelled, and deleted UTCs, MEFPAK transfers (UTCs transferred from one MRA to another), and UTC Title and DEPID code changes. 5.15.10.8.1. Newly registered UTCs will identify appointed pilot units and assigned suspense dates for LOGDET reporting to the MRA (ANG units are appointed as pilot units by NGB/ A4RX with an info copy to the MEFPAK Responsible Agency). 5.15.10.8.2. Cancelled UTCs relieve pilot units of all responsibility for maintaining and reporting UTC LOGDET. Non-pilot units will delete cancelled UTCs from their LOGPLAN database from all LOGPLAN PIDs, to include LOGMOD DSOE. Upon cancellation of a UTC, MRA LOGDET Managers will delete the pilot unit working LOGDET (Suffix 1, 5, 8, or9) from LOGFOR. The HAF LOGMOD Manager will change the DEPID code for the current approved LOGDET in LOGFOR to a zero. A zero DEPID code prevents all LOGMOD users from copying cancelled LOGDET detail to their LOGPLAN database. Cancelled UTCs will remain in LOGFOR for a period of one year in the event the UTC must be reinstated. Cancelled UTCs will continue to appear on unit DOC statements, the UTC Availability, and OPLAN/CONPLAN TPFDDs until the appropriate MAJCOM/ANG UTC FAM revises and publishes updated documents. Recommend all non-pilot units obtain MAJCOM UTC FAM guidance, in writing, relieving them from cancelled tasking until the aforementioned documents have been corrected.

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5.15.10.8.3. Deleted UTCs are those that have been cancelled for a period of one year, are no longer on Air Force/Base level file, and will be deleted from LOGFOR by the HAF LOGMOD Manager (AF/A4RX). 5.15.10.8.4. UTCs transferred from one MRA to another will reflect a newly designated pilot unit in the MANFOR/LOGFOR Quarterly UTC Update released by the MRA LOGDET Manager. Upon receipt of this update, designated pilot units will review the existing LOGDET and ensure it is in compliance with Air Force and MAJCOM directives. 5.15.10.8.4.1. When UTCs are transferred from one MRA to another, a pilot unit transfer will follow. The previous pilot unit will be relieved of all responsibility for maintaining and reporting the UTC‘s LOGDET; however, the unit is not relieved of UTC tasking unless the MAJCOM UTC FAM provides written guidance to that effect or until the appropriate tasking documents have been updated (i.e., UTC Availability, OPLAN/CONPLAN TPFDDs, etc). 5.15.10.8.4.2. MRAs will not designate pilot units to maintain another MRA‘s UTC(s) without proper coordination with and approval from the other MRA and AF/A5XW. 5.15.10.8.4.3. The MRA LOGMOD Manager will update UTC title changes in the LOGFOR UTC Header Record after the results of each Quarterly UTC Update are published. 5.15.10.8.4.4. When UTCs with a DEPID code change from P to 1, 2, 3, 4, or E, pilot units will have 90 days from UTC registration or DEPID Code change to develop and report the UTC in the LOGFOR module of LOGMOD to the MRA LOGDET Manager. UTCs with a DEPID change from 1, 2, 3, 4, or E to P require units to delete UTCs from their LOGPLAN database from all LOGPLAN PIDs, to include LOGMOD DSOE. Upon changing of the DEPID Code, MRA LOGMOD Managers will delete the pilot unit working LOGDET (Suffix 1, 5, 8, or 9) from LOGFOR. The HAF LOGMOD Manager will delete the current approved LOGDET from LOGFOR. 5.15.10.9. In accordance with AFIs 10-403 and 25-101, the MRA Command LOGDET Manager will ensure Internal Slingable Units (ISUs, Cadillac Bins or Brooks & Perkins containers) are not loaded in lieu of or as a substitute for 463L pallets within the standard Air Force LOGDET for UTCs for which it is responsible. The LOGDET OPR at MAJCOM level will direct pilot units to build standard UTC with 463L pallets and notify units not in compliance to take immediate corrective action. Note: Units are to develop logistics plan files for known taskings (i.e., OPLANs, CONPLANs, etc.). In these files they may outload in ISU containers provided they tailor to meet the unique mission/location and optimize their packing in a manner that prevents exceeding the gross weight of the standard UTC. 5.15.11. The MRA FAM: 5.15.11.1. Upon assignment, contacts MRA MEFPAK Manager to receive formal training on pilot unit responsibilities and LOGDET development/review.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.15.11.2. Submits requests for UTC development to MRA OPR 5.15.11.3. Submits requests for UTC cancellations to MEFPAK Manager, including reason UTC is no longer required. 5.15.11.4. Fully coordinates all UTC development, changes, and cancellations with all using commands and with ANG, HQ AFRC, HAF/FAM, and pilot unit if either has tasked non-pilot units in accordance with the UTC Availability. 5.15.11.5. Develops the manpower detail for their assigned UTCs and submits changes to the command Manpower Plans Office for submission to HQ USAF (as required). 5.15.11.6. Reviews and updates MISCAPs and manpower detail biennially or as required. 5.15.11.7. Designates a pilot unit from within the MRA to develop standard LOGDET for new UTCs and provides pilot unit with MISCAP. ANG and AFRC pilot unit designations will be coordinated with NGB/A4RX and HQ AFRC/A4X and applicable FAMs at those agencies. Information copies of pilot unit appointment should be provided to the MRA logistics plans office and pilot unit's local logistics plans function. MRA UTC FAMs will not designate a pilot unit from another MAJCOM without proper coordination and approval from the proposed pilot unit MAJCOM FAM and AF/A5XW. 5.15.11.8. Ensures LOGDET is accurate and consistent with current AS and policy statements in AFI 10-403 and AFI 25-101. Upon receipt of a LOGFOR Materiel Listing from the LOGDET Manager, conduct a thorough comparison of the UTC LOGDET against the appropriate AS (Use Code "A" items) for consistency to ensure the pilot unit has not exceeded authorizations. FAMs will use Air Force Equipment Management System (AFEMS), or request assistance from the MAJCOM Allowance Standard Manager (MAJCOM Supply) when comparing the LOGDET against the appropriate AS. LOGFOR Materiel Listings will be provided to MRA FAMs on the occasion of a firsttime report of a newlydeveloped LOGDET, when designated pilot units submit their UTCs to the LOGDET Manager as a result of semi-annual LOGDET reporting, and upon request from the MRA UTC FAM. 5.15.11.9. Develops common user lift passenger requirements and advises MRA LOGDET office. 5.15.11.10. Reviews LOGDET biennially and as required. Coordinates updates with designated pilot unit and appropriate staff agencies prior to implementation. Works with pilot unit to determine requirement and frequency of pilot unit conferences to ensure all non-pilot units (users of the same UTC) validate and plan for programmed manpower and equipment changes (i.e., Force Structure, UMD, Allowance Standard, MISCAP changes, etc). 5.15.11.11. Requests assistance from MRA manpower plans office to assist in UTC management and accountability. 5.15.11.12. Works closely with MRA plans, manpower, and logistics plans offices to ensure MANFOR and LOGFOR data are complete and accurate. 5.15.11.13. Reviews LOGDET data quarterly to ensure pilot units are accurately entering data into the system. When notified by MRA LOGDET Manager of overdue or missing

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LOGDET reports, the MRA UTC FAM will contact the pilot unit directly to ascertain the reason for the overdue report. 5.15.11.14. Maintains copies of MANFOR and LOGFOR data for each UTC managed. 5.15.11.15. Maintains information on availability and tasking of UTCs for which they are responsible. Ensures that units can fill whole or partial UTC requirements they are being tasked to support for mobility and contingency planning purposes from manpower authorized in the unit. Units will not be tasked to provide UTCs or portions thereof that exceed unit manpower document (UMD) authorizations. 5.15.11.16. Monitor pilot unit's progress in development of LOGDET in conjunction with MRA logistics plans office. Ensure LOGDET is submitted within timelines stated in Table 5.5 5.15.11.17. Accomplish MEFPAK risk mitigation processes when developing UTCs that establish 3-skil level requirements. 5.15.11.18. Ensure UTCs that require HAF Functional Area leadership ―approval‖ are approved at the HAF level prior to ―publishing and submitting‖ in UTM Registration. Once ―approved‖ by HAF Functional Area leadership, UTC can be ―submitted‖. Ensure approval statement is included in the Rationale/Justification (―HAF Functional Area leadership has approved this UTC request‖). 5.15.12. Pilot Unit. A pilot unit is responsible for developing and maintaining standard manpower and logistics detail for each UTC it has been assigned. The goal is a uniform package for all units that will use the UTC. Pilot units are appointed, in writing, by the corresponding MRA FAMs. The MRA FAM will formally appoint pilot units, via message traffic, by their unit designator. If the pilot unit is a tenant unit residing on another MAJCOM‘s installation and is not considered a wing, MRA LOGDET Manager will identify the appropriate unit designator. The Pilot Unit Logistics Readiness Squadron (LRS), Plans and Integration Section (LGRDX) acts as the overall point of contact when tasked to develop the required UTC detail. Based on the UTC Functional Grouping, the Installation Deployment Officer (IDO) is responsible for assisting the UDM(s) in the development and reporting of UTC detail (i.e., MANFOR and LOGFOR) to the MRA. The pilot unit: 5.15.12.1. Submits and coordinates UTC changes through its MAJCOM. For ANG units, submit all UTC changes to NGB/A4RX for staffing with info to ANG OFAMO. 5.15.12.2. Develops manpower detail in conjunction with the MRA FAM, MRA Manpower office, and base Manpower office. For personnel-only UTCs (DEPID code P), units will contact the MRA UTC FAM before developing and reporting manpower detail. In many cases the MRA FAM retains control for developing and maintaining the UTC MANFOR, in which case the unit would only be required to review and provide recommended changes. 5.15.12.3. Develops LOGDET using the appropriate AS (e.g., i.e., Weapons System Table of Allowances (WSTA), Equipment Supply Listing (ESL) as the source document based on the mission capability of the UTC. The following will be included: 5.15.12.3.1. Equipment items that are coded as mobility equipment in appropriate AS.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.15.12.3.1.1. Pilot unit UDMs or functional area representative(s) for a designated UTC will use Air Force Equipment Management System (AFEMS) to ensure all AS mobility-coded (Use Code "A") items are loaded in the standard UTC LOGDET prior to reporting to MRA LOGDET Manager. Pilot units will obtain access to AFEMS via the nearest Logistics Readiness Squadron Equipment Management Element, formerly known as Equipment Liaison Office (ELO)). Pilot units that are geographically separated and/or not collocated on a military installation with a Standard Base Supply System (SBSS) will request assistance from the nearest military installation Logistics Readiness Squadron customer service representative for AFEMS access. ANG and AFRC units may require assistance from their respective supply representatives at Numbered Air Force (NAF), ANG, HQ AFRC, or Gaining MAJCOM level. 5.15.12.3.1.2. All AS equipment LOGDET information at the item/suffix item level will reflect primary National Stock Numbers, applicable Allowance Source Codes (ASC), tasked quantities (see note), dimensional data for items (length, width, height, and weight), and all applicable hazard classes/divisions in accordance with AFMAN (I) 24-204, as well as all corresponding Special Handling Indicator (SHI) codes. Note: Regardless of the tasked quantity, item level weights will always be input as the single weight of one item. 5.15.12.3.2. Approved readiness spares capability, readiness spares package (RSP) for aviation UTCs. 5.15.12.3.3. Any non-equipment, non-RSP items necessary to directly support MISCAP (e.g., administrative supplies). However, do not include items in the LOGDET of one UTC that support another (e.g., do not include extra light-alls in an aviation UTC to support a security force entry control point). All non-equipment (non-AS) or non-RSP LOGDET information at item/ suffix item level will reflect primary National Stock Numbers (see note 1), tasked quantities (see note 2), dimensional data at item level (length, width, height and weight), all applicable hazardous classes/divisions in accordance with AFMAN 24-204(I), as well as all corresponding Special Handling Indicator (SHI) codes. Note 1: While standard Air Force LOGDETs must contain primary National Stock Numbers (NSNs), not every item/suffix item is guaranteed to have an NSN as reflected in the Allowance Standard, FEDLOG, or Standard Base Supply System (SBSS). In the event an NSN does not exist, pilot units will associate the proper supply Federal Stock Class (FSC), along with a "P" and the part number for the item, to create a usable NSN (e.g. 7510P3409A). If the item does not have a stock number or part number, the pilot unit will assign the proper supply FSC, along with a brief nomenclature of the item, to create an NSN (Ex: 7510STAPLER). For CE, use of a NSL number (Ex: 7510-00NSL-001) will serve the same purpose when associated to a specific part. Note 2: Regardless of the tasked quantity, item level weights will always be input as the single weight of one item. 5.15.12.3.4. Packaging material (pallets, nets, cargo bins, etc.) to ensure the most efficient packaging method is recommended to affected units to optimize their deployment footprint.

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5.15.12.3.4.1. LOGMOD automatically assigns standard planning information (weights, dimensional data, and quantities) to items 01, 02, and 03 when pilot/non-pilot units develop pallet increment types. The overall dimensions of a 463L Pallet are 88 inches by108 inches, by 2 1/4 inches thick. However, the usable dimensions of the upper surface are84 inches by 104 inches. This allows for two inches around the periphery to attach straps, nets, or other restraint devices. An empty 463L pallet weighs 290 pounds (355 pounds with nets) and has a maximum, netted load capacity of 10,000 pounds. The desired load capacity is 7,500 pounds (to help prolong pallet life). Internal Slingable Units (ISUs), Cadillac Bins, Brooks & Perkins containers, and married pallets/pallet trains are not considered LOGMOD Pallet Type Increments and will not be loaded as such in the LOGFOR module of LOGMOD. 5.15.12.3.4.2. Pilot/non-pilot units will load pallet dunnage as Item 04 for all pallet increments using the following movement characteristics: Length 88, Width 4, Height 4, Weight 30 pounds, with a quantity of three. Since dunnage is a local purchase item, pilot/ non-pilot units will use the appropriate Federal Supply Class (FSC) to create the National Stock Number (NSN). The appropriate FSC is 5510, Lumber and Related Basic Wood Materials, which includes dimensional lumber, wood flooring, etc. Dunnage (e.g., lumber or timber) is placed under 463L pallets to prevent damage to the lower pallet surface and to aid in transportation with a forklift. The minimum dimensions of a piece of dunnage are 4x4x88 inches long. Use three pieces to support each loaded 463L pallet while on the ground. Just about any type of material can be used as dunnage. However, wood is cheapest and the most readily available type. All 463L pallets will be shipped with dunnage. This is both required for deployment and redeployment and must be provided by the user (ref TO 35D33-2-2-2 and TO 35D33-2-3-1). 5.15.12.3.4.3. Pilot units will ensure Internal Slingable Units (ISUs, Cadillac Bins, or Brooks & Perkins containers) are not loaded in lieu of, or as a substitute for 463L pallets and nets within standard Air Force LOGDETs. Possession of ISUs does not relieve a unit of their responsibility/requirement to maintain 463L pallets and nets in sufficient numbers to meet the determined requirement. Exception: in accordance with AFI 25-101, Bare Base UTCs can only be shipped containerized and are therefore exempt from this guidance for items that must be containerized. This does not include RSP for BEAR Systems and items that may be shipped in other than containers provided within the UTC buy. MRA LOGDET Managers will identify all LOGDETs that contain ISUs to the pilot unit for immediate corrective action. 5.15.12.3.4.4. Units are not prohibited from loading ISUs in LOGPLAN UTCs for OPLAN or notional tasking as long as the gross weight of the standard UTC LOGDET is not exceeded. Deviations from this guidance are prohibited. 5.15.12.3.4.5. Pilot units will ensure the palletized increments within the standard UTC LOGDET do not exceed 10,000 pounds. Non-pilot units will ensure palletized increments within the LOGPLAN Module of LOGMOD do not exceed 10,000 pounds.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.15.12.3.4.6. Pilot units will physically build, weigh, and measure each increment of cargo when developing and maintaining standard UTC LOGDETs. 5.15.12.3.4.7. Within the UTC LOGDET, Pilot Units will list the contents (suffix items) for items identified as containers. In other words, Pilot Units must reflect the specific equipment/non-equipment requirements, to include NSN, Nomenclature, tasked quantities, Hazard/Special Handling Indicator codes, sensitive/controlled items, and ASCs, that all like units are required to deploy in order to meet the mission of the UTC MISCAP. The following exceptions apply: Do not list contents for MRSP except those that are hazardous or Use code "A" (Allowance Standard asset), Do not list the contents for Consolidated Tool Kits (CTKs) except those that are hazardous or Use code "A" (Allowance Standard asset), miscellaneous administrative supplies (pens, pencils, paper, etc.) except those that are hazardous or Use code "A" (Allowance Standard asset), medical supplies except those that are hazardous or Use code "A" (Allowance Standard asset) or individual civil engineer kits except those that are hazardous or Use code "A" (Allowance Standard asset). Note: LOGMOD is not designed for making frequent changes to fluctuating quantities of such expendables as pencils, forms, hand tools or narcotics. Inventory and Deployment Packing lists for CTKs and miscellaneous administrative supplies are the responsibilities of the owning unit. Logistics Readiness Squadrons and Medical units will use automated inventory and packaging lists generated by their functional systems (i.e., R-43 for supply and Defense Medical Logistics Standard Support (DMLSS) for medical). Civil Engineering pilot units will use the Equipment and Supply Listing (ESL) to define the contents of civil engineering kits; printed copies of pertinent ESL will be placed on or within individual kits. 5.15.12.4. Coordinates recommended changes to LOGDET and manpower detail with non-pilot units. To effectively coordinate all recommended changes, pilot units must know who their non-pilot units (users of the same UTC) are and in turn, non-pilot units must know who the pilot unit is for UTCs for which they are notionally tasked. Pilot units may also identify UTC non-pilot units by obtaining access to the Air Force UTC Availability, via Global Command and Control System (GCCS) platform or contacting the MRA LOGDET Managers directly for assistance. 5.15.12.5. If unit determines that mission cannot be accomplished with equipment currently authorized, the base unit equipment custodian: 5.15.12.5.1. Determines that use code "A" is applicable. 5.15.12.5.2. Prepares an AF Form 601/TACR or allowance change request via the TACR screen in the AFEMS with full justification. 5.15.12.5.3. Coordinates with base Logistics Readiness Flight. 5.15.12.5.4. Coordinates with wing Manpower office to ensure increase in equipment does not contain a manpower impact. 5.15.12.6. All manpower increases/decreases will be staffed with base Logistics Readiness Flight to ensure adjustment does not adversely affect equipment-to-operator ratio.

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5.15.12.7. The unit's Logistics Readiness Flight validates AF Form 601/TACR received from custodian and determines need for requested equipment. If requirement is valid, the unit logistics plans office sends a message addressed to non-pilot units, with information copies to MRA FAM, citing specific changes required (to include stock numbers and other information that identifies the problem and recommended action). 5.15.12.8. MAJCOM LOGDET Managers will assist in disseminating recommended changes to non-pilot units. 5.15.12.9. The wing Manpower office will ensure the UTC concept for manpower requirements does not exceed funded authorizations. 5.15.12.10. If majority of units concur with recommended change and action does not involve an AS change, the pilot unit sends a message to MRA FAM requesting approval to change LOGDET/ manpower detail. 5.15.12.11. If majority of units concur with recommended change and an AS change is required, the pilot unit must ensure that unit equipment custodian prepares AF Form 601/TACR. The EM element of the pilot unit Logistics Readiness Squadron approves AF Form 601/TACR or allowance change request via the TACR screen in the AFEMS and forwards it through supply channels. Upon MAJCOM approval or disapproval of AF Form 601/TACR, the unit EM element advises unit deployment manager (UDM) and wing manpower function office of approved changes or disapproval so manpower impacts can be assessed. A request to change LOGDET can only be made if equipment is included in the applicable AS. Other pilot units possessing similar systems determine if proposed changes are relevant to their weapons systems and, if so, initiate action described in 5.18 5.15.12.12. If consensus is for disapproval, sends a message containing a synopsis of disapproval to all affected addressees. 5.15.12.12.1. Pilot units will not load pending AS mobility items into the LOGDET until approval of AF Form 601/TACR and addition of the item(s) is reflected in the AS. Pilot units are not prohibited from adding pending AS items into LOGPLAN for the purpose of exercising UTCs. Pilot units may also physically deploy pending AS items, if required, with MRA UTC FAM written approval. The pilot unit Logistics Readiness Flight will maintain copies of the submitted AF Form 601/TACR on file, for inspection purposes, until such time as the AF Form 601/TACR has been approved and the applicable AS has been updated. 5.15.12.12.2. Non-pilot units will not add nor deploy pending AS items to LOGPLAN UTCs without written approval from the pilot unit and MAJCOM UTC FAM. 5.15.12.13. Prepares necessary LOGMOD transactions to reflect accepted changes and informs all agencies involved via message. 5.15.12.14. Provides LOGDET data to MAJCOM logistics plans office according to established time frames. 5.15.12.15. Enters in "last report date" column the date when LOGDET is submitted to the MAJCOM.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.15.12.16. The pilot unit will, during the biennial review process, build, measure, and weigh all palletized cargo and any increments of cargo for UTCs that have had major ASC, MISCAP, primary aircraft authorized (PAA), or equipment changes within the last 2 years (since the last biennial review) or has any other indication that the weights and measures have changed. Equipment end items (e.g., vehicles, AGE, trailers, home-station hard-wired/bolted down end items) are not required to be remeasured and reweighed during the annual review process as these items have static weights and dimensions that should not change. 5.15.12.17. Conduct pilot unit conferences every two years, scheduling them to maximize non-pilot unit availability. Pilot unit representation will be comprised of the Logistics Readiness Officer in Charge and/or Installation Deployment Officer (IDO), LOGMOD Administrator or designated representative, as well as the appropriate functional area representatives, to assist in the development, maintenance, and reporting of UTC detail (i.e., MISCAP, MANFOR, and LOGFOR). Attendance at pilot unit conferences by all non-pilot units is critical. MAJCOM UTC FAMs will coordinate conference scheduling with the assistance of the MAJCOM LOGMOD Manager. Note: Pilot unit conferences for small, personnel only UTCs are not required every two years. For those UTCs, pilot unit conferences are required on an as needed basis when major changes are projected. Telephone, video, or other electronic means will suffice in lieu of traditional conferences. 5.15.12.18. If a pilot unit can‘t meet the 90-day suspense for MANFOR and/or LOGDET completion, they must submit an extension request. The extension must be developed by the pilot unit, signed by the wing commander, endorsed by the appropriate MAJCOM 2digit and forwarded to AF/A5X. Extension request will include: justification, ECD, any request for assistance and POC.

5.15.13. Non-Pilot Unit. Non-pilot units are units having a weapon system or functional tasking the same as the pilot unit. The non-pilot unit is not normally subordinate to the pilot unit, except when the MAJCOM retains control of the UTC composition or a parent organization develops a UTC to be distributed to its subordinate units. Refer to AFI 10-403 for more details. 5.15.13.1. Advises pilot units of its correct message address for UTC information and unit identification code (UIC) (see paragraph 5.15.12.4 above). While the LOGFOR Module of LOGMOD should accurately identify a UTC‘s pilot unit, units should contact their MAJCOM LOGDET Managers if there is question or for further information. 5.15.13.2. Evaluates pilot unit recommended changes to the AS and manpower detail and provides comments, concurrence, or nonoccurrence directly to the pilot unit within 30 calendar days, or one unit training assembly (UTA) for ANG and AFRC units. 5.15.13.3. Loads Air Force approved LOGDET in standard UTC reference file as standard UTC for deployment planning. On a semi-annual basis, non-pilot units will download the most current Air Force approved LOGDET (UTC suffix zero) for UTCs in which they are tasked, into a standard LOGPLAN UTC reference file (Plan ID). Units will then conduct a thorough comparison between the current downloaded UTCs and existing UTCs in their Pseudo and UTC Availability PIDs to ensure tasked Unit Deployment Managers (UDMs) are aware of standard UTC requirements. Significant

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differences between the LOGDET and LOGPLAN UTCs will be identified, documented, and resolved by the non-pilot unit. 5.15.13.3.1. Non-Pilot units are required to procure and maintain the UTC equipment and supplies authorizations in order to provide the sustained 30 days of bare base capabilities required to support contingency and wartime missions. All Non-pilot units will establish a process for budgeting and procuring equipment (i.e., nonexpendable items) and expendable items required to support the mission of the UTC. Documentation, such as Memo-Due Out's and Memo-Due In's, in order for unit commanders to properly account for UTC items on-hand or on order, which are required for deployment. 5.15.13.4. To accurately identify the correct pilot unit for a UTC, non-pilot units will view the pilot unit working LOGDET (UTC suffix 1, 5, 8, or 9) within the LOGFOR module of LOGMOD. It is ultimately the non-pilot units‘ responsibility to identify themselves and provide the pilot unit with enough information for the LOGDET coordination process to function efficiently. Non-pilot units will provide pilot units with their correct organizational information (i.e., unit designation/ office symbol, point of contact (POC) name(s), defense switched network (DSN) and commercial telephone numbers, electronic mailing address, and street address) to ensure pilot units are able to coordinate recommended LOGDET changes prior to submission to MAJCOM FAM for review and approval. 5.15.13.5. Provides feedback on the pilot unit's developed LOGDET/manpower detail to ensure data integrity. 5.15.13.6. Maintains copies of the standard UTC LOGDET. 5.15.13.7. Submits AF Form 601/TACR directly to pilot unit for consideration and coordination with other non-pilot units when originating a request for change in mobility equipment authorizations. Non-pilot unit UDMs will submit all AF Forms 601 through the wing LOGMOD Administrator or Installation Deployment Officer (IDO). 5.15.14. Using MAJCOMs: 5.15.14.1. Review and evaluate MANFOR data developed by MRA/pilot unit to ensure UTC adequately defines manpower force requirements. 5.15.14.2. Provide comments and coordination with MRA. 5.16. Reporting 5.16.1. MANFOR Reporting. Each MRA will ensure that they have completed all of their changes, cancellations, etc prior to the date that runs the MANFOR update. The semiannual AFSC conversions and functional account code (FAC) conversions are accomplished on 31 Oct and 30 Apr of each year. The MRA Manpower Office will perform all conversions provides an updated MANFOR file for the MANPER-B system as required. 5.16.2. LOGFOR Reporting. Each MRA will submit its LOGFOR update to AF/A4RX. LOGDET data for all newly approved UTCs must be reported in LOGFOR by the next LOGFOR update. Only those UTCs with changes need to be reported as AF/A4RX pulls data from the central file server at HQ SSG/LGX.

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5.17. MEFPAK Biennial Review 5.17.1. The MRAs, for their respective UTCs, are tasked biennially to ensure the accuracy, consistency, and currency of the title, MISCAP, and logistics/manpower detail of its UTCs. Significant changes in UTC manpower requirements or concepts of operation must be coordinated with all potential using commands, the ANG, AFRC, AF/A1MR, and approved by AF/A5XW and the appropriate HAF functional area manager. 5.17.2. The validation will be done using the following criteria: 5.17.2.1. Is the UTC still needed? 5.17.2.2. Does the MISCAP state the true capability of the UTC? 5.17.2.3. Is the pilot unit still accurate? The accuracy of UTC detail is increased when the assigned pilot unit actually possesses, operates, or maintains the tasked capability. 5.17.2.4. Are the manpower detail and LOGDET correct for the stated mission capability? 5.17.2.5. Are all AFSCs and functional account codes still valid? 5.17.2.6. Is the manpower-to-equipment ratio adequate and valid? 5.17.2.7. Does the UTC contain enough operators for the amount of equipment identified in the LOGFOR? 5.17.2.8. If the equipment requires operators/maintainers, are the correct AFSCs listed? 5.17.2.9. Are operators/maintainers identified in the UTC but no equipment? 5.17.2.10. For aviation UTCs, have all sortie rates, crew ratios, and aircraft sortie durations(ASDs) been deleted from the MISCAP and replaced with the reference to WMP-5? 5.17.2.11. Are similar aviation UTCs (same MDS and MISCAP) consistent with regard to the number of personnel and short tons? Inconsistencies in these UTCs could impact combat readiness. In particular, these errors could lead to under-equipping a deploying unit or overstating requests for strategic lift. An example of inconsistency is a similar (same MDS and MISCAP) pair of UTCs in which one UTC is for 12 primary mission aircraft inventory (PMAI) and the other UTC is for 6 PMAI yet the larger one contains 10 times the amount of logistics support equipment (149.9 vs. 14.2 short tons). In this example, the MRA should either update the logistics data or alter the MISCAP to define the difference. 5.17.2.12. Are all cross-functional UTCs required to provide full capability identified in the MISCAP and the cross functional Table in DCAPES for inclusion in planning? 5.17.3. The review process will include coordination with: 5.17.3.1. Air Staff and MAJCOM functional area managers. 5.17.3.2. Pilot units. 5.17.3.3. Other MAJCOMs that use the UTC. 5.17.3.4. AFRC and/or ANG if applicable.

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5.17.3.4.1. Any MRA which recommends a change to a UTC that applies to the ANG or AFRC or which impacts the forces of another command must coordinate the change with the ANG, HQ AFRC, the affected command, and the HAF FAM before updating the UTC. 5.17.4. After a UTC is reviewed and updated, MEFPAK responsible agencies will update the MISCAP to indicate the date of the most recent review. 5.18. LOGDET Development and Maintenance. 5.18.1. Developing UTC LOGDET. 5.18.1.1. Pilot units will develop new UTCs to meet worldwide deployment, 30-day bare base capability, prioritizing cargo increments as detailed below. This guidance emphasizes the need to develop UTCs as they were intended, to manage critical airlift resources to meet combatant commander taskings. The end objective is to provide TRANSCOM, supported component headquarters, and MAJCOM Crisis Action Teams the ability to most efficiently communicate and analyze movement requirements in OPLAN TPFDDs. Civil Engineering is an exception to this process, AFCESA/CEXX will work with Air Staff and MRAs in development of new UTCs and defining ESL requirements. 5.18.1.2. Pilot units will not load mobility bags, weapons, ammunition, bottled water, or Meals Ready-to-Eat (MRE) into the standard UTC LOGDET unless directed by the UTC MISCAP or the MAJCOM UTC FAM. Mobility bags, weapons, ammunition, bottled water, and MREs may be loaded into LOGPLAN UTCs as additive requirements for OPLAN or notional tasking when directed by the UTC MISCAP, HHQ guidance, or the MAJCOM UTC FAM. Weapons and ammunition will be identified as "Sensitive Cargo" at item level in all LOGFOR and LOGPLAN UTCs. 5.18.1.3. Pilot units will not load general-purpose vehicles when developing/maintaining standard LOGDET unless directed by the UTC MISCAP, by HHQ guidance, or the MAJCOM UTC FAM. Non-pilot units will not load general-purpose vehicles when developing/maintaining LOGPLAN UTC information in LOGMOD/LSA unless authorized in the UTC MISCAP, reflected in the UTC LOGDET (developed by the pilot unit), or directed by HHQ or MAJCOM UTC FAM. 5.18.2. Maintaining and Reporting UTC LOGDET. 5.18.2.1. Biennial LOGDET Validation. Pilot units will conduct a biennial validation on their LOGDET(s) to coincide with the MAJCOM LOGMOD Manager‘s biennial LOGDET validation. The premise of conducting biennial LOGDET validations is to ensure pilot units are complying with Air Force and MAJCOM directives, as well as maintaining standard UTC requirements for all like units. Specifically, pilot units will conduct a thorough comparison of the existing LOGDET against the appropriate Weapon/Non-Weapon System AS, as reflected in AFEMS, to ensure both are consistent. Questions regarding Allowance Standard references should be directed to the MAJCOM UTC FAM or local Logistics Readiness Squadron Equipment Management Element. Pilot units will coordinate all LOGDET changes with all known non-pilot units prior to reporting the LOGDET to MAJCOM LOGMOD Manager for MAJCOM UTC FAM review and approval.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.18.2.2. Biennial LOGPLAN Validation. At least biennially, Unit Deployment Managers (UDMs) and cargo increment monitors will validate their equipment requirements in LOGPLAN against the applicable AS and standard Air Force LOGDET. Units will conduct a thorough comparison of the existing LOGDET against the appropriate Weapon/Non-Weapon System AS, as reflected in AFEMS, to ensure consistency. UTCs with no associated AS will use the UTC MISCAP and approved LOGDET as the primary source document for LOGPLAN development. Questions regarding AS references should be directed to the MAJCOM UTC FAM or local Logistics Readiness Squadron Equipment Management Element. 5.18.2.3. UDMs and/or cargo increment monitors will ensure they provide the wing/base LOGMOD Administrator with the correct Functional Account Codes (FACs) and Supply Org/Shop Codes when validating their UTCs. This information is necessary in order for the LOGMOD Administrator to maintain the local LOGPLAN Org/Shop table, as well as the local LOGPLAN Unit Org ID/FAC/Org Shop table. 5.18.2.3.1. Pilot units will report their LOGDET(s) out-of-cycle when major changes to the UTC occur. Major changes include the addition or deletion of whole increments/pallet positions (which can affect the overall airlift requirements for all like units when tasked to deploy the UTC), modification/re-configuration of deployment echelons and/or re-sequencing/prioritization of increment numbers, validation of AS Use Code "A" assets, or when significant weight or dimensional changes occur (either increase or decrease) that can affect the overall airlift requirements necessary to deploy the UTC. 5.18.2.3.2. Prior to reporting LOGDETs to MAJCOM LOGMOD Managers, pilot units will generate a LOGFOR Database Verification Report on each UTC being reported. UTCs reflecting errors will be corrected in each LOGDET, and all applicable LOGPLAN UTCs, prior to submission of LOGDET(s) to MAJCOM FAM for review and approval.

5.18.3. OPLAN and Pseudo PLAN IDs (PIDs) : Units will maintain deployment-planning data unique to their unit UTC tasking in the LOGPLAN module of LOGMOD. Individual LOGPLAN PIDs will be created for each tasked OPLAN, CONPLAN with TPFDD, and/or notional tasking such as AEF. Units will only use HAF-approved Pseudo PIDs in LOGPLAN in lieu of actual OPLAN PIDs for contingency planning to minimize the risk of classifying LOGMOD. Units tasked under specific OPLANs will build each LOGPLAN PID using the first four characters of the approved corresponding Air Force-approved Pseudo PID, and leave the 5th character blank (Example: WOTJ_). In the DSOE module of LOGMOD, units will maintain corresponding information using the full five-character Air Force-approved Pseudo PID (Example: WOTJZ). Units must use a different character in the fifth position of the LOGPLAN PID because LOGMOD will not support the use of the same PID in both LOGPLAN and DSOE. The reason units are required to use the full five-character Pseudo PID in DSOE is because units will be required to pass DSOE data to their MAJCOM in order to populate contingency and execution TPFDDs with tailored deployment data. Specific instructions regarding the passing of data from DSOE are identified in an attachment in AFI 10-403. A list of Air Force-approved Pseudo PIDs may be obtained from the MAJCOM LOGMOD Manager.

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5.18.4. Unit Line Number (ULN) Management : A ULN is a maximum seven character alphanumeric code that uniquely describes a unit entry (line) in a JOPES TPFDD. It is made up of three elements: a force requirement number (FRN equals 2-5 characters), a fragmentation code (FRAG equals1 character), and an insert code (INSERT equals 1 character). LOGMOD Administrators can use actual ULNs, as reflected in TPFDDs/ TPFDLs, in LOGPLAN for tasked OPLAN requirements. To minimize the risk of classifying their database, LOGMOD Administrators will ensure the correct Pseudo PID is assigned against tasked OPLAN UTCs in LOGPLAN. When using DSOE for real-world contingencies, Operational Readiness Exercises/Inspections (ORE/I), and/or local exercises, units will use tasked ULNs as they appear on the applicable tasking authorization document (Air Tasking Order (ATO), TPFDD/TPFDL, etc). When developing and maintaining the UTC Availability LOGPLAN PID, LOGMOD Administrators will designate ULNs or a series of ULNs to coincide with each unit‘s tasked UTCs, i.e., Civil Engineering would use ULNs CES01 through CES99. 5.18.5. Prioritization of Cargo. Although pilot units use deployment echelons and increment numbering to identify out-movement priority for cargo increments, non-pilot units (users of the same UTC) may have different priorities as to which cargo increments need to be available at the deployed location first. When differences between units occur, non-pilot units will use the movement priority field within the LOGPLAN Module of LOGMOD to prioritize the out-movement of each cargo increment. As there are several ways of using the movement priority field within LOGMOD, non-pilot units will determine the most efficient method of use based on the following guidance. Note: Recommend units document the most efficient method of prioritizing cargo increments in their Installation Deployment Plan (IDP). Two of the most efficient ways of utilizing the movement priority field in LOGMOD are by UTC or within a UTC. 5.18.5.1. Prioritizing by UTC means based on TPFDD requirements (i.e., ALD, RLD, or RDD). For example, units would assign "0001" to every increment within the first UTC scheduled to deploy and assign "0002" to every increment within the UTC scheduled to deploy second. By doing this, DCC Schedulers would have clear visibility as to which increments needed to deploy when creating a schedule of events in the DSOE module of LOGMOD. 5.18.5.2. Prioritizing within a UTC means units will prioritize, by increment, within each UTC. To do this, units should look at each increment and determine which ones need to deploy first, second, third, etc based on unit-unique requirements. When doing so, units must consider the minimum equipment needed to support the MDS for weapons loading and/or regeneration of aircraft (for aviation UTCs) and essential equipment requirements necessary to establish base operations at the employed location (i.e., force protection, rapid runway repair, communications, billeting/ food preparations, etc). Example: Three different UTCs may all be required to be at the employment location at the same time (or on the same day), but only certain increments from each UTC need to be in-place for aircraft generation and base operations set-up. By prioritizing within each UTC, units would designate those essential increments, from each UTC, by assigning "0001" in the movement priority field. By doing this, deployment control center (DCC) Schedulers would have clear visibility over the higher priority increments (coded as 0001) as opposed to those with a lesser priority (coded as 0002, 0003, 0004, etc). Another option

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 when using the movement priority field in LOGMOD is to assign UTC increments based on pre-planned load plans. Example: All increments scheduled to deploy on chalk 1 would have a movement priority of 0001. Those increments scheduled to deploy on chalk 2 would have a movement priority of 0002.

5.18.6. Load and Packing Lists. All units will use Deployment Load and Packing lists from LOGMOD/LSA when deploying cargo. Load and Packing lists must be accurate and be attached in weatherproof pouch with the pallet/container. Note: Accurate load and packing lists are critical to ensure unit equipment is not delayed by customs at entry into other countries. Failure by units to create accurate documentation can delay equipment arrival to the beddown location and seriously affect the mission. The exceptions are: Medical units may use DMLSS packing lists and logistics readiness units may use Standard Base Supply System listings (R-43, etc.) for MRSP packing lists. Civil Engineering units will use the ESL to identify civil engineering kits. Copies of the ESL will be placed on or within individual kits. Units will not use manual Deployment Load and Packing lists except under the most unusual of circumstances (i.e., LOGMOD/LSA system failure). 5.18.6.1. In accordance with AFI 10-403, units must include placards and military shipping labels as minimum forms of documentation/identification with each increment. Placard will be generated via LOGMOD/LSA and military shipping labels will be generated by CMOS or GATES. See AFI 10-403 for further details. 5.18.7. UTC Tailoring. 5.18.7.1. Tailoring from a UTC. Tailoring UTCs in LOGPLAN is authorized under certain circumstances. Tailoring out cargo is permitted if the deploying unit has sufficient documentation stating what required assets are in-place and available at the deployed location "for their use" or if the equipment is not required for the mission. Pre-positioned assets identified in the War Plans Additive Requirements Report (WPARR), in conjunction with the Base Support & Expeditionary Planning Tool (BaS&E) and/or TPFDD War Reserve Material (WRM) UTCs, will be tailored from the standard LOGDET UTC gross weight. Tailored weights will be based on the gross incremental weight of each item and adjusted in the appropriate TPFDD. Since LOGMOD no longer has "Tailor Key" capability, units will tailor their LOGPLAN UTCs by adding, deleting, and modifying applicable increments, items, and suffix items. 5.18.7.2. Tailoring to a UTC. Adding additional AS equipment items and/or vehicles of any sort to LOGPLAN UTCs is prohibited unless the pilot unit has added the item to the standard UTC or a unit has obtained MAJCOM UTC FAM approval in writing. Nonequipment items (admin supplies, weapons, mobility bags, munitions, expendables, etc.) may be added, without pilot unit or MAJCOM UTC FAM approval, to LOGPLAN UTCs if they are required to directly support the mission specified in the UTC MISCAP and the UTC does not exceed the LOGDET gross weight or total number of increment/pallet positions. When tailoring to a UTC(s), units must take care not to exceed the gross movement requirements of the UTC as airlift requirements are based on the standard UTC (LOGDET) weights, OPLAN TPFDD weights, and cube. The standard UTC should reflect the worst case, bare base capability to support the UTC MISCAP. Units will maintain documentation on equipment that has been tailored (added or deleted) from their LOGPLAN UTCs for historical and compliance inspection purposes. If non-pilot units

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have to add items to their LOGPLAN UTC(s) in order to meet mission requirements, the pilot unit and MAJCOM UTC FAM should be notified in case a change to the LOGDET is required for all like units. See AFI10-403 for further details. 5.18.7.2.1. Based on standard UTC requirements, as developed by the designated pilot unit, non-pilot units/users of the same UTC(s) are prohibited from tailoring UTCs without written authorization from the MAJCOM UTC FAM or HHQ approval. This includes changing deployment echelons/increment numbers as reflected in the standard UTC LOGDET. When pilot units develop standard UTC requirements they are tasked to identify everything required to sustain a unit in a bare base environment for a period of 30 days, at which time re-supply will begin or may have already begun. As such, pilot units will develop these requirements based on the UTC MISCAP and Weapon/Non-Weapon System Allowance Standard that are the baseline for LOGDET development. Pilot units are required to prioritize the outmovement of cargo in such a manner that the minimum equipment needed to support the mission, i.e. MDS for weapons loading and regeneration, be deployed on the first available support airlift to the FOL. Pilot units prioritize the out-movement of equipment using deployment echelons and increment numbers. Once pilot units establish these priorities, for all like units who may be tasked for the same UTC, those designated non-pilot units are prohibited from changing established deployment echelons as identified in the standard UTC LOGDET. If non-pilot units have differing opinions as to what equipment should be deployed first, second, and third, they are required to identify their prioritization requirements using the Movement Priority field for each increment of cargo within the LOGPLAN Module of LOGMOD. 5.18.8. Standardization of UTC Cargo Increment Types. Pilot/non-pilot units will identify cargo increments, within LOGMOD, using the proper increment types. 5.18.8.1. Pilot/non-pilot units will assign 463L pallets as LOGMOD Increment Type "pallet". Special shoring is always required when deploying palletized increments when the cargo may cause physical damage to the pallet. Special shoring is used to prevent metal-to-metal contact (damage) of the pallet and cargo loaded on the pallet. Note: Special shoring consists of dunnage and 3/4 inch plywood. Plywood will be used to cover the surface of the pallet susceptible to damage prior to loading any equipment or nonequipment items for deployment. 5.18.8.2. Pilot/non-pilot units will assign self-propelled vehicles (i.e., equipment that is driven onto an aircraft) as LOGMOD increment type "rolling stock". Rolling stock (vehicles or vehicular cargo) has an engine and is self-propelled with at least two axles. Examples of rolling stock include vehicles such as bobtails, trucks, jeeps, forklifts, R9/R-11 refuelers, MJ-1 bomb loaders, MB-4 Tug, etc.) Parking, roller, or sleeper shoring may be required when deploying rolling stock (vehicle) increments in order to prevent damage to Air Force assets (e.g., aircraft floor, deploying personnel, and the vehicle itself). Additional shoring (i.e., approach/bridge) may be required when deploying trailer type 1 increments. 5.18.8.3. Pilot/non-pilot units will assign single axle vehicular cargo that is non-selfpropelled(equipment that is pulled or winched onto an aircraft) as LOGMOD Increment Type "Trailer Type 1". Trailer Type 1 increments have no engine (non-self-propelled

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 vehicular cargo) and have only one axle with wheels. Trailer Type 1 increments have an axle that is usually centered or located towards the rear of the increment, with a fixed or immovable hitch that cannot be stowed or removed. The hitch itself, which may have a kickstand or caster that is part of the increment frame, rests on the ground and bears weight. Note: Kickstands and/or casters will not be counted as an axle in LOGMOD. Hitch location, hitch weight, and tongue length are essential elements in Automated Air Load Planning System (AALPS). (Examples of Trailer Type 1: H-1 heaters, MC-2A compressors, LOX carts, etc). Parking shoring is always used when deploying Trailer Type 1 increments. Additional shoring (i.e., rolling, sleeper, and approach/bridge) may be required when deploying Trailer Type 1 increments. 5.18.8.4. Pilot/non-pilot units will assign multi-axle vehicular cargo that is non-selfpropelled (equipment that is pulled or winched onto an aircraft) as LOGMOD Increment Type "Trailer Type 2". Trailer Type 2 increments have no engine and have two or more axles. Trailer Type 2 increments have a hitch and tongue that is primarily used for movement and steering. The hitch/tongue can be fixed or positioned (removed/stowed) and bears no weight as it never touches the ground. Hitch location and tongue length are essential elements in AALPS. Examples of Trailer Type 2 increments are MHU-110 trailers, ABDR trailers, nitro carts, -60 generators, NF-2 light-alls, 3000lb engine trailers, -86 generators, 40-foot flatbed trailers, etc. Additional shoring (i.e., parking, rolling, sleeper, or approach/bridge) may be required when deploying Trailer Type 2 increments. 5.18.8.5. Pilot/non-pilot units will assign self-propelled vehicles that are driven and move using tracks vice wheels as LOGMOD Increment Type "track". Examples of track increments are M1-Abrams tank, bulldozers, etc. Rolling shoring is always required when deploying track vehicles. Additional shoring (i.e., parking, sleeper, or approach/bridge) may be required when deploying track vehicles. 5.18.8.6. Pilot/non-pilot units will assign helicopters as LOGMOD Increment Type "skidded or wheeled". The helicopter configuration will determine the exact LOGMOD Increment Type to use. 5.18.8.7. Pilot/non-pilot units will assign equipment that doesn't meet any other LOGMOD Increment Type as "other". Examples are wooden skid, nesting boxes, crates, married pallets, ISUs, Cadillac Bins, and Brooks & Perkins containers. Note: Married pallet increments fall under this category for two reasons: 1) Because LOGMOD calculates the second position of the cargo category code (CCC) based on Increment Type and dimensional data, in which case pallet increments are automatically assigned a length and width of 88 x 108. Since LOGMOD will not allow UDMs to modify the overall dimensional data for a pallet increment type, increment type "other" must be used to capture the true number and length of the married pallet, and 2) AALPS reads our pallet increment types as 88 x 108 but doesn't load plan the increment correctly, which causes the load planner to delete and re-add the increment to correct it. Units should use increment type "other," but include the overall dimensional data for the number of pallets trained together and input a quantity the correct number of pallets trained together for the 01 Item. 5.18.8.7.1. Container Codes (CC). Container Codes are automatically generated in LOGMOD during UTC LOGDET development and identify equipment data

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contained in/on all pallets, boxes, cartons, crates, and any additional items identified as containers. See Table 5.8 for container codes to be used. 5.18.8.8. Pilot/non-pilot units will ensure the correct CCCs are loaded within each UTC, paying close attention to hazardous items. The first position in the CCC must reflect the proper code for all hazardous type items at the increment, item, and suffix item levels. Each Unit Deployment Manager and functional area representative within the designated pilot unit is overall responsible for ensuring all hazardous data input into LOGMOD is accurate. Note: Units should use AFMAN24-204(I), 49 CFR, existing Shipper‘s Decs, and local Transportation personnel when verifying accuracy of hazardous information within a UTC. When loading hazardous information in LOGMOD, units should enter the hazard class/division identified in Key 12 of the Shipper‘s Declaration for Dangerous Goods (SDDG) form. When entering the hazard class/division for vehicles with engines (internal combustion), Class 9 should be reflected in Key 12 of the SDDG not Class 8 for the battery, Class 3 for gas or Class 2.2 for the permanently attached fire extinguisher. Pilot units will also ensure all 99X hazard codes are updated to reflect the correct hazard class/division in the LOGDET. Note: Hazard code 99X is a default code that LOGMOD assigned to hazardous items during its upgrade from TG-2 (DOS based application) to TG-3 (Windows based application). It is very important to identify the correct hazardous information, as this will feed CMOS, AALPS, and the Global Transportation Network (GTN). 5.18.8.9. To optimize airlift, increments which are too small to palletize will be physically combined into a single increment and palletized whenever possible. When combining increments and/ or pallets, units must coordinate their efforts with the Deployment Control Center (DCC) Scheduler. For in-transit visibility (ITV) purposes, every increment for every deploying UTC must have its own Transportation Control Number (TCN), as reflected on the Deployment Schedule of Events (DSOE) and in the CMOS TCN Detail file created by the DCC when disseminating cargo files from LOGMOD-DSOE to the CMOS operator. Only the remarks block on the DSOE will be used to reflect combined increments and which unit has lead responsibility for those increments. 5.18.9. Use of Deployment Echelon Codes. 5.18.9.1. Pilot units will ensure the correct deployment echelon codes are used within UTCs to aid in the out-movement and prioritization planning of each UTC. A deployment echelon is defined as a capability within a UTC that commanders must deploy as a single entity. Deployment echelons facilitate deployment planning by identifying a unit‘s capabilities, material, and personnel requirements and designating the sequence of movement. Force echeloning is organizing units for movement. Force echeloning establishes a priority for movement within the deploying force to meet operational requirements and maximize available lift (surface or air). In LOGMOD, they are identified as two-position alphanumeric characters. The first position represents a type of deployment echelon relative to the equipment being deployed (Enroute Support, Initial Support, Tactical Support, etc). The second position represents an element/priority in which the equipment must be deployed (i.e., 1, 2, 3, etc).

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.18.9.2. To further prioritize the out-movement priority of cargo within the standard UTC LOGDET, pilot units will sequentially number every increment of cargo beginning with 0001, 0002, 0003, etc. Once pilot units establish these priorities, for all like units who may be tasked for the same UTC, those designated non-pilot units are prohibited from changing established increment numbers as identified in the standard UTC LOGDET. If non-pilot units have differing opinions as to what equipment should be deployed first, second, and third, they are required to identify their prioritization requirements using the Movement Priority field for each increment of cargo within the LOGPLAN Module of LOGMOD. Based on standard UTC requirements, as established by the designated UTC pilot unit, non-pilot units (i.e., users of the same UTC) are prohibited from tailoring UTCs without written authorization from the MAJCOM UTC FAM or HHQ approval. This includes changing standard UTC LOGDET deployment echelons/increment numbers in the LOGPLAN Module of LOGMOD. 5.18.9.3. Echelon of Deployment Elements. 5.18.9.3.1. All aviation (3-series) UTCs will be developed by pilot units using Air Staff (AF/ A3/5 and AF/A4MM) right-sizing guidance for modular/scalable UTCs. 3series UTCs will include support equipment for aircrew members, operations, life support, and intelligence personnel only. Supply and maintenance equipment previously identified in MTW-sized aviation UTCs will be removed and placed into corresponding generation maintenance UTCs. Lead packages will be designed to deploy independently. Follow-on UTCs will be dependent packages that fall in on (provide additional aircraft capabilities to) initial lead packages. Note: I, O, Q, U and Y are not used. 5.18.9.3.2. A1-9 Contingency Response Group Element (CRG-E) (formerly referred to as Tanker/Airlift Control Element (TALCE)). A functional airlift organization (provisional) established to provide support to air elements at an air facility. Normally, it includes an operations function such as movement control and communications, a support function, which relates to the air facility itself, and a liaison with appropriate airborne or other air units. 5.18.9.3.3. B1-9 Base Support Element (BSE). A deployment echelon normally composed of personnel and materiel over and above the flight and tactical support element. The BSE will include all personnel and materiel required to support the most demanding operation plan, operation order, or tasking order under which a unit is tasked. This deployment echelon is normally used in 4F, JF, LW, PF, QF, RA, UFT, XFB, XFF, and XW series UTCs. 5.18.9.3.4. C1-9 - Base Support Element. A deployment echelon normally composed of personnel and materiel over and above the flight and tactical support element. The BSE will include all personnel and materiel required to support the most demanding operation plan, operation order, or tasking order under which a unit is tasked. This deployment echelon is normally used in the 6K series UTCs. 5.18.9.3.5. D1-9 - Base Support Element. A deployment echelon normally composed of personnel and materiel over and above the flight and tactical support element. The BSE will include all personnel and materiel required to support the most

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demanding operation plan, operation order, or tasking order under which a unit is tasked. 5.18.9.3.6. E1-9 - Enroute Support Team (EST). Used in modular/scalable fighter and intra-theater airlift aviation/maintenance UTCs. A functional package of personnel and materiel, consisting of selected personnel skills, equipment, and supplies necessary to service and perform limited specialized maintenance on tactical aircraft at an enroute base so the aircraft can proceed to their destination base with a minimum of delay. If lead packages are already in place, and additional aircraft are required, the assumption is that the follow-on 6-ships will travel together and require only one EST. If they travel separately, the units will have to coordinate EST or enroute support to ferry the aircraft to the deployed location. For example, units may use FOL, sister-squadron support, main operating base (MOB) or collocated operating base (COB) support. 5.18.9.3.6.1. E1 - EST-A (Enroute Support Team A). Used in initial (lead) packages only. Provides limited aircraft support (generation maintenance purposes) and normally pre- cedes and travels with aircraft to port of debarkation (POD). Examples: -60, Hobart, Mule, towbar, hydraulic/oil cart, etc. 5.18.9.3.6.2. E2 - EST-B. (Enroute Support Team B). Used in the first follow-on package only. Provides additional limited aircraft support (generation maintenance purposes) for first follow-on aircraft capability, which normally precedes and travels with aircraft to POD. Examples: -60, Hobart, Mule, towbar, hydraulic/oil cart, etc. 5.18.9.3.6.3. E3-9. Reserved for future use. 5.18.9.3.7. F1-9 - Preflight Team. 5.18.9.3.8. G1-9 - Aerial Port Element. 5.18.9.3.9. H1-9 - Air Force forces (AFFOR) or Wing Headquarters. The Headquart ers Support Element (HSE) is used in planning for deployment of the AFFOR and/or Wing Head- quarters elements. The HSE consists of people and materiel designed to establish command elements and a command structure for deploying forces. This deployment echelon is normally used in 7F and 9A series UTCs. 5.18.9.3.10. J1-9 - Aircrew Members. Newly developed, modular/scalable 3-series aviation UTCs will use J1-9 deployment echelons to identify equipment directly supporting aircrew members, operations and intelligence personnel. 5.18.9.3.11. K1-9 - Mission Support Element. 5.18.9.3.12. L1-9 - Medical Support Element. A deployment echelon used to identify medical assets within an F-series UTC. 5.18.9.3.13. M1-9 - Munitions Support Element (MSE). Allmunitions (HG- and HH-series) UTCs will be developed using deployment echelon codes M1-M4, MSE. MSE includes personnel and equipment, which normally precedes the deploying aircraft to provide munitions capability at the employed location. All MSE cargo

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 increments will be developed to meet Initial Combined Air Operations Center (CAOC) Capability (ICC). 5.18.9.3.13.1. Fighter aircraft MSE (18 to 24 primary mission aircraft inventory (PMAI)) will be developed using the following deployment echelons: 5.18.9.3.13.1.1. M1 for 6 to 8 PMAI 5.18.9.3.13.1.2. M2 for 9 to 14 PMAI 5.18.9.3.13.1.3. M3 for 15 to 18 PMAI 5.18.9.3.13.1.4. M4 for 19 to 24 PMAI 5.18.9.3.13.1.5. Deployment echelons M1-M4 when deployed together comprise the complete 24 PMAI UTC package. If the UTC tasked required a tailored 12 PMAI, M1-M2 are the only echelons deployed. If the UTC deployed needed to increase its PMAI to 18, at the same location, them M3 is deployed. 5.18.9.3.13.2. Bomber aircraft MSE (6 to 12 PMAI) will be developed using the following deployment echelons: 5.18.9.3.13.2.1. M1 for 2 to 3 PMAI 5.18.9.3.13.2.2. M2 for 4 to 6 PMAI 5.18.9.3.13.2.3. M3 for 7 to 9 PMAI 5.18.9.3.13.2.4. M4 for 10 to 12 PMAI 5.18.9.3.13.2.5. Deployment Echelons M1-M4 when deployed together comprise a complete 12 PMAI UTC package. If the UTC tasked required a 4 PMAI, then M1-M2 deployment echelons are deployed. The basic concept is to use the second character of the deployment echelon to identify and prioritize the number of PMAI as described above. 5.18.9.3.14. N1-9 - Nuclear Augmentation. 5.18.9.3.15. P1-9 - Personnel. This deployment element is used to identify personnel tasked in RF series UTCs. 5.18.9.3.16. R1-9 - Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR). This deployment echelon is used to identify personnel and materiel associated with the rescue UTCs. This deployment echelon is used in 9AR, 3TR, and HRR UTCs. (Pilot units may elect to use E1, E2, S1, and T1 in the 3TR series UTCs.) 5.18.9.3.17. S1-9 - Initial Support Element (ISE). Used in modular/scalable fighter and intra-theater airlift aviation maintenance UTCs, this deployment echelon is organized and maintained for fighter, reconnaissance, bomber units, and other units. An ISE includes personnel and equipment, which normally precedes the deploying aircraft to provide initial support at the employment location. It is the basic building block for all aviation deployment packages. This deployment echelon is normally used in H-series UTCs. 5.18.9.3.17.1. S1 - Advanced Echelon (ADVON) (also known as initial support

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element). Used in initial (lead) packages only. The ADVON portion of this UTC consists of a minimal amount of equipment required to support an initial maintenance site survey team of personnel to include Supply, Maintenance Chief and Munitions personnel to assess the FOL and prepare for initial aircraft recovery/bed down and to establish aircraft parking areas at the deployed location. Common examples of ADVON equipment are combined tool kits (CTK) to facilitate the breaking down and opening of pallets and containers, as they arrive at the FOL, and soap sample kits. Note: Follow-on UTCs will have no ADVON capability. 5.18.9.3.17.2. S2 - Main Base. This portion of the UTC consists of equipment brought from home station to sustain and re/generate (turn) initial 12 Lead (6 Lead for ARC forces) tactical aircraft at an established military or civilian airfield (Main Operating Base) for Initial Combat Capability (ICC). 5.18.9.3.17.3. S3 - Bare Base –Remaining equipment not previously identified as S2 to support initial 12-ship Lead capability (initially a 6-ship lead for ARC forces). When the initial 12-ship Lead UTC deploys to a Bare Base location (runway and potable water source), all S2 and S3 equipment will be deployed simultaneously. 5.18.9.3.17.4. S4-9. Reserved for future use. 5.18.9.3.18. T1-9 - Tactical Support Element (TSE). Used in modular/scalable fighter and intra-theater airlift aviation maintenance UTCs. A TSE includes personnel and materiel which, when combined with ISEs and ESTs, will provide a unit with the operational capabilities pre- scribed by the UTC MISCAPs.T1 T2T3 echelons will be used for ANG 3-ship follow-on packages. T4-9 deployment echelons are reserved for future use. 5.18.9.3.18.1. Fighter units 5.18.9.3.18.1.1. T2 – Main Base – This portion of the UTC consists of equipment to support the first follow-on 6-ship capability. This equipment is normally comprised of the following: Air cylinders, Nitro carts, Lox carts, Hydraulic carts, 3-4 NF-2 Light-alls, aircraft jacks and generators. Also included is the remaining 20% of the authorized MRSP for a full 18/24 PMAI capability. Some assumptions should be made during development of this portion of the UTC. For instance, it should be assumed that back shop support equipment will be available at the FOL. It should also be assumed that sufficient lighting will be available in maintenance areas. These assumptions allow remaining equipment to be identified with a Dep Ech of T3 5.18.9.3.18.1.2. T3 – Bare Base – Remaining equipment not previously identified as T2 to support the 1st follow–on 6 ship. When this UTC deploys to a Bare Base location (runway and potable water source), all T2 and T3 equipment will be deployed simultaneously. 5.18.9.3.18.1.3. T4 – All remaining equipment (if any) required to support a 2nd 6-ship Follow-on capability (3-ship for ARC forces) at the same operating location as the initial 12-ship Lead and 1st Follow-on 6-ship UTC.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 5.18.9.3.18.1.4. Deployment Echelons T2-T4 when deployed together comprises the complete 24 PMAI UTC package (15 PMAI for ARC forces). If the UTC tasked required a tailored 12 PMAI (6 PMAI for ARC), T-2 is the only echelons deployed. If the UTC deployed needed to increase its PMAI to 18 (12 PMAI for ARC forces), at the same location, then T3 would be deployed. 5.18.9.3.18.2. Bomber units 5.18.9.3.18.2.1. T3 items required for Intermediate Level (IL) for any number of aircraft deployed (i.e., Phase Inspection, Special Handling Equipment). 5.18.9.3.18.2.2. T4 equipment required to sustain 4-8 PMAI deployment 5.18.9.3.18.2.3. T5 equipment required to sustain Follow-on packages. 5.18.9.3.18.2.4. Deployment Echelons T3-T5, when deployed together, comprise a complete 12-16 PMAI UTC package (B-1s deploy 4x4x4, B-52s deploy 6x6, B-2 deploy 8x8). 5.18.9.3.19. V1-9 - Air Force AudioVisual Service. 5.18.9.3.20. W1-9 - Air Force Weather. This deployment echelon is used to identify personnel and materiel for weather UTCs. This deployment echelon is used in XW series UTCs. 5.18.9.3.21. X1-9 - Miscellaneous Combat Support (CS). 5.18.9.3.22. Z1-9 - Others. This deployment echelon is used to denote people and/or equipment not easily fitting into other deployment echelons. It is appropriate to use in LOGMOD when units load weapons, ammunition, mobility bags, bottled water, and MREs ("additive requirements"). Note: When loading mobility bags in LOGPLAN, remember that deploying individuals may be tasked to bulk palletize, check as shipped baggage, or hand-carry their C-1 Bags. If the tasking order does not specify, deploying individuals will retain one ensemble from the C-1 bag and stow it in the passenger compartment, for military or civilian/commercial aircraft, for immediate access.

5.18.10. Functional Account Codes (FAC). Pilot units will use only standard Air Forceapproved FACs when developing, maintaining, and reporting standard UTC LOGDETs to MAJCOM LOGMOD Managers. FACs originate in the manpower and personnel systems but are used in LOGMOD/ LSA to denote ownership, within a squadron, for cargo increments and/or cargo packaged on or within an increment. A FAC in LOGMOD consists of six characters; HQ USAF controls the first four digits (FAC) and the Major Commands controls the last two digits (shredout). MAJCOM UTC FAMs are responsible for establishing the 2digit FAC shredouts to be used by their units. The FAC shredout is used to further define or identify an office/shop within a unit/squadron to denote ownership of equipment. When developing/maintaining LOGDETs, pilot units will only use the standard 4-digit FAC with a shredout "00" (zero, zero). The LOG PLAN section of LOGMOD is the only place users will assign a FAC shred-out other than "00" (zero, zero). A list of Air Force approved-FACs can be obtained from the MAJCOM LOGMOD/LSA Manager.

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5.18.11. For each UTC increment, and item/suffix item within each increment, UDMs are responsible for identifying the correct Unit Org ID and FAC within their unit/squadron that is responsible for packaging and deploying their respective assets. The wing LOGMOD/LSA Administrator is responsible for ensuring the Unit Org ID/FAC table is populated correctly based on UDM inputs. 5.18.12. Functional Account Groupings and Basic Functional Accounts. The first character of a FAC represents the major groupings of functions (1XXX Command and Command Support, 2XXX- Mission Equipment Maintenance, 3XXX - Mission Equipment Operation, 4XXX - Direct Support, 5XXX – Medical, 6XXX - Research and Development, and 7XXX - Activities Outside the Air Force). The first and second characters of a FAC represent the basic functional account. The third and fourth characters of a FAC represent the shredouts of basic functional accounts (sub-functions) and shred-outs of sub-functions, respectively. The fifth and sixth (or last two) characters are used in the event a MAJCOM UTC FAM feels a need to further define or identify an office/shop within a unit/ squadron to denote ownership of equipment, in which case they would assign two additional characters to the standard FAC. For a detailed list of all Air Force approved FACs, contact the MAJCOM LOGMOD/LSA Manager. 5.19. Tables Table 5.1. UTC Functional Codes. UTC Code 1 3 4 6

Overarching Functional Area Air Defense, Missiles, & Space Mission Aircraft Engineering Communications

7

Command & Control

8 9

Special Ops (non-aviation) Miscellaneous Base-Level Support

C

Higher Headquarters

E

Electronic Warfare (nonaviation) Medical Maintenance

F H J K

Supply, Fuels Research & Development, Test & Evaluation

Included Functional Area(s)

Communications, Engineering & Installation, Postal, Cyberspace Ops (Comm) GTACS (TACP, CRC, ASOC, AOC); Mobility C2; Airfield Ops; Personnel Recovery (non-aviation) Combat Control, Special Tactics Headquarters Staff, Command Post, First Sergeants, TCN Escort, Logistics Readiness, Aircrew Life Support, Acquisition, Scientist MAJCOMs, JTF Elements, AFFOR, Rated Staff Aug.

Medical, Dental, Aeromedical Aircraft Maintenance, Munitions, WRM Maintenance, ABDR Supply, Fuels, RSP

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P Q R T U

Intelligence Force Protection Personnel Force Support Training Transportation

X

Combat Support

Security Forces, Counterintelligence (OSI) Personnel, Services, Manpower, Historian Aerial Port, Vehicle Management, Vehicle Ops, Traffic Management Bare Base Support, Comptroller, Chaplain, Public Affairs, Legal, Contracting, Logistics Plans, OSS, Information Operations, Safety, Weather

Table 5.2. UTC Title Format. COLUMN DESCRIPTION AVIATION UTCs: 1-3 Force type (valid aviation types are listed on AF/A5XW CoP) 4 Blank 5-6 Primary Mission Aircraft Inventory (PMAI) (right justified, zero filled) 7 Blank 8 Modified mission prefix (blank if not used) 9 Basic mission 10-12 Design number (right justified, blank filled) 13 Design series (blank if not used) 14 Blank 15-26 Freeform force description (must contain whether package is Lead or Follow, if applicable) 27 "G" (if an Air National Guard (ANG)-unique capability) 28 "R" (if an AFRC-unique capability) 29-31 "DEP" (if readiness spares capability status is dependent) EXAMPLES: SOF 03 EC130E Commando Solo SBS 06 B 1B G DEP NON-AVIATION UTCS: 1-3 Force type (valid force types are listed on AF/A5XW CoP) 4 Blank 5-31 Freeform mission description (if number of equipment items is involved, that number should be in columns 5 and 6. If UTC is for an ANG-unique capability, column 27 is "G"; for an AFRC-unique capability, column 28 is "R") EXAMPLES: C-E AN/TMQ-35 HQS WING STAFF (LEAD) MMS 06 B 52H RDEP

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POL 02 PMU-27 PUMPS 50 GPM Table 5.3. Deployment Indicator (DEPID) Code Definitions. DEPID Code

Meaning

Definition1

MANFOR

LOGDET

1

Standard

Indicates a deployable organization with a standard composition that is defined and fixed by an appropriate, widely used reference document.

Yes

Yes

2

Fixed provisional

Indicates a deployable organization that is formed from existing resources and is designed to meet requirements of operation plans. When formed, the organization becomes deployable, self-administering organization that can be employed as an individual unit. UTCs with this DEPID are self-defining.

Yes

Yes

3

Augmentation

This organization is designed to augment the capability of an inplace organization to meet a specific operation plan requirement. When formed, this organization is deployable, but not self- administering. UTCS with this DEPID are selfdefining.

Yes

Yes

4

Programmed

Indicates a type organization that is programmed to be activated in the future. The activation date is not related to the implementation of operation plans but usually depends on budget or other internal Service considerations. For planning purposes, type organizations with this indicator should be considered deployable after the programmed activation date. Estimated date may be reported for programmed units.

Yes

Yes2

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5

Non-TUCHA build

Indicates a type organization with a standard composition that is defined and fixed by an appropriate, widely used reference document. Type organizations with this DEPID provide deployable fragments or detachments that are assigned self-defining UTCs. Use for USN and USCG units only.

6

Variable

Indicates type organization that is authorized by Service or joint documents. The organization is deployable. Composition is not fixed. UTCs with this DEPID are not self-defining. Also, A-UTCs will use this DEPID code; however, they are not to be used in a TPFDD.

No

No

7

Group or category

Indicates type organization that represents a generalized group or category of more specific UTCs. The deployability of a group depends on the deployability of its members. The group UTC should be self-defining if its included members are selfdefining.

No

No

8

Task organization

Indicates a type organization No identified as a task organization. The composition of task organizations varies depending on the specific assigned task or mission. Service and joint

No

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documents may provide broad doctrinal guidance on task organizations, but do not specify the composition. Task organizations are deployable. UTCs are not self-defining. 9

Permanent Base

Indicates UTCs assigned to permanent base installations, facilities, and organizations. This type organization may have been established outside the United States; however, it is not deployable. Normally, this type organization is deactivated rather than transferred.

E

Augmentation (Equipment only)

Indicates an equipment package No that can be constituted from existing logistic resources to augment the capability of an inplace operations plan requirement. Equipment packages with this indicator are deployable and self-defining

Yes

P

Augmentation (Personnel only)

Indicates a type organization that represents an identified current ability to form from existing resources the capability to augment an in-place organization to meet a specific operations plan requirement. When constituted, organizations with this indicator are deployable, but not selfadministering. UTCs with this indicator are self-defining.

Yes3

All Other

No

Yes

No

(Reserved for future use)

1

DEPID definitions are established by Joint Staff. See CJCSM 3150.24B Vol II, Table A-A-3. 2

Since this UTC is in future activation status, the logistics detail may not be available until prime equipment is delivered.

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Only passenger logistics detail required.

Table 5.4. Unit Level Codes2. CODE

MEANING

A

Numbered Army

ABF

Advanced Base Functional Component

AC

Aircraft

ACD

Academy

ACT

Activity

ADM

Administration

AF

Numbered Air Force

AFB

Air Force Base

AFD

Airfield

AFY

Air Facility

AGF

Miscellaneous Command Ship

AGP

Army Group

AGY

Agency

ANX

Annex

AP

Air Patrol

AR

Area

ARS

Arsenal

AST

Air Station

ATM

Air Terminal

AUG

Augmentation

AVT

Training Aircraft Carrier

B

Barge

BAS

Base

BB

Battleship

BD

Board

BDE

Brigade

BKS

Barracks

BLT

Battalion Landing Team

BN

Battalion

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 CODE

MEANING

BND

Band

BR

Branch

BSN

Basin

CODE

MEANING

BT

Boat

BTY

Battery

CAY

Corps Artillery

CEC

Communications-Electronic Complex

CEP

Communications-Electronic Package

CG

Guided Missile Cruiser

CGC

US Coast Guard Cutter

CGE

College

CGN

Guided Missile Cruiser (Nuclear Powered)

CLN

Clinic

CMD

Command

CMN

Commission

CMP

Camp

CO

Company

CPS

Corps

CRW

Crew

CTP

Port Captain

CTR

Center

CV

Aircraft Carrier

CVN

Aircraft Carrier (Nuclear Powered)

DAY

Division Artillery

DD

Destroyer

DDG

Guided Missile Destroyer

DEP

Depot

DET

Detachment

DIR

Director, Directorate

DIV

Division

DMB

Detachment for MEB

DMF

Detachment for MEF

139

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MEANING

DML

MEU Detachment Residual

DMM

MEB Detachment Residual

DMP

II MEB + MEU Detachment Residual

DMR

MEB + MEU Detachment Residual

CODE

MEANING

DMT

II MEB Detachment Residual

DMU

Detachment for MEU

DSP

Dispensary

DST

District

DTL

Detail

ELE

Element

ENL

Enlisted

EQP

Equipment

FAC

Facility

FAR

Field Army

FF

Frigate

FFG

Guided Missile Frigate

FLO

Flotilla

FLT

Numbered Fleet

FMF

Fleet Marine Force

FOR

Force

FT

Flight

FTR

Force Troops

GAR

Garrison

GRP

Group

HBD

HQ, HQ Company, and Band

HHB

HQ and HQ Battery

HHC

HQ and HQ Company

HHD

HQ and HQ Detachment

HHS

HQ, HQ and Company and Service Company

HHT

HQ and HQ Troop

HM

Home

HMC

HQ and Maintenance Company

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 CODE

MEANING

HQ

Headquarters

HQA

Headquarters Wing Augmentation

HQC

Headquarters Company

HQD

Headquarters Detachment

HQJ

Headquarters Joint Task Force

CODE

MEANING

HQS

Headquarters and Service Company

HQW

Headquarters Element Wing

HSB

HQ, HQ and Service Battery

HSC

HQ, HQ and Support Company

HSP

Hospital

INS

Installation

ISP

Inspector

IST

Institute

LAB

Laboratory

LCC

Amphibious Command Ship (General Purpose)

LHA

Amphibious Assault Ship

LHD

Amphibious Assault Ship (Multipurpose)

LIB

Library

LKA

Amphibious Cargo Ship

LPD

Amphibious Transport Dock

LPH

Amphibious Assault Ship (Helicopter)

LSD

Dock Landing Ship

LST

Tank Landing Ship

MAA

Military Assistance Advisory Group

MAG

Marine Air Group

MAW

Marine Air Wing

MCM

Mine Countermeasure Ship

MEB

Marine Expeditionary Brigade

MEF

Marine Expeditionary Force

MER

Merchant Ship

MEU

Marine Expeditionary Unit

MGR

Manager

141

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MEANING

MGZ

Magazine

MIS

Mission

MSC

Military Sealift Command (MSC) Ship

MSF

MSC One-Time Charter

MSO

Minesweeper, Ocean

MTF

Maintenance Float

CODE

MEANING

MUS

Museum

NAL

No Assigned Level

NSC

Navy Support Craft

NSL

No Significant Level

OBS

Observatory

OFC

Office

OFF

Officer

OIC

Officer-In-Charge

OL

Operating Location

PER

Personnel

PHM

Guided Missile Patrol Combatant (Hydrofoil)

PKG

Package

PKT

Packet

PLN

Plant

PLT

Platoon

PO

Post Office

PRT

Port

PTY

Party

PVG

Proving Ground

RCT

Regimental Combat Team

REP

Representative

RES

Reserves

RGT

Regiment

RLT

Regimental Landing Team

RNG

Range

SCH

School

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 CODE

MEANING

SCM

Support Command

SCO

Service Company

SCT

Sector

SEC

Section

SHP

Shop

SIP

Ship, Foreign or Merchant

SQ

Squadron

CODE

MEANING

SQD

Squad

SS

Shop Stores

SSB

Ballistic Missile Submarine (Nuclear Powered)

SSN

Submarine (Nuclear Powered)

SST

Substation

SSX

Submarine

STA

Station

STF

Staff

STP

Special Troops

STR

Store

SU

Subunit

SUP

Supervisor

SVC

Service

SYD

Shipyard

SYS

System

TE

Task Element

TF

Task Force

TG

Task Group

TM

Team

TML

Terminal

TRN

Train

TRP

Troop

TU

Task Unit

U

Unit

USS

US Ship

143

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MEANING

WG

Wing

WKS

Works

Note: 2. ULC definitions are established by Joint Staff. See CJCSM 3150.16A, Table A-7. Table 5.5. MEFPAK Data Submission Table. DEPID

LOGDET Required

Detail Developed Within

Data Submitted By

1

Manpower Detail Required Yes

Yes

2

Yes

Yes

3

Yes

Yes

6 9 E

No No No

No No Yes

P

Yes

No

90 days of UTC registration 90 days of UTC registration 90 days of UTC registration Not applicable Not applicable 90 days of UTC registration 90 days of UTC registration

The next cycle after development The next cycle after development The next cycle after development Not applicable Not applicable The next cycle after development The next cycle after development

Table 5.6. UTC Suffix Definitions. UTC SUFFIX DEFINITION 0

A standard HAF-approved and distributed UTC. A UTC with this code cannot be altered or deleted. To change a UTC, it must first be duplicated in the database to a higher suffix.

1

UTC has been fully staffed at the MAJCOM and has been transmitted to HQ USAF for approval. It cannot be changed and should not be deleted.

2

UTC has been fully staffed at the MAJCOM and is ready to be transferred to HQ USAF.

3

UTC is in a fully extended condition; there is one C record on file for each position identified. It may be used to update individual lines with deployment echelon and so forth, where quantity grouping is impractical. When transferred from this code, the UTC is summarized by like records (identical data element value). This code can only be transferred to suffix 2.

4

UTC has been transferred to the pilot unit manpower and organization (MO) office for their review.

5

UTC has been updated and/or reviewed by the pilot unit Logistics Readiness Office and Manpower office and is ready for transfer or transferred to/received by the MAJCOM for review.

6

UTC is MAJCOM controlled to indicate a tailored UTC for contingencies and exercises.

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7

UTC is base-level/MAJCOM controlled to indicate a tailored UTC or a MAJCOM or higher directed exercise.

8

UTC is MAJCOM/base-level controlled to indicate a tailored UTC or one in the MAJCOM coordination stages.

9

UTC was returned to the MAJCOM with changes during a HAF update or has reject conditions.

Table 5.7. UTC Registration Codes (in DCAPES). STATUS

MEANING

RESPONSIBILITY

W

Working

MRA

P

Published

MRA

S

Submitted

MRA

HAF MEFPAK and MANFOR Manager

C

Coordinated

AF/A5XW

HAF FAM

I

Incomplete

AF/A5XW

Agency Submitted

A

Approved

AF/A5XW

HQ MANFOR Manager

D

Disapproved

AF/A5XW

R

Registered

AFMA

Table 5.8. Container Codes Increment Level L Loaded if the increment has more than one item (CC- L) A Stand alone, if item is one single item (CC- A) Item Level A Stand alone, if the item is stand alone (CC- A) C If the item is a container and suffix items are added to the container (CC- C) Suffix Item Level S All items will use this code (CC- S)

REVIEWS

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Chapter 6 FORCE MODULES AND OPERATIONAL CAPABILITIES PACKAGES Section 6A—Purpose 6.1. Force Module (FM)/Operational Capabilities Packages (OCP). A force module, as defined in CJCSM 3122.01A, JOPES Volume 1 (Planning Policies and Procedures) is a planning and execution tool that provides a means of logically grouping records, which facilitate planning, analysis and monitoring. Force modules may include both forces and sustainment. The elements of force modules are linked together or are uniquely identified so that they may be extracted from or adjusted as an entity in the Joint Operational Planning and Execution System (JOPES) databases to enhance flexibility and usefulness of the operations planning and execution process. This chapter provides the policy for development and use of force modules in four specific areas enabling force presentation: Air and Space Expeditionary Task Force (AETF) FMs, Functional Area FMs, AETF Support FMs, and OPLAN specific FMs. In addition, this chapter provides the policy for the development and use of OCPs. AETF FMs are the basis from which combatant commander functional capability requirements are sourced. Functional Area FMs provide an additional mechanism for packaging UTCs in larger groups for "teaming‘ of smaller/modular UTCs when needed. OCPs are a combination of pre-packaged FMs with UTCs that provide a playbook type product to support numerous response options. For force module and OCP execution guidance, see Chapter 8. Section 6B—Background 6.2. Force Presentation. 6.2.1. The AETF FMs are defined as a grouping of combat and expeditionary combat support (ECS) UTCs with accompanied supplies and required non-unit re-supply and personnel necessary to sustain forces with a base population of approximately 3,000 for a minimum of 30 days. 6.2.2. The Functional Area FMs can also be a grouping of combat and expeditionary combat support (ECS) UTCs; however, they provide a more specific capability than the AETF FMs. They can be OPLAN-dependent or used for Force Tracking. (See CJCSM 3122.01A). 6.2.3. The AETF Support FMs are defined as a grouping of ECS and equipment UTCs used to open, operate and sustain the AETF. 6.2.4. OPLAN Specific FMs, which are developed and managed by supported commanders, Service components, or the AEFC, are designed to respond to a specific planning task. 6.2.5. An OCP is a collection of tailored FMs/UTCs grouped together to support numerous response options. OCPs provide a means of logically grouping records, which facilitate planning, analysis and monitoring. OCPs may include both forces and sustainment. The elements of OCPs are linked together and uniquely identified so that they may be extracted from or adjusted as an entity in DCAPES to enhance flexibility and usefulness of the operations planning and execution process.

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Section 6C—Guidance 6.3. AETF Force Modules. The AETF force modules are a method of packaging command and control, operational mission, and ECS forces for presentation to a combatant commander through the commander, Air Force forces (COMAFFOR). The modules were developed to provide a standardized template optimizing initial planning through rapid requirements generation. 6.3.1. The AETF force modules consist of six scalable, modular elements: Open the Airbase, Command and Control, Establish the Airbase, Generate the Mission, Operate the Airbase, and Robust the Airbase. 6.3.2. When utilized in concert, the scalable AETF force modules provide capabilities required to open, establish, and operate an air expeditionary wing (AEW) or group (AEG). AEGs are normally formed utilizing the Generate the Mission force modules as tenant organizations at an Air Force, joint, or coalition operating location as long as the Service/nation responsible for providing base operating support can provide sufficient support capabilities for the AEG to establish adequate command and control over assigned/allocated forces. 6.3.3. Each element is built on capabilities required to accomplish specific processes necessary to achieve desired effects. The capabilities contained within each module element are designed to work synergistically. Component headquarters may modify the capabilities within the FMs based upon the situation and mission requirements. The AETF force modules are all built on the following basic planning assumptions: 6.3.3.1. Runway and taxiways must support or be repairable to support minimum weapon system operations. 6.3.3.2. MOG 2 - 24 hr Ops (C-17). 6.3.3.3. Water source that can be made potable. 6.3.3.4. Jet fuel and ground fuel are available from host nation with limited storage at location. 6.3.3.5. General purpose vehicles are available from host nation. 6.3.3.6. Limited Class IV available on local economy. 6.3.3.7. Munitions storage and build up infrastructure is limited. 6.3.3.8. Approximate Population Flow: 6.3.3.8.1. 24 hrs: 150 6.3.3.8.2. 48 hrs: 550 6.3.3.8.3. C + 14: 2000 6.3.3.8.4. C + 30: 3000 6.3.3.9. Threat Level is Semi-permissive or Uncertain, (i.e. Ground: special ops, sabotage, limited stand-off capability; CBN: localized chemical attack possibility). 6.3.3.10. Environmental: high desert, mountainous, climate.

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6.3.3.13. Host nation has bandwidth spectrum available. Figure 6.1. AETF FM Construct

6.3.4. Open the Airbase. This force module provides the capabilities to open an airbase, regardless of the follow-on mission. Open the Airbase forces will normally arrive first and assess the airbase for establishment of minimum airfield operating parameters, command and control, and supporting host-nation support capabilities. The lead agency for the Open the Airbase Force Module is AMC/A3. 6.3.4.1. This module provides the initial capabilities for command and control, force protection, cargo and passengers handling, logistics, airfield operations, force accountability, finance and contracting, and reception and beddown of follow-on modules. It may support any Service or nation and provides capabilities to transition responsibilities to the follow-on forces. 6.3.4.2. The capabilities contained in this module fall under the following eight categories: assess the airbase, establish minimum operating strip (MOS), protect the forces, initial command and control of forces, conduct airfield operations, establish communications, handle cargo/passengers, receive/beddown initial forces. 6.3.4.3. The capabilities contained within the module should rapidly establish an initial operating capability (IOC) in approximately 24 hours from the arrival of forces. The

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primary constraint is the "Establish Minimum Operating Strip" capability. If extensive runway preparation is required then the IOC for this module is approximately 36 hours. 6.3.4.4. Assumptions. Basic assumptions were made in development of the Open the Airbase capabilities. 6.3.4.4.1. Base opening forces are capable of rapid recovery and redeployment to meet combatant commander requirements. Follow-on modules will assume operations and are not to be integrated with or robust this module. 6.3.4.4.2. No Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD). 6.3.4.4.3. No Theater Battle Management defensive capability. 6.3.4.4.4. Limited chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high yield explosives (CBRNE) defensive and detection response. 6.3.4.4.5. Base Defense support available at 1 hour (IOC) provides security for airfield, defined as the runway, immediate taxiway and parking area. Note: Base security, in this FM, does not include security of the Joint Security Area (JSA) and areas surrounding the runway, immediate taxiway and parking area. 6.3.4.4.6. Average mean time between failures of material handling equipment (MHE) may impact offload of cargo. 6.3.4.4.7. Initial air traffic control (ATC) capability for visual flight rules (VFR) operations can be provided within an hour by Air Force Special Operations Forces (AFSOF) using rucksack portable markings and communications equipment; next increment requires 6 hours. 6.3.4.4.8. Initial airfield lighting can be provided within hour using rucksack portable equipment; next increment requires 12 hours. 6.3.4.4.9. Adverse weather impacts are magnified due to limited ATC and lighting. 6.3.4.4.10. Timely communication frequency and host nation approval (at HHQ) and limited communication bandwidth. 6.3.4.4.11. Limited fire protection (one P-19/contracted equivalent). 6.3.4.4.12. Limited medical care. 6.3.4.4.13. Potable water is available via host nation or contracting. 6.3.4.4.14. Aviation/jet fuel and ground fuel are available via host nation or contracting. 6.3.4.4.15. Only hand-carried/deployed unit basic combat load ammunition will be available. 6.3.4.4.16. Note: If above assumptions are not valid for the desired location, additional UTCs will be required. 6.3.4.5. Constraints. The following issues may inhibit utilizing the module. 6.3.4.5.1. Transition of control of airbase from seizure forces to the C2 capability within the Open the Airbase FM.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 6.3.4.5.2. Effective command and control prior to establishing permanent communications. 6.3.4.5.3. Maximum on Ground (MOG) 2 / 12-hour operation limitation. Force modules do not accommodate for increases in flow of transportation requirements. Note: MOG - 2 assumes initial cargo flow is primarily rolling stock. 6.3.4.5.4. Equipment accountability for initial chalks. 6.3.4.5.5. Establishing refueling capability within 8 hours. 6.3.4.5.6. Minimum lighting for night operations. 6.3.4.5.7. Host nation interface without on-site legal counsel. 6.3.4.5.8. Acquiring adequate potable water

6.3.5. Command and Control. This module contains the capabilities to establish an AEW command and control structure to include an initial maintenance group, mission support group, operations group, and medical group staffs. If an AEG is required and established, the module can be scaled back to complete the appropriate command structure. This initial capability will be rounded out once the Establish the Airbase and Operate the Airbase FMs arrive. The leadership elements of the C2 force module will be sourced using lead/primary wing personnel to the maximum extent possible. The lead agency for the Command and Control Force Module is AF/A5X; AF/A3O is the OCR for this force module. 6.3.5.1. This module begins at some point on or after C-0 and must be in place prior to any command elements leaving from the Open the Airbase FM. 6.3.5.2. It will assume the command and control responsibilities for the airbase from the initial elements in the Open the Airbase FM upon arrival. Secure communications and intelligence are key capabilities to establishing control. 6.3.5.3. The Command and Control FM provides only minimum basic initial command and control capability. The Command and Control FM is estimated to be IOC in approximately 16 hours from arrival at destination. 6.3.5.4. Assumptions. A high level overview of capabilities within this module includes: Assume command and control of the airbase/establish AEW structure, establish command centers, establish interfaces and integration to support mission planning and execution, and establish permanent secure and non-secure voice and data capability. 6.3.5.5. Constraints. 6.3.5.5.1. Command and control capability will be adversely impacted until minimum communication links are established. 6.3.5.5.2. Timely host nation and frequency approval capability 6.3.6. Establish the Airbase. This module contains limited forces to bring the base to an initial operating capability. The Establish the Airbase FM contains capabilities designed to support most missions or weapon systems. It will facilitate the integration of those capabilities within the Open the Airbase and Command and Control FMs to provide the airfield‘s earliest capability to execute its assigned mission. The lead agency for the Establish the Airbase Force Module is AF/A5X; AF/A4R is the OCR for this force module.

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6.3.6.1. This module will provide capabilities to build and modify existing and deployed support infrastructure (petroleum, oils, and lubricants (POL), munitions storage and operating sites, maintenance shelters, tents, electrical), establish 24-hour day/night mission operations and communications. 6.3.6.2. Establish the Airbase FM begins at some point after C-0 with its efforts assuming tasks from the Open the Airbase FM. The module is estimated to be IOC in approximately 4 days from arrival at destination. 6.3.6.3. This dependency on integration with preceding modules may also limit the effectiveness of the Establish the Airbase FM further emphasizing the need to right-size the capabilities in the Open the Airbase and Command and Control FMs. 6.3.6.4. In addition to integrating with or replacing capability included in Open the Base and Command and Control FMs, this FM also brings in capabilities previously excluded due to lack of immediate urgency. A high level overview of the capabilities within the module includes: 24-hour day/night mission operations, Airfield Operations, Aerial Port, Infrastructure, Site Preparation, POL, Vehicle Operations & Maintenance, Billeting, Finance, Contracting and Utilities, Force Protection, Emergency Response (Fire Crash Rescue, Medical, Security Forces, Safety and EOD), Personnel Accountability (Personnel Support for Contingency Operations (PERSCO)), Munitions Management, and Communications. 6.3.6.5. Assumptions. The assumptions involved in employing the Establish the Airbase FM as it is presently constructed are as follows: 6.3.6.5.1. Strategic flow of resources will be maintained at a MOG 2 / 24-hour operation with limited resource impediments. 6.3.6.5.2. Large aircraft fire fighting capability is limited. 6.3.6.5.3. Required POL available. 6.3.6.5.4. Explosive site plans and storage/operating infrastructure may be rudimentary or not exist requiring risk assessment and acceptance of explosive safety risks/constraints to meet operational mission tasking. Munitions Management Team will be tasked as part of this FM to work directly with Civil Engineering and Safety personnel to ensure capability to receive, store, and execute munitions operations upon arrival of the aviation munitions support UTCs. These personnel should be tasked from the lead wing and may be tailored out of the aviation support UTC. 6.3.6.6. Constraints. There is limited emergency response capability. 6.3.7. Generate the Mission. There are 13 Generate the Mission force modules. These force modules correspond to the 13 mission areas explained in AFTTP 3-1.1, Air Force Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures, General Planning and Employment Considerations. These Generate the Mission FMs will produce the desired military effects as requested by the combatant commander. These force modules are a combination of three subordinate force modules: a Multiple UTC Grouping (MUG) and two mission platform packages. The lead agency for the Generate the Mission Force Module is AF/A5X.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 6.3.7.1. The MUGs contain the aviation and direct aviation support (i.e. maintenance, munitions, etc) associated with the aviation capability. The direct aviation support UTCs are those that are specifically identified on the aviation UTC‘s MISCAP statement. 6.3.7.1.1. The MUGs will be identified by the specific type weapon system and number of aircraft supported. If there are distinct packages amongst components and/or commands or special capabilities, then there will also be distinct MUGs. Examples of MUG titles would be: B-52, 12 PAA, ACTIVE; C-130E (AWADS), 12 PAA, USAFE, ACTIVE; F-16C, B40, 18 PAA, ACTIVE. 6.3.7.1.2. The MUGs will include the lead aviation package, any corresponding follow aviation packages, and associated direct aviation support. 6.3.7.1.3. If Munitions Management UTC deploys as part of the Establish the Base FM, these personnel may be tailored out of the munitions aviation support UTC. 6.3.7.2. The mission platform packages contain "common" operations combat support capabilities that are required to support singular or multiple ―like‖ aviation packages. The mission platform packages contain weather, intelligence, operations support, maintenance supervision, and communications. 6.3.7.2.1. There are eight specific mission platform force modules (see Table 6.1): Fighter, Bomber, Tanker, Airlift, SOF, CSAR, command, control, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C2ISR), and Electronic Warfare. 6.3.7.2.2. There is also a general mission platform package. This MPP includes common operations support UTCs that are required to support all aviation packages. 6.3.7.3. The interrelationship between the 13 Generate the Mission FMs, the MUGs, and the Mission Platform packages is detailed in paragraph 6.3.10.1.2 below. 6.3.7.4. These force modules are intended to provide a rapid response and conduct operations within 36 hours of initial arrival and have embedded sustainment for up to 30 days of operations. Mission support elements may begin to flow before the C+0 day. 6.3.7.5. The Generate the Mission FMs are estimated to be IOC in approximately 4 days from the C+0 (the start of the Open the Airbase module). If extensive operational planning is not required, then the IOC for this module is approximately 2 days. However, planners must ensure the flow of the Generate the Mission FM does not outpace the flow of critical support elements in the Command & Control, Establish the Airbase, and initial Operate the Airbase FMs.

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Table 6.1. Mission Platform Packages. Mission Platform Size

Generate the Mission FMs Supported 1

Fighter

6 - 24 Aircraft

CAS, AI, SA, OCA, DCA, SEAD

Bomber

4 - 12 Aircraft

OCA, SEAD, AI, CAS, SA, CSea, IO

Tanker

4 - 15 Aircraft

Air Refueling

Airlift

4 - 16 Aircraft

Airlift

SOF

3 - 7 Aircraft

SOF, CAS, IO, C2ISR, CSAR

CSAR

2 - 10 Aircraft

CSAR

C2ISR

3 - 13 Aircraft

C2ISR, IO

Electronic Warfare 3 - 5 Aircraft

IO, SEAD

6.3.7.6. Assumptions. Required combat support and operational support is available upon aircraft arrival. 6.3.7.7. Constraints. The ability to reach IOC is dependent upon the strategic flow of combat support capabilities and the deployment of required mission aircraft and operators. 6.3.8. Operate the Airbase. The Operate the Airbase force module contains mission support forces needed to achieve full operating capability. Forces within this module make the initial operating capabilities of the airbase more robust with supplies and personnel to sustain forces for a minimum of 30 days. The lead agency for the Operate the Airbase Force Module is AF/A5X; AF/A4R is the OCR for this force module. 6.3.8.1. This module will provide capabilities to enhance force protection, communications, cargo handling, quality of life activities such as chaplain, fitness, library, health care, feeding and sheltering, and reach-back capabilities. This module brings the airbase into full operating capability. 6.3.8.2. The timing of forces flow begins on or after day C+2 and reaches closure on or before day C+14. The module is estimated to be IOC in approximately 7 days from arrival at destination. 6.3.8.3. Assumptions. No significant assumptions were made for the implementation of this force module. 6.3.8.4. Constraints. The following constraints may impede the utilization of this force module. 6.3.8.4.1. The ability to augment BEAR 7 days from ramp to IOC. 6.3.9. Robust the Airbase. The Robust the Airbase force module contains those support forces that would typically not arrive until 30 days after an operating location is established. The lead agency for the Robust the Airbase Force Module is AF/A5X; AF/A4R is the OCR for this force module.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 6.3.9.1. This module provides additional ECS forces to robust the capabilities already in place from the previous FMs until a rotational operation can be implemented. 6.3.9.2. The Robust the Base FM is considered part of the baseline structure for the AETF.

6.3.10. Guidelines for using and maintaining these AETF FMs. 6.3.10.1. The AETF FMs will be maintained in DCAPES in 088-series PIDs as depicted in Table 6.2 Table 6.2. AETF Force Module Identifiers. AETF FM

PID

FMIDs1

ULN Structure

Open the Airbase

088OB

8xxOB

8OBxx

Command and Control

088C2

8xxC2

8C2xx

Establish the Airbase

088EB

8xxEB

Operate the Airbase

088OP

8xxOP

Generate the Mission (GTM)

088GM

Mission Area Force Modules

See Table 6.3. See Table 6.3.

GTM Mission Platform Packages (MPPs)

See Table 6.4. See Table 6.4.

GTM Multiple UTC Groups (MUGs)

User defined

User defined

Robust the Base

088RB

8RB00

Close the Base

088CB

―Extended‖ Force Modules

088EF

8CB002 8Exxx

User defined

Operational Capability Packages (OCPs)

088**

User defined

User defined

NOTES: 1. Standard force module will be designated with ―00‖ in 2nd/3rd positions; rotational FMs will be designated with ―0R‖ in 2nd/3rd positions. Similar variations across multiple FMs (e.g. key UTCs, sequence segment of FM, etc) will use the same characters in the 2nd/3rd positions. 2. New requirements for Close the Base will have FMID 8CB00. Existing requirements will maintain their original FMID.

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Table 6.3. AETF Force Module Identifiers (Generate the Mission, Mission Area). AETF FM

PID

FMIDs

ULN Structure

088GM

8AI00

User defined

Air Refueling GTM



8AR00



Airlift GTM



8AL00



Close Air Support (CAS) GTM



8CS00



Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) GTM



8CR00



Countersea (CSea) GTM



8SE00



Defensive Counterair (DCA) GTM



8DC00



Command & Control, Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance (C2ISR) GTM



8SR00



Offensive Counterair (OCA) GTM



8CA00



Information Operations (IO) GTM



8CI00



Special Operations (SOF) GTM



8SF00



Strategic Attack (SA) GTM



8SA00



Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses (SEAD) GTM



8SD00



Air Interdiction (AI) GTM

Table 6.4. AETF Force Module Identifiers (Generate the Mission, Mission Platform Packages). AETF FM

PID

FMIDs

ULN Structure

General MPP

088GM

8GNxx

User defined

Fighter MPP



8FTxx



Bomber MPP



8BRxx



Tanker MPP



8TKxx



Airlift MPP



8ATxx



Special Operations MPP



8SOxx



Combat Search and Rescue MPP



8RQxx



Command & Control, Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance (C2ISR) MPP



8C2xx



Electronic Warfare



8EAxx



6.3.10.1.1. The Open the Airbase, Command and Control, Establish the Airbase, Operate and Robust the Airbase force modules are all stand-alone. All of the UTCs that constitute the force module will be included in the FMID.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 6.3.10.1.2. The Generate the Mission force modules will only contain the primary UTC(s) for the applicable MUG(s). Each MUG will have a unique FMID and include the primary UTC in the force module title. Depending on the MUG chosen, the general MPP and one of the eight Mission Platform force modules will also need to be selected to complete the Generate the Mission FM. Following is an example of how to use the Generate the Mission FM. 6.3.10.1.2.1. Choose the Generate the Mission FM based on the desired effect, e.g., 8CS00, for Close Air Support. 6.3.10.1.2.2. The UTCs listed in this FMID represent all of the primary UTCs that could support the mission (e.g. CAS would have UTCs for A-10s, F-16 Block 30s, F-16 – Block 40s, B-1s, and B-52s; each MDS might be further identified as either Active, Guard, or Reserve). 6.3.10.1.2.3. The primary UTC selected (e.g. 3FVF1 - A-10 Active) will also represent the FMID for MUG. Note: Some UTCs might be the primary UTC in more than one MUG. 6.3.10.1.2.4. Since the platform chosen is a fighter, the Fighter Mission Platform FM and the general MPP will also need to be selected. 6.3.10.2. The AETF FMs are designed to have limited tailoring because they are built to lowest common denominator. If a location already has a capability covered or designated to support less than a population of 3,000, then and only then, would planners tailor the force module. When tailoring force modules, entire UTCs will be tailored out. 6.3.10.3. If functional areas determine that certain capability is overor understated in the current AETF FMs, the Air Staff FAM and/or designated FM lead agency should contact AF/A5XW to propose modification to the force module.

6.3.11. Posturing UTCs with respect to AETF force modules. When posturing UTCs, Air Staff FAMs should ensure there are sufficient UTCs postured as identified below. See Chapter 7 for details on posturing UTCs. See Chapter 10 for procedures to request a deviation to the respective Scheduling Integrated Product Team (SIPT) schedules if posturing UTCs in support of AETF FMs conflicts with the schedule(s). 6.3.11.1. Each AEF vulnerability period should contain the capability to support and operate five AEW bases (eight with mobilization). Therefore, each AEF vulnerability period will have sufficient number of UTCs postured to fill eight Command and Control, eight Establish the Airbase, eight Operate the Airbase, and eight Robust the Airbase FMs. HAF FAMs will include this requirement in their FAM guidance. 6.3.11.2. The Air Mobility Operations Enabler category (with augmentation from UTCs, in some functional areas, from the AEF Tempo Bands) will have sufficient number of UTCs postured to fill three Open the Airbase FMs simultaneously (four with ARC augmentation). HAF FAMs will include this requirement in their FAM guidance. 6.3.11.3. The Generate the Mission FM is actually a combination of a MUG and a Mission Platform Package.

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6.3.11.3.1. Each base that is tasked with a primary UTC of the MUG should be able to posture all of the UTCs included in that MUG. Furthermore, all of the UTCs that constitute the MUG must be aligned to the same AEF Library. 6.3.11.3.2. Each AEF pair, plus available forces from the Enabler library, should have a sufficient number of UTCs postured to build the applicable number of Fighter, Tanker, Bomber, Theater Airlift, Rescue, Special Forces, and C2ISR/Electronic Warfare Mission Platform Packages as outlined in the WMP 3 Part 4. 6.3.11.3.3. Each AEF pair should have sufficient UTCs postured to support eight General MPP force modules. 6.3.12. The AEFC will assign a FM identification/association code to those UTCs that match the FM construct and have a P-code of "DW*."(See Chapter 7) 6.3.12.1. The AETF FM UTCs will not be fenced and can be used to meet any combatant commander‘s requirements. 6.3.12.2. All units (active, AFRC, and ANG) will be considered when the FM identifications are assigned. This is necessary to determine how many FMs can be built within each AEF Pair. 6.3.13. Organizational Responsibilities 6.3.13.1. AF/A5XW 6.3.13.1.1. AF/A5XW will oversee maintenance and upkeep of force modules. Adding and deleting UTCs as necessary, revising processes to keep pace with current weapon systems and employment strategies. 6.3.13.1.2. AF/A5XW will ensure current and future execution systems are designed and built to accommodate force modules. 6.3.13.1.2.1. The system will be used to support the development and maintenance of both types of force modules. This will ensure proper coordination is accomplished for changes and deletions of UTCs in the FM(s). Roles and permissions (access) for the AETF FMs are to be managed by AF/A5XW, while the owner of the FM or AF/A5XW as appropriate, will maintain Functional/Cross-Functional Area FMs. 6.3.13.1.3. AF/A5XW will hold conferences as needed but not less than once a year, to convert and subsequently upkeep operational plans to correspond to force module force presentation methodology. 6.3.13.1.4. AF/A5XW will provide overarching guidance to FM lead agencies on the development, usage, and maintenance of FMs. 6.3.13.2. AF/A5XS 6.3.13.2.1. AF/A5XS will coordinate with AF/A5XW to ensure current force presentation strategies are incorporated into force module execution development. 6.3.13.2.2. AF/A5XS will provide information regarding changes to the Task Force CONOPS to AF/A5XW.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 6.3.13.3. AF/A3OO 6.3.13.3.1. DELETED 6.3.13.3.2. AF/A3OO, as Command Post functional area manager, will be the lead agency OCR for the Command and Control FM. 6.3.13.4. AF/A4/7 6.3.13.4.1. AF/A4/7 will develop and maintain Agile Combat Support (ACS) capabilities that support force module execution. 6.3.13.4.2. AF/A4/7 will develop and maintain procedures and processes to package equipment for deployment. 6.3.13.4.3. AF/A4/7 will accept vehicle requirements from functional managers and identify sourcing. See paragraph 5.12.5.6 6.3.13.4.4. AF/A4/7 will be the lead agency OCR for the Establish the Base, Operate the Base, and Robust the Base FMs. 6.3.13.5. AF/A1 6.3.13.5.1. AF/A1 will provide advice on personnel matters as requested. 6.3.13.6. AF/JA. 6.3.13.6.1. AF/JA will provide legal advice as requested. 6.3.13.7. Lead Agencies 6.3.13.7.1. Lead Agencies will be responsible for developing a CONOPS for their applicable force module. This CONOPS will expand on guidance provided in this chapter and the overarching guidance provided by AF/A5XW. 6.3.13.7.2. HAF FAMs will coordinate with Lead Agencies on proposed changes to the FMs that affect other functional areas. 6.3.13.7.3. Lead Agencies will provide recommended changes to their applicable FMs to AF/ A5XW. 6.3.13.7.4. Lead Agencies may designate a FOA or MAJCOM as the executive agent for development and maintenance of the force module. 6.3.13.8. HAF FAMS 6.3.13.8.1. Will ensure the development of those UTCs necessary to support capabilities-based deployment as outlined in AETF force module Libraries. 6.3.13.8.2. Will maintain and update functional UTCs found within the force module libraries as changes occur. 6.3.13.8.3. Will build and manage UTCs consistent with force module policies and doctrine. 6.3.13.8.4. Will coordinate any new UTCs developed in support of meeting the AETF force module concept with applicable MAJCOM and ARC FAMs.

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6.3.13.8.5. Will publish and provide clear guidance to MAJCOMs (force providers) with specific numbers of UTCs to posture and how to meet force module guidance. 6.3.13.9. MAJCOM FAMs 6.3.13.9.1. HQ AMC/A3 will be the lead agency for the Open the Airbase FM. 6.3.13.9.2. MAJCOM and ARC FAMs will posture UTCs to their units as necessary to support efficient distribution across the AEF while adhering to the respective Scheduling Integrated Product Team (SIPT) schedules unless a waiver is approved. 6.3.13.9.3. MAJCOM and ARC FAMs will assist HAF FAMS as necessary in developing and managing functional UTCs 6.3.13.10. AEFC 6.3.13.10.1. AEFC will ensure that all assigned personnel have sufficient knowledge regarding use of force modules. 6.3.13.10.2. AEFC will develop and implement procedures, to the extent possible, to ensure deployments are executed using force modules. 6.3.13.10.3. AEFC will assign FM identification/associations to the UTCs within each pair that meet the AETF FM template. 6.3.13.10.4. AEFC will source forces consistent, to the extent possible, with current force module policies and doctrine. 6.3.13.11. MAJCOMs 6.3.13.11.1. MAJCOMs will ensure personnel are trained and equipped as required. 6.3.13.11.2. MAJCOMs will validate/source consistent with force module policies and doctrine. 6.3.13.12. Supported Component Headquarters 6.3.13.12.1. Component headquarters will use AETF force modules as the initial and primary concept for TPFDD development and request of forces. 6.3.13.12.2. Air Force component headquarters will ensure that host nation (HN) agreements and arrangements outlined in the DOD FCG or through separate negotiations will support the TPFDD or other planned deployments, employment or sustainment. Ensure, through the applicable Unified Command, that US Embassy or US Defense Representative receive a copy of CJCS Orders to assure that U.S. Embassies have sufficient time, input and manpower to support coordination with HN. 6.3.13.13. Wings 6.3.13.13.1. Wings will ensure personnel are trained to execute air and space operations using AETF force modules. 6.4. Functional/Cross-Functional Area FMs. Functional/Cross-Functional Area FMs facilitate UTC requirements determination during TPFDD development. These FMs contain modular-scalable UTCs that are commonly combined at time of execution to form a specific capability, e.g. base transportation function, AFFOR or Air Operations Center (AOC) staff, etc.

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The primary purpose of these FMs is to provide the planning community the ability to package capability via UTCs. The benefit of using these FMs is the ability to capture what is needed for a specific tasking that is made up of more than one UTC. Instead of creating a large UTC, many smaller functional area UTCs can be developed and packaged in this type of FM. 6.4.1. Tailoring at execution is allowed similar to UTC tailoring in order to ensure the correct amount and types of UTCs are utilized. FM tailoring can be by whole UTC or by partial UTC. 6.4.2. With the advent of smaller, modular-scalable UTCs, Functional/Cross-Functional Area FMs are a tool to minimize "parent-child" and "cross functional" UTCs. FAMs at all levels must scrutinize large UTCs with cross-functional capability (AFSC level) to determine if they meet the cross-functional criteria (see paragraph 5.12.5.4). 6.4.3. MAJCOM, component headquarters, or Air Staff FAMs who desire to formalize a functional/ cross-functional area FM should contact AF/A5XW. If it is determined that a FM is more beneficial than a new UTC, the FM with associated UTCs will be included in 08FML. In addition to the associated UTCs, FAMs should develop and provide a mission description for the FM. 6.5. AETF Support Force Modules. The AETF Force Modules provide the capability to initially stand up a deployment location. Support Force Modules accomplish a dual role. These FMs augment the AETF FMs and identify the additional capability needed to support a continual rotational presence. 6.5.1. Augmentation, or extended, force modules. While the AETF FMs are designed to operate under a fixed set of assumptions, the augmentation force modules provide the additional capability to meet a more demanding requirement with extended capabilities (for example: enhanced security, disaster response, RED HORSE, NEO, etc.) 6.5.2. Rotation Force Modules. These force modules are a sub-set of the AETF FMs with tailored out, pre-identified functional equipment and personnel that do not need to be replaced if the deployed location is supporting rotational operations (e.g. BEAR assets, Fire Trucks, Cable Installation Teams). The rotational force modules may also include ―substitute‖ UTCs for those capabilities in the baseline AETF force modules. 6.6. OPLAN-Specific Force Modules. In addition, OPLAN Dependant FMs, which are developed and managed by supported commanders, Service components, or the AEFC, are designed to respond to a specific planning task such as flexible deterrent options (FDOs) or OPLAN FM Packages (FMPs). These FMs are groupings of force data used to manage TPFDD development and movement execution (See paragraphs 8.9.6 and 9.9.2). Sample OPLAN dependent FMs include, but are not limited to: 6.6.1. Functional grouping (e.g., all medical, all air defense). 6.6.2. Geographical grouping (e.g., ULNs with SPOD of Wilmington). 6.6.3. Date grouping (e.g., forces with LAD less than 10). 6.6.4. Grouping ULNs for Movement Requirement Submission and Validation. 6.7. Operational Capabilities Packages (OCPs). OCPs are a grouping of FMs/UTCs designed for COMAFFORs to present a comprehensive pre-packaged Air Force capability to CCDRs.

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6.7.1. OCPs are a method of packaging command and control, operational mission, and ECS forces for presentation to a CCDR through the COMAFFOR. The OCPs provide prepackaged capability playbooks to optimize planning. 6.7.2. OCPs may consist of tailored elements from the AETF FMs (for example, Open the Airbase) as outlined above, and other FMs/UTCs. 6.7.3. Examples of OCPs may include, but are not limited to, Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA), Humanitarian Relief Operations (HUMRO), Non-Combatant Evacuation Operations (NEO) and support to International Law Enforcement. 6.7.4. Each OCP is built on capabilities required to accomplish specific mission objectives and is designed to be initially self-sustaining. Figure 6.2. FM to OCP Relationship

6.7.5. Organizational Responsibilities 6.7.5.1. SAF/FM will develop, as required, cost estimates to implement the OCP. 6.7.5.2. HQ USAF will develop and maintain capabilities that support OCP execution. 6.7.5.3. AF/A5X will designate OCP OPRs. 6.7.5.4. AF/A5XW 6.7.5.4.1. Ensure current and future planning and execution systems are designed and built to accommodate OCPs. 6.7.5.4.2. Manage roles and permissions (access) for the OCPs. 6.7.5.4.3. Ensure proper coordination is accomplished for changes and deletions of FMs/ UTCs in the OCPs. 6.7.5.4.4. Validate OCPs annually. 6.7.5.4.5. Provide overarching guidance to OCP OPRs on the development, usage, and maintenance of OCPs.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 6.7.5.4.6. Maintain and post a list of OCPs and OPRs. 6.7.5.4.7. Post OCPs on A5XW web site. (Insert URL here) 6.7.5.5. AF/A3OO (AFOG) will coordinate the execution of OCPs via the EXORD/DEPORD coordination process. 6.7.5.6. HAF FAMS 6.7.5.6.1. Ensure the development of those UTCs necessary to support capabilitiesbased deployment as outlined in the OCPs. 6.7.5.6.2. Maintain and update functional UTCs required in the OCP as changes occur. 6.7.5.6.3. Build and manage UTCs consistent with OCP/force module policies and doctrine. 6.7.5.6.4. Coordinate any new UTCs developed in support of OCP requirements with applicable MEFPAK manager and ARC FAMs. 6.7.5.6.5. Publish and provide clear guidance to MAJCOMs with specific numbers of UTCs to posture and how to meet OCP guidance. 6.7.5.7. MAJCOMs 6.7.5.7.1. MAJCOM FAMs will assist HAF FAMS as necessary in developing and managing functional UTCs in support of OCPs. 6.7.5.7.2. Validate/source consistent with OCP policies. 6.7.5.8. AEFC 6.7.5.8.1. Assist AF/A5XW to institutionalize usage of OCPs. 6.7.5.8.2. Develop and implement procedures to ensure deployments are executed using OCPs, when applicable. 6.7.5.9. Component Headquarters 6.7.5.9.1. Utilize OCPs to enhance Air Force force presentation to CCDR. 6.7.5.9.2. Review those OCPs applicable to your AOR annually and provide feedback to the OPR. 6.7.5.9.3. Exercise the execution of OCPs applicable to your AOR. 6.7.5.10. OCP OPRs 6.7.5.10.1. Develop OCPs IAW the format in Attachment 2. 6.7.5.10.1.1. When determining UTCs required in the OCPs, start with the current AETF FMs. Delete UTCs that are not required to support the OCP. Determine what other UTCs are required to meet mission requirements and group them in an ―extended FM.‖ 6.7.5.10.1.2. The OCP will include the tailored AETF FMs and the ―extended‖ FM.

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6.7.5.10.2. Build and maintain OCPs in DCAPES using FMs/UTCs. 6.7.5.10.3. Conduct annual review to ensure OCP meets mission objectives to keep pace with current technology, doctrine and strategy. 6.7.5.10.4. Ensure FMs/UTCs contained considerations/assumptions are valid. considerations/assumptions, as necessary.

in

OCPs Adjust

are current FMs/UTCs

6.7.5.10.5. Coordinate revisions among component headquarters FAMs. 6.7.5.10.6. Provide revisions to AF/A5XW to coordinate with HAF FAMs

and and

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Chapter 7 UTC POSTURING Section 7A—Purpose 7.1. Purpose. The purpose of this chapter is to provide the background, guidance and procedures for the posturing of Air Force capabilities, known as unit type codes (UTCs). Section 7B—Background 7.2. Presentation of Forces. As discussed in AFPD 10-4, the U.S. Air Force presents its forces via an Air & Space Expeditionary Task Force (AETF). The basic building block used in force planning and the deployment of AETFs is the UTC. A UTC depicts a force capability with personnel and/or equipment requirements. The assignment of a UTC categorizes each type organization into a class or kind of unit having common distinguishing characteristics. 7.3. DELETED 7.4. AEF Capability Library. The AEF Capability Library contains the Air Force‘s total warfighting capability in terms of UTCs. The library consists of all the forces postured in the five primary and two ARC Tempo Bands plus the Enabler force. AEF Capability data is currently in the AEF TPFDD Libraries, located in DCAPES. When this data migrates to the UTC Availability (UTA) application of DCAPES, the TPFDD libraries will be phased out. 7.4.1. AEF Library data is currently resident in two locations -the WMP-3 Part 2 (AFWUS) (see paragraph2.14.4) and the TPFDD AEF Libraries, located in JOPES. The data contained in these two sources is being merged in the UTC Availability application of DCAPES with the release of DCAPES4.0.2.0., at which point the AFWUS and TPFDD libraries (in their current form) will be phased out. 7.4.2. Designation of which UTC records are aligned to which AEF library is contained in UTC Availability. The UTC Availability records and their corresponding AEF library represent a pool of capability from which the Air Force will provide forces to support contingencies. Section 7C—Guidance and Procedures 7.5. UTC Posturing Concept Overview. All Air Force personnel contribute to the AEF and are inherently deployable or employ in-place. Those organizations identified as a Combat, Combat Support (CS), or Combat Service Support (CSS) organization in the JCS Unit Descriptor Code (UDC) field in the PAS file (see Attachment 8) will posture UTCs; institutional organizations are identified with a UDC of ―Other‖ and will not posture UTCs. Deviations to this policy represent a deviation to the AEF Construct and therefore require AF/A3/5 approval (see paragraph 10.2.1.). 7.5.1. Posturing UTCs is based on funded military authorizations on an organization‘s unit manpower document (UMD). All authorizations in warfighting organizations must be accounted for when posturing UTCs in UTA. Force providers should package manpower authorizations into standard deployable UTCs to the maximum extent possible. With unit

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chain-of-command involvement and MAJCOM OFAMO and/or AEF Cell oversight, MAJCOM FAMs posture UTCs based on the prioritization and sequencing guidance defined by each HAF FAM. Note 1: Individual Mobilization Augmentee (IMA) authorizations attached to AC units will not be postured in UTCs, regardless of the attached organization‘s UDC. IMAs will be managed by their AEFI code, which corresponds to their vulnerability window (see Chapter 14). Note 2: Civilian positions will not be postured in UTCs unless standard UTCs specifically include civilian authorizations (e.g. Historian, AFETS, etc). 7.5.2. Unit commanders will ensure individuals are associated to a specific AEF via the AEF Indicator (AEFI) in MilPDS (Note: Reserve components will determine component-specific AEFI policy). In determining AEF Indicators, commanders need to ensure sufficient personnel are associated to AEF blocks to fulfill the UTCs the unit has postured. An individual‘s AEFI in MilPDS must correlate to an AEF block where the unit has a UTC postured. See Chapter 14 for procedures on associating individuals, from both warfighting and institutional organizations. 7.6. Overview of Different Types of UTCs. All funded military authorizations from warfighting organizations will be used as the basis for UTCs postured in UTC Availability. For all unfunded requirements, the MAJCOMs and ARC must ensure these requirements are processed through the corporate process or PPBE for programming prior to being postured. Authorizations will be postured in standard or Associate UTCs. 7.6.1. Standard deployable UTCs represent a package of capability with a specific MISCAP, as defined in the MEFPAK, and are designed to reduce the amount of detailed planning and coordination needed during combatant commander Crisis Action TPFDD development. Standard deployable UTCs provide the most detail to Air Force planners and will be used to the greatest extent possible. Deployable UTCs may be used in TPFDDs to define an in-place capability. Details for posturing standard deployable UTCs are in paragraph 7.9 7.6.2. Funded authorizations that cannot be described with or do not fit into an existing standard UTC will be postured into an "Associate" UTC (A-UTC). A-UTCs do not contain MISCAPs or standard manpower/logistics detail and are not available for use by a combatant commander or its component to describe deployment requirements in an executable TPFDD. A-UTCs facilitate AEF association for all personnel and provide alternate capability to meet requirements. Details for posturing A-UTCs are in paragraph 7.10 7.7. Overview of UTC Posturing. Posturing a UTC consists of entering a UTC for a specific unit (UIC) into UTC Availability. Multiple occurrences of the same UTC for a unit will have separate Record Numbers (RecNums) and separate Availability Line Numbers (ALNs). The UTC-UIC-RecNum combination or ALN is referred to as the UTC Availability record or UTC record. When posturing a UTC Availability record, MAJCOM FAMs must determine the record‘s Posturing Code (P-Code) (see paragraph 7.14), align the record to a specific AEF library, and ensure supporting UTCs, if applicable, are similarly postured. When determining what types of UTCs to posture, MAJCOM FAMs should use the functional area prioritization and sequencing instruction and the following definitions: 7.7.1. Non-deployable . Reserved for those UTCs (identified with a DEPID of 9 in MEFPAK) used to register a unit in GSORTS. Nondeployable UTCs will not be used to posture capability in UTC Availability and cannot be used in TPFDDs.

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7.7.2. Deployable . A capability that could fulfill the manpower and equipment requirements of a MEFPAK-registered UTC. Deployable does not necessarily indicate that the particular UTC for a specific unit is intended to deploy. All Air Force forces are inherently deployable. 7.7.3. Available to Deploy. Indicates that a specific UTC for a specific unit would normally be eligible for deployment given a certain set of deployment conditions and assuming full readiness. Current posturing strategy identifies two deployment conditions -normal rotational conditions and maximum surge (surge level 3). The availability to deploy during intermediate levels of surge (i.e. minimum surge (surge level 1) and limited surge (surge level 2)) cannot be directly determined from the P-code. Since deployment availability, as defined in the context of this AFI is based on the assumption of100% of authorizations filled, the actual availability of a UTC can‘t be inferred by the P-code. 7.7.4. Ready to Deploy . Indicates that a UTC record is sufficiently manned, trained, and equipped to meet the MISCAP of the UTC. Whether a UTC record is ready or not ready to deploy should not be taken into consideration when posturing UTCs. UTCs that are ‗Ready to Deploy‘ may not necessarily be considered to be ‗Available to Deploy.‘ For example, a UTC record coded ‗DXX‘ may still be coded Green in ART. 7.7.5. In-place Requirement . A requirement that is needed at home station to conduct dayto-day operations while the base has forces deployed under one of the two deployment conditions stated above in "Available to Deploy." 7.7.6. Employed at Homestation. A capability that is intended to perform its CCDR inplace/in-theater mission from home station. This mission is considered that capability that is providing direct support to a combatant commander. 7.7.7. Deployable Within Assigned Theater Only. A specific wartime capability required by a combatant commander that must forward deploy within their assigned theater to meet an OPLAN timeline. UTC may require in-place backfill if deployed for other than its OPLAN mission. 7.8. Nondeployable UTCs. In the past, capability that cannot be postured into a deployable UTC was postured in a non-deployable UTC. Although non-deployable UTCs (DEPID 9) still exist, capability that cannot be postured into a deployable UTC will be postured in A-UTCs. If an Associate UTC does not exist for a functional area/career field, the FAM/CFM should develop an A-UTC per Chapter 5 and submit to AF/A5XW for approval. 7.9. Posturing Standard Deployable UTCs. 7.9.1. Force providers will posture the maximum number of manpower authorizations from warfighting organizations into standard deployable UTCs. The specific UTCs to posture will be based on the HAF FAM prioritization and sequencing guidance that can be found on AEF Online. This guidance provides the functional area concepts of operation and the UTC structure that supports it. The HAF FAM provides guidance on which UTCs should be postured by the MAJCOMs and made available for planning purposes based on component headquarters‘ requirements and the AETF force modules. UTCs used by component headquarters to state requirements in TPFDDs should match the UTCs that providing commands have postured. The MAJCOM FAM, based upon HAF FAM guidance, determines which organizations will posture the required UTCs and the quantity. The

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prioritization and sequencing refers to the guidance MAJCOM FAMs provide to units when they attempt to maximize the number of UTCs postured based on the units‘ funded manpower authorizations. MAJCOMs should contact their HAF FAM if they have any questions on the FAM guidance. These instructions will be reviewed and updated by the HAF FAMs as part of the normal AEF planning cycle, approximately 9 months prior to the next AEF schedule, as described in Chapter 2. General posturing rule sets are in paragraph 7.17 Units that do not represent a warfighting capability will not posture UTCs; individuals from these organizations are still deployable but will be sourced via MilPDS (See Chapter 14). 7.9.1.1. Updates and UTC additions/deletions will be based on input from MAJCOM or component headquarters FAMs and the AEFC. MAJCOM FAMs, through their plans office or AEF Cell, will request applicable UTC records be "unlocked" by the AEFC for update via hqaf.aef.planning newsgroup. AEFC will unlock records within 72 hours (only the Libraries from past AEF rotations and Libraries currently being sourced by the AEF Center will be locked). 7.9.1.1.1. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OP will be the conduit to AFPC/DPW for locking, unlocking and updating the Tempo Band Libraries. 7.9.1.2. FAM prioritization and sequencing instructions. Air Staff FAMs will develop functional guidance for the specifics on how their functional area will posture UTCs. Information on the content, format, and instructions for FAM Guidance will be promulgated in conjunction with the AF/A3/5 AEF Schedule Planning, Preparation, and Posturing Guidance Memorandum. 7.9.1.3. AF FAM Guidance will include, but not be limited to, the following: the tempo band each of the functional area‘s UTCs should be aligned in as well as mitigation strategies to align capability in that tempo band, alignment strategy for UTCs within the tempo band, approved/pending posturing waivers for the upcoming AEF Schedule, and any other functional area-unique rules, processes, and/or procedures (includes but not limited to UTC development, posturing, scheduling, sourcing, tasking, deployment, and/or employment) that deviate from the standard AEF construct. 7.9.1.3.1. DELETED. 7.9.1.3.1.1. DELETED. 7.9.1.3.2. DELETED. 7.9.1.3.3. DELETED 7.9.1.3.4. DELETED. 7.9.1.3.5. DELETED. 7.9.1.3.6. DELETED. 7.9.1.3.7. DELETED. 7.9.1.3.8. DELETED. 7.9.1.3.8.1. (DELETED) . 7.9.1.3.8.2. (DELETED) .

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 7.9.1.3.9. DELETED. 7.9.1.3.10. DELETED. 7.9.1.3.11. DELETED. 7.9.1.3.12. DELETED. 7.9.1.3.13. DELETED. 7.9.1.4. MAJCOM FAMs may supplement Air Staff guidance to address specific unique aspects within their commands. 7.9.1.5. Air Staff FAMs will ensure guidance is applied equitably across the MAJCOMs. Dissimilarities between MAJCOMs will be adjudicated by Air Staff DCS.

7.9.2. Use all funded military manpower authorizations, to include commander billets, without regard to home station requirements when posturing UTCs. When posturing UTC records, the AFSC/skill level/grade of the UMD should match the AFSC/skill level/grade requirements listed in the UTC MANFOR with the following exceptions: 7.9.2.1. Exception #1: Standard and Authorized Substitutions. 7.9.2.1.1. MAJCOMs may posture UTCs using AFSC skill-level substitutions (two up / one down) or grade substitutions (one up / one down) when UMD-to-UTC mismatches exist and substitutions are not prohibited by the MISCAP or applicable FAM guidance. 7.9.2.1.2. MAJCOMs may posture UTCs using Air Force Specialty (AFS) substitutions if specifically allowed in the MISCAP. The UTC MISCAP is the sole source for substitution other than skill and grade substitutions discussed in paragraph 7.9.2.1.1. (Note: Substitution rules outlined in functional AFIs must be included or cross-referenced in UTC MISCAPs). 7.9.2.1.3. MAJCOMs may modify the UTA manpower detail in accordance with the substitution rules stated above. Regardless if line level detail was modified or not, units will assess UTCs in ART in accordance with AFI 10-244, paragraph 3.5. 7.9.2.2. DELETED. 7.9.2.3. Exception #3: For UTCs that represent a weapon system or are in direct support of a weapon system (i.e. aviation UTCs, maintenance UTCs, AOC UTCs, etc), units tasked with the UTC should posture the UTC even if they do not have the corresponding authorizations to fill the UTC (this Exception will not apply to ANG, which will only posture UTCs when the corresponding authorizations exist in the UIC). MAJCOMs must notify AF/A5X of this deviation. Note: The unit must assess in ART the ability to meet the full MISCAP, not just the postured portion. 7.9.2.4. Other UMD-to-UTC MANFOR mismatches may only be postured with AF/A5XW concurrence. 7.9.3. DELETED. 7.9.3.1. DELETED. 7.9.3.2. DELETED.

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7.9.3.3. (DELETED) . 7.9.4. Alignment of standard deployable UTCs to the AEF blocks or Enabler force will follow the rule sets outlined in paragraph 7.12 7.9.5. Standard deployable UTCs will be given appropriate posturing coding as described in paragraphs 7.13 and 7.14 below. 7.9.6. When posturing UTC records into UTC Availability, FAMs must ensure funded Air Force manning positions are aligned to no more than one UTC record. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by Headquarters Air Force, War and Mobilization Division (AF/A5XW). The only waivers that will typically be granted are for UTCs supporting unique missions that are mutually exclusive from standard contingency operations (e.g., STRATCOM support, CONUS air defense). Note: MAJ- COMs will not be authorized to double-posture UMD positions to fill TCN Escort UTCs (9AEM*). 7.9.7. The UTCs a unit has postured in UTC Availability will be reflected in the unit‘s DOC Statement as required by AFI 10-201, Status of Resources and Training System (SORTS). However, FAMs must not delay posturing UTCs in UTC Availability pending the update of the unit‘s DOC statement. 7.10. Posturing "Associate" UTCs (A-UTCs). 7.10.1. Manpower authorizations in warfighting organizations that were not used when posturing standard UTCs will be used as the basis for posturing A-UTCs. A-UTCs have a DEPID Code of "6" and typically end in ―Z.‖ Since A-UTCs do not have standard line level detail (LLD), the number of authorizations and the LLD must be manually entered in UTA. When posturing A-UTC records, the authorized AFSC/skill level/grade of the UMD positions will be used to provide the LLD. 7.10.2. A-UTCs will be postured in the UTC Availability and aligned to the AEF libraries in accordance with paragraph 7.12 below. Since A-UTCs have no standard manpower detail, line level detail must be manually annotated in UTC Availability. A-UTCs will be given appropriate posturing coding as described in paragraph 7.16 below. 7.10.3. As with all UTCs, personnel assigned to authorizations linked to A-UTCs can be exchanged with authorizations linked to standard deployable UTCs to meet deployment requirements as long as the individual‘s AEF alignment is not changed. 7.10.4. An A-UTC‘s 5-character alphanumeric UTC designator will be constructed using the functional groupings appropriate to the AFSC from Table 5.1 of this instruction. For example, a Supply authorization assigned to a Civil Engineering unit, if not postured in a standard deployable UTC, must be postured in a JFZZZ UTC vice a 4FZZZ UTC. The UTC designator will begin with the characters defined in Table 5.1, and any undefined characters will be filled with the letter ―Z.‖ The ―Z‖ in the last character will identify the UTC as an AUTC. Examples include 3FZZZ for fighter pilots, 9ALZZ for life support specialists, and XFFCZ for chaplains. 7.10.5. Positions postured in A-UTC at the base level provide a pool of capability for alternate backfill for, or as an additional source of deployable and available UTCs. A-UTCs postured at the base level will be aligned to the same AEF libraries as the unit‘s standard deployable UTCs. Associate UTC records, which have the same UTC, UIC, AEF library, and

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P-Code, should be combined into one record. The AFSCs of an A-UTC must be functionally aligned; therefore units may need to posture multiple A-UTCs. The AEFC may request a position in an A-UTC before breaking a standard deploy- able UTC to fill an individual augmentation requirement. 7.10.6. For warfighting units above base level (e.g. AOCs, AFFOR Staff, etc), the A-UTC represents AEF-aligned capability or positions not in a standard UTC but typically used to fill IA requirements for combatant commander or AFFOR staffs. Above-base-level A-UTCs will be aligned across the applicable Tempo Band(s) to evenly distribute deployable capability. The UTC designator is based on the functional grouping that best describes the duty AFSC or functional capability of the positions. MAJCOM FAMs will posture A-UTCs for each unique UIC; however, aggregation of capability at a higher level, such as the twoletter level, is allowed if the same deployment manager manages all positions. Since these staffs are cross-functional, each UIC may have several different A-UTCs postured per rotation. These UTCs will be postured with level-4 detail to describe the capability of the positions within the A-UTC. 7.11. DELETED 7.11.1. DELETED 7.11.1.1. DELETED 7.11.1.2. DELETED 7.11.1.3. DELETED 7.11.1.4. DELETED 7.12. UTC AEF Alignment Process. All UTC records, to include A-UTCs, will be aligned to a specific AEF block/pair and coded appropriately (see Table 7.5). Aligning forces to the AEF blocks/Pairs or the Enabler Force enables teaming and systematic scheduling. 7.12.1. Those Active Component forces that do not fall into one of the Enabler categories make up the core of the AEF construct and will be aligned in one of the five primary Tempo Bands. 7.12.1.1. Approximately 12 months prior to the start of the 24-month AEF Schedule, HAF FAMs will determine which UTCs fall into each Tempo Band. FAMs will align all UTCs within a particular capability area (but not necessarily the entire functional area) in the same Tempo Band. When considering which Tempo Band, FAMs need to determine the ratio of rotational available UTCs to the worldwide employment requirement. The rotationally available UTCs will be the total DW*-coded UTCs less an unavailability factor (historically ―red‖ in ART, unable to deploy, etc). HAF FAMs must coordinate with AFPC/DPW, AF/A1PR, AF/A5XW, AF/A3O-AOB, and MAJCOM FAMs in determining these factors. If the FAM determines the capability area should be aligned in Band ―D‖ or ―E,‖ ANG and AFRC must also be included in coordination. Final recommendation to be placed in a Tempo Band will be submitted by applicable HAF Deputy Chief of Staff (DCS) or equivalent through AF/A1 to AF/A3/5 for approval. 7.12.1.1.1. In determining which Tempo Band to align in, the HAF FAM will use the formulas in Tables 7.2 and 7.3:

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7.12.1.1.2. ARC forces will remain in Band ―A‖ when the Active Component (AC) force is aligned in Bands ―A,‖ ―B‖ or ―C.‖ If the AC has a capability area aligned in Band ―D‖ or ―E,‖ AFRC/CV and/or NGB/CF may re-align the applicable ARC UTCs into Band ―M‖ (if AD in Band ―D‖) or Band ―N‖ (if AD in Band ―E‖) in accordance with the ARC 2-year utilization plan. 7.12.2. UTCs for aviation packages (3-series UTCs) will be aligned to the appropriate AEF block/pair as determined by the CAF SIPT and AMC/A3O. The CPS produced by HQ ACC/A3O provides the unit alignment by AEF for the CAF. HQ AMC/A3O develops the MAF Schedule, which provides the MAF alignment. 7.12.3. UTCs for direct aviation support (primarily maintenance and munitions UTCs but may also include Weather, Intel, etc) will be aligned in the same AEF block/pair as the aviation package they are supporting. Only those UTCs that are specifically identified in the aviation UTC‘s MISCAP will be considered direct aviation support. 7.12.4. All other UTCs for ECS forces will be aligned in accordance with HAF FAM direction using the guidelines in paragraphs 7.12.4.1 through 7.12.4.5 7.12.4.1. Tempo Band ―A‖ (Baseline AEF) . Forces aligned in Band ―A‖ will be aligned in accordance with the ECS Target Base Alignment. The ECS Target Base Alignment Template ensures Air Force forces are postured across the AEF Tempo Band enabling the availability of the full range of air and space capabilities to meet combatant commander requirements. The ECS SIPT develops the Target Base Alignment with the following considerations. 7.12.4.1.1. Bases providing ECS UTCs will be aligned in two pairs; furthermore, these two on-call periods will not be back-to-back. ARC bases will only be postured to support one AEF vulnerability period. Note: Units geographically separated from their parent wing will be aligned to the same AEF(s) as their Servicing Military Personnel Element (MPE). 7.12.4.1.2. ECS forces from aircraft-providing bases will typically be aligned to the same AEF period as the aircraft. However, these bases will not be aligned in back-toback AEF pairs. In cases where aviation packages are aligned in back-to-back AEF pairs, ECS forces will only be aligned with one of the base‘s aviation packages. 7.12.4.1.3. Capabilities should be equitably distributed across the AEF pairs. 7.12.4.1.4. MAJCOM FAMs must align ECS forces in one of the two designated AEF pairs for that particular base. Functional areas that are aligned in Band ―A‖ but cannot equitably distribute UTCs in accordance with the ECS Target Base Alignment must request a waiver. The approval level for this deviation is the HAF DCS. See paragraph 10.4. 7.12.4.2. Tempo Band ―B.‖ Forces aligned in Band ―B‖ do not have to follow the Target Base Alignment but must still adhere to the two-hit policy (i.e. a unit‘s (squadron‘s) UTCs should only be aligned in two of the five blocks in Band ―B.‖) 7.12.4.2.1. When UTCs are initially aligned to Band ―B,‖ it is the HAF FAM‘s responsibility to ensure that capability is equitably distributed across the band while still maintaining a two-hit schema. To the maximum extent possible, UTCs should be

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 aligned to a block in Band ―B‖ that will have an overlapping eligibility period to the base‘s alignment in Band ―A.‖ 7.12.4.2.2. Functional areas that are aligned in Band ―B‖ but cannot equitably distribute UTCs while maintaining a two-hit structure must request a waiver. The approval level for this deviation is the HAF DCS. See paragraph 10.4. 7.12.4.3. Tempo Band ―C.‖ Although not required, forces aligned in Band ―C‖ should strive to maintain a two-hit construct. 7.12.4.3.1. When UTCs are initially aligned to Band ―C,‖ it is the HAF FAM‘s responsibility to ensure that capability is equitably distributed across the band. To the maximum extent possible, UTCs should be aligned to a block in Band ―C‖ that will have an overlapping eligibility period to the base‘s alignment in Band ―A.‖ 7.12.4.4. Tempo Bands ―D‖ and ―E.‖ It is expected that forces in Bands ―D‖ and ―E‖ will not follow the two-hit policy and that UTCs will be equitably distributed (―peanut butter spread‖) across all blocks in the applicable band. HAF FAMs must ensure this equal distribution whenever possible. 7.12.4.4.1. In order to effectively and efficiently manage forces postured in a 1:1 deploy-to-dwell (Band ―E‖), functional areas may develop internal management methods to allow overlapping of capability within the Blocks E1 and E2 to ensure CCDR and home station requirements are satisfactorily covered. 7.12.4.5. Tempo Bands ―M‖ and ―N.‖ As AC capability areas, augmented by ARC volunteerism, are realigned in Band ―D‖ or ―E,‖ corresponding ARC capability areas will be realigned into Band ―M‖ or ―N‖ respectively at the discretion of the AFRC/CV or NGB/CF. In accordance with SecDef and SECAF Mobilization Business Rules, a mobilization period will include pre-deployment preparations, deployment and postdeployment administrative time; therefore, 6 months time in theater usually requires a 9month mobilization period. The nine blocks in Band ―M‖ enable ARC forces to maintain a 1:5 mobilization-to-dwell ratio (i.e. 9 months of mobilization and 45 months of dwell). When the postured AC and volunteer ARC capabilities are inadequate to sustain a 1:2 deploy-to-dwell ratio (Band ―D‖), the ARC 2-year utilization plan will be executed. HAF and ARC FAMs will coordinate equivalent distribution of ARC UTCs throughout each of the respective M/N blocks in order to sustain the force indefinitely under mobilization. When the AC tempo, augmented by volunteerism, is able to sustain a 1:2 ratio, ARC forces will be realigned back to Band ―A.‖

7.12.5. UTC Realignment . When realigning UTCs from one band to another, FAMs should minimize the movement from AEF vulnerability period to another to the maximum extent possible and movement of two execution periods should be avoided. A guide for realigning UTCs between bands is at Table 7.4 7.12.6. DELETED. 7.12.7. UTC Realignment within Tempo Band. Once a UTC‘s alignment is determined, any changes to the alignment require a waiver. The approval level for realigning a UTC is HAF DCS except as outlined below. Note: This applies to realigning a UTC from one block to another; moving individuals from one block to another requires MAJCOM/CV approval.

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7.12.7.1. Exception: HAF DCS, or equivalent, may direct an AEF realignment between or during the AEF Schedule by redistributing UTCs within the Tempo Band in order to better balance capabilities across the AEF. Note: realignment of the capability area into another Tempo Band requires AF/A3/5 approval. When executing these HAF-directed realignments, every effort should be made to move as few UTCs as necessary. No waiver is required for these realignments. 7.12.8. Enabler Forces. Certain forces that provide a unique capability or support a specific operation may be aligned in one of the Enabler categories. Due to the different OPTEMPO management standards for these forces, they may not rotate on the normal Tempo Band rotational schedule. Placement of UTCs into the Enabler force should be kept to a minimum because these forces are subject to deploy as often as required. Note: ARC forces will typically remain in Band ―A.‖ 7.12.8.1. Enabler forces are those forces that fall into one of the following categories. Note: Capability areas that fall under one of the Enabler categories may be aligned in the Tempo Bands; however all UTCs of a specific type must be in either the Tempo Bands or the Enabler unless assigned to a specific Enabler unit. 7.12.8.1.1. (DELETED) . 7.12.8.1.2. Air Mobility Operations (E-GRL) . E-GRL (formerly known as Global Reach Laydown) is restricted to airlift and tanker assets and associated support, Contingency Response Groups, AMC En route forces, and Aeromedical Evacuation forces. Only those UTCs that directly support the Global Mobility CONOPS mission will be aligned to this Enabler category. Air Refueling forces and intra-theater airlift forces (currently consisting of C-130 units) support Air Mobility Operations and AEF operations. HQ AMC/A3O will schedule these Enabler assets against AEF requirements and USTRANSCOM/AMC-directed Global Mobility Missions. ARC forces are aligned in appropriate tempo band. The UTCs in this category will constitute most of the Open the Base AETF force module. The lead agency for this Enabler category is AMC/A3X. 7.12.8.1.3. Special Operations and Rescue (E-SOR). E-SOR is restricted to those forces that perform Special Operations and Personnel Recovery. This includes special operations/special tactics forces, as well as resources assigned outside of Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC). Note: It does not automatically include those ECS forces assigned to AFSOC, unless their UTC provides unique capabilities for supported SOF and/or is funded by US Special Operations Command (USSOCOM). This category also includes forces within the Personnel Recovery triad (CSAR and Guardian Angel). Other special activity missions (e.g. 820 SFG) may be considered on a case-by-case basis. The lead agency for this Enabler category is AF/A3O-AS. 7.12.8.1.4. (DELETED) . 7.12.8.1.5. Theater battle management (E-TBM) . E-TBM is restricted to those command and control UTCs that due to their unique and/or limited nature (e.g., AFFOR, CRC, AMD, etc) cannot be aligned to the Tempo Bands. The lead agency for this Enabler category is AF/A3O-AYO.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 7.12.8.1.6. (DELETED) . 7.12.8.1.7. Army Support (E-ARY). E-ARY is restricted to those UTCs which are habitually associated with supporting specific Army (or other sister Service) units such as combat weather teams or TACP/ASOC UTCs. These UTCs almost exclusively support the Army. The co-lead agencies for this Enabler category are AF/A3O-W and AF/A3O-AYO. 7.12.8.1.8. Essential Installation Support (E-EIS) . E-EIS is restricted to those UTCs that are required to establish and operate an airbase. There are two groupings of UTCs in this category: (1) Air Force vehicle- and equipment-only UTCs that do not directly support or deploy with specific units, and (2) UTCs from specialized units required for base establishment such as RED HORSE, BEAR assets and forces, engineering and installation (E&I) teams, combat communications, etc. The lead agency for this Enabler category is AF/A4/7. 7.12.8.1.9. DELETED 7.12.8.1.10. (DELETED) . 7.12.8.1.11. Global Strike Support (E-GSA). E-GSA is restricted to those UTCs that support the Global Strike mission to include forces identified in DoD Nuclear Weapons Employment Guidance (NUWEP), Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan-Nuclear (JSCP_N) Supplement, and the Requirements and Planning Document (RPD). For some units in this category, this will be a secondary mission (units may be dualpostured). The co-lead agencies for this Enabler category are ACC/A3O and AFSPC/A3O. 7.12.8.1.12. (DELETED) . 7.12.8.1.13. Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Support (E-ISR). EISR is restricted to those weapon systems and direct support UTCs that perform the ISR mission. The lead agency for this Enabler category is AF/A2D. 7.12.8.1.14. Combat Air Forces (E-CAF). E-CAF is restricted to those weapon systems within the CAF community that cannot operate within one of the existing Tempo Bands. Direct support UTCs (e.g. aviation maintenance, munitions, etc) will also be aligned in this category if the corresponding aviation UTCs are included. ARC forces are aligned in the appropriate tempo band. The lead agency for this Enabler category is ACC/A3O. 7.12.8.1.15. Additional Enabler categories may be created through coordination with AF/A5XW. 7.12.8.2. Enabler assets are intended for specific operations and are not normally sourced by AFPC/DPW. MAJCOMs may release certain Enabler assets for DPW sourcing. These will be stipulated in the applicable Enabler guidance (see paragraph 7.12.8.3) or through one-time concurrence with the MAJCOM/A3. 7.12.8.3. Lead agency for each Enabler category will develop and staff posturing, coding, and utilization guidance for their applicable Enabler category. AF/A3/5 will approve this Enabler guidance. Lead responsible agency may be a MAJCOM or a HAF directorate. Enabler guidance will include:

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7.12.8.3.1. Expand on the criteria listed in paragraph 7.12.8.1 on what UTCs may be postured in the applicable Enabler. Include justification criteria, if any, required by the lead agency. 7.12.8.3.2. Outline the posturing coding for how UTC records in the Enabler should be coded. 7.12.8.3.3. Describe the trigger points on when and how UTCs will be used. 7.12.8.3.4. Describe who will be responsible for scheduling capabilities within the Enabler. If a portion of the Enabler may be used to fulfill rotational requirements, describe the applicable thresholds. 7.12.8.4. (DELETED) . 7.12.8.5. (DELETED) . Table 7.1. Deploy-to-Dwell Calculation Formula. Step Description

POC(s)

Remarks

A

Total Active Component (AC) UTCs

HAF FAM

UTCs postured in AEF Capability Library

B

In-place Requirements

MAJCOM FAMs

UTCs w/ P-Codes of ―DP*‖ or ―DX*‖

C

Historically Unavailable UTCs (ART Red)

HAF FAMs; AF/A1PR; AFPC/DPW

D

Total AC UTCs rotationally available

Calculation

E

AC UTC Rqmt per Rotation (Worldwide CCDR Rqmts)

AF/A3O-AO; AF/A1PR; AFPC/DPW; Component FAMs

F

Rotations Supported

Calculation

D / E (round down)

G

Deploy-to-Dwell Ratio

Calculation

1: (F – 1) (See Note 1)

A – (B+C)

Note 1: If calculation indicates 1:1 deploy-to-dwell, HAF FAM is required to determine how much additional capability is required to be able to posture at a 1:2. (Table 7.3.)

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Table 7.2. Deploy-to-Dwell Calculation Mitigation Formula Step Description

POC(s)

Remarks

H

HAF FAM

Band ―D‖ = 3

Desired Band Multiplier

Band ―C‖ = 4 Band ―A/B‖ = 5 I

Requirements per Cycle

Calculation

E*H

J

UTCs Shortage

Calculation

I-D

K

Anticipated Contribution From Homestation Support

HAF FAM; MAJCOM FAMs; AFPC/DPW

Percentage of ―DP*‖ and/or ―DX*‖ UTCs

(subtracted out in Step B) L

Anticipated Contribution From ―Unavailable‖ UTCs

Risk Assessment: DCS AFPC/DPW

Percentage of ART ―Red‖ and ―Yellow‖ UTCs (Fragging Rqmt)

(subtracted out in Step C) M

Anticipated Contribution From ARC (Volunteer and Mobilized)

ARC FAMs, HAF FAM

ARC mobilization only applicable to prevent moving to Band ―E‖

N

Mitigation Strategy

Calculation

(K + L + M) > J

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Table 7.3. Guideline for Realigning UTCs between Tempo Bands. Realigning To1:

Band "A"

Realigning From:

Band "B"

Band "A"

Band "B"

Band "C"

Band "D"

Band "E"

----

A1 - B1 A2 - B2 A3 - B3 A4 - B4 A5 - B5

A1 - C1 1/4 A2 - C1 3/4 A2 - C2 1/2 A3 - C2 1/2 A3 - C3 3/4 A4 - C3 1/4 A4 - C4 A5 - C4

A1 - D1 2/3 A2 - D1 1//3 A2 - D2 A3 - D2 1/3 A4 - D2 2/3 A4 - D3 A5 - D3

A1 - E1 A2 - E1 1/2 A3 - E1 1/2 A3 - E2 A4 - E2 A5 - E2

B1 - C1 1/4 B2 - C1 3/4 B2 - C2 1/2 B3 - C2 1/2 B3 - C3 3/4 B4 - C3 1/4 B4 - C4 B5 - C4

B1 - D1 2/3 B2 - D1 1//3 B2 - D2 B3 - D2 1/3 B4 - D2 2/3 B4 - D3 B5 - D3

B1 - E1 B2 - E1 1/2 B3 - E1 1/2 B3 - E2 B4 - E2 B5 - E2

C1 - D1 1/3 C2 - D1 2/3 C2 - D2 2/3 C3 - D2 1/3 C3 - D3 C4 - D3

C1 - E1 C2 - E1 C3 - E2 C4 - E2

B1 - A1 B2 - A2 B3 - A3 B4 - A4 B5 - A5

----

Band "M"

Band "N"

See Note 2

See Note 2

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

D1 - E1 1/2 D2 - E1 1/2 D2 - E2 D3 - E2

N/A

N/A

----

N/A

N/A

Band "C"

4/5 C1 - A1 1/5 C1 - A2 3/5 C2 - A2 2/5 C2 - A3 2/5 C3 - A3 3/5 C3 - A4 1/5 C4 - A4 4/5 C4 - A5

4/5 C1 - B1 1/5 C1 - B2 3/5 C2 - B2 2/5 C2 - B3 2/5 C3 - B3 3/5 C3 - B4 1/5 C4 - B4 4/5 C4 - B5

Band "D"

3/5 D1 - A1 2/5 D1 - A2 1/5 D2 - A2 3/5 D2 - A3 1/5 D2 - A4 2/5 D3 - A4 3/5 D3 - A5

3/5 D1 - B1 2/5 D1 - B2 1/5 D2 - B2 3/5 D2 - B3 1/5 D2 - B4 2/5 D3 - B4 3/5 D3 - B5

3/4 D1 - C1 1/4 D1 - C2 1/2 D2 - C2 1/2 D2 - C3 1/4 D3 - C3 3/4 D3 - C4

Band "E"

2/5 E1 - A1 2/5 E1 - A2 1/5 E1 - A3 1/5 E2 - A3 2/5 E2 - A4 2/5 E2 - A5

2/5 E1 - B1 2/5 E1 - B2 1/5 E1 - B3 1/5 E2 - B3 2/5 E2 - B4 2/5 E2 - B5

1/2 E1 - C1 1/2 E1 - C2 1/2 E2 - C3 1/2 E2 - C3

2/3 E1 - D1 1/3 E1 - D2 1/3 E2 - D2 2/3 E2 - D3

Band "M"

See Note 2

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

----

See Note 2

Band "N"

See Note 2

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

See Note 2

----

----

----

Note 1: This Table is based on an Execution Period where all Tempo Bands are starting with Block 1 (e.g. Month 0-6 in Figure 2.2. If realignment occurs at another Execution Period, a similar distribution will be used only with different blocks. For example, if realigning from Band ―C‖ to Band ―D‖ at Execution Period months 12 – 18 (Figure 2.2), C3 will realign to D3; C4 will realign to D3 and D1; C1 will realign to D1 and D2; and C2 will realign to D2. AF/A5XW will develop a Band Realignment Matrix as part of each AEF Schedule implementation timeline.

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Note 2: ARC will develop a matrix to identify a predictable plan for reposturing ARC UTCS between Tempo Bands ―A‖ ―M‖ and ―N‖ to ensure a unified strategy for all ARC FAMs to utilize in reposturing.

Table 7.4. AEF Capability Library (AEFBN) Codes. AEFBN CODE (UTA)1 BLKA1 BLKA2 BLKA3 BLKA4 BLKA5 BLKA6 BLKA7 BLKA8 BLKA9 BLKA0 BLKB1 BLKB2 BLKB3 BLKB4 BLKB5 BLKC1 BLKC2 BLKC3 BLKC4 BLKD1 BLKD2 BLKD3 BLKE1 BLKE2 BLKE3 BLKE4 BLKM1 BLKM2 BLKM3 BLKM4 BLKM5 BLKM6 BLKM7 BLKM8 BLKM9

DESCRIPTION Block A1 Block A2 Block A3 Block A4 Block A5 Block A6 Block A7 Block A8 Block A9 Block A10 Block B1 Block B2 Block B3 Block B4 Block B5 Block C1 Block C2 Block C3 Block C4 Block D1 Block D2 Block D3 Block E1 Block E2 Offset of Block E1 (with AF/A5XW coordination only) Offset of Block E2 (with AF/A5XW coordination only) Block M1 Block M2 Block M3 Block M4 Block M5 Block M6 Block M7 Block M8 Block M9

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 BLKN1 BLKN2 BLKN3 BLKN4 BLKN5 BLKN6 BLKN7 BLKN8 E-GRL E-SOR E-TBM E-ARY E-EIS E-GSA E-ISR E-CAF

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Block N1 Block N2 Block N3 Block N4 Block N5 Block N6 Block N7 Block N8 Enabler Air Mobility Operations (formerly Global Reach Laydown) Special Operations and Rescue Enabler Theater Battle Management Enabler Army Support Enabler Essential Installation Support Enabler Global Strike Assets Enabler Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Support Enabler Combat Air Forces

Note 1: Corresponding MilPDS AEFI codes are included in Table 14.1

7.12.9. The above codes will be used in the AEF library column of UTC Availability to indicate to which AEF each UTC record is aligned. 7.12.10. Once the UTC is aligned to an AEF, it is available for potential sourcing to meet requirements across the range of military operations depending on the posturing code. 7.12.11. The above codes will be used in the AEFBN column of UTA to indicate the alignment of each UTC record with each AEF block/pair or Enabler category. 7.12.11.1. AEFBN codes for CSAF-approved deviations will be created and maintained by AF/A5XW. 7.13. Posturing Codes (P-Code). Prior to P-coding units‘ UTCs, every level of leadership (DCS, Air Staff, MAJCOM/CV, Wing/CC and Unit/Squadron/CC) must, through the respective FAM, expressly articulate their permissions, mitigating factors and risks that are expected in order to make the maximum amount of capability available to the Combatant Commands. Resource dependent mitigations (e.g. contract dollars, IMAs) must be planned for and ready for immediate implementation during normal rotational operations and at each declared level of surge (i.e., minimum, limited, and maximum). The wing/ base commander is expected to place this guidance in the base support plan and ensure their subordinate commanders are aware of the permissions, mitigating factors, and risks, and use them when validating the proposed P-codes and of the respective MAJCOM FAMs 7.13.1. Posturing codes indicate the availability of UTCs a unit has postured. The codes are located in the P-Code column of the UTA. The specific procedures and guidelines for determining a UTC record‘s "P-Code" are outlined in paragraphs 7.14. through 7.16.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 7.13.1.1. Although P-Codes are recorded for each postured UTC, they are not tied to that UTC. Instead, they are used to determine the maximum number of UTCs of that type that can be deployed simultaneously. During rotational operations, the sum of all **S coded UTCs for that rotation can be tasked. If surge is authorized, then the sum of *W* UTCs for the entire AEF cycle can be tasked. For example, UTCs coded DXX are just as deployable as a DWS UTC as long as the maximum number of simultaneously deployed UTCs has not been exceeded. UTCs are not tasked by specific UTC record, but by UTC type only. 7.13.1.2. The P-code is determined when the functional area is in the baseline AEF (Band ―A‖). When a functional area realigns to a different tempo band, the P-code will not be redetermined.

7.13.2. The first character of the P-Code (D for ―deployable‖ or A for ―associate‖) shows the deployable capability as a ―Standard Deployable‖ D-UTC or an ―Associate‖ A-UTC. 7.13.3. The second character of the P-Code is used in determining the maximum simultaneously tasked UTC records that can be utilized under surge conditions. 7.13.3.1. For standard deployable UTCs, the second character is either ―P‖, "W" or "X." The ―P‖ designates the UTC records that are required to be ―Employed at Homestation‖ to support a CCDR mission or are ―Deployable Within Assigned Theater Only‖ (see paragraph 7.7.6 & 7.7.7). The "W" is given to each UTC in a unit that, when combined or aggregated, represent the maximum simultaneous deployment capability of the unit for contingencies, up to and including major theater war. The total number of ―P‖ and ―W‖ coded UTCs postured by a unit, across all its aligned libraries, represents the unit‘s most stringent tasking capability (in-place wartime mission plus maximum surge (surge level 3)). The ―X‖ is given to UTC records to define the minimum homestation requirement of the unit. P-coding determines what deployable UTCs go on units‘ DOC statements. See AFI 10-201 for current DOC and SORTS requirements. When sourcing contingency plan requirements, the Air Force can only source DW* UTCs and specific DP* coded UTCs that are assigned to the corresponding CCDR. 7.13.3.2. For Associate UTCs, the second character is either ―P‖, ―W‖ or ―X.‖ A ―P‖ as the second character represents the authorizations included in the A-UTC that are required to Employ at Homestation with a Wartime Mission. A ―W‖ as the second character represents that the authorizations included in the A-UTC would be available for tasking during all conditions. However, these positions must be tasked via a standard deployable UTC. Note: UTCs coded as AX* may be deployed as long as a like AW*coded UTC record remains at home station. AP coded UTCs have a home station wartime mission. 7.13.4. The third character for both standard deployable and Associate UTCs is either "S" or "X." The "S," which stands for rotational (formerly steady-state) sustainable support, identifies the UTC Availability records that are available to support taskings within its aligned AEF rotation without exceeding the unit‘s capability to sustain critical home station operations. The ―X‖ represents UTCs that are not normally available within the rotational construct without exceeding the unit‘s capability to sustain critical home station operations. Rotational sustainable support refers to the level of support or capability that can be provided within the AEF rotational construct.

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7.13.5. (DELETED) . 7.13.6. Posturing codes will not be used to justify manpower programming actions, such as program element code (PEC) changes, nor will it be used as justification to prevent pending or potential Competitive Sourcing and Privatization (CS&P) actions. 7.14. Procedures for P-Coding Standard Deployable UTCs. The P-Code matrix described above results in 12 different Posturing Codes -six deployable and six associate. In order to correctly P-Code records, MAJCOMs must follow the Six Step process outlined below. Ad hoc coding of UTCs could result in an overstatement or understatement of a unit‘s capability that is available for wartime/surge operations or for AEF rotational operations. 7.14.1. Determining P-codes require unit commanders, in coordination with MAJCOM FAMs, to make decisions in the posturing phase that would normally have to be made at the execution phase. Definition of each unit‘s deployment capability is beyond a simple mathematical equation because of the unique circumstances of each base or unit. The basic essence of determining P-Codes comes from how the following three questions are answered -―What capability is required at homestation to fulfill the unit‘s wartime mission?‖ ―What are the minimum home station requirements to continue critical operations during maximum surge (surge level 3) operations?‖, and ―What are the minimum requirements needed at home station during the normal standing rotational operations (i.e. non-surge operations that can be sustained indefinitely)?‖ 7.14.2. An example of how UTC P-Codes are generated from start to finish for a generic unit is located on the War and Mobilization Plans‘ web site (http://www.xo.hq.af.mil/xox/xoxw/index.htm) and should be reviewed before coding deployable UTCs. The following six steps are a written interpretation of the website PowerPoint presentation. 7.14.2.1. Step 1 - Determine what UTCs and the number of UTCs that need to be postured based on the Air Staff FAM guidance (see http://aefcenter.acc.af.mil/aep/team.asp) provided on the AEF Online web site. Posture as many standard deployable UTCs as possible. Any residual deployable authorizations will be postured into associate UTCs. 7.14.2.2. Step 2 - Determine Wartime Requirements that are Employed at Homestation or Deployable Within Assigned Theater Only with a Wartime Mission supporting a CCDR. This refers to the capability that is identified as wartime essential by a combatant commander but is intended to be employed at home station or deployed within assigned theater. First, determine what positions in the A-UTC are to be employed at home station or deployed within assigned theater and code these as ―AP*‖. Second, determine which additional standard deployable UTCs are required to be employed at home station or deployed within assigned theater; these will be coded as ―DP*.‖ The third character of the P-Code will be determined in Step 6. 7.14.2.3. Step 3 - Determine Minimum Critical Home Station Requirements during Maximum Surge (surge level 3) Operation (Wartime). This refers to capability, in terms of UTCs, that must be withheld during a maximum simultaneous deployment of capability during maximum surge (surge level 3) operations. Unit commanders, in coordination with Air Staff and MAJCOM FAMs, will determine, in terms of UTCs, the

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 wartime home station requirements that are over and above positions in the associate UTCs and civilian positions. Backfill workarounds (contingency contracts, civilian overhire authority, individual mobilization augmentees, etc.) should be used when available to minimize required withholds. Withheld capability should not reduce what is currently shown as deployable capability in Part II of the unit‘s DOC. During this level of conflict, it is assumed that all deployable warfighting capability is committed and only sustainment and training directly supporting the conflict is provided. At the end of the contingency or operation, significant reconstitution and retraining of forces will be required. All UTC Availability records that are home-station required are coded DX* and all those not required are coded DW*. The third character is determined during Step 6. 7.14.2.4. Step 4 Align UTCs to AEF Libraries (see paragraph 7.12). MAJCOM FAMs will align all deployable UTCs from an installation into two AEF libraries to enhance teaming. UTCs will be aligned as equally as possible between the two AEF libraries (N/A for ARC). 7.14.2.5. Step 5 - Determine Minimum Sustainable Home Station Requirements during maxi- mum, non-surge rotational operations. Unit commanders, in coordination with Air Staff and MAJCOM FAMs, will determine, in terms of UTCs, the minimum rotational sustainable home station requirements that are over and above positions in the associate UTCs and civilian positions. As with wartime home station requirements, backfill workarounds such as contingency contracts, civilian overhire authority, individual mobilization augmentees, etc., should be considered. 7.14.2.5.1. When determining minimum home station requirements, units are expected to feel discomfort from the level of support provided during an AEF rotation without "breaking the base" to a point where future aligned AEFs would be unsupportable. Restricted services and extended workdays do not provide sufficient justification to withhold deployable capability from AEF rotational participation. Deployable capability should not be withheld unless deployment of that capability will risk or actually create significant and lasting harm to the capability and readiness of the unit to support the AEF. 7.14.2.5.2. Rotational operations assumes that the "at home" sustainment, training, and support requirements do not fully go away, even during the unit‘s AEF deployment. Even though MAJCOMs and commanders are expected to investigate and implement mitigation strategies and provide permissions to units to defer or reduce performance standards to allow maximum deployment participation during the unit‘s AEF deployment, the reality is that home station requirements do not fully go away. To assist in determining home station requirements, commanders must review the home station impact mitigation plans and FAM prioritization and sequencing instructions found on the AEF Online web site (http://aefcenter.acc.af.mil/aep/team.asp). Note: The minimum wartime (maximum surge) home station requirement and the minimum rotational sustainable home station requirement must be determined independently of each other. 7.14.2.6. Step 6 Determining the Third Character of the UTC Availability P-Code. The third character of the P-Code is dependent on the UTC AEF alignment (Step 4) and the minimum rotational home station requirements (Step 5). When one of the two AEF

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libraries is eligible for tasking, determine if UTCs in the nontasked AEF library are sufficient to satisfy minimum rotational home station requirements. If not, identify the additional required UTCs from the first AEF library and add an X as the third character to the P-Code for these UTCs. For all other UTCs in the first AEF library, add an S as the third character. Accomplish the same process for the second AEF library‘s UTCs. Repeat with additional AEF libraries as required. 7.14.3. Each functional area may establish standards for MAJCOMs to follow in determining the P-Codes. These standards will be included in the Air Staff FAM‘s Prioritization/Sequencing and Mitigation Strategies guidance. 7.14.4. Each MAJCOM FAM is responsible for determining the initial P-Codes for all UTC records within their functional areas based on the 6-step process identified in paragraph 7.14 Wing commanders will validate the coding for their units. The MAJCOM/CV will adjudicate disparities between wings within the command. 7.14.5. To ensure an appropriate balance of available forces, the VCSAF will adjudicate disparities in posturing levels between MAJCOMs. 7.15. Definitions for P-Coding Standard Deployable UTCs. The various P-codes indicate what UTC records would generally be available during normal rotational operations or during the various levels of surge. Minimum surge (surge level 1) operations must be approved by AF/A3/5, and results when rotational requirements exceed the available D*S capability within an AEF pair and additional UTCs are required within that AEF pair. At this time, sourcing of DWX and DXX UTCs are authorized up to the total number of each UTC coded DW* across all AEFs. For limited surge (surge level 2) operations, the requirement to task UTCs in the next AEF pair must initially be approved by the SECDEF. Once overarching approval is granted by SECDEF, limited surge (surge level 2) of individual functional areas must be approved by the AF/CV. Again, sourcing of DWX and DXX UTCs are authorized up to the total number of each UTC coded DW* across all AEFs. Maximum surge (surge level 3) operations, consists of reaching forward past 2 AEF pairs and using the maximum DW* aggregate capability. The total number of DW* coded for each type of UTC across the 10 AEFs defines the total number of that UTC from a particular unit that can be deployed simultaneously during surge operations. 7.15.1. DP*. Authorizations that fight from home station and have a direct Combatant Commander mission. DP*-coded UTCs should be identified in a combatant commander‘s TPFDD as an in-place requirement. A DPX or APX coded UTC indicates a home station mission, a direct Combatant Commander mission or deployable within an assigned theater only, and therefore not normally able to deploy for AEF operations. The authorizations within the UTC are always required for the critical CCDR in-place/in-theater mission. 7.15.1.1. DPS. Authorizations assigned to DPS coded UTCs are required to meet combatant commander in-place missions at home station, but can be deployed in their aligned AEF during rotational operations implementing permissions, mitigating factors, or accepting risk. 7.15.1.2. DPX. Authorizations assigned to DPX-coded UTCs are required to meet combatant commander in-place requirements at home station or deployed within assigned theater and are not normally available for deployments.

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7.15.2. DW*. The aggregate of DW* UTC records represents the maximum simultaneous deployment capability of the unit during maximum surge (surge level 3) operations. There should be sufficient DW* UTCs to support OPLAN tasking in support of current Strategic Planning Guidance. Commanders must articulate ―permissions‖, ―mitigation strategies‖, and ―risk‖ factors in order to provide sufficient DW* UTCs to the Combatant Commands. 7.15.2.1. DWS. DWS UTCs are available to support the range of military operations (ROMO) requirements to include small-scale contingencies and short-duration crises; standing, rotational operations; or major theater war. 7.15.2.2. DWX. DWX UTCs are not normally available to support rotational requirements within their aligned AEF library; however, they can be made available during minimum surge (surge level 1) within their AEF pair, during limited surge (surge level 2), reaching forward into the next AEF pair or during maximum surge (surge level 3), reaching beyond two AEF pair. 7.15.3. DX*. Represents the minimum number of UTC requirements to support critical home station operations. 7.15.3.1. DXS. DXS UTCs can normally deploy in support of AEF requirements within their aligned AEF rotation. DXS UTC records are usually coded as such because there is a like UTC that is coded DWS in the unit‘s other AEF library. A UTC record may result in a DXS, per the coding methodology, because the UTC record cannot be deployed while another UTC record of the same type is deployed. 7.15.3.2. DXX. UTCs coded DXX are not normally available for deployment under non-surge ops within their aligned AEF, but can be deployed during declared surge operations if the maximum number of simultaneously deployed UTC number (DW*) has not been reached. In those cases where the maximum number of DW* UTCs are reached, the AEFC may request additional DXX coded UTCs only after coordination with the MAJCOM FAM who will confirm availability with the providing commander. The AEF Center will announce when it is anticipated that it will need this capability so units can work to implement mitigation strategies and ―green-up‖ red-assessed UTCs. A DXXcoded UTC can be deployed during rotational operations provided a similar D*S, in the same pair, does not deploy. 7.15.4. (DELETED) . 7.15.4.1. (DELETED) . 7.15.4.2. (DELETED) . 7.15.4.3. (DELETED) . 7.16. Definitions for P-Coding Associate UTCs. 7.16.1. Posturing codes for A-UTCs provide the AEFC and the unit commander with a reference on how many "residual" positions a unit has once all standard deployable UTCs have been postured. Unlike posturing codes for standard deployable UTCs, posturing codes for A-UTCs show the com mander‘s intent on how many positions and for what level of conflict he/she can make available for tasking. Air Staff FAMs, working with the MAJCOM FAMs, must ensure the minimum numbers of authorizations are postured in A-UTCs. Standard deployable UTCs must be postured to the maximum extent possible. The

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authorizations postured in A-UTCs must be placed in standard UTCs prior to being tasked to deploy in a TPFDD. EXCEPTION: When no standard UTC exists (e.g. many IA taskings), requirements should be tasked in TPFDD using a nonstandard - Z99 UTC. 7.16.1.1. APS. A-UTCs coded APS are required at homestation to fulfill a combatant commander‘s in-place mission. However, these positions may be used to deploy under normal rotational operations, primarily as alternates or IA fills. 7.16.1.2. APX. A-UTCs coded APX are required at homestation or deployed within assigned the ater to fulfill a combatant commander‘s in-place mission. Additionally, these authorizations are not typically available to deploy during normal, rotational operations due to the homestation war time commitment. 7.16.1.3. AWS. A-UTCs coded AWS contain authorizations available for requirements across the range of military operations. 7.16.1.4. AWX. A-UTCs coded AWX can normally be made available during levels of increased conflict, but not during routine rotational operations. 7.16.1.5. AXS. The authorizations (Airmen) in A-UTCs coded AXS are normally available within their rotation but may not be available during levels of increased conflict because of commitments to wartime tasks, such as CAT duty. 7.16.1.6. AXX. The sum of positions (AFSCs/grades) in A-UTCs with AXX P-codes is not normally available for tasking. However, individuals filling these in-place requirements can be swapped with or be an alternate for positions in other associate or standard UTCs. 7.16.2. (DELETED) . 7.17. Rule Sets and Posturing Checklist 7.17.1. General Posturing Rule Sets. For a UTC to be postured by MAJCOMs, the following criteria must be met: 7.17.1.1. UTCs cannot be postured in UTC Availability until they have been registered, approved, and placed in MEFPAK. 7.17.1.2. Small oneand two-person standard deployable UTCs should be avoided unless the UTC represents the logical team or package size to support combatant commander TPFDD requirements (i.e., chaplains, historians, comptrollers, public affairs, aircraft battle damage repair, etc.). 7.17.1.3. Deployable UTCs postured in UTC Availability must contain all funded manpower authorizations as specified in the MANFOR or is an authorized substitution as listed in the MISCAP. In other words, a tailored UTC will not be postured unless a waiver from AF/A5XW has been approved. 7.17.1.3.1. If functional areas have overages (available personnel is greater than authorized), then these functional areas are permitted to posture above their authorizations with AF/A5XW concurrence (see Chapter 10). Note: In the MilPDS, all personnel must be given an AEFI regardless of the decision to apply for posturing waivers. If two or more individuals are assigned to a UMD authorization, then each individual is associated with an appropriate AEFI. HAF FAMs should include in the

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 prioritization and sequencing guidance how manning overages should be postured and/or associated with AEFIs. 7.17.1.3.2. If authorizations are unfilled, this must be reflected in the AEF Reporting Tool (ART) (see AFI 10-244). Units will not be tasked to provide personnel resources for wartime and/or contingency requirements that exceed their unit manpower document (UMD) authorizations unless authorized to posture above their authorizations. 7.17.1.4. Deployable UTCs in UTC Availability must be authorized the full allowance standard of equipment as specified in the Logistics Force Packaging (LOGFOR) subsystem. If authorized equipment is not on hand, this must be reflected in ART. 7.17.1.4.1. EXCEPTIONS: There are two exceptions to this requirement -- if the unit is posturing MANFOR-only, or if the UTC record is "fragged" across multiple units. 7.17.1.4.1.1. Units Providing MANFOR Only. Units may posture the entire manpower only portion of a UTC if the complete equipment requirement is not available. The UTC record will be coded using the standard coding procedures; however, UTC Availability must be annotated to reflect that the UTC record is providing manpower only and that the entire equipment detail has been tailored out. MANFOR Only UTC records allow the Air Force to posture additional manpower authorizations in standard deployable UTCs; these UTCs may be executed when the equipment portion is provided by another UTC, available in place, or not required. Prior to posturing a tailored UTC, the MAJCOM FAM must seek a waiver from AF/A5XW (see Chapter 10). FAMs may choose to develop personnel only UTCs when equipment is not authorized or funded. 7.17.1.4.1.2. Fragging UTC Records. The second exception is if a UTC record is"fragged." See paragraph 7.17.1.5 for details on fragging UTC records. 7.17.1.4.2. In such cases as described above, the unit must still be able to provide the full compliment of manpower authorizations as described in paragraph 7.17.1.3 7.17.1.5. UTCs will only be filled with authorizations and equipment from the same unit (i.e., not fragged). Exceptions to this policy require a waiver (see Chapter 10). Fragging could occur where one unit provides the manpower and another provides the equipment or if one unit provides manning augmentation to another unit. Typically, fragging UTC records will only be allowed in cases where the two units are formally linked in DOC statements or other functional area documents. 7.17.1.6. No authorization will be counted against more than one UTC record unless a waiver is granted by AF/A5XW (see Chapter 10). An example of an approved dualposturing waiver is for EWO tankers. Additionally, each UTC record will be placed into only one AEF library per cycle. 7.17.1.7. If a unit can no longer support a postured UTC (e.g., a change in authorized position or equipment), the unit must coordinate with the respective MAJCOM war planner and MAJCOM FAM. The MAJCOM war planner will accomplish the following tasks when deleting a UTC Availability record: 7.17.1.7.1. (DELETED) .

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7.17.1.7.2. It is the responsibility of the MAJCOM war planner to notify any component headquarters of records that have been deleted from UTC Availability that are sourced in any OPLAN/CONPLAN. The component headquarters will shortfall these TPFDD records and these shortfalls will be re-sourced at the next sourcing opportunity. 7.17.1.7.3. If the UTC record is in the AEF pair currently being sourced, the MAJCOM must coordinate with the AEFC. 7.17.2. Coding and Alignment Rule Sets 7.17.2.1. Each UTC Availability record will have a corresponding P-Code in the Posturing Code column. Paragraphs 7.15 and 7.16 outline the procedures for determining the appropriate code for standard deployable and associate UTCs respectively. 7.17.2.2. UTC Availability records will be aligned and coded by the owning MAJCOM to one of the 10 AEF libraries. Only UTCs that meet the guidance in paragraph 7.12.8 will be placed in the Enabler library. 7.17.2.3. Standard, deployable UTCs (DEPIDs 1, 2, 3, E, and P) must have a P-Code beginning with "D" and must have a corresponding AEF library. 7.17.2.4. Associate UTCs (DEPID 6) must have a P-Code beginning with "A", must have a corresponding AEF library, specify the number of authorization in the AUTH column of UTC Availability and provide AFSC detail. 7.17.2.5. The AUTH data element must be greater than zero (0) unless it is an equipment only UTC (DEPID of "E"). Note: The AUTH data element is populated automatically for standard deployable UTCs from the MEFPAK. For Associate UTCs, the AUTH data element is automatically updated when mandatory level 4 detail is manually provided. 7.17.2.6. At base level and below, alignment of all UTCs in Band ―A‖ must match the ECS Target Base Alignment unless a waiver to the two-Hit policy is submitted and approved (Chapter 10). 7.17.2.7. DELETED. 7.17.2.8. For A-UTCs, there should be only one UTC record for each UTC/UIC/AEF library/ P-Code combination. 7.17.3. Miscellaneous Rule Sets 7.17.3.1. Personnel in deployable UTCs must be trained in accordance with AFI 10-403 (immunizations, small arms training, etc.) and be equipped or have access to equipment to maintain the UTC capability. 7.17.3.2. ART must be updated to reflect status of personnel and equipment for each standard deployable UTC in accordance with AFI 10-244. 7.17.3.3. When "assigned" personnel is less than "authorized," priority should be given to filling UTCs required to maintain maximum combat capability as described by the unit DOC statement and reported in SORTS. For most units this will put priority on filling deployable UTCs; however for units with an employed home station/in-place primary

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 wartime mission, priority will be placed on in-place requirements. As a reminder, a UTC record coded DX* can fill a DW* requirement at execution as long as the total number of UTCs of that particular type does not exceed the total number of DW* UTCs of that type postured across all AEF libraries.

7.17.4. Posturing Checklist. 7.17.4.1. For warfighting organizations, was every funded military manpower authorization postured? It is critical that FAMs do not posture unfunded manpower requirements. FAMs must ensure only funded requirements are identified to be postured. 7.17.4.2. Can any more standard deployable UTCs be postured from residual positions (associate UTCs)? 7.17.4.3. Was posturing based on Air Staff FAM priority and sequencing guidance? 7.17.4.4. Was alignment to AEF pair in accordance with ECS Target Base Alignment? (Band ―A‖ only) 7.17.4.5. If aligned in the Enabler library, do UTCs meet the criteria for one of the Enabler categories? 7.17.4.6. Do UTC records have the appropriate P-Code and AEF library code as described in Coding Rule sets above? 7.17.4.7. (DELETED) . 7.17.4.8. Are A-UTCs postured at the UIC level and in functionally designed UTCs? 7.17.4.9. Are A-UTCs aligned per designated rotation for base-level and below and across the AEF libraries for above base level? 7.17.4.10. Was line-level detail added for all A-UTC records? 7.17.4.11. Was line level detail exploded for all standard UTC records? 7.18. Sourcing UTCs in TPFDDs. The correct posturing and coding of UTCs in UTC Availability facilitates sourcing of TPFDD requirements. This includes TPFDDs that support contingency plans, crisis action plans, and TPFDDs for rotational operations. Details for sourcing TPFDD requirements across the range of military operations are in Chapter 8 and Chapter 9. 7.19. Multiple UTC Groups (MUGs), Mission Platform Packages (MPPs) and AETF Force Modules (FMs). In order to facilitate UTC requirements determination, MUGs, MPPs and FMs have been developed. MUGs are listings of UTCs that correspond to a specific PAA and MDS. MPPs are listings of UTCs that support the MUGs and correspond to MDS categories (Fighters, Bombers, Airlift, Tankers, ISR, Rescue, etc). In addition to linking UTCs, MUGs, MPPs and FMs may or may not link specific units (UICs). 7.19.1. MUGs are primarily used in contingency planning. Currently, the only MUGs utilized are aviation MUGs. These MUGs include the aviation and direct combat support UTCs for a specific unit (e.g. maintenance, munitions, spares, etc.). The aviation UTCs are derived from the UTCs listed in the WMP-3 Part 1; the support UTCs are those that are specifically listed in the aviation UTCs mission capability (MISCAP) statement. Aviation MUGs, if sourced, should be sourced from the same location. MPPs are also aviation FMs,

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but are not directly associated with a particular PAA/MDS, but are associated with MDS categories and would not normally be sourced as a FM. 7.19.2. AETF FMs are more generic UTC combinations that provide an overarching mission. There are multiple AETF FMs: open the airbase, command and control, establish the airbase, operate the airbase, and robust the airbase. The UTCs that comprise these FMs will be equitably aligned across the AEF libraries to facilitate crisis action planning while maintaining the AEF. AETF FMs are discussed in detail in Chapter 6. 7.19.3. Functional Area and Cross-Functional Area Force Modules. Although not currently formalized, Functional/Cross-Functional Area FMs also facilitate UTC requirements determination during TPFDD development. These FMs contain modular-scalable UTCs that are commonly combined at time of execution to form a specific capability, e.g. base transportation function, AFFOR staff, etc. Functional/Cross-Functional Area FMs are also discussed in detail in Chapter 6.

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Chapter 8 TIME-PHASED FORCE AND DEPLOYMENT DATA (TPFDD) MANAGEMENT Section 8A—Purpose 8.1. Purpose. The purpose of this chapter is to provide the background information, guidance and procedures for the development, maintenance, and utilization of the Time-Phased Force Deployment Data (TPFDD) in an Air and Space Expeditionary Force presentation manner. This chapter addresses cradle-to-grave TPFDD management to include contingency planning, crisis action planning, and rotational operations. Step-by-step instructions on DCAPES functionality to support TPFFD management is available in the DCAPES AFJET user‘s guide located in the DCAPES launch menu. Detailed instructions for TPFDD management of rotational and sustainment operations, are located in Chapter 9. 8.1.1. Policy and guidance applies to all Air Force planners, FAMs, and individuals supporting the operational planning and execution process under the authority of the Chief of Staff, United States Air Force. This includes Air Force Service staffs to Combatant Commands. 8.1.2. The directions in this chapter and overall instruction must be followed. If conflicts arise between the contents of this chapter and the contents of joint publications, the specific information in the joint publication will take precedence for the activities of joint forces unless the CJCS has provided more current and specific guidance to the contrary. Also, if the conflict in question impedes the Air Force‘s ability to meet mission requirements, issue should be staffed to AF/A3/5 for arbitration with Joint Staff. The authoritative sources of information required by JOPES are contained in the documents listed in paragraphs 1.8.1 through 1.8.5 Section 8B—Background 8.2. TPFDD Overview. A TPFDD is the electronic data portion of a plan that exists in JOPES/DCAPES. It contains detailed requirements, capabilities, and movement data that support Air Force, Joint, and Combined Plans. A TPFDD contains critical information to include the time phasing of forces by C-dates to specific destinations (called routing data). Additionally, through the use of UTCs, this information includes personnel and equipment details. 8.2.1. Data Ownership. The Supported Commands and designated functional managers own the data in the TPFDDs that support their JSCP taskings, operations, and exercises. They have overall control of TPFDD development, distribution, security level, maintenance, and overall quality. 8.2.2. The Supported Combatant Commands depend on their Service Component Commands, Supporting Commands, AF/A5XW, and the AEF Center (AEFC) to provide and maintain accurate data in the TPFDD. 8.2.3. Service Component Commands, Supporting Commands, AF/A5XW, and the AEFC are data stewards for most of the data elements within the ULNs; therefore, they must ensure

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Air Force unique guidance that supports the Air Force process of presenting forces are included in AOR-specific instructions, e.g. TPFDD Letters of Instruction (LOIs). 8.2.4. TPFDD management encompasses requirements determination, to include timing; sourcing, verification and validation of forces; and continued maintenance of the TPFDD. This initiates the joint deployment process. 8.2.5. The TPFDD enables timely operational capability assessments to facilitate joint force projection planning/execution in support of national objectives and operational missions. 8.2.6. For contingency and crisis action planning, planners at the supported component headquarters develop the Air Force requirements, by UTC, in the TPFDD to express the total expeditionary force needed to meet the specified mission objectives. These unique requirements are referred to as a Unit Line Number (ULN). 8.3. Types of TPFDDs. Joint guidance states that planning that supports JOPES is capabilitiesbased. This implies that military planners only employ the forces and resources specified for regional or global planning in the Global Force Management Guidance apportionment tables, CJCS orders, Service capabilities documents (e.g. U.S. Air Force WMP-3 Part 1), allied and coalition agreements, or approved operation plans/operation orders. Using these forces and resources, the Supporting Command, Supported Command, and AEFC will select the specific forces that they intend to employ to satisfy the assigned mission. This capabilities-based planning in JOPES results in specific types of TPFDDs. The two major types of TPFDDs are requirements-driven TPFDDs and capabilities-driven TPFDDs. 8.3.1. Requirements-driven TPFDDs. In general, requirements TPFDDs are normally associated with written OPLANs/CONPLANs/OPORDs. These types of TPFDDs contain the Air Force presentation of forces in support of a specific requirements driven plan. Air Force planners support the requirements TPFDDs by building, sourcing, verifying, and validating ULNs to the component headquarters and the supporting or supported combatant command. Examples of requirements TPFDDs include but are not limited to: 8.3.1.1. Contingency planning TPFDDs as required by the JSCP or other defense planning document. 8.3.1.2. Crisis Action Planning TPFDDs (includes but is not limited to imminent/ongoing combat operation, Humanitarian Relief Operations (HUMRO), Noncombatant Evacuation Operations (NEO), and rotational operations. 8.3.1.3. Military Operations Other Than War (MOOTW) (includes but is not limited to Olympics Support, POTUS Support Operations, Natural Disasters, and Wildfire/Forest Fire Support). 8.3.2. Capabilities-driven TPFDDs. Capabilities TPFDDs can be utilized to assess our methods for organizing, training, equipping, and sustaining our air and space forces to meet the defense strategy requirements 8.3.3. In general, capabilities TPFDDs are normally those that depict an Air Force capability not directly associated with a specific requirement. A capabilities TPFDD is used to illustrate a capability that represents the Air Force commitment to rapidly respond with air and space forces to fulfill war fighting and operational requirements.

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8.3.4. Unlike requirements TPFDDs, capabilities TPFDDs are normally Service owned. Air Force planners at all levels support capabilities TPFDDs by building and sourcing ULNs to ensure we can support a potential operational requirement or assess overall operational and population driven Air Force capabilities. Examples of Capabilities TPFDDs include: 8.3.4.1. AETF FM "force module" and Operational Capability Packages (OCP) libraries 8.3.4.2. Base Level Assessment (BLA) to include Air Force specific exercises 8.3.4.3. TPFDDs used to support war games and/or studies in support of strategic analyses 8.4. TPFDD Data Elements. A critical part of TPFDD management is the accuracy and timeliness associated with the data elements. All Air Force planners are responsible to ensure the use of accurate, real world UTC and unit data. This is necessary to achieve and maintain effective operational force capabilities. There are a myriad of TPFDD elements, but can be functionally categorized as follows: 8.4.1. Force description data . Provides force description information as well as the ULN/FRN, the UTC, unit level code (ULC), and force modules. The Air Force utilizes a subcategory known as unit data. 8.4.2. Unit specific data . Identifies an actual unit (i.e. UIC) and describes a type or notional unit designated to support the force requirement. JOPES/DCAPES utilizes the GSORTS and Air Force PAS reference file database to automatically populate UIC related data fields. This data includes unit name, origin, MAJCOM code (in the Service reserved code data field), and component code. 8.4.3. Force movement characteristics . This data includes both unit cargo and personnel data such as authorized strength (PAX/PERS/AUTH), and detailed cargo data (cargo short tons). 8.4.4. Routing and time phasing data . This includes origin, POE, POD, Destination, Intermediate Location (ILOC) GEO Codes, transportation mode and source and applicable commencement or C dates (RLD, ALD, EAD, LAD, RDD, and CRD). 8.4.5. Service unique force requirement data . Known as Service force definition data in joint publications, this provides additional information identified by the individual Services to meet force requirements. This includes Service Reserved Code (SRC) and Critical Employment Indicator (CEI) that are primarily used by the Manpower/Personnel communities. Additionally, FAMs at the supported component headquarters and force provider level use Service unique force requirement data when there is a need to tailor or specify individual personnel Line Level Detail (LLD) such as Attached Personnel Accounting Symbol (APAS) Codes, Air and Space Expeditionary Force Indicator (AEFI), and Command Remarks (CRM). 8.4.5.1. The Service Reserved Code (SRC) is a five-character data field in the TPFDD used by the Air Force to primarily identify our supporting MAJCOM/MAJCOM equivalent and component. The first two characters are the MAJCOM Code (see Table 8.1), which depicts the actual force provider; the third character is the component code (see Table 8.2); the fourth and fifth characters are undefined. Note: For ARC units, the SRC defaults to the Gaining MAJCOM.

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8.4.5.2. Attached Personnel Accounting Symbol (APAS) Codes. Identifies the established or provisional unit that an individual is gained to during employment. 8.4.5.3. Air and Space Expeditionary Force Indicator (AEFI). Identifies the actual AEF deployment window that an individual deployed in. 8.4.5.4. Command Remarks (CRM). Identifies unique baseline data and/or special requirements for billets at the LLD. (See Table 9.1). Table 8.1. Major Command and Reporting Designator Identity Codes 1. CODE

MAJCOM

CODE

MAJCOM

01

AF Mgmt Engineering Agency

2L

AF Tech Applications Cntr

02

AF Inspection Agency

2M

AF Review Boards Office

03

Operational Test & Eval Center

2N

AF Ctr Studies & Analy

04

AF Communications Agency

2Q

Air Force Weather Agency

05

AF Intel Analysis Agency

2R

AF Program Executive Office

06

Air Force Audit Agency

2S

AFELM NORAD

07

AF Office of Special Investigations

2T

AF Safety Center (FO)

08

AF Security Forces Center

2U

Air Force Services Agency

09

AF Personnel Center

2W

0B

Air Force Academy

2X

11th Wing AF Real Estate Agency

0D

Air Forces In Europe

2Y

AF Pentagon Comm Agency

0J

Air Education & Training Cmd

2Z

AF Medical Ops Agency

0M

HQ Air Force Reserve Command

30

AFELM Def Info Sys Agency

0N

Headquarters USAF

31

AFELM DFAS

0R

Pacific Air Forces

33

AFELM Def Log Agency

0U

Air Intelligence Agency

34

Air National Guard

0V

AF Special Operations Command

35

AFELM Def Intel Agency

11

AF Manpower Agency

37

AFELM Def Threat Red Agency

1A

AF C2, Intel, Surv & Recon Ctr

38

AFELM Joint Chiefs of Staff

1C

Air Combat Command

39

AFELM Ofc of Sec Def

1F

USAF Ammo Control Point

3A

Defense Contract Mgmt Agency

1G

AF Logistics Management Agency

3C

AFELM US Central Cmd

1L

Air Mobility Command

3D

AFELM US Spcl Ops Cmd

1M

AF Materiel Command

3G

AF Elements - NATO

1P

AF Real Property

3I

Reserve, Central Managed

1Q

AF Flight Standard Agency

3J

AF Security Clearance Agency

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1S

AF Space Command

3K

AFELM USEUCOM

1W

AF Engr & Sprt Agency

3M

AFELM US Southern Command

1Y

AF Civilian Career Training

3N

AFELM US Joint Forces Command

21

AF Nuclear Weapons Agency

3O

AFELM US Pacific Command

24

HQ AF Direct Suprt Elements

3P

Counter Intel. Field Activity

25

AF Wide Support Elements

3Q

AFELM USSTRATCOM

CODE

MAJCOM

CODE

MAJCOM

26

AF ELM BMDO

3T

AFELM USTRANSCOM

27

AF Agency Modeling & Simul

3V

AF Elements Other

29

AF Nat Sec Eme Pre

3W

AF Ctr For Envrmnt Exclnc

2A

AF Cost Analysis Agency

3Y

HQ AF Freq Management Agency

2B

AF Doctrine Center

41

Nat‘l Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

2D

AF Personnel Ops Agency

4D

US Northern Command

2E

AF Legal Operations Agency

4K

AF Combat Ammunition Ctr

2F

AF Medical Support Agency

4M

AFMC Depots or ALCs

2G

AF News Agency

4R

AFROTC

2H

AF Operations Group

4W

AF Dist of Washington

2I

ANG Readiness Center

88

Defense Mapping Agency

2K

AF Hist Research Center

1See AF Data Dictionary (http://www.afbudsys.disa.mil/afdd.htm) for current list of Major Command and Reporting Designator Identity Codes Table 8.2. Component Codes. A

Active

G

Guard

R

Reserve

8.4.6. Non-unit-related cargo characteristics and routing . Known as Cargo Increment Numbers (CINs) this data describes a cargo category, the providing unit, type of movement, and routing data for non-unit related (requirements not built by a ULN) cargo data. 8.4.7. Non-unit related personnel characteristics and routing . Known as Personnel Increment Numbers (PINs) this data describes the category of personnel, the providing unit, type of movement, and routing data for non-unit related (requirements not built by a ULN) personnel data. 8.4.8. Remarks section data elements This data provides additional information pertaining to any other TPFDD entry. This includes Baseline and Point Of Contact (POC)

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information. Use of these fields will be detailed in specific TPFDD Letters of Instruction (LOIs). 8.4.9. Data element instructions JOPESREP contains the technical definition of the data elements in a TPFDD. It provides the valid data entry values for each data element. The "ULN Data Management Table" expands the information in JOPESREP to support deployment/redeployment, force rotations, and exercises. Although not a classified publication, it is controlled under the provisions set forth by the joint library and is considered FOUO. The Joint Electronic Library website (http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/)can also be accessed through the SIPRNET: http://www.js.smil.mil/masterfile.sjsimd/jel/Index.htm Section 8C—Guidance 8.5. TPFDD Development Concept of Operation (CONOPs). TPFDD management and standardized terminology is vital to TPFDD development and enables effective and efficient support for the planning, execution, and assessment of the Air Force‘s force presentation. It is necessary that Air Force planners and FAMs at all levels are not only provided the necessary information, but have the ability to interpret, translate and execute accordingly to meet mission requirements. 8.5.1. This section serves two primary functions. First, it provides methods and procedures that focus on TPFDD development. Second, it provides the Air Force planning staffs at all levels with direction, guidance, and timing criteria for planning and successful execution of an operation. 8.5.2. TPFDD development has two major elements -- TPFDD initialization and TPFDD force planning. 8.6. TPFDD Initialization and Generation. Generation of a TPFDD is a process that includes the creation of a Plan Identification Designator (PID), assigning a Supported MAJCOM for the PID, and setting access permissions. 8.6.1. This first step in the TPFDD development process is assigning a PID. A PID is a fivecharacter designator that links the TPFDD to a specific operation or capability. The Joint Staff allocates a series of PIDs to each Combatant Command, Service, and DOD agency. Supported commands may further allocate PIDs to their subordinate and/or supporting commands. Refer to JOPES Vol I for additional information and specific joint guidance. 8.6.2. The Primary Series FM (functional manager) is the steward and caretaker of specific series of Operations Plans (OPLANs) PIDs at Unified Commands, Services, and DOD agencies as specified in JOPES Vol I. 8.6.3. The Primary Series FM and sub FMs will assist in the System Management of the system by resolving user data access issues, including user account and OPLAN management. 8.6.4. The Air Force‘s allocated series of PIDs is 08xxx. AF/A5XW, as process owner for operational planning, is the Air Force functional manager for the 08-series PIDs. AF/A5XW delegates the management of 08 series PIDs to Air Force providers using the following construct:

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Table 8.3. Commands and PID Allocations. CMD

PID SERIES

ACC

08Cxx

AETC

08Jxx

AFMC

08Mxx

AFSOC/AFSOF1

08Vxx

AFSPC/AFSTRAT-S1 08Sxx 08Lxx AMC/AFTRANS1 PACAF/AFPAC/ AFKOR1

08Pxx

USAFE/AFEUR1 AFRC

08Dxx

ANG

08Ixx

AFSTRAT-GS1 AFCENT1

08Txx

CONR/AFNORTH1 AFSOUTH1

084xx

AFOSI

087xx

HAF/11WG

08Nxx

USAFA

08Bxx

AFPC

089xx

AIA

08Uxx

AF FM/OCP

088xx

OTHERS

08Zxx

08Rxx

08Fxx

08Hxx

NOTE: 1. Air Force elements at Unified Commands will utilize the same PID construct as their applicable component headquarters. 8.6.5. The Supported MAJCOM Code. AF/A5XW must be notified when a new PID is generated and TPFDD development is initiated. This is necessary to ensure Air Staff knowledge of Air Force presence in a given TPFDD and supports updating the WMP 2, Plans Listing and Summary. In DCAPES, the default supported MAJCOM code (MAC) for the PID is 0N, Headquarters United States Air Force. This prompts MAJCOMs and Air Force component headquarters to request the DCAPES FM at AF/A5XW to change the MAC code from 0N to the respective supported MAJCOM Code. Without requesting AF/A5XW to change the MAC code, the supported MAJCOM cannot effectively manage the TPFDD and all force providers cannot source requirements.

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8.7. Permissions and Accessibility. Action above applies to restricted and non-restricted (networked) TPFDDs/PIDs. Refer to JOPES Vol I for additional information and specific joint guidance regarding restricted and non-restricted PIDs. 8.7.1. TPFDD accessibility is detailed in Chapter 4. 8.7.2. User Account Management is detailed in Chapter 4. 8.7.3. Roles and Permissions in DCAPES User Account Maintenance (UAM) and JOPES Permissions Software (JPERMS) that support TPFDD management are detailed in Chapter 4. 8.8. The Force Planning Process. The force planning process (known as step 1 of the Plan Development Phase of contingency planning) is the product of mission analysis and intelligence assessment with its foundation in the supported commander's concept of operations. Force planning consists of force requirements determination, force list development and refinement (or sourcing), and shortfall management. Shortfall management is addressed in Chapter 10. 8.8.1. Effective force planning by the component headquarters requires extensive coordination and data exchange among HQ Air Force, MAJCOMs, AEFC, ANG, and other applicable Air Force sourcing agencies before the TPFDD is submitted to, and approved by, the unified command. In addition, functional planners at the component headquarters level must ensure adequate coordination is achieved in situations where the requirements of one function impact on the requirements of another. It is imperative ARC coordination occurs at all phases of the Force Planning Process. This will aid in the effective and efficient utilization of ARC forces. 8.8.2. When developing a TPFDD, force planners must comply with the apportioned forces and availability times contained in the WMP-3 Part 1 and will comply with the combatant commands‘ TPFDD Letter of Instruction (LOI). Component headquarters must ensure Air Force-specific requirements are addressed either in the Combatant Command‘s LOI, component‘s corresponding LOI, or component‘s supplement to the LOI. Paragraph 8.16 contains the minimum information that must be addressed. 8.8.3. Additionally, the TPFDD LOI gives guidance to force providers and supporting commands on how to support and manage their part of the TPFDD. 8.9. Force Requirements Determination. This is the building of requirements, identified as ULNs, in the TPFDD, to include consolidation of ULNs into force modules. When directed by the supported commander, the component headquarters planner reviews and validates the combat forces apportioned for planning and determines the applicable combat support and combat service support forces to accompany combat forces. Component headquarters planners and FAMs are ultimately responsible for determining force requirements but must coordinate these requirements with Air Staff, force provider, and AEFC counterparts. When determining these force requirements, component headquarters planners/FAMs need to ensure the standard Air Force ULN construct is followed. 8.9.1. ULN allocation for the Air Force. Supported commanders are authorized to allocate blocks of ULNs to their Service components and supporting commands to include Service force providers. For 08-series Air Force TPFDDs, the allocation will come from AF/A5XW.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 8.9.1.1. Joint guidance states that forces will be entered by Service components and providing organizations using allocated ULNs and force modules (FMs). This achieves maximum simplicity and flexibility during operational planning and execution. 8.9.1.2. To avoid duplication of ULN allocations between multiple force providers, the unified commands allocate ULNs and reserve the first character for specific force providers.

8.9.2. Standard Air Force ULN Construct. Air Force ULNs are comprised of a fivecharacter force requirement number (FRN) and a two-character fragmentation code. The same ULN must not appear more than once in a TPFDD and each FRN will only identify a single UTC capability. 8.9.2.1. Planners and FAMs build initial requirements by creating an FRN. This ensures that positions 6 and 7 are earmarked to support the JOPESREP Fragmentation Logic within DCAPES/ JOPES in support of the AEF presentation policy and the Air Force organizational structure. 8.9.2.2. This standard process supports sourcing of requirements to multiple units and locations in order to meet the capability and tasking. This process is called "fragging" and the ensuing ULNs are called "frags". 8.9.2.3. This includes sourcing in line level detail (LLD) as prescribed in this document. 8.9.2.4. The use of standard procedures that support five character FRNs and subsequent fragmentation (fragging) is vital to accurately identify data elements, define codes and allowable values, enhance processing of reported data by automated methods and: 8.9.2.4.1. Improves the accuracy of planning data. 8.9.2.4.2. Facilitates the development, review, coordination, and approval of courses of action(COAs), operation plans (OPLANs), and Operation Orders (OPORDs). 8.9.2.4.3. Assists in the identification of plan requirement shortfalls. 8.9.2.5. The first position of the ULN is assigned to Service components by each combatant commander to designate the Service or supporting command, (e.g. Air Force or USTRANSCOM). 8.9.2.5.1. Although not required during the contingency planning TPFDD process, once the plan is executed and a force rotation is approved, Air Force planners must ensure the AEF ULN construct applies unless it contradicts CCDR guidance. 8.9.2.6. Standard ULN methodology is critical to ensure data integrity and accuracy throughout the life cycle of the requirement. 8.9.2.7. Free-Format, Seven Character ULNs. When the ULN is entered as a freeformat two to seven (2-7) character code, it may consist of any combination of alphabetic (except I and O) or numeric characters (no special characters). 8.9.2.7.1. Component headquarters must ensure that CCDRs utilize 5 character ULNs in building Air Force TPFDD records. Air Force sourcing methodology requires the 6th and 7th characters available for fragmentation. Air Force uses

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fragmentation logic to enable split routing (e.g., time phasing, multiple Origins/POEs/PODs/Destinations, split shipments) 8.9.2.7.2. Seven digit ULNs have a tendency to cause procedural problems when managing the TPFDD. This occurs when ULN characters are excessively utilized to reflect data that is already defined in other fields of the JOPESREP TPFDD data elements. 8.9.2.7.3. Intentionally building seven character ULNs that will need to be renumbered and fragged causes procedural problems and system degradation. 8.9.2.7.3.1. Most current operations reflected in a TPFDD are fragmented to support different time phasing and routing. The use of a seven character ULN that will be fragmented will cause unnecessary system usage and may protract the validation process since renumbering to an FRN for fragmentation logic is required. 8.9.2.7.3.2. Poor system performance and lack of application responsiveness is encountered which can result in system degradation and synchronization problems when meeting combatant commander requirements. 8.9.3. For contingency planning, component headquarters planners will only use major combat forces that are apportioned to them in GFM and WMP-3, Part 1. For AEF rotation planning, component headquarters planners will use the major combat forces identified in the WMP-3, Part 4. All combat support forces available for both contingency and crisis action planning, are identified in UTC Availability. 8.9.3.1. Contingency Planning. Once AF/A5XW forwards WMP-3 Part 1 to the component headquarters and MAJCOMs for review, in conjunction with the JSCP development process, the following options are available to identify changes to either the WMP-3 Part 1 or the CJCS force apportionment: 8.9.3.1.1. The component headquarters will make requests for additional forces, through the Combatant Command, to the Joint Staff who in turn provides requests to the Services (AF/ A5XW). 8.9.3.1.2. The component headquarters can make unit/MDS requests and will normally provide destination and RDD recommended changes to the WMP-3 Part 1 directly to AF/A5XW. 8.9.3.1.3. MAJCOMs can make unit/MDS requests and will normally provide UTC, UIC, PMAI, DOCID, Avl Date, and Special Capability recommended changes to the WMP-3 Part 1 directly to AF/A5XW. 8.9.3.2. Crisis Action Planning. Once SecDef approves the capabilities annex, supported component headquarters planners will review and the following should occur: 8.9.3.2.1. The component headquarters will make requests for additional forces, if necessary, through the Global Force Management Board (GFMB); for Individual Augmentees, use the Prioritization and Sourcing Review Board (PSRB) in accordance with CJCSI 1301.01C.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 8.9.3.2.2. The component headquarters will make requests directly through AF/A5XJ for prioritization against global requirements of all combatant commanders. 8.9.3.3. Using JOPES procedures and processes, component headquarters will develop OPLAN TPFDDs based on combatant command-provided planning guidance and planned employment concept. The planning guidance contained in the WMP-1, Basic Plan, should guide support force planning. 8.9.3.4. The component headquarters will select, time-phase, and determine employment and beddown location of combat forces, by UTCs, as reflected in the CJCS force apportionment and WMP-3 Part 1 (contingency planning) or AEF libraries (crisis action planning). Combat forces will not exceed the WMP-3 Part 1 identified units for each combatant command in any given OPLAN or CONPLAN scenario, unless those forces are identified as requirements but not sourced. If there are discrepancies between the CJCS force apportionment and WMP-3 Part 1, with regard to number of units/elements or particular PMAI, the WMP-3 Part 1 will take precedence.

8.9.4. Component headquarters planners will use the "Generate the Mission" AETF force module(s) as the starting point for combat forces requirements determination (see Chapter 6). 8.9.5. Air Force planners supplement the combat forces by providing Expeditionary Combat Support (ECS). This is also known as Base Operating Support (BOS). The type/quantity of ECS support can be driven by base population (e.g. services, finance, personnel); aircraft number/type at the employment location (e.g. fuels, safety); or type of location (e.g. civil engineering, communications). 8.9.5.1. The component headquarters FAM will develop the initial ECS force requirements based on the AETF force modules and modify the requirements based on several assumptions and supporting documents/information such as beddown requirements, WRM, site survey and Base Support & Expeditionary (BaS&E) Planning Tool data, and theater limitations (e.g., population ceiling). 8.9.5.2. Component headquarters planners should distribute the force requirements to their functional managers to ensure accuracy and to modify requirements as necessary. Component headquarters FAMs have the responsibility of ensuring the requirements for their functional area are properly identified in the TPFDD. 8.9.5.3. Component headquarters planners will only put UTCs in the TPFDD that are registered in MEFPAK. Component headquarters FAMs should coordinate with force provider and Air Staff counterparts to ensure that force providers either already have these UTCs postured in UTC Availability or intend to posture these UTCs in UTC Availability. 8.9.6. Force Modules (FMs). Once the force requirements are determined, component headquarters planners will establish force modules to assist in the management of the TPFDD. FMs are the standard methodology to accomplish taskings (sourcing, verification/validation from MAJCOM to supporting Command to Supported Command to Transportation) and are planning and execution management tools used within DCAPES/JOPES to link major combat units with supporting units and to identify Air Force

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capability presented to the combatant commanders. Force module packages expedite quick TPFDD development, especially in a crisis situation. 8.9.6.1. Force modules are functional groupings of force data used for planning and to manage TPFDD development and movement execution. Sample FMs include: 8.9.6.1.1. Functional grouping (e.g., all medical, all air defense). 8.9.6.1.2. Geographic grouping (e.g., ULNs with "Seaport of Debarkation" (SPOD) of Wilmington). 8.9.6.1.3. Date grouping (e.g., forces with LAD less than 10). 8.9.6.1.4. Grouping ULNs for Movement Requirement Submission and Validation. 8.9.6.1.5. Capability grouping (e.g. open the base, operate the base, generate the mission). 8.9.6.1.6. Note: Depending on the FM construct used, a single ULN may be included in multiple FMs. 8.9.6.2. Force module Assignment in support of verification and validation. Supported Commands are assigned the first letter of FM identification code (FMID) as shown in joint publications. The FMID first character allocation mirrors the allocation of ULN characters. Supported Commands allocate a range of FM numbers to their Service Components to group allocated forces. Supported Commands also allocate FM assignments to Supporting Commands. The AEFC follows the FM assignments allocated to the supported component headquarters when establishing FMIDs. Supported Commands may establish any number of FMs, provided the FMIDs are within their authorized FM allocation. 8.9.7. Force Tracking Number (FTN). An FTN is an eleven character alphanumeric reference number assigned by a supported CCDR which represents a single force or capability requirement. The FTN is used to uniquely identify, organize, and manage force or capability requirements requested in the GFM force allocation process and to support execution of JFP responsibilities. Associating the FTN with a force or capability requirement in record message traffic (including NEWSGROUPS); JOPES applications; and deployment, force tracking, scheduling, and mobilization systems; creates another means to link all information and data for the same FTN in multiple databases. To facilitate tracking of CCDR requirements from planning through deployment, each ULN will contain the complete FTN (Note: Until the mandatory FTN field is included in DCAPES, users will annotate the FTN in the baseline field). The FTN will be the first text entered in the baseline field ended by a colon with no spaces. Specific FTN structure is outlined in CJCSM 3150.16C and supported CCDR TPFDD LOIs. 8.9.8. Electronic Joint Manpower and Personnel System (EJMAPS). EJMAPS provides a numeric reference number assigned from the Joint Manning Document (JMD) which represents the specific capability requirement. The EJMAPS reference number is used to uniquely identify, organize, and manage force or capability requirements requested in the GFM force allocation process and to support execution of JFP responsibilities. Associating the EJMAPS number with a force or capability requirement in record message traffic (including NEWSGROUPS); JOPES applications; and deployment, force tracking,

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scheduling, and mobilization systems creates another means to link all information and data in multiple databases. To facilitate tracking of CCDR requirements from planning through deployment, each EJMAPS number will be the first text entered in the baseline field ended by a colon with no spaces. (Note: Until the mandatory field is included in DCAPES, users will annotate the EJMAPS in the baseline field). Section 8D—Guidance 8.10. TPFDD Sourcing Overview. CJCSM 3122.01A refers to the sourcing process as starting with assigning a UIC (a six-digit code that uniquely identifies a unit) to a TPFDD UTC requirement through JOPES/DCAPES and concluding with verification (verification of sourcing solutions is covered in paragraph 8.14.9). Sourcing is the comprehensive and collaborative process of assigning actual units to force requirements. DCAPES uses the UIC to access the GSORTS and the Air Force-specific Personnel Accounting Symbol (PAS) files to extract the unit number, unit name, and current location. 8.10.1. The Air Force Planning and Execution Community (AFPEC) has the ability to take an initial requirement, or "Baseline FRN" and source the requirement to multiple units and locations in order to meet the capability and tasking. This process is called "fragging" and the ensuing ULNs are called "frags". Although necessary at times, fragging should be kept to a minimum, if possible. 8.10.2. Typically, fragging includes "drilling down" to the line-level detail (LLD) to source and continue resourcing single individuals by "TASKED PAS". This is accomplished without losing sight of personnel or equipment in the TPFDD because of DCAPES‘ LLD and LOGMOD level-6 capabilities. 8.10.3. This intricate sourcing process is accomplished in three distinct echelons: The first and second echelon can occur concurrently or in sequence and the third echelon completes the personnel-sourcing loop. 8.10.4. Contingency sourcing is a new method of sourcing and is being accomplished as an element of Contingency Planning. It is the use of currently available forces to match requirements in a contingency plan force flow, for a specified date/time frame. 8.11. TPFDD Sourcing Methodologies and Direction. DCAPES provides the Air Force with the capability to source TPFDD records in three different echelons. The following section provides information as to what qualifies as sourcing in these three different echelons. 8.11.1. In the first echelon (level 2 detail), the entire baseline FRN is sourced from the UIC. This mirrors sourcing via JOPES and is referred to as "sourcing" at level 2. 8.11.2. In the second echelon (line level detail or level 4 detail), sourcing is accomplished by linking the Air Force Personnel Accounting Symbol (PAS) file data to the AFSC-level detail pulled from MEFPAK. Sourcing via the PAS provides Air Force unique personnel data. 8.11.2.1. Sourcing from the PAS must be used when multiple bases and/or organizations are tasked to support the Baseline FRN. Data at the line-level detail is used as the Deployment Requirements Manning Document (DRMD). 8.11.2.2. Sourcing at this echelon uses the same Fragmentation Logic as JOPES but provides a higher degree of visibility for Air Force planners that manage the TPFDD

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personnel details in DCAPES. Fragging in JOPES is only accomplished at the level 2 details. 8.11.3. The third echelon, known as the force deployment stage, takes place in DCAPES at the Wing/ Unit when the designated wing representative (usually PRF) populates LLD with the members‘ SSAN. Prior to sourcing at this echelon, the FRN/ULN is already sourced either at the first or second echelon. 8.11.3.1. This process is the hook that links the Deployment Manning Requirements (DMR) space to the personnel (face) and generates the complete DRMD. An interim process in which MANPER-B and LOGMOD-B feed DCAPES a "pax detail file" is mandated and currently being utilized. 8.12. TPFDD Sourcing Methodology Overview. TPFDD sourcing conducted by Air Force planners will be achieved by two related but distinct methodologies utilizing the above three echelons as applicable: 8.12.1. Method 1. The first method supports TPFDD sourcing of Combatant Command requirements developed during Contingency Planning in the Plan Development Phase as detailed in JOPES, Volume I and includes contingency sourcing of Combatant Command TPFDDs. 8.12.2. Method 2. The second method supports TPFDD sourcing based on Combatant Command requirements primarily reliant on crisis action planning that may or may not be in a contingency plan. This is a dynamic process and the TPFDD changes as the plan is in execution as detailed in the JOPES volume III. 8.12.2.1. Method 2 sourcing is used for JCS-approved operations, JCS exercises held in excess of30 days, and AF/A3/5 approved rotational operations supported with the AEF operational policy. 8.12.2.2. The process for supporting Sec Def or combatant commander approved rotational operations is detailed in Chapter 9. 8.12.3. Teaming. One of the key factors in sourcing TPFDDs is teaming. Teaming enables individuals who train together as a unit to deploy together. Teaming in support of rotational operations focuses at the squadron-level and shifts to wing-level/home station as the AF crosses the continuum through contingency operations to OPLAN execution. The AETF force modules facilitate the transition of teaming through the entire ROMO. The teaming concept is designed to provide combatant commanders a trained and integrated team, ready to do its job with minimal AOR training, as soon as it reaches its deployed location. There are various levels that must be considered when task organizing units and sourcing UTCs for TPFDDs. 8.12.3.1. In accordance with AFPD 10-4, the leadership elements of a deploying AEF will be sourced using lead wing/ home station personnel to the maximum extent possible. See 6.1 and 6.3.10.4 8.12.3.2. At the most basic level, teaming ensures that all individuals who make up a particular UTC come from the same origin or unit, i.e. these UTCs are not fragged across multiple origins.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 8.12.3.3. At the deployed unit (squadron) level, teaming means that the majority of UTCs within a functional area come from the minimum number of origins. This guidance applies mostly to the base level and below but will be used when practical for teams from the NAF level and above. 8.12.3.4. At the deployed unit (wing) level, the objective is to ensure that the majority of UTCs are sourced from the wing deployed to that location with the remainder of ECS UTCs coming from as few bases as practical. Priority of ECS sourcing will be to the lead wing. 8.12.3.5. During rotational sourcing, the AEFC first fills deployed expeditionary squadron requirements for a particular functional area with as many UTCs from a single installation as possible. These initial solutions are then compared with other functional areas in order to look at teaming above the squadron level. When teaming is viewed from this aggregate wing or group level, the AEFC may determine it is more beneficial to overall wing/group teaming to accept a lesser degree of teaming in a particular functional area. 8.12.3.6. During crisis sourcing (OPLAN, HUMRO, etc), the objective is to ensure that the majority of UTCs are sourced from the appropriate lead wing/home station with the remainder of ECS UTCs coming from as few bases as practical.

8.13. Contingency Planning Processes, Requirements, and Sourcing. (Method 1). 8.13.1. Contingency Plan Sourcing Overview 8.13.1.1. For contingency planning, the JSCP identifies the PID associated with a specific operation. The TPFDD will correlate to this PID and the written plan. Variations of the master TPFDD (e.g. Air Force-only requirements) will be in separate TPFDDs known as a Service slice (refer to paragraph 8.19). 8.13.1.1.1. Method 1 sourcing will normally be accomplished in the Air Force component headquarters‘ TPFDD slice. These TPFDDs are maintained under separate PIDs on GCCS. Combatant Commands may build their TPFDDs in the Collaborative Force Analysis, Sustainment and Transportation System (CFAST). If TPFDDs are built in CFAST, then the Air Force will source those TPFDDs in CFAST as well. 8.13.1.2. Access to the TPFDD in DCAPES/JOPES is equivalent to accessing the written portion of the OPLAN and the Time-Phased Force and Deployment List (TPFDL). The TPFDL is located in appendix 1 to annex A of the OPLAN and contains extracts of specific data from the TPFDD file. The TPFDL is also considered a printed version of the TPFDD. 8.13.1.2.1. Component headquarters planners will use the apportioned forces identified in the WMP-3, Part 1 when building OPLAN/CONPLAN TPFDDs. Therefore, the requirements determination and sourcing of aviation combat forces are accomplished concurrently. When conducting ―contingency sourcing‖, ―replacement‖ units will be identified for those units deployed in support of other contingencies. Other forces available for planning are listed in GFM annexes and Service documents (UTC Availability). For contingency sourcing, ACC will determine the replacement

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units for those units in a Combatant Commands‘ TPFDD that are not available due to current deployments or ART reporting. 8.13.1.2.2. Once the aviation combat forces and in-theater assets are sourced and all requirements are developed, the component headquarters planner will notify AF/A5XW and force providers (info), by email, that the TPFDD is ready for ECS sourcing. 8.13.1.2.3. AF/A5XW will determine whether a sourcing conference will be required or whether AF/A5XW will source the component headquarters‘ TPFDD. 8.13.1.2.4. If between the Forces, Logistics, Transportation or Maintenance conferences, component headquarters have additional UTC requirements, then the process is repeated and the component headquarters planner will notify AF/A5XW and force providers, by email, that the TPFDD has additional ECS to be sourced. 8.13.1.3. No contingency planning TPFDDs will be sourced without prior coordination and approval of AF/A5XW. This includes contingency sourcing of a Combatant Commands‘ TPFDD. 8.13.1.4. All Air Force TPFDDs will be sourced according to AF/A5XW instructions. AF/A5XW will initiate sourcing conferences when deemed appropriate, and/or if necessary. 8.13.1.5. Prior to sourcing TPFDDs, AF/A5XW will review the TPFDD for the correct apportioned forces and corresponding maintenance/munitions UTCs in accordance with the WMP-3, Part 1 and ‗generate the mission‘ AETF force modules. 8.13.1.6. If a sourcing conference is not held, then AF/A5XW will download the TPFDD and run the automated sourcing routines that can provide POEs for each sourced record. If TPFDDs are built in CFAST, then AF/A5XW will run the automated sourcing routine that is provided in CFAST. 8.13.2. Contingency Plan Sourcing Process. Sourcing applied using this process is normally for planning purposes. Once component headquarters planners have completed their force requirements determination, they will source requirements from in-theater assets as required. After this step, they provide the TPFDD to AF/A5XW who will complete the sourcing process using the following step-by-step approach. This same approach will be used whether TPFDD is built in JOPES or in CFAST and will also be used during a TPFDD sourcing conference if deemed necessary. 8.13.2.1. Step 1 - Source Active Duty Aviation Origins. Each destination is sourced using only the active duty aviation units‘ origins that are to be deployed at each corresponding destination. This is accomplished for all destinations. In addition, as ULNs are sourced from the aviation origins, the aviation origins are identified as the POE. 8.13.2.2. Step 2 - Source ARC Aviation Origins. Each destination is sourced using only the Air National Guard and Reserve aviation units‘ origins that are to be deployed at each corresponding destination. This is accomplished for all destinations. In addition, as ULNs are sourced from the aviation units‘ origins, the aviation origins are identified as the POE. 8.13.2.2.1. The process in steps 1 and 2 is identified as "Teaming". Teaming is the process of sourcing, at any given destination, as many UTCs as feasible from the

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 same origin as the combat aviation units. Departure from the combat aviation unit‘s home station, allows USTRANSCOM, in most cases, to transport the supporting UTC requirements directly into the final destination by avoiding use of a separate POE and potentially separate POD; therefore, those units do not require interor intra-theater transportation. 8.13.2.3. Step 3. Close Proximity to Aviation Origins. Sourcing is accomplished at origins as close to aviation units‘ origins as possible. This is accomplished for all destinations. POEs for ULNs sourced in this manner reflect the nearest aviation units‘ origin. 8.13.2.3.1. In step 3, supporting units (UTCs) that are within close proximity of aviation origins can avoid the normal delays associated with transit through the origin-APOE-APOD-destination chain. Units that travel from the combat unit's origin directly to destination are able to reduce planned travel time anywhere from 2 to 8 days. 8.13.2.4. Step 4. Maximum Teaming (maximum number of UTCs from any origin). The next step is to source, at each destination, as many unsourced ULNs as possible from one location. This sourcing of large ‗chunks‘ of UTCs has been called ‗auto-sourcing‘ in the past; however, the current sourcing program does not differentiate between ‗teaming‘ and ‗auto sourcing‘. POEs for ULNs sourced in this manner reflect the closest POE, identified in the combatant commanders‘ LOI. 8.13.2.5. Step 5. Residual Requirements. The last step is to source anything that is available, always referencing what origins have already been used in the sourcing process for each destination. POEs for these UTCs reflect the closest POE as possible or may be left blank. The goal is to always attempt to minimize the number of origins that are sourced at any given destination.

8.13.3. Contingency Sourcing of Contingency Plans. To ensure contingency OPLAN TPFDDs have the most available forces (aviation and ECS) identified, the Joint Staff has initiated contingency sourcing. Contingency Sourcing is the process of determining what forces in an OPLAN TPFDD are currently deployed outside of that OPLAN‘s AOR and backfilling those forces with available aviation and ECS forces. 8.13.3.1. Contingency Sourcing is the first step toward adaptive planning. A tenet of adaptive planning is to bridge the gap between contingency and crisis action planning. 8.13.3.2. Contingency Sourcing will be executed as a collaborative effort between the component headquarters, AEFC, ACC/A3X and AF/A5XW. 8.13.4. Responsibilities of the Component Headquarters in Contingency Planning. 8.13.4.1. Once AF/A5XW forwards WMP-3 Part 1 to component headquarters, MAJCOMs and ANG for review, in conjunction with the JSCP/GFM apportionment development process, component headquarters will accomplish the following: 8.13.4.1.1. Review the WMP-3, Part 1 for accuracy and make requests for unit changes directly to AF/A5XW. Component headquarters will normally provide recommended changes to destinations and RDDs as necessary. Procedures for GFM Guidance apportionment changes are identified in paragraph 8.9.3.1

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8.13.4.1.2. Reviews will be accomplished using the "Command Updates to WMP-3, Part 1" function within the WMP system. 8.13.4.1.3. Identify the need for provisional organizations at each destination. A provisional unit will be created when a specific organization is required and no organization exists to attach personnel. Provisional units will be organized the same as regular units. Establish provisional organizations at the organization level required to meet mission requirements (i.e., wing, group, squadron) in accordance with AFI 38-101. 8.13.4.1.4. Build their TPFDDs‘ combat forces utilizing the WMP-3, Part 1 apportioned forces. 8.13.4.1.5. Build ECS requirements utilizing the AETF force modules, MUGs, and the functional managers to determine the mix of UTCs required at each destination. 8.13.4.2. Supported component headquarters will source requirements from their intheater assets to the maximum extent possible prior to sending the TPFDD to AF/A5XW for sourcing. In-theater assets, to include equipment-only UTCs, must be postured in the UTC Availability. Component headquarters are not authorized to source any assets owned by the other force providers. 8.13.4.3. Component headquarters will formally notify (via email, GCCS newsgroup, message) AF/A5XW, and send a courtesy copy to the sourcing agencies, of the specific PID that is ready to be sourced. This notifies all planners what specific PID is in the process of being sourced by AF/ A5XW or to be sourced at the sourcing conference. 8.13.4.4. In order for AF/A5XW to insert POEs in the sourcing process, component headquarters will provide AF/A5XW with the approved POEs from the Combatant Commands‘ LOI. 8.13.4.5. The component headquarters will provide the requirements TPFDD to AF/A5XW for sourcing in sufficient time for AF/A5XW to conduct sourcing using their automated programs and return the TPFDD back to component headquarters to provide to USTRANSCOM by the required date. 8.13.4.6. The component headquarters will take the sourcing data file, provided by AF/A5XW, and enter the sourcing into the contingency plan TPFDD if accomplished in JOPES. If sourcing is accomplished in CFAST, no transfer of data is necessary. 8.13.4.7. Once all sourcing has been inserted into the TPFDD, the component headquarters will formally notify AF/A5XW and the sourcing agencies. This is required in order that the sourcing agencies can begin to validate AF/A5XW sourcing and update their databases. 8.13.4.8. The component headquarters will coordinate completion of routing data, Cdates, and any additional time phasing based on combatant commander requirements in the theater/AOR. 8.13.4.9. For Contingency Sourcing of TPFDDs, ACC/A3O staff will provide to the component headquarters the ―replacement aviation units‖ for those units that are unavailable due to deployments. The component headquarters will replace the deployed

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 units with the ―replacement aviation units‖ and their corresponding maintenance and munitions UTCs.

8.13.5. Responsibilities of the Force Providers in contingency planning. 8.13.5.1. Once AF/A5XW forwards WMP-3, Part 1 to component headquarters, MAJCOMs and ANG for review, in conjunction with the JSCP development process, force providers will accomplish the following: 8.13.5.1.1. Review the WMP-3 Part 1 for accuracy and make requests for unit changes directly to AF/A5XW. MAJCOMs will normally provide recommended changes to UTCs, UIC, PMAI, DOCIDs, availability dates, special capabilities, etc as necessary. 8.13.5.2. Ensure that the UTC Availability is up-to-date, accurate and only includes those UTCs, to include equipment-only UTCs, which have been approved through the UTC management process in DCAPES and are identified in the MEFPAK. 8.13.5.3. Ensure that the specific UTC-UIC combinations in the TPFDD have a corresponding UTC-UIC combination in UTC Availability. 8.13.5.4. Review the OPLAN TPFDD sourcing once sourcing has been completed and component headquarters informs force providers that the TPFDD is ready for review and verification. Force providers will ensure tracking of their UTCs that have already been sourced and those still available for future sourcing. They must ensure deconfliction of those UTCs within the TPFDD and between OPLAN TPFDDs that require deconfliction. 8.13.5.5. Participate in the sourcing collaboration and if needed, the sourcing conference. 8.13.5.6. Participate in the joint Force Flow (TPFDD) conference. 8.13.5.7. As part of contingency sourcing and as the Air Force component of JFCOM, ACC/A3X staff will identify the forces that are currently in the TPFDD that are not available for contingency sourcing and provide the ―replacement aviation units‖ to the corresponding component headquarters. 8.13.6. Responsibilities of AF/A5XW. 8.13.6.1. AF/A5XW will forward an email, with an attached copy of the WMP-3 Part 1, to component headquarters and force providers, with a courtesy copy to AEFC, during the JSCP development process. This email will request a review of the WMP-3, Part 1 to be conducted through the Command Updates to the WMP-3, Part 1 function in the WMP System. 8.13.6.2. AF/A5XW will ensure that the WMP-3 Part 1 is current and updated with component headquarters and Force Provider recommended changes once validated. 8.13.6.3. AF/A5XW will review TPFDDs to ensure component headquarters have used the correct apportioned forces identified in the WMP-3 Part 1 and the corresponding maintenance/ munitions UTCs in accordance with the AETF ‗generate the mission‘ FMs. 8.13.6.4. When notified by component headquarters, AF/A5XW will either download the TPFDD and run the sourcing routines to include the identification of POEs or execute

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sourcing directly in CFAST or schedule a TPFDD sourcing conference prior to the joint force flow conference. 8.13.6.5. Once AF/A5XW has completed sourcing, they will notify the corresponding component headquarters with a courtesy copy to the sourcing agencies and the AEFC. If sourcing is conducted in JOPES, provide the data file; if sourcing is conducted in CFAST, notify component headquarters of completion. This notifies all planners that sourcing has been completed and provides the component headquarters with the sourcing data. 8.13.6.6. AF/A5XW will sponsor an Air Force sourcing conference if deemed necessary and will notify all sourcing agencies of details. 8.13.6.7. AF/A5XW will participate in the joint force flow conferences when deemed necessary. 8.13.6.8. For Contingency Sourcing, AF/A5XW will review all Aviation, Maintenance and Munitions UTCs to ensure UTCs are in compliance with right-sizing and that the corresponding MX and MMS UTCs are linked to their aviation counterparts. 8.13.7. Responsibilities of the AEFC for Contingency Sourcing. 8.13.7.1. Once supported component headquarters has updated the TPFDD with the ―replacement aviation‖ and corresponding maintenance and munitions UTCs, AEFC will verify with AF/ A5XW that all aviation, maintenance and munitions UTC with a list of forces that will be unavailable for sourcing based on the date identified by the Joint Staff. These forces will be identified by UTC/ UIC combinations. Unavailable forces would include those forces that are currently deployed under normal rotational operations or that may be ―red‖ in ART. 8.13.8. TPFDD refinement. 8.13.8.1. The plan development phases are collectively referred to as TPFDD refinement. The normal TPFDD refinement process consists of sequentially refining forces, logistics (non-unit-related personnel and sustainment), and transportation data to develop a TPFDD file that supports a feasible and adequate overlapping of several refinement phases. 8.13.8.2. For global planning, refinement conferences are conducted by the Joint Staff in conjunction with US Transportation Command. TPFDD refinement is conducted in coordination with supported and supporting commanders, Services, the Joint Staff, and other supporting agencies. Commander, US Transportation Command, will normally host refinement conferences at the request of the Joint Staff or the supported commander. 8.14. Crisis Action Planning: Sourcing and Verification (Method 2). This will include information in support of TPFDD sourcing during crisis, current operations, and transition to rotational requirements. Details for TPFDD management during rotational operations are detailed in Chapter 9. 8.14.1. For a crisis, the supporting TPFDD could be executed via three methods as follows: 8.14.1.1. Execution of a Contingency Plan TPFDD. Although unlikely, the POTUS and SecDef can decide to execute the contingency planned operation. If this option

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 occurs, the CJCS issues an Execute Order to the supported and supporting combatant commanders, Services, and sourcing agencies to execute a contingency plan TPFDD. 8.14.1.2. A TPFDD already residing in GCCS via the JOPES/DCAPES database may be modified to meet current CJCS warning order and supported commander requirements. 8.14.1.2.1. The non-unit data (CINs and PINs) created during the contingency planning process are available only for contingency planning and are not used for execution. In other words once a TPFDD is executed, the CINs and PINs that were previously built are no longer available for execution. The Air Force defers the use of CINs and PINs to ULNs at execution. Force modules (FMs) from established OPLANs are also utilized. 8.14.1.3. The third method is a TPFDD built based on the Crisis Action Planning process and plan information written based on the applicable Course of Action (COA).

8.14.2. Entering Plan Information. As Crisis Action TPFDDs are developed and loaded into JOPES, the supported combatant commander must enter specific plan information into each TPFDD. Appendix B of JOPES Vol II lists all data elements that the supported combatant commander should enter or update when involved in a contingency and TPFDD in execution. 8.14.3. Supported Command newsgroup for a specified operation will be established and Service specific newsgroups identified. The Service newsgroups are used for supporting UTC management; sourcing actions; verification and validation actions; force rotation management; and DCAPES functional, technical, and planning support/management. 8.14.4. Once a combatant commander receives a duly authorized CJCS order (e.g. alert, warning, deployment, execute), the supported commander has 72 hours to provide a sourced and validated, level-4 detail TPFDD for at least the first 7 days of the operation. 8.14.5. Collaborative sourcing during crisis action and execution. Component headquarters will source requirements from their in-theater assets to the maximum extent possible before initiating an RFF/RFC to their CCDR. AEFC will work closely with the component headquarters and force providers to efficiently source and ensure timely verification by the Force Provider of UTC that may be available as postured in the UTC Availability in DCAPES and reported as ready in the AEF UTC Reporting Tool (ART). 8.14.6. Sourcing during the Crisis Action Planning Process. Once component headquarters planners have completed their force requirements determination and inputted the requirements in the TPFDD for that COA, the following step-by-step approach will be used. 8.14.6.1. Step 1 – Force Provider Determination. The component headquarters will first source requirements from their own forces identified for crisis response (e.g. unique capability enablers), if applicable. Component headquarters should avoid sourcing assigned forces tasked in the current FY GFMAP unless no other assigned forces are available. The sourcing decision must be coordinated with the applicable AF FP (ACC, AMC, AFSOC) to ensure the change is approved by the delegated JFP. If component headquarters cannot source requirements with assigned forces, they will submit RFF/RFC through their CCDR (see paragraph 1.10.4.1).

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8.14.6.1.1. The component headquarters will coordinate planning activities and combatant commander requirements with the AEFC and establish additional guidance for subsequent LOIs for sustainable operations (see Chapter 9). 8.14.6.1.2. Identify the need for provisional organizations at each destination. A provisional unit will be created when a specific organization is required and no organization exists to attach personnel. Provisional units will be organized the same as regular units. Establish provisional organizations at the organization level required to meet mission requirements (i.e., wing, group, squadron) in accordance with AFI 38-101. 8.14.6.1.2.1. DELETED. 8.14.6.1.2.2. DELETED. 8.14.6.1.3. Component headquarters planners and AEFC will ensure applicable Air Staff, component headquarters, MAJCOM, and ARC FAMs are fully engaged and heavily involved with these processes to establish proper integration and harmonization at all functional levels, to include actual responsibilities to perform tasks and ensure proper actions. 8.14.6.1.3.1. Coordination of planning activities between FAMs, planners and AEFC personnel will be accomplished to alleviate administrative and operational burdens that impede the verification and validation process and mitigate risk of erroneous and late requirements. 8.14.6.1.3.2. MAJCOMs (i.e., FAMs and/or war planners) will ensure Installation Deployment Readiness Cells (IDRCs) are informed of wing AEF sourcing by use of DCAPES Air Force Verification Capability (AFVC). For ANG wings, the unit level LGRR will be responsible for the wing AEF sourcing and verification. 8.14.6.1.3.2.1. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OP is the designated MAJCOM AEF Cell for TPFDD Management to include AEF Execution, AEF Rotations and Exercises. Actions are centrally managed from this office for performing execution activities to include: TPFDD management; verification/validation process to include locking and unlocking of requirement; and newsgroup coordination between Component Numbered Air Forces (CNAF) and base level activities. The AEF Cell has authority, depending on the situation, to coordinate issues with the Installation Deployment Readiness Cell (IDRC) with affected command functional office notified as a courtesy. 8.14.6.2. Step 2 - AEFC sources forces (see paragraph 8.14.8). 8.14.6.3. Step 3 - Force providers verify to the component headquarters the readiness of sourced forces (see paragraph 8.14.9) to include the ability to meet the TPFDD timelines. 8.14.6.3.1. This includes supporting FAM/planner determination of capability and requirement and use of AFVC to notify units through the IDO. 8.14.6.3.2. Once base-level verification is complete in accordance with AFI 10-403, the IDO (on behalf of the installation/wing commander) will use DCAPES AFVC to verify back to respective MAJCOM the acknowledgement of task(s).

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 8.14.6.4. Step 4 - Supported component headquarters verifies to combatant commander who in turn validates the requirement (see paragraph 8.14.10). 8.14.6.5. When the requirement qualifies for force rotational management with AEFC involvement, Chapter 9 will be applied.

8.14.7. Air Force planners and FAMs must ensure timelines established to support the sourcing process, to include verification and validation, are followed. Timelines will be established in accordance with TPFDD LOI guidance from the combatant commander. 8.14.7.1. Timelines from an end-to-end process will be tracked and documented to include: 8.14.7.1.1. Timelines from when a requirement is created and posted in a TPFDD to when the AEFC sources and FAM/planner verifies (using DCAPES/AFVC) to a unit via the IDRC. 8.14.7.1.2. Timelines from when a requirement is acknowledged by a unit via the IDRC and subsequently verified back to the MAJCOM utilizing DCAPES/AFVC. 8.14.7.1.3. Timelines from when the MAJCOM verifies to the supported Service component (as applicable). Note: After the AEFC has completed sourcing and distributed the initial verification FM, the force provider can apply verification to new/additional sourcing applied to their organization without it being placed in a verification FM. 8.14.7.2. All requirements (not just aggregate requirements) will be tracked by the AEFC and compared to the number of completed sourcing and verifications. This will be accomplished using established time standards, as the standard method to measure the effectiveness of the sourcing process. Crisis and contingency timelines will be established by TPFDD LOI prior to execution. 8.14.7.3. All reclamas and UIC changes from the unit/wing up to HQ Air Force level will be tracked in accordance with Chapter 10. 8.14.8. AEF Sourcing Process. Once requirements have been approved for inclusion in the GFMAP, AFPC/DPW will place sourced requirements into a DCAPES force module within 10 days of receipt to provide MAJCOMs/FOAs/DRUs with visibility of upcoming requirements. For rotational requirements, DPW will place sourced requirements into the Verification Force Module NLT 150 days prior to RDD. See paragraph 8.14.9. for detailed verification procedures. Note: While MAJCOMs/FOAs/DRUs may verify requirements in DCAPES/JOPES at anytime following the initial sourcing verification prior to the transfer of ULN to the Verification Force Module is generally discouraged and they are responsible for the Names-in System (NIS) timeline in accordance with AFI 36-3802. MAJCOMs/FOAs/DRUs must continuously monitor the requirements listing to account for adds, changes, or deletions that may have occurred prior to placement in the Verification Force Module. 8.14.8.1. Depending on the tasking type denoted in the ULN (see Table 1.1), AFPC/DPW will either follow the UTC sourcing methodology as outlined below or the MilPDS sourcing methodology outlined in Chapter 14.

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8.14.8.2. AFPC/DPW sources and MAJCOMs/ARC verify sourcing solutions to meet crisis action requirements using a hierarchical progression that first examines whether residual forces available in the current vulnerability period are suitable or capable. If these forces are insufficient, AFPC/DPW will look to available Enabler forces as outlined in applicable Enabler guidance. If transition to crisis results in execution of an established Prepare to Deploy Order (PTDO), the hierarchical progression described above applies to support PTDO in accordance with JOPES Vol 1. When Air Force commitments to crisis requirements exceed capabilities in the current AEF vulnerability period plus available Enabler force, then Air Force transitions to surge operations. See paragraphs 2.6. and 3.7.5 8.14.8.2.1. DELETED. 8.14.8.2.2. In circumstances where there are insufficient forces in the appropriate AEF block/pair to meet SecDef-approved GFM Allocation Plan (GFMAP) requirements, and applicable approval levels indicated in Table 2.1 were not met (e.g. excessive number of unit reclamas), the following process will be followed: 8.14.8.2.2.1. AFPC/DPW Director will notify applicable HAF FAM of the need to surge. The HAF FAM, through the MAJCOM AEF Cells (or designated agent, e.g. CAT Team, OFAMO, etc.), will request MAJCOMs provide a risk assessment if ―forced to source‖ and/or mitigation strategy for sourcing forces not normally available (e.g. exceeding maximum simultaneously deployable capability (i.e. sum of DW*UTCs), forces in the next AEF block/pair, forces in Institutional Force, etc.). 8.14.8.2.2.2. MAJCOMs will develop internal procedures to provide the HAF FAM risk assessments within 48 hours. In developing risk assessments, MAJCOMs must use the criteria for Force Provider Risk Metrics – Impact of Sourcing found at Appendix 3 to Section III of Global Force Management Implementation Guidance (GFMIG). 8.14.8.2.2.3. HAF FAM will determine the sourcing solution based on applicable MAJCOM risk assessments. If Significant or High risk is determined by all force providers, the HAF FAM will elevate to HAF functional director for adjudication. The HAF FAM will then notify AFPC/DPW and applicable MAJCOMs of the sourcing solution. If a ready and available resource cannot be identified, HAF FAM will initiate an Air Force reclama as outlined in Chapter 10. 8.14.8.2.2.4. AFPC/CC will provide AF/A3/5, AF/A1, and applicable HAF DCS a deviation report of all requirements requiring nonstandard sourcing. 8.14.8.2.3. Available Enablers . Enabler assets are intended for specific operations and are not normally sourced by AFPC/DPW. MAJCOMs may release certain Enabler assets for DPW sourcing. These will be stipulated in the applicable Enabler guidance (see paragraph 7.12.8.3) or through one-time concurrence from the MAJCOM/A3. 8.14.8.3. Sourcing ARC Forces during Crisis Action. The AEFC will identify ARC forces by UTC as necessary to meet combatant commander requirements beyond those the Active Duty can support. Sourcing procedures utilized for rotational and/or surge

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 operations will be utilized for both AD and the ARC for deployment during crisis action. The ARC headquarters, through the gaining MAJCOM, will verify availability and identify the ARC UTCs/UICs for mobilization, utilizing mobilization authority as needed. In accordance with AFI 10-402 and any other AF-approved ARC activation procedures, gaining MAJCOMs will request mobilization authority through the AFCAT (AFOG) so that portions of their gained ARC forces can be activated. If mobilization authority is approved, the gaining MAJCOM will direct activation of forces through the appropriate ARC headquarters and load UTC/UIC in the established TPFDD.

8.14.9. Verification. Verification is the process whereby MAJCOMs/DRUs/FOAs/Service Components accomplish JOPES requirements to finalize the sourcing process. During the verification process, every responsible agency ensures the sourced UTC/UIC has the required complements to meet the requirement; the applicable forces are available and ready; forces have been alerted for deployment; and the cargo is tailored to level-4 detail, if applicable. Verification completes the sourcing process. Air Force planners and FAMs at all levels must ensure that the TPFDD accurately reflects and is consistent with actual resources that units will deploy. In other words verification confirms the sourced data from the first and second echelon reflect actual data provided by the base or unit in the force deployment level. Failure to accomplish this verification could result in misstating planned airlift requirements and possibly delaying the execution of a combatant commander‘s plan. 8.14.9.1. When verifying ULNs, FAMs utilize AFVC in DCAPES to support information on deployment activity and data reflected in the TPFDD. 8.14.9.1.1. The purpose for providing an AFVC is to allow designated users to reflect verification of sourced requirements by performing edits; setting, changing, or overriding the ULN Project Code (PC); and generating reports. AFVC provides the ability to perform these actions on a single ULN, a selected group of ULNs, force modules (FMs), or an entire Operation Plan (OPLAN) basis. 8.14.9.1.2. AFVC will be used to reflect force provider verification actions at the MAJCOM level (or equivalent) and below. FAMs and planners at those levels will use AFVC to perform specified levels of verification to ensure the record contains accurate movement data (PAX and Cargo) and does not contain fatal errors. When the force provider pulls the requirements, it keys on the Project Code (PC) "flag" to find those records ready for supporting component verification. After the records are pulled, the PC changes to reflect the new status. As editing is completed on the requirement, this information is updated in DCAPES to display the actions which affected that ULN. Note: For rotational requirements/taskings there may be instances where required data fields may not be populated (e.g. APOE due to aggregation actions). In this case, force providers will verify and ensure all other required fields are free of fatal errors. 8.14.9.1.3. Each MAJCOM/MAJCOM-equivalent (see Table 8.1.) will initiate verification for assigned units except as follows: 8.14.9.1.3.1. Air Force District of Washington (AFDW) will initiate verification for units assigned to AFDW (MAJCOM Code ―4W‖) as well as Headquarters USAF (MAJCOM Code ―13‖) after the HAF FAM provides coordination approval.

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8.14.9.1.3.2. AFPC will initiate verification for all organizations considered ―outside‖ the Air Force (see Table A8.3) and will provide documentation of approval from OSD/A&M to the servicing Installation Deployment Readiness Center (IDRC). 8.14.9.1.3.3. SAF/PA, on behalf of AF Public Affairs Agency (AFPAA), will initiate verification for all PA taskings. 8.14.9.2. Force providers and bases will utilize AFVC to initiate the verification process (see Table 8.4, MAJCOM/Base-level Codes, and Table 8.5, Verification Timeline). Note: For ARC forces requiring mobilization, ARC headquarters will enter the directed TPFDD LOI Project Code which represents ―Request for Mobilization‖ as part of the verification process. Table 8.4. MAJCOM/Base-level Codes MAJCOM-level Codes N B A S Base-level Codes BX BXP BXC BXA N NXX

MAJCOM Authenticate/Reset Base Level Tasking MAJCOM disapproval of NXX/Reset Base Level Verification MAJCOM Approval of Command or Command-gained aviation SPTG Component Approval of MAJCOM Verification Base Approval, no Changes Necessary Base Approval with Personnel Changes Base Approval with Cargo Changes Base Approval with Personnel & Cargo Changes Base Undo Approval Base Disapproval – Note: IDO initiates the formal reclama IAW Section 10C--Shortfall and Reclama Process

Table 8.5. Verification Timeline (Calendar Days). Action

Standard >30 days from RDD

Short Notice <=30 days from RDD

Sourced requirement added to Verification Force Module by AFPC/DPW

Day 0

Day 0

MAJCOM Authentication (‗N‘ code)

Day 3

Day 1

MAJCOM Verification (‗S‘ code)

Day 6

Day 2

8.14.9.2.1. Force providers (planners, FAMs, or AEF Cells) will enter an ―N‖ in the PC field of AFVC. Note: Force providers may designate specific offices authorized to update this field. This notifies the base, through the Installation Deployment Officer (IDO), of sourcing. The IDO, or designated representative, will acknowledge receipt of the sourcing through AFVC and determine if the base can fill. 8.14.9.2.2. If the base can fill the requirement, the IDO, or designated representative, will verify the sourcing to the MAJCOM using AFVC by annotating ―BX‖ if the base

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 can fulfill the tasking as is or BXP/BXC/BXA if the base can fulfill the tasking with changes to personnel, cargo, or both. 8.14.9.2.3. If the sourced base cannot support the deployment requirement with an alternate resource, the base IDO/equivalent will enter ―NXX‖ in the PC field. If the MAJCOM FAM agrees with the "NXX" code and can resource the tasking within the MAJCOM, they will submit a UIC change request via the RPT, as outlined in Chapter 10. If the MAJCOM FAM agrees with the "NXX" code but cannot resource within the command, the FAM will submit a condition 1 - 4 reclama on behalf of the wing to expedite processing. 8.14.9.2.4. Once the IDO verifies requirements by utilizing AFVC, force provider planners/FAMs/AEF Cells will verify, through the supporting commander, to the supported component headquarters by placing an "S" in the project code field in DCAPES. 8.14.9.2.5. If the force provider does not concur with the base‘s ―NXX‖ code they will reset the PC from ―NXX‖ to ―B.‖ 8.14.9.3. If a force provider does not verify the record within (6) days, they are required to submit a reclama and follow the process stated inChapter 10. 8.14.9.3.1. (DELETE) . 8.14.9.3.2. (DELETE) . 8.14.9.4. Once verified by the force provider, supported component headquarters will complete the verification process by putting an ―SC‖ in the project code field in DCAPES. This indicates that the requirement is ready for supported commander validation.

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Figure 8.1. AFVC Verification Process.

8.14.9.5. (DELETED) . 8.14.9.6. (DELETE) . 8.14.10. Validation. The validation process immediately begins once the force provider has verified the sourcing. This involves close coordination between supported and supporting commands and Service components. 8.14.10.1. The supported command‘s TPFDD letter of instruction (LOI) should set forth guidance regarding procedures and direction for TPFDD validation at the supporting and supported command level. 8.14.10.1.1. Supported component headquarters verifies force requirements to their supported command. 8.14.10.1.2. Supporting agencies will follow the JOPES validation process outlined in JOPES Volume III. 8.14.10.2. The TPFDD LOI contains specific direction for supporting commands on validation procedures. 8.14.10.3. During execution, movement data within a TPFDD must be validated in order to schedule strategic transportation. "Validate" in this context is defined in joint publications as: "Execution procedure used by combatant command components, supporting combatant commanders, and providing organizations to confirm to the supported commander that all the information records in a TPFDD are not only error-

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 free, but also accurately reflect the current status, attributes (lower level personnel and cargo data), and availability of units and requirements".

8.15. Force Reporting. The actual units sourced in a plan must be registered in GSORTS. All Air Force units should be registered in SORTS and those with postured UTCs will report the readiness status of their UTCs in accordance with AFI 10-244. Units will measure and report Category Levels (C-Levels) in SORTS in accordance with AFI 10-201. 8.15.1. For non-SORTS reporting units, a situation report (SITREP) and ART will be used to monitor their deployability readiness and status. Actual units may be designated during either Phase III or V of CAP, if not previously designated during contingency planning. SORTS is designed to be able to provide the data specified in CJCSM 3150.01A as a result of its interface with JOPES. Thus, all force requirement numbers in the OPLAN TPFDD are matched to actual units or parent commands reported in SORTS. 8.15.2. SORTS reporting provides C-Levels, which reflect the resources and training for the full capability of a given unit. Therefore, availability of specific resources may not be sufficiently reflected if a unit is tasked for one or more smaller UTC packages. The availability and readiness of a specific UTC within the unit is reported in ART. 8.15.3. Provisional units that must be constituted or reconstituted specifically to meet the requirements of an operation are registered by the gaining MAJCOM and reported in SORTS as soon as they are activated. Mobilized units constituted or reconstituted specifically to meet the requirements of an operation are reported in SORTS as soon as they are activated. 8.16. TPFDD Letter of Instruction. As stated in paragraph 8.8.2, component headquarters planners must ensure that certain Service-specific information is included in a TPFFD LOI. The LOI addresses Service unique methods and procedures that will enhance TPFDD management. Additionally, the LOI will be written to prevent the use of generic guidance that can be deemed as open for interpretation. 8.16.1. The LOI identifies certain Air Force processes and standard procedures to be used in developing and executing the TPFDD in support of specific operations. 8.16.2. The LOI is directive and applies to supported Service components, and force providing organizations/agencies throughout the Air Force Planning and Execution Community during both deployment and redeployment operations. 8.16.3. Detailed instructions for requesting unlocking of transportation-validated ULNs for re-sourcing. 8.16.4. The component headquarters must ensure the following information, as a minimum, is included in a TPFDD LOI: 8.16.4.1. All transportation routing data to include GEOLOCs, Mode/Source and priority of air and sea movement for Air Force units. 8.16.4.2. Allocation of transportation assets, specifically, common user assets (known as strategic lift) are highly fluid and intensely dynamic at the execution of a TPFDD. Component headquarters is responsible for detailing rules sets that explain GEOLOCs, Mode/Source and priority of air and sea movement (to include C Dates). Movement of forces is subject to change until scheduled for movement by USTRANSCOM.

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8.16.4.3. Allocation of air and sealift capability between Service components and resupply/rotation/sustainment needs. 8.16.4.4. Standard time windows for re-supply and information relevant to sustainment planning in the TPFDD. 8.16.4.5. TPFDD maintenance instructions and Security Classification Guidance. 8.16.4.6. Applicable C Dates to include specific combatant commander‘s RDD and reference start time of the TPFDD. 8.16.4.7. Ensure compliance with JOPESREP force requirement and routing data to include time phasing according to procedures in JOPESREP. 8.16.4.8. TPFDD points of contact. Detailed requirements and reporting methods/standards for POCs from component headquarters functional areas (i.e. FAMS, Manpower/Personnel: A1, Operations: A3, Logistics: A4, etc); MAJCOMs (i.e. FAMs, CAT POCs,); wing-level 24-hour POC, etc. 8.16.4.9. Specific ULN construct and allocation for AEF combat forces and accompanying ECS/ BOS to include format for FRN construction and if applicable, specified FRAG logic. 8.16.4.10. USTRANSCOM and Combatant Command standard POEs and PODs for forces, as well as methods and process for deviations (e.g.. component headquarters selection of POEs in lieu of providing organization‘s selection). 8.16.4.11. The supporting PIDs (e.g. Service slices) must be included in the Supported Command‘s TPFDD LOI. 8.17. Transportation Feasibility of TPFDDs 8.17.1. Early Injection of Transportation Expertise. To assist in initial planning, USTRANSCOM will deploy flyaway teams to help combatant commanders in the early stages of Crisis Action Planning. Collaborating with the planners from the beginning will overcome many problems and streamline the process. 8.17.2. Timely Submission of Movement Requirements. Component headquarters will need to determine with the supporting and supported command the best method to ensure timely validation of a requirement to USTRANSCOM to include all available modes of transportation. 8.17.3. Mode/Source Analysis and Recomme ndation. The most effective measure for USTRANSCOM to determine transportation solutions is early identification of requirements, supported command RDD, and early collaboration with transportation/mobility planners. 8.17.4. Flexible Validation. Flexible validation of requirements primarily deals with changes to Mode/Source that drive changes to C-dates and POE/POD. Knowing the requirement early on, the RDD, and being involved in the initial stages of the planning process will facilitate the validation process as well as reduce the amount of changes in Mode/Source. 8.18. TPFDD Maintenance. This section provides instructions for maintaining the TPFDD data of contingency OPLANs. It primarily addresses Plan Identifications (PIDs), force modules (FMs), Unit Line Numbers (ULNs), Unit Type Codes (UTCs) and data elements that make up

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the requirements. The Supported Command will publish operation or exercise-specific data management instruction in a Supplemental TPFDD LOI that details maintenance requirements for a given TPFDD. 8.18.1. TPFDD maintenance is essential and mandatory in accordance with this instruction and joint publications. The supported component headquarters is responsible for ensuring detailed instructions to include security classification guidance are provided to HAF FAMs and planners for effective and efficient maintenance of any variation of a TPFDD (i.e. contingency and execution TPFDDs). 8.18.2. FAMS and planners must ensure that accurate and valid UTCs are used when maintaining a TPFDD. Accurate Air Force data is essential for managing the updates and changes to unit level data in support of a TPFDD. This will include UTC posturing and availability in accordance with Chapter 7 of this instruction. 8.18.3. TPFDD maintenance will be accomplished under the following circumstances: 8.18.3.1. The supported Combatant Command determines that TPFDD maintenance is required (this includes USTRANSCOM maintenance requirement). 8.18.3.2. The component headquarters feels it is necessary. 8.18.3.3. If directed by AF/A5XW. 8.18.3.4. A year has passed since the last review/TPFDD update. 8.19. Contingency Plan TPFDD Maintenance. For Contingency Plan TPFDDs, the Air Force portion will be maintained under a separate JOPES PID on the component headquarters‘ GCCS host database and updated as required. Updates can be as dynamic as daily and as deliberate as annually. This is known as the "Air Force slice" referring to a TPFDD owned by the combatant commander containing only Air Force requirements. 8.19.1. All Services have a "Service slice" that is maintained and managed by the respective component. The component headquarters will ensure appropriate level of access and permissions are granted to MAJCOMs and force providers to facilitate specified maintenance. 8.19.2. These slices will provide current and updated capabilities (UTCs), correctly postured and available to support an executable Contingency Plan TPFDD. 8.19.3. Not only is this Air Force slice used at execution, it can be used by MAJCOMs and component headquarters for unit training requirements, exercises and evaluations.

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Chapter 9 FORCE ROTATION MANAGEMENT Section 9A—Purpose 9.1. Purpose. To articulate the methodology, policies, rules, and procedures the Air Force uses to meet and sustain combatant commander mission needs while maintaining the AEF battle rhythm. This chapter also identifies the organizations and considerations involved in planning and preparing deployable combat capabilities and is applicable to scheduled and tasked to deploy forces. Section 9B—Background 9.2. Force Presence. The U.S. Air Force supports Joint Force Commander (JFC) requirements through a combination of assigned, attached (rotational), and mobility forces that may be forward deployed, transient, or operating from home station. The USAF presents required capabilities to the Joint Force Commander (JFC) as an AETF. The AETF can be task organized as a NEAF, AEW, AEG or AES, depending on mission requirements. The central management, scheduling, and use of these forces in support of all combatant commander requirements is vetted and arbitrated via the Global Force Management Board (GFMB) and SecDef and outlined in the GFM Implementation Guidance (GFMIG). 9.3. Air Force Sourcing and Tasking Priority. The Air Force uses the following priorities when responding to and supporting deployment taskings whether one time fills or rotational. These priorities also apply when submitting reclamas for shortfalls. 9.3.1. Meeting validated combatant commander requirements and deployed commanders involved in real-world contingencies in support of an authorized Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) order. 9.3.2. Meeting requirements of combatant commands and deployed commanders involved in JCS exercises. 9.3.3. Supporting Air Force level exercises. 9.3.4. Supporting MAJCOM exercises and inspections. 9.3.5. Meeting Numbered Air Force (NAF) level exercises. 9.3.6. Meeting and supporting wing and group-level exercises and events. 9.3.7. Assisting other commands with manning assistance. Section 9C—Guidance 9.4. Force Rotation Planning. Force rotational plans support the GFM requirement of an immediate executable schedule. The AEF construct, with its five tempo bands, is the Air Force methodology of meeting existing and emerging worldwide CCDR requirements as depicted in the SecDef-approved GFMAP. CJCS orders to the supported commander, supporting commanders, and Services initiate such operations. These orders define plan details and

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requirements to accomplish the mission and authority to deploy forces. In accordance with CJCSM 3122.02C, such orders will specify weapons systems and a description of the ECS capability needed to sustain the operation. Additional orders may need to be issued when an operation becomes a rotational mission and the Air Force, as a Service, or all force providing combatant commanders are not identified to support. The supported component headquarters, in coordination with AFPC/DPW, is responsible for preparing the force rotation plan and ensuring the plan is time-phased to meet the AEF battle rhythm. The component headquarters will coordinate with AFPC/DPW to identify UTC capabilities from the AETF force modules and UTC Availability necessary to sustain the crisis operation and transition from crisis to rotational operations. A CJCS DEPORD, and ensuing AFEXORD, will be used to task and deploy USAF forces for each AEF rotation. The supported component headquarters will not source a requirement identified in the force rotation TPFDD. 9.4.1. Defining Rotational Requirements. Deployed commanders and component headquarters constantly evaluate their ability to execute their missions based on the forces in theater. When there is a change to the deployed unit‘s mission, equipment or weapons system, operating location, or a reduction in forces, the deployed commander will evaluate the impact and notify the component headquarters of needed changes via either an authorization change request (ACR) or a request for forces/request for capability (RFF/RFC). See paragraph 9.4.2. and Figure 9.1 for the ACR process. 9.4.1.1. The first priority of the component headquarters FAM is to use standard UTCs postured in the UTC Availability to expedite timely sourcing and minimize tailoring actions. If the desired UTC is not postured in the UTC Availability, consider a suitable standard UTC in the Manpower and Equipment Force Packaging (MEFPAK). Standard UTCs may be reasonably tailored, if necessary. As a last resort, use a non-standard UTC (i.e., "Z99"). Note: A "ZZZ" non-standard UTC is not deployable and cannot be used. If the requirement is projected to become rotational, the AEFC scheduler should refer the requirement to the Air Staff FAM to determine if a new UTC should be developed. 9.4.1.2. New rotational requirements will be scheduled per 9.9.6 For IA requirements, reference 9.4.3.3 9.4.2. Authorization Change Request (ACR). The ACR is used to explain changes or a deletion to the deployed commander‘s mission needs in support of an executed deployment order (DEPORD). The ACR will cite all original and new UTC and TPFDD level-4 detail. All changes will include a Command Remark Code (CRC) to indicate whether the estimated tour length (ETL) may be split to facilitate the support of Air Reserve Component (ARC) forces, see Table 9.1 If prohibited, the deployed commander will include justification explaining why the ETL cannot be split. 9.4.2.1. The deployed unit commander will submit the request to the applicable component headquarters A1 for validation. Supported component will ensure the request meets the following criteria: (1) is a modification to an existing GFMAP-approved requirement, (2) is in support of an Air Force component requirement (i.e., not a JET requirement), and (3) is fewer than the lesser of 10 persons or 10 percent of a functional area of an existing FTN already authorized by SecDef. If the AFFOR/A1 does not validate the ACR, the request is sent back to the requestor to resubmit as an RFF/RFC.

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9.4.2.2. The supported component will forward all validated ACRs to ACC/A3O (or applicable AF FP if other than conventional force) for action. ACC/A3O will coordinate request with applicable MAJCOM and/or HAF FAMs. If ACC/A3O disapproves request, they will notify supported component A1 to initiate request via RFF process. If request is approved, the supported component headquarters will update the TPFDD using the appropriate ULN construct and forward a copy of the ACR to AFPC/DPW for update of the master rotational TPFDD. Note: ACRs changing ETLs to greater than 179 days will be in accordance with paragraph 9.11.1. 9.4.2.3. If the ACR is enduring, the supported component will include as a requirement in the subsequent FY GFM requirements submission. 9.4.2.3.1. If changes are made to a requirement after the force provider verified the tasking, the verification code must be removed. This will allow the MAJCOM the opportunity to examine the changes and ensure the originally sourced unit can meet the new requirements or can fill tasking with another unit within the timeframe. If applicable, AFPC/DPW should inform component headquarters that change in requirement may result in a delay in filling the new requirement. Table 9.1. Command Remark Codes. Old Code New Code

DESCRIPTION

R1

F1

Minimum 15-Day TDY Length

R2

F2

Minimum 30-Day TDY Length

R3

F3

Minimum 40-Day TDY Length

R4

F4

Minimum 60-Day TDY Length

R5

F5

Minimum 90-Day TDY Length

R6

F6

Minimum 120-Day TDY Length

R7

F7*

Minimum 180-Day TDY Length

F9*

Minimum 365-Day TDY Length

B1

Minimum 15-Day TDY Length - Aircraft Package (3 Series UTCs And Related MISCAP Tasked UTCs)

B2

Minimum 30-Day TDY Length - Aircraft Package (3 Series UTCs And Related MISCAP Tasked UTCs)

B3

Minimum 40-Day TDY Length - Aircraft Package (3 Series UTCs And Related MISCAP Tasked UTCs)

B4

Minimum 60-Day TDY Length - Aircraft Package (3 Series UTCs And Related MISCAP Tasked UTCs)

B5

Minimum 90-Day TDY Length - Aircraft Package (3 Series UTCs And Related MISCAP Tasked UTCs)

A1

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Minimum 120-Day TDY Length - Aircraft Package (3 Series UTCs And Related MISCAP Tasked UTCs)

B7*

Minimum 180-Day TDY Length - Aircraft Package (3 Series UTCs And Related MISCAP Tasked UTCs)

B9*

Minimum 365-Day TDY Length - Aircraft package

J1

K1

Joint Billet, Min 15-Day TDY Length

J2

K2

Joint Billet, Min 30-Day TDY Length

J3

K3

Joint Billet, Min 40-Day TDY Length

J4

K4

Joint Billet, Min 60-Day TDY Length

J5

K5

Joint Billet, Min 90-Day TDY Length

New Code

DESCRIPTION

J6

K6

Joint Billet, Min 120-Day TDY Length

J7

K7*

Joint Billet, Min 180-Day TDY Length

K9*

Joint Billet Minimum 365-Day TDY Length

N1

N1

NATO Billet, Min 15-Day TDY Length

N2

N2

NATO Billet, Min 30-Day TDY Length

N3

N3

NATO Billet, Min 40-Day TDY Length

N4

N4

NATO Billet, Min 60-Day TDY Length

N5

N5

NATO Billet, Min 90-Day TDY Length

N6

N6

NATO Billet, Min 120-Day TDY Length

N7

N7*

NATO Billet, Min 180-Day TDY Length

N9*

NATO Billet Minimum 365-Day TDY Length

NR

* = DELETED

Tour Length Must Be Approved/Coordinated IAW AFPD 10-4 NATO Rotational Between Services

C1

DELETED

Colonel Billet

* =

Tour Length Must Be Approved/Coordinated IAW AFPD 10-4

Old Code

9.4.3. Individual Augmentation (IA) Requirements. Individual Augmentation is a joint term and process described by CJCSI 1301.01C. Individual Augmentation represents unfunded temporary duty positions (military or civilian) requested to augment a supported combatant commander's or governmental agency‘s staff operations during contingencies. Similar to requests for forces (RFFs) in support of contingencies, IA requirements are inherently temporary in nature and are not to be used to solve permanent manning or capability shortages. They are not to be used to source joint training or exercise requirements. [Note:

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For the remainder of this paragraph and subparagraphs, the term "Supported Command" is intended to mean a supported combatant commander, the supported component headquarters, or a governmental agency approved by the Joint Staff to receive IA support from the Services]. Supported Commands must first evaluate their ability to fulfill contingency staff requirements using organic/ assigned manpower; only then should they request IA support to cover any identified mission gaps. Once the supported commander develops, validates and forwards an IA Joint Manning Document (JMD) to the Joint Staff, the Joint Staff initiates the prioritization and sourcing process described in CJCSI 1301.01C, and the Air Force sources IA requirements it commits to or is directed to. Figure 9.2 depicts Individual Augmentee sourcing procedures in accordance with CJCSI 1301.01C and internal Air Force procedures. Figure 9.1. Authorization Change Request (ACR) Process.

9.4.3.1. IA Requirements Development and Service Allocation. Individual Augmentation requirements for a particular joint operation and organization are developed by the supported commander, associated with the appropriate TPFDD, and assigned to Services for fill as a Joint Action tasking in accordance with CJCSI 1301.01C. Supported commanders will make every attempt to synchronize the RDD/DRI with the AEF pivot date and also maximize the notification time afforded deploying members. The Joint Staff relays validated joint IA requirements for Air Force fill (via a JMD formatted per CJCSI 1301.01C) to the Air Force Joint Action Coordinating Office (JACO) in AF/A5XJ as a Joint Action. Upon accepting the Joint Action tasking, the JACO relays the AF‘s slice of the IA JMD and the associated Joint Action instructions to the HAF Crisis Action Team Manpower & Personnel Readiness Center (AFCAT-MPRC)

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 for further processing. If the AFCAT-MPRC is not activated, AF/A1PR assumes all MPRC duties in these paragraphs. 9.4.3.2. Air Force Review of IA Requirements. Upon receipt of the Joint Action from the JACO, the MPRC performs an initial JMD ―scrub‖ to ensure format/content compliance with CJCSI 1301.01C. The MPRC then relays the JMD to the AEFC and affected HAF FAMs for detailed review and analysis. The AEFC, with HAF FAM and MPRC assistance, works with the Joint Staff and supported commander to resolve any requirements discrepancies or ambiguities, makes a preliminary determination regarding the Air Force‘s ability to source and sustain the requirements if rotations are authorized, and forwards its analysis back to the MPRC. With this information, the MPRC, working with JACO, develops and coordinates a formal Air Force position and response to the Joint Staff, typically in the form of an Air Force Planner‘s Memo (AFPM), Air Force OpsDep Memo (AFODM), or CSAF Memo (CSAFM), as determined by the JACO. Upon compiling Service positions regarding their ability to source and sustain the requirements, the Joint Staff may choose to convene a Prioritization and Sourcing Review Board (PSRB) to address Service or supported commander issues/concerns, broker IA sourcing solutions, and/or elevate unresolved sourcing issues within the OPSDEP and JCS Tank structure (see CJCSI1301.01C). The Air Force Planner (AF/A5XJ) is the formal Air Force representative in all PSRBs and will be assisted by the MPRC, the AEFC and HAF FAM representatives as appropriate. Once PSRB issues are resolved, the Joint Staff secures formal tasking of the Services to fill their allocated IA requirements. 9.4.3.3. IA Rotational Tour Lengths. IA rotational tours lengths will be in accordance with AEF rotation policy and IA Business Rules. Longer tour lengths may be approved by CSAF or as delegated. SecDef-approved tour lengths are posted in the Global Force Management Allocation Plan, Annex D. tour lengths are posted in the Global Force Management Allocation Plan, Annex D. 9.4.3.3.1. The supported commander may request longer/non-standard IA tour lengths to meet position continuity or other requirements. The request must include the positions and justification. The requesting command submits the request to the Joint Staff who tasks Air Force to respond via AF/A5XJ (JACO) office. The JACO assigns an Air Staff OPR and OCRs to evaluate the request and develop an Air Force position. The OPR documents the Air Force position in an Air Force Policy Memo (AFPM) and Joint Action Brief Sheet (JABS). The AFPM and JABS are routed through A3O and A3/5 for CSAF decision. Note: This paragraph only addresses nonstandard tour length requirements based on supported commander requests; not internal Air Force decisions to extend ETLs, e.g., to meet surge requirements or manage operationally stressed AFSCs. 9.4.3.3.2. Out of cycle requests. When the initial required delivery date (RDD) cannot be met, or the ETL does not meet warfighter requirements, AFPC/DPW, component headquarters, and supporting MAJCOM (if known) will coordinate resolution. Tour length options for IA requirements follow the same prioritization as UTC requirements outlined in section 9.9.6. 9.4.3.3.2.1. DELETED.

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9.4.3.3.2.2. DELETED. 9.4.3.3.2.3. (DELETED) . 9.4.3.3.2.4. DELETED. 9.4.3.3.3. DELETED. 9.4.3.3.3.1. DELETED. 9.4.3.3.3.2. DELETED. 9.4.3.3.3.3. AFPC will source requirement to meet established RDD/DRI. Subsequent rotations will continue to be sourced out-of-cycle from AEF block pivot date. 9.4.3.4. IA Sourcing Procedures. Once the supported commander, Joint Staff and the Service(s) agree to the sourcing commitments, the supported component headquarters ensures the requirements are entered in the appropriate TPFDD for sourcing and identifies the tasking type as IA. The requirement(s) will use standard UTCs to the maximum extent possible. The use of non-standard "Z99" UTCs is only authorized when standard tailored UTCs cannot match the requirement(s). AFPC/DPW will source these requirements using the MilPDS sourcing method outlined in Chapter 14. 9.4.3.4.1. DELETED. 9.4.3.5. Eliminating Longstanding or Recurring IA Requirements. Given the nature of Individual Augmentation, IA requirements, once validated and sourced, can become longstanding or "perpetual" if no mechanism exists to review them on a recurring basis and remove them once they are no longer required. CJCSI 1301.01C requires the "supported commander" to review and revalidate IA requirements every 12 months; however, it is also incumbent upon the Air Force to establish trigger points that drive an internal review of IA requirements on a recurring basis, in which longstanding requirements are either eliminated or converted to permanent positions. It is the responsibility of the HAF IA cell (AF/A1PRO), in coordination with HAF FAMs, component headquarters, AF/A1MR and the AEFC, to develop and manage this process. 9.4.3.6. IA Requests Not IAW CJCSI 1301.01C. To ensure global visibility and centralized management of all joint IA requirements, any requests for IA support that are not sent by a supported commander via the Joint Staff to the Services in accordance with CJCSI 1301.01C should not be supported by the AF. Air Force offices aware of such requests should redirect the requestor to the Joint Staff/J1 for further processing. 9.4.4. Non-Rotational Requirements/Temporary Line Numbers. Non-Rotational Requirements/ Temporary line numbers are normally the result of nonrecurring mission or workload increases that can be resolved with additional manpower or equipment for short durations. The deployed commander will evaluate the mission impact and send a request to the component headquarters with the needed workload, through the deployed Manpower function. The request must contain all TPFDD level-4, line-level detail to include purpose of TDY. Component headquarters will approve or disapprove all change requests, enter the requirement into the TPFDD using appropriate ULN construct, and forward the request to the AEFC as quickly as possible to allow for timely sourcing. Note: Non-mission or by name TLNs will be filled by the component headquarters directorate of personnel.

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9.4.5. Permanent Party Billets. When permanent party billets replace rotational requirements, the component headquarters deletes the rotational requirement with the effective date to coincide with the arrival of the permanent party member. All such actions will be closely coordinated with the AEFC to ensure deployments are properly terminated. Permanent party billets include those rotational requirements that are outsourced and supported by a contractor force. Once outsourced these requirements must be removed from the rotational PID. 9.4.6. Intercommand Manning Assistance. U.S. Air Force MAJCOMs will occasionally face temporary, operations staff or unit manning requirements, CONUS or OCONUS, that are not associated with a combatant commander's TPFDD or PID and for which the MAJCOM does not posses the internal (intracommand) personnel resources to satisfy them. Validation of these requirements is a shared responsibility between the requesting (supported) MAJCOM and affected HAF FAMs. If the requirement is approved, it is filled in accordance with AF/A1 policy. 9.5. AEF Pivot Date. The AEF pivot date is the date each AEF deployment begins. The AEF pivot date is normally the 15th day of the first month of the AEF deployment eligibility window. The transportation movement window is 15-days on either side of the AEF pivot date (i.e., AEF 1 & 2 pivot date is 15 May. Transportation movement window begins 1 May and ends 30 May.) The AEFC commander establishes the AEF pivot date for use by all agencies responsible for the planning and scheduling of AEF resources (ECS and aviation). The AEFC commander may change the pivot date when necessary. 9.5.1. Rotation of Airmen (ROA) Template. The AEFC will work to phase all deploying ECS forces into the deployed location within the 30-day movement window to the maximum extent possible. Note: If initial requirement is delivered outside of the AEF movement window, it will be phased into the window during subsequent AEF rotations. Key and essential personnel, such as commanders and vice/deputy commanders would move into a deployed location during the first 8 days of the movement window. Remaining personnel will have their RDDs adjusted or realigned to rotate approximately one third of the force in 7-day intervals over 21 days. This ROA Template is designed to deliver forces in stable and predictable pattern to support the warfighter. It will also provide deploying commanders insight into what capabilities are scheduled into their units during the critical AEF transition through the unit change of command. Aviation and direct support aviation support UTCs, Individual Augmentees, and permanent party are currently excluded from the ROA Template, but will be taken into consideration.

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Figure 9.2. CJCSI 1301.

9.6. AEF Sourcing Plans and Tasks Timeline. To ensure the Air Force is ready for each AEF rotation, the AFPC/DPW will distribute a 4-month and a 6-month AEF Sourcing Plans and Tasks message outlining critical tasks to be accomplished by responsible OPRs. All component headquarters and MAJCOMs are required to adhere to the milestones in this message to ensure the orderly presentation of capability to the combatant commanders. The timeline may be compressed for crisis action TPFDDs and during periods of deviation from the normal AEF battle rhythm. The 4-month AEF Sourcing Plans and Tasks message is distributed approximately 165 days from the pivot date and covers requirements primarily sourced from the Baseline AEF (Band ―A‖). For requirements supported via Band ―B‖ through ―E‖, AFPC/DPW will distribute a 6-month AEF Sourcing Plans and Tasks message approximately 192 days prior to the pivot date. Actual deployment time may be different from what the ETL states due to type of mission supported, en route travel time, functional training requirements, and CCDR-approved rotation policy. Each AEF Sourcing Plans and Tasks message with corresponding timeline will be posted on the AEF Operations NIPR and SIPR web site. Reference Figure 9.3. 9.6.1. Force Rotational TPFDDs. Component headquarters that require AEF scheduled forces are required to synchronize the building of requirements with the AEF battle rhythm. Use of the appropriate AEF ULN is mandatory when transitioning to force rotation support. 9.6.1.1. The AEFC builds the rotational requirements into the appropriate PIDs, and provides them to the supported component headquarters for approval, prior to each AEF

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 rotation consistent with the AEFC timeline. Additional capability or changes to existing requirements can be generated by an ACR, a new or modified DEPORD, or a vetted PSRB action, in paragraph 9.9.6 (for IAs, see paragraph 9.4.3.1). Deletions will be submitted immediately upon determination that the capability is no longer required.

9.6.2. Master Rotational TPFDDs. The AEFC will maintain a master rotational TPFDD for each theater employing AEF scheduled forces. Once an operation‘s initial response has transitioned to rotational and met guidelines for sourcing with AEF scheduled forces, the AEFC will capture requirements in the master rotational TPFDD and perform daily analysis to maintain them. The AEFC will present AEF rotational requirements to the component headquarters for acceptance or comment approximately 160 days (4-Month rotations) and 191 days (6-Month rotations) prior to each AEF pivot date. 9.6.2.1. Establishing Rotational Operations. A component headquarters must identify requirements that necessitate sustained rotation support to the AEFC, AFCAT (AFOG) and AF/A3/5. The AEFC will incorporate new requirements into the master rotational TPFDD. 9.6.2.2. Rotational Criteria. All requirements must meet the following rotational criteria: 9.6.2.2.1. Established supported combatant commander rotational requirement. 9.6.2.2.2. Requirement expected to exist for greater than one calendar year. 9.6.2.2.3. Must have a executable TPFDD networked. 9.6.2.2.4. SecDef approves via inclusion in GFMAP. 9.6.2.3. (DELETED) . 9.6.2.3.1. (DELETED) . 9.6.2.3.2. (DELETED) . 9.6.2.3.3. (DELETED) . 9.6.2.3.4. (DELETED) 9.6.2.4. Inclusion in AEF Schedule 9.6.2.4.1. The component headquarters provides a message with reporting and funding instructions, estimated tour lengths, and classification guidance, as a minimum. 9.6.2.4.2. The component headquarters translates requirements into standard UTCs to the maximum extent possible and ensures the TPFDD(s) are made available/networked for access by the AEFC and Air Force force providers. 9.6.3. Non-standard UTC Requests. The Air Force sources capabilities using standard UTCs resident in the UTC Availability. A supported combatant commander may submit a request for a capability not defined in the UTC Availability to their air component. If this capability cannot be defined by tailoring a standard UTC, the applicable component headquarters will translate the request using a non-standard UTC. The component headquarters, in coordination with the HAF FAM, will forward the non-standard

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requirement, using an ACR, to the AEFC. The ACR must include a brief job/mission description since non-standard UTCs have no MISCAP statement. 9.6.3.1. If the requirement is projected to become rotational, the AEFC scheduler(s), in coordination with the component headquarters FAM(s), should refer the requirement to the Air Staff FAM to determine if a new UTC should be developed. 9.6.3.2. The Air Staff FAM will work unresolved non-standard UTC issues within their functional area chain of command. 9.6.3.3. AF/A5XW, as Air Staff Office of FAM Oversight (OFAMO), will adjudicate any unresolved cross-functional non-standard UTC issues, if required. Figure 9.3. AEF Rotation (4-Month) Planning Timeline.

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Figure 9.4. AEF Pair Rotation (6-Month) Planning Timeline.

Figure 9.5. (DELETED) 9.7. Aef Battle Rhythm. To ensure the efficient and timely execution of the AEF battle rhythm, AF/A5X and AFPC/CC monitor the tasks associated with planning for each AEF cycle and each AEF rotation. AEF Cycle tasks are outlined in paragraph 2.4.3 AEF rotation tasks and timelines are outlined below. Air Force planners and commanders, as well as AF, MAJCOM, and component headquarters FAMs must ensure their actions are completed in accordance with published timelines. 9.7.1. (DELETED) . 9.7.2. (DELETED) . 9.7.2.1. (DELETED) . 9.7.2.2. (DELETED) . 9.7.3. (DELETED) .

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9.7.4. (DELETED) . 9.7.4.1. (DELETED) . 9.7.4.2. (DELETED) . 9.7.5. (DELETED) . 9.7.6. AEF Association Review. Unit commanders must remain aware of which AEF their UTCs are expected to deploy by periodically analyzing the UTC Availability. A subsequent review of personnel AEF association, as denoted by AEF Indicator (AEFI) in MilPDS, should also be conducted to ensure sufficient numbers and types of personnel are associated to the same AEF(s) as the postured UTCs. See paragraph 14.4.1 on rule sets for changing an individual‘s AEFI. 9.7.7. Posturing Code (P-Code) Review. UTC posturing codes should be reviewed by the unit and FAMs and adjustments made NLT 180 days prior to the start of each AEF rotation. The appropriate coding of UTCs should be done in accordance with Chapter 7, taking into consideration the AEF deployment period(s) the unit is expected to deploy. Changes to UTC P-codes will not be made to justify manpower programming actions (such as PEC changes) nor will it be used as justification to cancel pending or potential Competitive Sourcing & Privatization (CS&P) actions. However, approved CS&P may be used to justify the adjustment of UTC posturing codes throughout the gradual phase out of the unit‘s manpower authorizations. 9.7.8. Rotational Requirements Review. Component headquarters will continually review the rotational requirements throughout their area of responsibility with the goal of meeting the combatant commander‘s needs with the fewest forces possible. This evaluation will take place throughout the AEF cycle. However, component headquarters will capitalize on the planning and preparation for the start of a new AEF rotation to ensure ECS and aviation requirements are stated using standard UTCs; where possible, restrictive line remarks are reduced or eliminated; and all requirements have a Command Remark (CRM) code in the line-level detail. The component headquarters will review all known rotational requirements NLT 160 days (4-Month rotations) and 191 days (6-Month rotations) prior to each AEF rotation‘s pivot date. 9.7.9. Installation to Forward Operating Location (FOL) Alignment Template. The purpose of the Installation to FOL Alignment Template is to synchronize the sourcing of each installation‘s ECS UTCs across all functional areas thereby facilitating the AF‘s teaming objectives. The template is developed by the AEFC approximately 124 days (4Month rotations) and 155 days (6-Month rotations) prior to each AEF deployment period. MAJCOMs, FOAs, and DRUs recommending changes to the AEFC‘s sourcing decisions must remain aware of the AF‘s teaming objective and recommend a UTC from the installation(s) targeted to a particular FOL. 9.7.10. Scheduling AEF Airlift Missions for Rotating Passengers. AMC Tanker Airlift Control Center (TACC) purchases and publishes passenger bookable contingency missions for rotating ECS passengers. The use of these designated missions ensures solid in-transit visibility of personnel on Unit Line Numbers moving in and out of the theater in support of rotational taskings. It also ensures optimum use of Air Force dollars by ensuring the maximum numbers of seats are filled by deploying forces. Component headquarters provide

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TACC validated data for mission purchase NLT 75-days prior to the start of each AEF movement window. TACC uses this information to update the Global Air Transportation Execution System (GATES) with bookable AEF missions NLT 45-days prior to the start of each AEF movement window. The Installation Deployment Readiness Cell (IDRC) will provide a TPFDD extract of mode/source to the Installation Transportation Management Flight (TMF). The TPFDD extract will prevent TMFs from double booking mode/source AK (i.e. via strategic AMC/AMC-contracted aircraft) passengers on mode/source AC (i.e. via Supporting Commander channel aircraft) missions. Mode/source AK passengers are booked by TACC from the designated APOE. If necessary, IDOs will direct the TMF to arrange commercial airline travel to the APOE only. If the Mode/Source is AC, the TMF will book passengers on missions loaded in the Global Air Transportation Execution System (GATES) to meet their DRI at the end destination. This entails getting the individuals to the theater APOD by the LAD in order to meet the RDD/DRI at the end destination. TMFs should use F94* missions loaded in GATES if they‘re provided by TACC/XOP prior to booking on the typical Patriot Express (PE) missions. The F94* missions are purchased specifically to augment the AEF deployment for AC passengers. TMF personnel need to book AC passengers when they receive the tasking from the IDO, this can be up to 60-days out, in order to ensure each person deploy ing gets a seat on aircraft. The TMF must have the 5 or 7 digit ULN and final destination from the PRF before making any reservation in GATES. 9.8. Sourcing Considerations and Guidelines. For warfighting organizations, it is imperative that owning MAJCOMs, FOAs, and DRUs, accurately posture their UTCs, align them in the correct AEF block/pair, accurately P-Code them, and accurately assess their readiness using the AEF UTC Reporting Tool (ART) (see Chapter 7). AFPC/DPW makes sourcing decisions using this communicated UTC status. Inaccuracies ultimately delay the timely notification of deployment taskings to a unit and its personnel. Unless specifically stipulated otherwise (e.g. in FAM guidance), all force rotational and temporary requirements are sourced and/or un-sourced by AFPC/DPW using UTCs aligned to the applicable AEF blocks/pairs in UTC Availability. 9.8.1. Force providers may provide alternative sourcing to the unit originally sourced by AEF Operations using the Reclama Processing Tool (RPT) to initiate UIC changes (see paragraph 10.21.1.1.). The replacement UIC should be from the same eligibility period, and when possible, follow AEF Operations teaming construct as outlined in paragraph 8.12. AEF Operations will change the UIC in the TPFDD. 9.8.2. When the on-call AEF library does not reflect the stated requirement, the AEFC will recommend a suitable substitute UTC or combination of UTCs that meet the capability requested by the component headquarters. Substituted UTC capability must be coordinated with the component headquarters by the AEFC before sourcing. The component headquarters must approve the use of any substitute UTC before placement in the TPFDD. Component headquarters approved substitutions must be reflected in the JOPES/DCAPES record to document authorized changes and to ensure that the tasked unit provides the requested capability. AEFC will also source temporary TRANSCOM pop-up requirements according to the AEF schedule from residual AEF forces. The following considerations and guidelines are used during the sourcing process. 9.9. UTC Sourcing Process. AFPC/DPW coordinates Air Force sourcing of all forces to ensure the Air Force is able to immediately determine its level of committed forces, its residual capability available to meet the next national security objective, and when it is about to exhaust a

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particular capability. The following paragraphs outline the UTC sourcing process; sourcing individuals using MilPDS is outlined in Chapter 14. 9.9.1. ECS Sourcing. AFPC/DPW sources for all known rotational and temporary, standard and non-standard UTC requirements approximately 123 days (4-Month rotation) or 151 days (6-Month rotation) prior to each AEF pivot date using standard D-coded UTCs and nonstandard A-coded UTCs in the on-call AEF blocks/pair for the deployment period. Enabler assets, are those intended for specific operations, (ref paragraphs 7.12.8 and 9.9.1.6), and are not normally sourced by AFPC/DPW. MAJCOMs may release certain Enabler assets for DPW sourcing. These will be stipulated in the applicable Enabler guidance (see paragraph 7.12.8.3) or through one-time coordination with the MAJCOM/A3. All UTCs in the on-call AEF blocks/pair are considered for sourcing utilizing the ECS sourcing prioritization outlined below. AFPC/DPW sources for crisis operation requirements immediately upon receipt of the requirement and authorization by the approval authority to use AEF-scheduled forces to support the operation. 9.9.1.1. ECS Sourcing Priorities. The AEFC sources UTC requirements, and MAJCOM, FOA, and DRU staffs verify sourcing of UTC requirements in accordance with the following priorities: 9.9.1.1.1. The ARC will complete their validation of full UTCs for the AEF vulnerability period not less than 150 days prior to the start date of each AEF vulnerability period. In cases where the capability exists within the ARC but the CRM code prevents sourcing, the ARC, through ACC (as AF primary force provider), will provide the component headquarters a list of recommended CRM code changes. The ARC will provide a list of partial UTC buys that AFPC/DPW can utilize to fill "Yellow/Red" AC UTCs. 9.9.1.1.2. Unit commanders will provide UTCs aligned with the AEF rotation, sourced and able to fill/meet all requirements (typically UTCs that are coded DW* and whose ART assessment does not preclude filling a requirement). When identifying a UTC to fill a requirement, AFPC/DPW will select a UTC assessed green, yellow, or red as long as the reason the UTC is red or yellow does not stop the UTC from fulfilling the mission or requirement. AFPC/DPW will coordinate with the MAJCOM when the reason the UTC is red or yellow is not clearly stated. 9.9.1.1.3. After exhausting the number of DW* UTCs at the installation(s) targeted to the FOL, AFPC/DPW will begin sourcing from remaining UTCs (up to the number of DW*-coded UTCs) considering those installations in closest proximity to the installations targeted to the FOL. Available and ready UTCs in the Enabler force designated as available in applicable Enabler guidance are also sourced. This process is followed until all requirements are filled or all qualifying UTCs are used/considered, whichever comes first. 9.9.1.1.4. (DELETED) . 9.9.1.1.5. If there are remaining unfilled requirements, the AEFC will coordinate with the ARC to determine if they can fill any additional requirements. 9.9.1.1.6. If there are remaining unfilled requirements, then AFPC/DPW will notify the applicable HAF FAM of the need to surge and follow the procedures in paragraph

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 8.14.8.2.2. If a ready and available resource cannot be identified, AFPC/DPW will submit an AEF reclama to the AFOG and ACC OC with recommended COA(s). 9.9.1.2. Senior Officer Sourcing Procedures. For the purpose of sourcing, a senior officer is defined as a colonel or general officer. The AEFC sources senior officer requirements for rotational operations, JCS/joint exercise requirements, and crisis operation requirements as follows. The exception is Air and Space Operations Center/Air Force forces (AOC/AFFOR) and medical officer requirements. 9.9.1.2.1. General Officer Scheduling. The AEFC identifies general officer requirements directly to the Air Force Colonel's management Office (AF/A1O) General Officer‘s Group. AF/A1O will provide a name and Unit Identification Code (UIC) to the AEFC for sourcing. The AEFC coordinates with the owning MAJCOM A1O staff to obtain MAJCOM CC or CV (2-digit at the Air Staff) concurrence and with the component headquarters directorate of personnel for COMAFFOR/Deputy COMAFFOR approval. 9.9.1.2.2. Colonel Scheduling. In a 20 June 2002 memorandum to MAJCOM CCs, CSAF designated the MAJCOM senior leader management office (A1O) as the functional manager for all deployment requirements for colonels assigned to their MAJCOM with the following exceptions. 9.9.1.2.2.1. For the ANG, the AEFC works with the NGB/A3X. For Headquarters Air Force (HAF) personnel, AF/A3OTA, the 11th Wing, and HAF functional area managers are the coordinating agencies. 9.9.1.2.2.2. For very small career fields, the AEFC will work directly with force providing functional area manager to source billets. 9.9.1.2.2.3. Once functional area managers make nominations, the AEFC must still coordinate with the appropriate A1O for the MAJCOM CC or CV (3-digit or higher at the Air Staff) as well as COMAFFOR/ Deputy COMAFFOR approval prior to entering sourcing into DCAPES. 9.9.1.2.2.4. For PA officers, the AEFC works with SAF/PAR for nominations. 9.9.1.2.2.5. For FM officers, the AEFC works with ACC/FM for nominations. Note: SAF/ FM has delegated the responsibility to ACC/FM to work with the MAJCOMs to identify a nominee(s) to forward for SAF/FM selection and approval. 9.9.1.2.2.6. For communication-information (comm-info) officers, the AEFC will coordinate with ACC/A6O to develop a specific comm-info sourcing matrix to be incorporated into the AEFC overall sourcing matrix. Note: ACC/A6 is given coordinating authority by HAF comm-info functional area managers to address comm-info concerns with the matrix. 9.9.1.2.3. Medical Officer Scheduling. Per AFI 10-403, clinical O-6 medical officers may be tasked to fill non-colonel requirements. However, MAJCOM CC or CV approval is required prior to sourcing. The respective, MAJCOM A1O office will obtain MAJCOM CC or CV approval and forward to the AEFC. 9.9.1.2.4. AOC/AFFOR Scheduling.

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9.9.1.2.4.1. HQ ACC/A3C sends all AOC senior officer requirements to the affected MAJCOM A1O staffs (i.e., ACC, PACAF, or USAFE). Note: All geographic component headquarters currently fill AFCENT AOC requirements on a rotating basis. The affected MAJCOM/A1O staff will be the staff that‘s component headquarters is scheduled to support the current AEF pair as determined by HQ ACC/A3YC. HQ ACC/A1O will coordinate with the CONUSbased geographic component headquarters and PACAF/USAFE will coordinate with their respective component headquarters for sourcing. 9.9.1.2.4.2. (DELETED) . 9.9.1.2.4.3. The AEFC forwards AFFOR requirements to the affected MAJCOM/A1O staffs (i.e., ACC, PACAF, or USAFE). Note: AFFOR ARC LNO requirements are filled by the AFRC and ANG on a rotating basis; AFFOR Command Staff Surgeon requirement(s) is sourced by the AEFC Medical Functional Scheduler; and AFFOR Command Staff PA Director requirement(s) are immediately coordinated and sourced by the AEFC and SAF/PAR. HQ ACC/A1O will coordinate with the CONUS-based geographic component headquarters and PACAF/USAFE will coordinate with their respective component headquarters for sourcing. 9.9.1.2.4.4. (DELETED) . 9.9.1.2.5. All senior officer sourcing decisions must be approved by the respective MAJCOM CC or CV (3-digit or higher for Air Staff sourced requirements) before sourcing can be entered into DCAPES for levy to the affected unit. 9.9.1.2.5.1. For AFRC senior officers (unit personnel only), the nomination must be approved by the wing commander, NAF commander, AFRC/IG (clearance), and AFRC/ CV. For Individual Mobilization Augmentees (IMAs), the nomination must be approved by the individual‘s supervisor, the individual‘s Program Manager, the IMA Readiness Management Group (RMG), AFRC/IG, and AFRC/CV. 9.9.1.2.5.2. For ANG senior officers, the unit commander and Adjutant General must approve the nomination. 9.9.1.2.5.3. For HAF personnel, the appropriate Deputy Chief of Staff (DCS) (i.e., A3/5, A1, A4/7, SG, etc.) or designated 3-digit representative (i.e. A5X, etc.) must approve the nomination. 9.9.1.2.5.4. For DRU and FOA senior officers, AF/A3OT or appropriate Air Staff functional area manager will coordinate approvals through AFSLMO. 9.9.1.2.5.5. Per AFPD 10-4, all senior officers filling component wing/group commander requirements must be approved by the gaining COMAFFOR. For component IA requirements, the senior officers must be approved by the gaining COMAFFOR or Deputy COMAFFOR. This process applies to all component theaters (AFCENT, AFNORTH, PACAF, USAFE, and AFSOUTH). 9.9.1.2.5.6. For combatant commander IA requirements (JTF HQ, Coalition Provisional Authority, etc.) on an approved Joint Manning Document (JMD),

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 once MAJCOM CC or CV approval is received, the AEFC can enter sourcing into DCAPES. Note: The appropriate component A1O office should be informed of all senior officers projected into their theater of responsibility. 9.9.1.2.6. AEF Rotational Requirements Sourcing Matrix. Commander requirements identified by a "C" AFSC prefix are sourced from postured UTCs aligned in accordance with the ECS Target Base Alignment Template. Noncommander requirements are sourced using the AEF Rotational Requirements Sourcing Matrix. 9.9.1.2.6.1. The AEFC will use colonels from the wings in the AEF pair to fill key leadership positions. Command authority for lead wing operations is activated in deployed locations only. For Expeditionary Operations Group (EOG)/CC positions, the AEFC will identify the MAJCOM and wing for tasking and update the matrix accordingly. For Expeditionary Mission Support Group (EMSG)/CC and Expeditionary Maintenance Group (EMXG)/CC positions, the AEFC will forward the appropriate ECS Target Base Alignment Template to the MAJCOM A1Os to identify the on-call period for each wing. 9.9.1.2.6.2. The MAJCOM A1Os will review the draft matrix, vet it through their MAJCOM directorates, and forward any concerns to the AEFC. 9.9.1.2.6.3. The AEFC will address all concerns and send the matrix back to the MAJCOM DPO/A1Os so they can forward to their respective MAJCOM CC or CV (3-digit for Air Staff scheduling) for approval. 9.9.1.2.6.4. Upon MAJCOM CC or CV (3-digit at Air Staff) approval, the AEFC will use the approved matrix for sourcing throughout the AEF cycle. 9.9.1.2.6.5. For added or deleted positions, the AEFC will evaluate what AFSC/function is requested and look at the matrix to determine which MAJCOM is currently filling (if any), determine which MAJCOMs are programmed for future rotations based on the ECS SIPT Target Base Alignment Template or the CAF/MAF schedule and assign tasking(s) as appropriate. 9.9.1.2.7. Expeditionary Commander Sourcing. 9.9.1.2.7.1. All expeditionary wing and group commanders deploying for less than 365 days will be selected from current "sitting" or graduated wing/group commanders. Commanders deploying for 365 days may be selected from the current Command Screening Board (CSB) list. Except for the vice commander and deputy group commander positions, the designated lead wings, if applicable, will fill AEW/AEG senior leadership positions from their wing‘s current commanders and command NCOs.. To the maximum extent possible, commanders are sourced to the deployed forward operating location where their base is providing the preponderance of forces. 9.9.1.2.7.2. Expeditionary squadron commanders deploying for 365 days may be selected from the CSB list. Expeditionary squadron commanders deploying for less that 365 days should be selected from sitting commanders then graduated commanders. MAJCOM vice commanders (or equivalent) may select a qualified

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officer from the Squadron Commander Candidate Selection process, if there are no other qualified and available sitting or graduated commanders. 9.9.1.2.7.3. Non-commander requirements from the supported command or AFFOR staff with a line remark specifying the need for an officer with command experience will be filled first by graduated commanders and then by sitting commanders. The goal is to not involuntarily deploy a sitting squadron commander to fill non-commander positions unless there is no other qualified, available and ready-to-deploy officer in the on-call period. 9.9.1.3. Aviation and Direct Aviation Support UTC Sourcing. The AEFC will apply sourcing to aviation UTCs as depicted in the CPO, and those UTCs whose MISCAP indicates they are in direct support of a particular (MDS), during the requirement build process. This is normally done approximately 160 days prior to the AEF deployment period. Sourcing will be in accordance with the published CPO and MAF schedule and any applicable DEPORDs. Aviation and direct aviation support UTC MAJCOM FAMs, or applicable MAJCOM OPR, will receive suspense 144 days from the AEF pivot date to review and coordinate with the supported AOR then provide tailoring actions back to the AEFC, 75 days from the AEF pivot date. Once the tailoring actions are updated in the TPFDD, requirements will be placed in the applicable verification force module (FM) and suspensed. 9.9.1.4. Sourcing Associate UTCs. Requirements for skills or capabilities not resident in the on-call AEF pair as a standard UTC may be filled using the forces in an associate (Acoded) UTC. When such resources are identified, the AEFC will coordinate with the MAJCOM to determine the readiness of the desired resources in the A-UTC. If ready, the AEFC will source the forces in deployable UTCs. 9.9.1.5. Personnel Early Return/Release and Replacement Sourcing. Deployed commanders have the authority to curtail a deployment and return entire UTCs or individual members to home station. When the mission of a UTC or individual member is complete, they should be returned home regardless of the tour length specified in the CED order. When personnel are returned because of mission completion, replacements are not authorized and will not be provided. To be replaced personnel must be filling a valid DRMD/JMD requirement. 9.9.1.5.1. Deployed commanders may require the replacement of an entire UTC or individual members of a UTC prior to the completion of their tour. Reasons for return must be associated with problems beyond the member‘s control (medical, emergency leave, etc.), substandard duty performance, or the member may not be qualified for duty (as defined by the UTC MISCAP or TPFDD‘s level-4 detail). If there are 30 or more days left on the tour and a replacement is required, the providing unit will deploy another qualified member or team. If there are less than 30 day left on the tour a replacement will be provided from the next AEF rotation. In cases where the requirement does not line up with the standard AEF rotation cycle the AEFC scheduler will use the above concept as a guide, but will make the final determination as how the replacement will be sourced based on the specific situation. 9.9.1.5.2. When the home unit is unable to provide a replacement, the unit will submit a reclama or UIC change via RPT immediately.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 9.9.1.5.3. When deployed commanders voluntarily release members for reasons other than problems beyond the member‘s control (medical, emergency leave, etc.), substandard duty performance, or the member is not qualified for duty (as defined by the UTC MISCAP or the TPFDD‘s level-4 detail) covered in paragraph 9.9.1.5.1 above), the home station is not required to deploy a replacement. 9.9.1.5.4. In all early return cases, the DRI/RDD of the subsequent rotation will not be adjusted. Replacements will only serve the remainder of the replaced member's tour length and will be replaced as scheduled by the next rotation. 9.9.1.5.5. For all early returns, the servicing PERSCO teams must send an early release/return message to the component headquarters directorate of personnel with an informational copy to the home station PRF, home station unit commander, MAJCOM readiness branch, and the AEFC CAT advising of the member‘s status and request a replacement if authorized. If the component headquarters directorate of personnel decides to forward deploy the UTC/individual vice return to home station the ―new‖ requirement must be a valid Air Force DRMD/JMD requirement. The tour length for the forward deployed UTC/individual will remain the same. The PERSCO and home station IDRC/PRF will process and manage such actions as specified in AOR reporting instructions and AFI 10-215, Personnel Support for Contingency Operations, keeping the component headquarters, AEFC CAT, and supporting MAJCOM informed. 9.9.1.5.6. In cases of sensitive issues such as casualties (KIAs and some VSIs), deployed commanders should work with component headquarters staff, PERSCO teams and the AEFC for backfills from other AEF postured units unless the positions for backfill require specific skill sets only available from the originally tasked unit. 9.9.1.6. Sourcing Enabler Assets. Enabler forces are intended to support specific operations and are primarily sourced by the respective MAJCOM. To provide total visibility of worldwide requirements, MAJCOMs need to inform AFPC of assets tasked directly by MAJCOM to meet CCDR requirements. MAJCOMs may release certain Enabler assets for DPW sourcing. These will be stipulated in the applicable Enabler guidance (see paragraph 7.12.8.3) or through one-time concurrence with the MAJCOM/A3. 9.9.1.7. Sourcing Augmentee UTC Requirements. The applicable HAF FAM (e.g. AF/A7C for TCN Escort), in coordination with their respective MAJCOM FAMs and AF/A1P, develop an augmentee UTC allocation plan which is provided to AFPC/DPW for sourcing. This allocation plan outlines the distribution of requirements to applicable MAJCOMs which, in turn, allocate these requirements to their wings. Wing commanders, through applicable squadron commanders, are responsible for selecting qualified individuals to meet these augmentee requirements. Note: These allocation plans will only comprise of Active Component capability areas postured in Bands ―A‖, ―B‖ or ―C.‖ At execution, if the planning pool provides insufficient forces to meet augmentee requirements, approval authority to task individuals from capability areas in Bands ―D‖ or ―E‖ is the applicable HAF functional director. Additionally, MAJCOMs may release certain Enabler assets for AFPC/DPW sourcing of augmentee requirements.

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9.9.2. Identification of TPFDD Requirements for Sourcing. To assist with the identification of TPFDD requirements for AEF sourcing, the AEFC establishes force modules (FMs) for new and rotational requirements, to include requirements added after the cutoff date identified in the AEFC‘s AEF rotation ―Sourcing Plans and Tasks‖ message. FMs allow the supported component headquarters to quickly identify and communicate valid requirements for Air Force sourcing. The component headquarters will place requirements reviewed and accepted in a designated FM during planning for each AEF pair‘s rotation. Force providing organizations delegated authority to write to the supported commanders TPFDD must adhere to these guidelines 9.9.2.1. Following initial identification of rotational requirements, any additions, changes or deletions during the current rotation window will require newsgroup notification via the hq.source newsgroup and the applicable supported TPFDD‘s operational newsgroup. The newsgroup should explain what has been done and why or on what authority the modifications were made, i.e., an approved ACR. On receipt of newsgroup and referenced authority for the change, the AEFC will update the ―added after the cutoff FM.‖ 9.9.2.2. The component headquarters must ensure requirements added after the FM cutoff have an EAD plus 55 on strategic (AK) movements and an EAD plus 35 for channel (AC) movements. An EAD less than 35 days should be of an urgent nature and identified as short notice by the component headquarters. This allows the AEFC to take necessary actions to ensure short notice requirements are sourced with appropriate priority. 9.9.2.3. Failure to provide a newsgroup to confirm updates could result in sourcing not being applied and requirements will not be captured in the sourcing FM by the AEFC. Component headquarters authorizing other components to build requirements (AFSOC, AMC, etc,) in their TPFDDs must provide a letter of authority to the AEFC and update prior to each AEF cycle or change. 9.9.3. MAJCOM TPFDD Verification. To complete the sourcing process, AFPC/DPW places sourcing that requires verification in a designated FM, in accordance with the AEF rotation ―Sourcing Plans and Tasks‖ message. An accompanying newsgroup will be posted for notification and to establish the verification suspense. Verification will be completed in accordance with timelines depicted in Table 8.5. Note: After the AFPC/DPW sourcing and verification FM has been suspensed, verifying agencies do not have to wait for release of the subsequent verification FMs to apply verification. 9.9.3.1. AEF Operations will source short notice requirements within 48 hours. Verification must be completed within 48 hours (2 calendar days), making 96 hours the standard timeline for sourcing an approved short notice requirement. Short notice is defined as 30 days or less from first movement date. 9.9.3.1.2. Reclama procedures remain unchanged and should be processed in accordance with Chapter 10. AEF Operations will place newly sourced requirements in a subsequent FM and establish a new 6 day suspense (or 2 days for short notice) for verification completion to the newly sourced MAJCOM/DRU/FOA.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 9.9.3.2. In-lieu-of (ILO) requirements defined in a CJCS DEPORD/EXORD may be inserted into a TPFDD at any time during the Force Rotation TPFDD Development Process Timeline. The Air Force may be tasked to support Joint sourcing/ILO sourcing solutions that require Airmen attend predeployment training to obtain sister Service skills as described in line remarks (e.g. Army combat skills training). Because training may be required en route to the deployed location, all JOPES dates (availability to load date (ALD), earliest arrival date (EAD), latest arrival date (LAD), RDD) and locations must be carefully reviewed by MAJCOM AEF Cells and IDOs. These requirements may have a short timeline from CJCS DEPORD/EXORD approval to LAD/RDD. Short timelines make it imperative that sourcing, MAJCOM verification, and names filled by the Installation Personnel Readiness (IPR) are accomplished within the prescribed time to ensure deploying Airmen meet the required training dates. Requirements within 30 days of first movement will be treated as short notice requirements per paragraph 9.9.3.1. and will have names in the system in accordance with AFI 36-3802 timeline. AFPC/DPW will monitor MAJCOM verification and name fill information. In situations where these actions are not accomplished in a timely manner thereby possibly jeopardizing meeting first movement, AEF Operations will notify the IPR and/or MAJCOM AEF Cells for resolution. 9.9.3.2.1. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OP is the OPR for reviewing requirements supporting Joint Sourcing taskings IAW AFI 10-401, Para 9.9.3.2. AFPC/DPW AEF Operations will monitor MAJCOM verification and name fill information. In situations where these actions are not accomplished in a timely manner thereby possibly jeopardizing meeting the Latest Arrival Date, AEF Operations will notify ACC/A3OP, through the ACC Contingency Action Team (CAT), for resolution. 9.9.3.3. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OP is the OPR for TPFDD Management; PreVerification process; Verification/validation process; and Newsgroup coordination between CNAFs and base level activities and working with MAJCOM FAMs.

9.9.4. ARC Participation. During each AEF vulnerability period, the deploying AEFs will have force elements provided by AFRC and ANG units. These units fill the applicable rotation by teaming (when feasible) units and personnel and rainbowing equipment. Specific methodology for meeting this objective is managed by the AFRC and ANG. ARC force volunteerism is maximized by providing rotation and tour duration flexibility. Component headquarters should consider the appropriate rotation policy and tour length with the goal of maximizing ARC volunteerism. 9.9.5. Cancellation of AFRC and ANG Sourcing. The AEFC will immediately notify the appropriate ARC headquarters when an ARC sourced requirement is deleted or changed. At ARC discretion, the AEFC will attempt to secure an available equivalent active duty tasking during the same time frame. If one is identified, the AEFC will coordinate with all concerned parties to cancel the active duty unit tasking and redirect the tasking to the appropriate ARC unit. If an active duty UTC tasking cannot be obtained, the ARC can request component headquarters approval to deploy their volunteers on a case-by-case basis. 9.9.6. Timelines for Sourcing/Executing Manpower Changes. When starting a new rotational requirement, or implementing changes to existing requirements, the component headquarters will make every attempt to synchronize the initial RDD/DRI with the start of the next AEF

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deployment period. When the initial LAD/ RDD cannot be met, or the ETL does not meet the warfighter requirements, LADs/RDDs will be adjusted in accordance with the Joint Staff GFM Sourcing Business Rules. AFPC/DPW, component headquarters, and supporting MAJCOM (if known) will coordinate resolution. AFPC will submit a LAD/RDD shift message to the AF FP for submission to the supported CCDR. If the supported CCDR agrees, then the AF FP will forward the information to the Joint Staff. The Joint Staff will release an order modification announcing the change. Tour length options, in order (appropriate waivers/permissions required): 9.9.6.1. 120-day ETLs. 9.9.6.1.1. ETL extends to end of current AEF rotation. Subsequent rotational tour lengths are synchronized with the AEF deployment window. 9.9.6.1.2. The initial ETL is 120 days, extending into the subsequent AEF rotation. The second rotation includes the remainder of the second AEF plus the next AEF rotation (third), not to exceed 179 days. Subsequent rotational tour lengths are synchronized with the AEF vulnerability period. 9.9.6.1.3. If 179 or longer ETLs are approved, AFPC/DPW, in coordination with the supported and supporting commands, will schedule the first two (or second and third) rotations in order to align subsequent rotations with the AEF battle rhythm. 9.9.6.2. 179-day ETLs. 9.9.6.2.1. AFPC, in coordination with the supported and supporting commands, will schedule the first rotation in order to align with the AEF pivot dates. This may require an earlier or later reporting date than originally requested by the supported command. 9.9.6.2.2. AFPC will source requirement to meet established RDD. RDD will be adjusted during subsequent rotations to align with the AEF pivot dates. 9.9.6.3. Out of Cycle Indeterminate TDY (ITDY) Requests. Initial or new ITDY requirements will be approved and forwarded to AFPC for fills NLT 120 days prior to first movement. Any requests for an ITDY fill inside of 120 days will initially be filled by a 120/179 day followed by an ITDY fill. 9.9.7. Equipment Requirements and Sourcing. The force provider will identify sourcing solutions to AFPC/DPW for equipment-only UTCs not directly tied to a unit (e.g., vehicles) postured in the AEF Tempo Bands or Enabler force. UTCs that contain both MANFOR and LOGFOR detail will be sourced by AFPC/DPW using the same procedures and priorities as personnel-only UTCs. Due to the sensitivity of AFSOC's SOF mission and AMC's global MAF support, these mission requirements will continue to be sourced by the respective MAJCOMs. HQ AMC will source unique theater requirements for mobility support. The ECS SIPT is the focal point for coordinating all issues and concerns relative to equipment sourcing. 9.9.7.1. Generic equipment only UTCs will be placed in the Enabler library in accordance with guidance in Chapter 7. The unit must accurately assess the readiness of the UTC using ART. For sourcing purposes, all equipment only UTCs placed in the UTC Availability are available for deployment.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 9.9.7.2. DELETED. 9.9.7.3. At the direction of the parent MAJCOM, units/wings will electronically pass their equipment (DCAPES cargo level detail) information to their MAJCOM FAM. Units/Wings must indicate if the equipment detail is from a UTC that contains both equipment and personnel or an equipment only UTCs. 9.9.7.4. The following procedures apply for replacement of in-place (equipment transferred to the AOR) and deployed (home station marked deployed) equipment: 9.9.7.4.1. The forward location supply authority will coordinate with the supported component headquarters FAM on the requirement. The component headquarters FAM approves the requirement and determines if an asset can be sourced within theater. 9.9.7.4.2. If the item is not supported in theater the component headquarters FAM will coordinate with component headquarters planners to include the requirement in the appropriate TPFDD for the AEFC to source. 9.9.7.4.3. The MAJCOM FAM, or other agency designated by the MAJCOM, of the unit nominated to fill the requirement verifies that the correct unit is sourced and notifies the unit of the TPFDD requirement. 9.9.7.4.4. All equipment movement will be coordinated through the supporting MAJCOM Command Equipment Management Office to affect the necessary equipment record changes prior to actual property movement. 9.9.7.4.5. All equipment movement will be coordinated through the supporting MAJCOM supply function to affect the necessary equipment record changes prior to actual movement. Standard supply operating procedures will be followed. 9.9.7.5. For replacement or rotation of deployed equipment, the supporting command providing the UTC or equipment is responsible for replacement or rotation of the UTC or equipment. 9.9.7.5.1. The supported Combat Air Forces Logistics Support Center (CAF/LSC) and MAJCOM equipment office will send a message to the supporting command CAF/LSC identifying UTC or equipment to be replaced, with information copy to the Air Staff equipment office. 9.9.7.5.2. If unable to source the requirement, the supporting command CAF/LSC will notify the supported component headquarters via reclama message, with information copy to the Air Staff equipment office. 9.9.7.5.3. If the requirement is shortfalled, the HAF FAM may direct cross-command sourcing. 9.9.7.5.4. The organization deploying the equipment will forward the information required for the parent MAJCOM to build the TPFDD line level detail in DCAPES. 9.9.7.6. Use of War Reserve Materiel (WRM). WRM supports the range of military operations within our National Military Strategy. Accordingly, use of WRM is restricted to ensure sufficient capability is available to support theater start or swing stock requirements. Use must be approved only after considering the impact on ability to meet

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emerging requirements and the ability and timeliness of reconstituting the WRM assets. WRM assets should not be used solely to support ongoing rotational operations. Prior to using WRM, requesting organizations will make every effort to satisfy the requirement using alternative means of support. If still required, the requesting organization must follow procedures for indirect mission support outlined in AFI 25-101. 9.10. Line Remark Program. Line remarks is an Air Force owned program that allows the component headquarters to further define capability requests. They do not allow the combatant command to request capabilities that the Air Force does not train to. Air Force standard line remarks are used in conjunction with the UTC to further identify unique requirements. The use of line remarks, in some cases, may invalidate the UTC; therefore the component headquarters should use line remarks judiciously to avoid this situation. Line remarks that require early arrival or end of tour overlap will be counted to determine total time spent in the AOR without adjustment to the ETL. The AEFC, with support of component headquarters, will conduct a review of force rotational requirements with line remarks prior to the start of each AEF cycle. To the maximum extent possible, component headquarters will eliminate line remarks and rely on standard UTC MISCAPs to state a requirement. 9.10.1. The AEFC manages the creation and publication of standard line remarks and is the final approval authority for additions, changes, and deletions. The AEFC makes the line remark available on the classified and unclassified AEF Online web site. 9.10.2. Prior to submitting a request for additions or changes, the component headquarters will ensure that no current line remark satisfies the requestor‘s needs. Coordinate requested line remark addition/ change with the appropriate component headquarters FAM and then forward to the AEFC. 9.10.3. The AEFC verifies that no current line remark satisfies the requester‘s needs and verifies the accuracy of the requested clear text. Approved requests are announced by message. Disapproved requests are returned to the requester with rationale. 9.10.4. If a ULN‘s Line Remark is changed after the MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU has verified the tasking, and makes filling the tasking more restrictive, then the verification code must be removed. This will allow the MAJCOM the opportunity to examine the changes and ensure that it can meet the new requirements with the originally sourced unit, or can fill tasking with another unit within the timeframe outlined in paragraph 9.8 9.11. Estimated Tour Length (ETL). Rotational requirements are generally the result of a crisis operation the combatant commander has authorized the Service to support with rotating forces. During the initial crisis response, unless otherwise specified in the SecDef DEPORD, USAF forces will deploy on CED orders with an ETL up to 179 days to allow the Air Force to effectively respond, build up forces and plan for follow-on forces in an orderly manner. Once the Service is authorized by the GFMAP to support the operation with rotating forces, the Air Force will use ETLs (120or 179-day) corresponding to the Tempo Band to which functional areas are aligned (shorter rotations within a standard ETL may be authorized by component headquarters in order to facilitate ARC participation). Note: If ETLs greater than 120 or 179-days are directed via the JMD or RFF/DEPORD process, then USAF forces will follow Joint direction. Enabler forces provide specialized capabilities that may require non-standard ETLs. Acceptable ETLs will be coordinated between the CCDR and applicable force provider.

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9.11.1. Extended ETLs During Initial Requirement Submission. Combatant commander rotational requirements, as depicted in the SecDef-approved GFMAP, with tour lengths greater than 179 days which do not allow the option of shorter duration tour lengths will be filled as requested. Standard force solution tour lengths greater than 179 days are a deviation to AEF operational policy and the component headquarters must gain CSAF approval to state a requirement with an ETL greater than 179 days. These requests will be limited to ―Key and Critical‖ positions. CSAF approved ―Key and Critical‖ criteria for position requests beyond 179 days that allows Air Force leadership to manage in a way that capabilities are deployed to the greatest effect. The ―Key and Critical‖ construct will (1) inform senior leaders on tour lengths beyond 179 days and provide a platform for adjudicating, (2) assess risk of supporting positions for future budgets and service costs and manpower offsets for vacant positions, and (3) require annual review for requested positions beyond 179 day deployment durations. 9.11.1.1. Requests to extend and/or generate positions beyond 179-day tour lengths must meet one or more of the following CSAF force generation ―Key and Critical‖ criteria for approval: 9.11.1.1.1. Commanders (wing-, group-, and squadron-level) and key Senior Enlisted leadership (wing- and group-level command/executives/superintendents). 9.11.1.1.2. Positions requiring extensive Host Nation/Local populace interaction. Airmen who maintain direct and continuous daily contact with national and/or local populace organizations in order to support, be located on, operate in, or transit through its territory based on government invitation and/or national agreements. 9.11.1.1.3. Positions requiring critical continuity to Coalition/Joint operations. Airmen maintaining direct, regular, timely, and collaborative working relationships between civilian and/or military coalition/joint forces. 9.11.1.2. EETL requests will be submitted as follows: 9.11.1.2.1. Forward all request(s) to AF Operations Group (AFOG) no less than 180 days prior to RDD. Supported component headquarters request must include, but not limited to, signed approval memo from component headquarters commander/deputy commander, position description/RFF position description/FTN, and identify/state which criteria meets the request with clear and concise justification for that criteria. 9.11.1.2.2. AFOG will forward request to AF/A5XW who will coordinate SSS package across the HAF Staff. It is important that the HAF FAM is involved in this process to allow them the opportunity to force manage and coordinate on their specific functional area skill sets that may have a high risk factor based on its level of demand/stress in meeting global CCDR requirements. AF/A5XW will ensure all applicable organizations (AF/A1PR, AF/A3O-AO, AFPC/DPW, applicable AF FP, and respective MAJCOM FAM) have provided their inputs to ensure request meets the CSAF "Key and Critical" criteria. Requests without proper justification will be returned to the supported component command for further clarification. 9.11.1.2.3. AF/A5XW will continue HAF coordination which will consist of AF/A5X, AF/A3O, AF/A1P, AF/RE, NGB/CF, and respective HAF FAM 3-digit and their respective HAF DCS prior to submitting to CSAF for approval/disapproval.

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AF/A5XW will forward CSAF approved/disapproved package to AFOG, AF FP, the submitting component, and AFPC/DPW. 9.11.1.2.4. If approved, AF FP will include in next AF DEPORD and include applicable component headquarters. Once applicable component headquarters has AF DEPORD with approved positions then AFPC will source. For ITDY requirements, AFPC must be notified NLT 120 days prior to RDD. Note: AFPC will NOT source any position unless the request has been approved by the CSAF. 9.11.1.3. DELETED. 9.11.2. DELETED. 9.12. DELETED. 9.12.1. DELETED. 9.12.2. (DELETED) . 9.12.2.1. (DELETED) . 9.12.2.2. (DELETED) . 9.12.2.3. (DELETED) . 9.12.3. DELETED: 9.12.3.1. DELETED. 9.12.3.2. DELETED. 9.12.3.3. DELETED. 9.13. Tasking Notification Process. AFPC/DPW provides oversight of the tasking notification process for all TPFDDs sourced using AEF scheduled assets. It is responsible for controlling visibility for these TPFDDs and will provide automated support using DCAPES to base-level IDRC, manpower and personnel readiness offices, PERSCO teams, and central sites. AFPC/DPW provides visibility after coordination with and receiving the approval of the supported component headquarters. 9.13.1. Assigning names to requirements in MANPER-B is critical to the entire deployment process. Deploying members must be identified and updated in system in accordance with AFI 10-215 to ensure name visibility of members projected to deploy, to facilitate any advance training requirements, and schedule an appropriate airlift mission to meet the supported commander‘s DRI/RDD. The AEFC will provide a bi-weekly nameless ULN report to the MAJCOMs for further processing with the MAJCOM FAMs and appropriate wing staffs. Additionally, at least 45 – 60 days following an AEF rotation, the AEFC will publish metrics data depicting the percentage of names received in a specific window for the MAJCOM AEF Debriefs. Applicable window range covers 45+ days prior to the RDD, 3144 days prior to the RDD, 0-30 days prior to the RDD or names received after the RDD has passed as of the report date. 9.14. Employment. The AEF employment objective is to meet a supported combatant commander‘s needs through the COMAFFOR with relevant UTC capabilities-based AETF packages (AEWs and AEGs) in accordance with validated theater mission requirements, as

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identified by the TPFDD. Planning must focus on sustained execution in the area of operations for the AEF execution period by integrating AEW, AEG, and AES command, operations, and support elements into an integrated, cohesive force. 9.14.1. Posture Concepts. AEF on-call forces will maintain the capability to rapidly transition from normal day-to-day operations to crisis response operations. Unit posture will increase consistent with the issuance and receipt of CJCS Warning/Planning/Alert/Deployment Order, Prepare to Deploy Order, and/or Execution Order. 9.14.1.1. On-Call Status (AD only). Untasked UTCs will assume on-call status for the duration of the AEF block/pair vulnerability period. This posture enables these UTCs to rapidly transition from normal day-to-day operations to crisis response operations. MAJCOMs and AFPC/DPW will describe on-call force actions in CONOPS and supporting plans, as appropriate. HD/LS assets will be managed through the HD/LS Force/Capability Management Process. 9.14.1.2. Alert Status. Normally initiated by a CJCS Warning Order (or Prepare to Deploy Order and Alert Order with Secretary of Defense (SecDef) direction), this posture prepares forces for rapid deployment upon receipt of an execute order. However, a warning order does not authorize movement of forces unless specifically stated. Typical units specifically authorized to move under a warning order include air mobility assets. As an example, Contingency Response Groups (CRGs) and other air mobility support units may deploy to forward locations to establish enroute support and reception capabilities at the aerial port of debarkation (APOD). Tankers and essential beddown support units may deploy to forward locations in preparation for air bridge support. 9.15. Response Timing. Theater combatant commander mission requirements dictate responsetiming constraints. In general, CONOPS should allow for a stair-step of response timing to reduce alert requirements. Service components must prepare to deploy forces, particularly ECS forces, during the initial phases of contingencies. Personnel should deploy only after receipt of valid contingency, exercise, and deployment (CED) orders and validation by the installation deployment officer (IDO) that the unit line number (ULN) has been validated in the TPFDD by the supported commander. 9.16. Shortfall and Reclama Procedures. Air Force active duty, AFRC, ANG, MAJCOMs, wings, groups, and units will make every effort to meet all crisis taskings. Generally, relief should only be sought when a wing or tasked unit does not possess sufficient or qualified personnel to support a crisis tasking, the deployed commander is unable to waive the requirement, or the tasking is impossible to meet or will shut down critical elements of the homestation mission, as determined by the wing commander or equivalent. Filling shortfalls in one UTC may mean moving a person from another UTC as long as the UTC and associated person are in the on-call AEF being sourced by the AEFC. Units will immediately update ART to reflect the status of the UTC(s). They will submit reclamas only after exhausting all other options. All reclamas will comply with the tasking and sourcing processes and priorities in this chapter. Paragraph 10.21 defines shortfall and reclama. Note: Reclamas will only occur under the most extenuating circumstances and require MAJCOM/CV approval (Category 5) unless the unit does not have the capability (Category 1 - 4). See Section 10C. Reclamas are minimized when UTC

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Availability and ART are properly maintained. Units will ensure UTC Availability and ART are accurate and up to date. 9.16.1. Organizations will submit reclamas in accordance with the procedures outlined in Chapter 10, Section 10C. 9.17. Retention Beyond Normal Tour Completion Date. Tour length or rotation guidance should be directed in the SecDef approved DEPORD. Retaining an Airman beyond the normal tour length, while not normally supported, will be coordinated between the affected combatant commander, component headquarters, parent MAJCOM and the AEFC. 9.17.1. The deployed commander, through the deployed PERSCO and the chain of command, may request the home unit commander, in writing (e.g., email), to retain the member(s) beyond the normal tour completion date. If the home unit commander nonconcurs with the request, the member must be sent home as scheduled unless the component headquarters directorate of personnel coordinates an alternative solution with the affected MAJCOM, in coordination with the AEFC. If the extension issue cannot be resolved by the component headquarters and the affected MAJCOM, the authority to retain or release the individual will be based on the CCDR‘s authority as specified in the applicable SecDef approved DEPORD or, if necessary, the direction of the common superior commander. 9.17.2. Mobilized ARC members will not be retained beyond their tour expiration date unless an approved AF/A1/A3/5/CAT retention policy is in effect. Affected members must be returned to their home station on schedule to ensure sufficient time to take accrued leave and complete all demobilization actions prior to their approved demobilization date. ARC members shall not be retained on active duty beyond their demobilization date unless an approved SAF/MR waiver exists. Guidance on demobilization date extensions is frequently updated and announced through SAF/MR memoranda and AF/ A1 electronic messages. 9.17.3. ARC members performing voluntary active duty tours in accordance with 10 USC 12301(d), may not be extended beyond the expiration of their orders without the member‘s consent and a written request (e.g., email) from the deployed commander to the member‘s home station unit commander. If the ARC home station commander approves the extension, the PERSCO team will request an ETL adjustment through the component headquarters directorate of personnel and the AEFC. Upon component headquarters approval and adjustment of the ETL by the AEFC, the member‘s home unit will request additional mandays and O&M funding through established command channels, with an information copy to the appropriate ARC headquarters. Home station units must procure man-days and O&M funding prior to expiration of the original order and publish the appropriate amended orders. Note: Unavoidable transportation delays are not considered tour extensions; only home station notification and the necessary additional man-days to cover the delay are required. 9.17.4. Personnel filling non-rotational requirements cannot be retained without approval from the member's home station commander and the component headquarters directorate of personnel. The deployed unit commander, through PERSCO, initiates a request to the home station commander in writing (e.g., email). 9.17.5. When members are retained, the DRI/RDD of the subsequent rotation will not be adjusted. The incumbent‘s ETL will not be adjusted if retained for less than 25 days.

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9.17.6. In accordance with AFI 33-328, Administrative Orders, amendments are not required for extensions of a TDY of 30 days or less except for extensions past 30 September of a given fiscal year into a new fiscal year. Amendments to extend the number of days of TDY past 30 September of a given fiscal year into a new fiscal year must be processed prior to entering the extension period. 9.18. Recovery and Reconstitution. The normal AEF battle rhythm provides sustainable rotational operations, maintains the capability of the Air Force to respond at any time with ready forces, and minimizes the need for reconstitution. Reconstitution of the force becomes a major necessity only after surge operations of more than 6 to 12 months. Generally, the longer the period and number of AEFs deployed, the greater the reconstitution requirement. During periods of reconstitution, it may be necessary to adjust the AEF battle rhythm (i.e., extended tours, freeze in place, reaching forward into subsequent AEFs, and/ or coalesce remaining residual capability) to include the temporary continuation of mobilization. All such actions are approved by the CSAF before implementation. 9.18.1. DELETED 9.18.2. DELETED 9.18.3. DELETED 9.19. Volunteer Guidance. The following section describes how Air Force personnel (military and civilian, Active and ARC) can volunteer for AEF ECS crisis taskings. 9.19.1. General. The intent under the AEF operational policy is to deploy units and personnel as they train (as a cohesive fighting team) and to maintain a low tempo (OPSTEMPO and PERSTEMPO) for much of the Air Force. To accomplish this, units, UTCs and the Airmen identified to fill the UTCs are matched to combatant commander requirements based on a published schedule. There may be times when Airmen will want to volunteer to continue in a tasking or deploy more than once in an AEF cycle. However, commanders must vigilantly adhere to the AEF scheduling process and discourage Airmen from deploying outside their associated AEF deployment period. In cases where the commander deems it beneficial for mission accomplishment, Airmen may be allowed to voluntarily deploy outside their associated AEF deployment period as long as they understand they are still eligible to deploy during their AEF deployment period. Commanders at all levels will vigorously manage the tempo events of assigned Airmen to avoid exceeding tempo management thresholds that place airmen in high deployment status. The AEF battle rhythm attempts to manage the Air Force tempo impact, which is a challenge greater than that of individuals, single UTCs, or individual units. 9.19.2. Volunteer Procedures. During the normal AEF battle rhythm, units receive crisis taskings at least 120 days prior to the RDD/DRI. This length of time allows units to match volunteers to UTC taskings. Volunteers can ascertain what UTC positions they are qualified to support by contacting their Unit Deployment Manager (UDM) or the IDO. Volunteers should first attempt to fill UTC positions within their own unit. If none are available, they may apply to support UTCs allocated to other units within their wing or on their installation. Once volunteers have identified UTC positions they are qualified to support (to include line remarks and SEIs), they must submit their volunteer request in writing through their chain of command, to include the wing commander or equivalent. All applications should be

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completed at least 90 days prior to the RDD/DRI. If the UTC tasking is allocated to another unit within the wing or on the installation, volunteers must first gain their commander‘s approval before routing the application to the tasked unit for consideration. Approval by the tasked commander is required for the volunteer to fill the selected position. If for any reason the volunteer is unable or unwilling to fill the requirement after approval, the originally tasked commander is required to fill the tasking as the tasking was levied based on preidentified sourcing conditions. 9.19.3. Implementation Guidance. Commanders must carefully consider each request. Before accepting a volunteer‘s application, the tasked commander must be certain the member is fully qualified, has time to train and integrate with UTC members, and can fully support the UTC‘s mission capability statement. UTC reclamas cannot be submitted based on a member‘s approved volunteer application to support another UTC tasking. 9.19.3.1. Ideally, a volunteer should not fill a UTC committed to an AEF different from the volunteer‘s associated AEF. Volunteers will remain associated in MilPDS to their original AEF on-call period and cannot disrupt a unit or wing‘s ability to support UTC taskings. (Note: Reserve components will determine component-specific AEFI policy). Commanders must be able to fill all UTC positions for each AEF regardless of the status of volunteers within their unit or wing. 9.19.3.2. In order to reference the most current PERSTEMPO policy along with AF identified thresholds and approval levels vi sit the Air Force TEMPO website (http://www.tempo.hq.af.mil), or call AF/A3OR 703-695-0301, DSN 225-0301. 9.19.3.3. Volunteers are not permitted to split tours unless expressly approved by the COMAFFOR. All volunteers must be able to serve the entire stated tour length. 9.19.3.4. Before approving any application, overseas commanders are reminded to evaluate the impact of the volunteer‘s request and whether it may result in a prorating of the applicant‘s tour and/or adjustment of the volunteer‘s overseas duty selection date or short tour return date in accordance with AFI 36-2110, Assignments. 9.19.3.5. Commanders must determine if the volunteer has deployed to the same location during the past 12 months. If so, and the combined tour lengths exceed 179 days in a consecutive 12 month period, the unit, via the MPF, must gain a Secretary of the Air Force waiver as specified in AFI 36-2110. 9.19.3.6. Deploying in multiple deployment periods does not automatically authorize a member to receive short-tour credit. Short-tour credit is defined in AFI 36-2110. 9.19.3.7. The originally tasked commander must fill the requirement even if an approved volunteer from another unit no longer desires to fill the requirement. 9.19.4. Augmentee Positions (e.g. Third Country National (TCN) Escorts or Postal Augmentee). Airmen may volunteer to fill augmentee requirements. US military personnel, usually in the grade of E-5 and below, are eligible. Note: Active Component personnel aligned (as indicated by their AEFI) against capability areas postured in Bands ―D,‖ ―E‖ or the Enabler force are excluded from the planning pool for augmentee taskings and therefore, should not volunteer for augmentee duty. TCN escorts are responsible for accompanying and observing TCN personnel while performing contractual duties on US facilities. Postal

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augmentees are responsible for sorting and pitching mail, and escorting mail shipments. The tour length for augmentee positions is normally 120 days. Based on the duties performed, any career field can fill TCN Escort UTCs 9AEMP and 9AEMQ or Postal Augmentee UTC 6KDB4 (see paragraph 9.9.1.7 for Augmentee UTC allocation). 9.19.4.1. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OP is the Third Country National Escorts FAM. 9.20. Voluntary Extension (Deployed Forces). 9.20.1. Personnel who wish to extend their current deployment must first obtain their home unit and deployed commander concurrence and provide concurrence documentation to the PERSCO team. IMAs must receive Program Manager approval before volunteering to extend in the AOR. 9.20.1.1. Extensions must be for the entire length of the next rotation (e.g., 4-months) in order to maintain sourcing integrity under the AEF battle rhythm. ARC personnel who volunteer to remain in a deployment may volunteer for a shorter period based on the component headquarters approved CRM (e.g., 60 days of a 120 day tour); however the request may be disapproved in favor of filling the entire tour with a single individual. 9.20.1.2. Extensions should be requested no later than 60 days prior to end of member's normal TDY return date to allow time for proper processing 9.20.2. Processing Guidance. 9.20.2.1. The PERSCO team reviews and obtains local approval based on existing policy (e.g., Wing/Group commander) and forwards approved requests to the component headquarters directorate of personnel for further review and coordination. 9.20.2.2. The component headquarters directorate of personnel reviews and forwards approved extension requests to the AEFC Operations Center for further coordination and final approval. 9.20.2.3. The AEFC Functional Scheduler reviews and determines if the request can be supported. If the next rotation is sourced the Scheduler will coordinate with the MAJCOM FAM to ensure no hardship will be incurred for the tasked unit/individual. Non-concurrence by the MAJCOM FAM and/or the AEFC will result in disapproval. 9.20.2.4. If the extension is approved, the AEFC adjusts the current ETL and delete the next rotation. PERSCO, component headquarters directorate of personnel, owning/gaining MAJCOM Readiness Staffs, and the AEFC will be included in approval notification email. 9.21. Split Tours. Airmen tasked to fill either ECS or aviation requirements are expected to fill the entire stated tour unless a non-standard or midtour rotation is approved in advance (e.g. in line remarks) by the gaining COMAFFOR (Note: Airmen assigned to the ARC are considered to be pre-approved and do not require specific COMAFFOR approval). 9.21.1. Forward deployed Airmen may have their tour length shortened due to unforeseen circumstances (e.g., medical profile change, emergency leave, etc.) In such cases, another Airman may be tasked to complete the tour. The "rotation for cause" functionality in DCAPES was designed to support mission continuance with a one for one (individual personnel) substitution of an Airman from the supporting unit for administrative actions (e.g.,

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medical profile change, emergency leave, etc.); other uses of this functionality causes the loss of visibility of the combatant commander‘s requirement and significantly impacts the Air Force‘s verification process. 9.21.2. Where the CCDR/AFFOR has established a requirement allowing tour durations of less than normal Service rotation policy to afford the opportunity for greater ARC participation and the ARC cannot fill the entire tour length, an active duty Airman may be utilized to fill the remainder of the requirement. 9.22. AEF Debrief Concept. The AEF debrief concept is developed to ensure supported combatant commanders are provided the best Airmen the Air Force has to offer. An AEF Debrief may be held by the MAJCOM Vice Commanders after each AEF rotation to establish norms and provide crosstalk for AEF planning and execution. The AEF Center is measured on sourcing timelines, unit changes, stressed career fields, teaming, and extended tour lengths. MAJCOMs will report on their Posturing and Coding, ART, verification statistics, timeliness of names in system, etc. Wing metrics will include ART, shortfall information, and timing of names in system. MAJCOM/CVs will host the AEF Debriefs on a four-month basis, approximately 45-60 days after each AEF pivot date to review common metrics to determine how well each rotational AEF was executed. Note: MAJCOM/CV may waive the AEF debrief requirement when crosstalk between MAJCOM/CV and Wing commander(s) is accomplished via other means and AEF Debrief information is covered. 9.22.1. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OP is the OPR for the ACC/CV AEF Debrief. 9.23. Executive Review Process. This process provides a hierarchical approach to adjudicating and resolving force management, generation and allocation issues. The CSAF is responsible for the management of Air Force forces for the purpose of generating and providing capability/forces in support of combatant commander requirements. Issue resolution should occur at the lowest possible level of authority. 9.23. (ACC)Command Newsgroup Discipline. 9.23.1. The CAF SIPT, ECS SIPT and MAF Scheduling function is responsible for developing their respective portion of an AEF schedule/plan that supports SecDef GFM as well as APEX processes and timelines. The chair of each scheduling entity (ACC/A3, AFPC/CC, and AMC/A3, respectively) will attempt to adjudicate and resolve internal scheduling issues. 9.23.1. (ACC) Newsgroups are the official means of communications. Command newsgroup for a specified operation will be established and specific newsgroup(s) identified. The Command newsgroup(s) will be used for supporting UTC management; sourcing actions; verification/validation actions; force rotation management; and DCAPES functional, technical, and planning support/management. 9.23.1.1. (Added-ACC) Wing IDRCs will use the following newsgroup for AEF matters when addressing TPFDD issues; this newsgroup is located on the Pentagon News Server - gccs.acc.aef.operations. 9.23.2. The AEF Steering Group (AEFSG) will resolve force management or generation issues which cannot be resolved by the respective scheduling entities. The AEFSG will resolve management of constrained resources, scheduling conflicts and policy discrepancies.

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9.23.3. The VCSAF AEF Forum will attempt to resolve force management and generation issues which cannot be resolved by the AEFSG. The CSAF is the final adjudicator of force management or generation issues, which require a change in the Air Force‘s force management and generation methodology. The AF/A1 will advise the CSAF on matters of personnel rotation management, end strength accounting, rotation pivot dates, personnel rotation planning and deploy-to-dwell ratios, line remarks, tasking notifications, AEF Debrief issues and the executive review process. 9.23.4. COMACC is the final decision authority for force management/providing issues related to recommending Air Force sourcing solutions to USJFCOM and the submission of Service reclamas for all conventional forces (whether assigned or unassigned). The ACC Operations Center or AEF Cell will coordinate and advise COMACC on all issues impacting the AEF schedule/plan, recommended sourcing solutions, military risk assessments, Service reclamas and execution of the GFMAP annexes. The Commanders of AMC and AFSOC will adjudicate mobility and SOF allocation issues with the advice of their respective operation center/AEF Cell. 9.24. (Added-ACC) Post-Deployment Downtime Guidance Note: this section will be deleted when incorporated into command supplemental to AFI 10-403. 9.24.1. (Added-ACC) Guidance on post-deployment downtime for active duty personnel, including Reserve Component personnel activated under a mobilization authority and personnel serving temporary tours of active duty on MPA days. 9.24.2. (Added-ACC) Post-deployment downtime will start as soon as possible following return to home station, not to exceed 72 hours after return. Commanders/directors will ensure redeploying Airmen have completed Deployment Planning and Execution, reintegration activities IAW AFI 10-403 prior to starting post deployment downtime. Failure to do so could adversely affect member‘s Duty Status. 9.24.3. (Added-ACC) IAW AFI commanders/directors may provide:

36-3003

guidance

regarding

special

passes,

9.24.3.1. (Added-ACC) Deployment or TDY length, 45-89 days, 4 compensatory days and not more than 3 days off unscheduled time to tend to personal matters. 9.24.3.2. (Added-ACC) Deployment or TDY length, 90 days or longer, 4 compensatory days and not more than 10 days off unscheduled time to tend to personal matters. 9.24.3.3. (Added-ACC) Compensatory time must begin and end in the local area. During compensatory time, members will not be assigned formal duties and will be given appropriate time to care for personal and professional matters deferred while TDY. The member will check in daily during any period of unscheduled time and must take leave if departing the local area IAW AFI 36-3003. 9.24.3.4. (Added-ACC) Active duty members approved for leave Enroute prior to home station return. Commanders will review USAF/A3/5 Interim Waiver to AFI 10-403, Deployment Planning and Execution (16 Dec 09—will be incorporated into the updated AFI 10-403) and have discretion, regarding appropriate compensatory and recovery/reconstitution time off.

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Chapter 10 DEVIATIONS, WAIVERS, AND RECLAMA PROCEDURES Section 10A—Purpose 10.1. Purpose. The purpose of this chapter is to outline the processes, responsibilities, and approval mechanisms for obtaining waivers to the policies and procedures addressed in this instruction and AFPD10-4. Table 10.1 outlines deviation/change approval authorities. For purposes of this chapter, the following definitions apply: 10.1.1. Deviation - a temporary adjustment to published guidance. 10.1.2. Change - a permanent adjustment to published guidance. 10.1.3. Waiver - the process of requesting approval for a deviation or change from the appropriate approval authority. Section 10B—Deviations and Waivers 10.2. AEF Operational Policy and Construct. The CSAF determines the Air Force‘s operational policy for meeting and sustaining combatant commander rotational requirements. The Air Force‘s established operational rotation policy requires Airmen to deploy for a baseline of 120 days with select functional areas deploying for a period of 179 days. Combatant commander requirements may allow for shorter rotations (e.g. to enable ARC volunteerism). Note: This rotation policy does not necessarily apply to the Enabler forces. Deviations to the operational rotation policy require CSAF approval. 10.2.1. To enable the AEF operational policy, the CSAF charters AF/A3/5 to organize all USAF forces via the AEF construct. The AEF construct places all Air Force capability from warfighting organizations into one of the AEF Tempo Bands or the Enabler force. Forces aligned in the Tempo Bands are eligible to deploy once during the applicable band‘s battle rhythm (20, 30, 24, 18, or 12 months for Bands A through E respectively) for a period of 4 (Band ―A‖) or 6 (Bands ―B through ―E‖) months. This battle rhythm does not apply to the Enabler forces. The Institutional Force will not be postured via UTCs; however, individuals assigned to institutional organizations will be given an AEF Indicator (AEFI) which corresponds to a specific vulnerability period. Deviations to this construct (e.g. posturing Institutional Force in UTCs, posturing associate vice standard UTCs, etc) must be approved by AF/A3/5 and will be spelled out in AF/A3/5‘s AEF Schedule Planning, Preparation, and Posturing Guidance Memo. In all cases, approved deviations must be renewed with each 24month AEF Schedule. 10.2.2. All waiver requests must be submitted through AF/A5X and AFPC/CC for review and submission to AF/A3/5. AF/A3/5 is responsible for management and execution of the AEF schedule. 10.2.3. (DELETED) . 10.2.4. (DELETED) .

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10.3. Comprehensive AEF Rotational Force Schedule. The Air Force supports the global force management (GFM) process by providing a schedule of forces the Air Force expects to make available to combatant commanders to support the range of military operations. The schedule is developed based on the AEF operational policy and is comprised of all Air Force forces, regardless of allocation, apportionment or assignment, that SecDef has approved for use to support the missions of all combatant commanders. Any changes to the AEF Schedule must be approved by AF/A3/5 unless these changes violate CSAF- or SecDef-directed redlines. For such changes, AF/A3/5 will forward to appropriate authority. The schedule is developed based on the AEF operational policy and is comprised of all Air Force forces, regardless of allocation, apportionment or assignment 10.3.1. The consolidated AEF rotational force schedule is a composite of the CAF and ECS SIPT and AMC/A3O developed schedules. MAJCOM CVs will submit deviation or change requests, through the applicable scheduling organization, to AFPC/CC. AFPC will provide recommended approval/disapproval to AF/A3/5. 10.3.2. For changes affecting a functional area across multiple MAJCOMs, such requests will be submitted by Air Staff functional 3-digit to AF/A5X. AF/A5X will submit change requests, through the applicable SIPT, to AFPC/CC. AFPC will provide recommended approval/disapproval to AF/A3/5. 10.3.3. (DELETED) . 10.3.4. Note: MAF aviation assets are postured in the Enabler library and as such do not lend themselves to a long-term schedule like the CAF. Therefore, the MAF portion of the SecDef-approved Consolidated/Comprehensive AEF Rotational Force Schedule will only consist of a force apportionment (number of aircraft available per AEF rotation) from each MAJCOM containing MAF aircraft. 10.4. ECS SIPT Target Base Alignment. This section covers changes to the ECS Target Base Alignment in the development of the alignment. Note: Deviations or changes once approved are covered in paragraph 10.3. Approval is effective throughout a single AEF Schedule; afterwards a new request must be submitted. 10.4.1. The ECS SIPT develops the Target Base Alignment. Approximately 10 months prior to the start of each AEF Schedule, the ECS SIPT revalidates the alignment to ensure the criteria in paragraph 7.12 are met. 10.4.2. Force providers should propose recommended changes through their respective SIPT members. Air Staff FAMs should propose changes through AF/A5X. 10.4.3. The ECS SIPT will provide recommended realignment to AFPC/CC for approval. 10.4.4. Deviations to the Target Base Alignment are covered in paragraph 10.7 10.5. CAF SIPT Consolidated Planning Order (CPO). This section covers changes to the CPO in the development of the CPO. Requests to change or deviate from the published CPO are processed in accordance with paragraph 10.3 Scheduling actions that place an installation‘s resources in more than two AEF rotations must be approved by the VCSAF. Changes or deviations that impact the forces assigned to combatant commanders prior to the approval of the comprehensive AEF rotational schedule by the SecDef must be approved by the CSAF.

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Approval is effective throughout a single AEF cycle; afterwards a new request must be submitted. 10.5.1. Request for changes or deviations to the CPO may be initiated by the supporting command, supported command, CAF SIPT member, or Air Staff FAM. The request must include rationale with substantiating data. 10.5.2. After coordination with the CAF SIPT, requests are submitted to the AEFC/CC. 10.5.3. The AEFC/CC will forward the request to COMACC for endorsement and forwarding to AF/ A3/5. AF/A3/5 will, in turn, submit the request to CSAF for approval. 10.6. MAF Schedule. Mobility aviation units support every AEF block/pair providing a portion of unit capability during each eligibility period. HQ AMC/A3O uses the MAF Schedule Process to internally develop a detailed schedule for MAF aviation forces, which is approved by AMC/CC with concurrence of the participating MAJCOMs, in order to support USTRANSCOM and warfighter requirements. Changes or deviations that impact MAF forces must be coordinated with applicable MAJCOM and approved by HQ AMC/A3O before approval of the schedule by AMC/CC, and by the HQ AMC/A3 after approval of the schedule. Changes to the MAF section of the SecDef-approved comprehensive AEF rotational schedule must be approved by the SecDef. 10.6.1. Request for changes or deviations to the MAF schedule may be initiated by the supporting command, supported command, HQ AMC/A3O or Air Staff FAM. 10.6.2. AMC assigned ECS forces not directly in support of the MAF aviation mission are scheduled in accordance with the ECS SIPT Target Base Alignment Template. Any requests to change or deviate from the approved ECS Target Base Alignment are processed in accordance with paragraph 10.7 10.7. Two-Hit Policy and ECS Target Base Alignment Waiver (Band ―A‖ only). Bases will be aligned in no more than two AEF pairs per 20-month battle rhythm. Waiver authority to the two-hit policy is the applicable HAF DCS. A request to deviate from the two-hit policy must include the anticipated duration of the deviation. In all cases, deviations from the two-hit policy will be renewed for each AEF Schedule. Note: The two-hit policy is not applicable to ARC units. 10.7.1. (DELETED) . 10.7.2. Functional areas will only request a two-hit waiver if anticipated requirements cannot be met within the two-hit construct and aligning UTCs across all five pairs will enable a functional area to stay in Band ―A.‖ 10.7.3. The deviation/change request may be initiated by any functional representative responsible for AEF posturing or scheduling, i.e., SIPT member, AEFC scheduler, MAJCOM FAM, or Air Staff FAM. The Air Staff FAM is responsible for developing the waiver request package based on the initiator‘s request. For 3-series UTCs, AF/A3O will act as the Air Staff FAM. 10.7.4. AEF alignment deviations or changes will only be processed at the beginning of every AEF cycle. Out-of-cycle deviation or change requests can only be requested in cases of force structure changes (e.g. CS&P actions, changes in unit missions, etc).

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10.7.5. The FAM deviation/change request package will include the following information, as required, as part of the justification. A sample request template is at Attachment 7. 10.7.5.1. Degree of deviation: Is deviation for entire functional area or selected skill set within the functional area. 10.7.5.2. Manning Data: Provide authorized, assigned, and average Air Force manning level. 10.7.5.3. Posturing Data: Provide the number of authorizations for each P-code (DWS, DPS, DXS, DWX, DPX, DXX, AWS, APS, AXS, AWX, APX, AXX). 10.7.5.4. Functional Area Abnormalities/Challenges: This could include high percentage of lower skill-level individuals, limited number of bases that provide required capability, etc. 10.7.5.5. Historical deployment data: This will include information that supports the fact that the career field is sufficiently stressed, such as routine use of EETLs, recurring shortfalls, high PERSTEMPO rate, heavy dependence of ARC support, etc. 10.7.5.6. Anticipated number of requirements for sustainable operations. This will also include the number of requirements to meet the AETF FM construct. Note: Even if each AEF pair has sufficient forces to meet anticipated requirements, a deviation may be requested if the functional area is significantly "out-of-balance." 10.7.5.7. Home station impact mitigation strategies. Number/type of personnel required to remain at home station to conduct operations, decreased services, deferred actions, etc. 10.7.5.8. Proposed re-alignment. This could entail adjusting the alignment for a base(s) from one AEF pair to another or across multiple AEF pairs. 10.7.5.9. Anticipated duration of the requested deviation. In all cases, deviations will only be effective for one AEF cycle and must be renewed for each cycle. 10.7.5.10. Any other pertinent information necessary to justify the deviation/change. 10.7.6. The Air Staff FAM will forward the package to AF/A5XW for review and validation prior to formal coordination of the package. AF/A5XW will ensure the request meets the criteria for a waiver. The Air Staff FAM will send the validated package to their respective functional directorate (three-digit) for recommendation. AF/A5XW will consolidate all directorate-endorsed packages and forward to the AEFC for review. 10.7.7. HAF FAM will coordinate with AF/A5XW prior to submitting to applicable HAF DCS for approval. 10.7.8. (DELETED) . 10.8. (DELETED). 10.8.1. (DELETED) . 10.8.2. (DELETED) . 10.8.3. (DELETED) . 10.8.4. (DELETED) .

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10.8.5. (DELETED) . 10.9. Extended Estimated Tour Lengths (EETLs) 10.9.1. The baseline AEF deployment period (ETL) is 4 months. The Air Force recognizes there may be circumstances when EETLs are warranted. However, such tour lengths deviate from the AEF operational policy and must be approved by the CSAF. The procedures in Chapter 9 will be followed when requesting EETLs. EETL requests must include the anticipated amount of time the EETL will be required. In all cases, requests for EETLs will be renewed with each AEF cycle. 10.10. AEF Pivot Date. The AEF pivot date is designed to establish the battle rhythm for AEF scheduled forces. Requests to begin a rotation on a date other than within 15 days of the established pivot date must be approved by the AEFC/CC. 10.10.1. The waiver request is submitted by the chairman of the respective SIPT (CAF, MAF, or ECS) 180 days prior to the start of each AEF cycle. 10.10.2. Approved pivot date deviations are effective for the duration of the AEF cycle and must be resubmitted each cycle. 10.11. TPFDD Line-level Detail/DRMD Waivers. Prior to submitting a reclama, the tasked commander will request the deployed group commander waive the requirement that precludes the unit from filling the tasking (e.g., line remarks, special experience identifier (SEI), grade, skill level, etc.) or expand substitution rules that will still meet the UTC‘s MISCAP. 10.11.1. The IPR will route the waiver request via message, e-mail, fax, etc., to the deployed PERSCO team, in accordance with AFI 36-3802. The written waiver submission will include, at a minimum: PID, ULN, line number, UTC, line remarks(s), RDD, ILOC training event with inclusive dates, AFSC and specific justification as to why the tasked asset cannot fill the specific requirement or DRMD line remark. 10.11.1. (ACC) Wing IDRC will follow CNAF Reporting Instructions (RI) or Operational Instruction (OI) supplements for submitting waivers/deviation to tasking they cannot support. CNAF generates these RI and OI to complement AFI or adds more stringent direction or when no AFI is available. 10.11.2. If the deployed group commander approves the waiver request, the unit will be notified through the IPR/IDRC and proceed to ready asset for deployment. The tasked commander will certify on the tasking letter to the IPR/IDRC that their member is qualified and trained to meet the requirement as approved/modified by the deployed group commander. 10.11.3. If the deployed group commander disapproves the waiver request, the IDO will continue with or begin the reclama process via RPT as per Section 10C. 10.11.4. If the TPFDD Line-level Detail/DRMD waiver has not been received within 5 duty days of submission (3 days for requirements within 30 days of first movement), the tasked unit/wing/MAJCOM is authorized to complete the RPT process by forwarding the RPT template to the wing commander/equivalent for a final decision. Such reclamas will include information regarding the unanswered waiver request in one of the 3 justification fields.

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10.12. Non-Standard or Mid-Tour AEF Rotations (Active Component and Mobilized ARC only). The Air Force‘s standard tour length for AEF rotations is 120 days (Band ―A‖) or 179 days (Band ―B‖ through ―E‖). Active component forces tasked to fill either ECS or aviation requirements are expected to fulfill the entire stated tour length unless a non-standard or mid-tour rotation is approved in advance by the gaining COMAFFOR. Non-standard rotations will be used to respond to unforeseen crisis development only. CCDR requirements may necessitate that certain Enabler forces rotate on non-standard ETLs, and these enabler forces are therefore exempt from the waiver requirements of this paragraph. ARC rotations in accordance with COMAFFOR personnel rotation policy are also exempt from the waiver requirements of this paragraph. Procedures for waiver follow: 10.12.1. MAJCOM/CV will submit requests for ECS or aviation forces to AFPC/CC. 10.12.2. The request must include specific rationale to substantiate a non-standard or midtour rotation to include identification of replacement forces. 10.12.3. Replacement forces must be from the same unit and aligned to the same AEF pair. The tasked unit cannot reclama any portion of the rotation they cannot fill as a result of a COMAFFOR approved mid-tour swap-out. 10.12.4. The request must be submitted to the AEFC/CC 120 days prior to the scheduled AEF pivot date to allow sufficient time to process and notify the MAJCOM/CV of the COMAFFOR decision. 10.12.5. AFPC/CC will forward the request, through AF/A1, to AF/A3/5 for submission to the gaining COMAFFOR for approval. 10.12.6. The request may be disapproved and returned to the MAJCOM/CV by AF/A3/5. 10.12.7. Requests for non-standard or mid-tour rotations must include the anticipated duration of the swap-out period. In all cases, non-standard or mid-tour rotation deviations must be renewed each AEF cycle. 10.12.8. If non-standard or mid-tour AEF Rotations are approved and supported by the AEFC, a new requirement (ULN) will be built in the TPFDD reflecting the rotation. 10.12.9. The "rotation for cause" functionality. The "rotation for cause" functionality in DCAPES was designed to support mission continuance with a one for one (individual personnel) substitution of an airman from the supporting unit for administrative actions (e.g., medical profile change). 10.12.9.1. The Air Force approved the use of the functionality to support ARC volunteer teaming/ splitting the 4-month commitment and CSAF approved non-standard AEF rotations. 10.12.10. This functionality will not be utilized in an unauthorized manner to rotate Airmen outside of standard AEF rotations. Unauthorized use causes the loss of visibility of the combatant commander‘s requirement and significantly impacts the Air Force‘s verification process. 10.12.11. Unauthorized use also results in the following negative results: 10.12.11.1. Lack of force provider visibility required for verification.

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10.12.11.2. Delays in the AEF verification process. 10.12.11.3. Arbitrary loss of personnel accountability. 10.12.11.4. Arbitrary/unauthorized movement and deployment of forces into and out of an AOR. 10.12.11.5. Inaccurate accounting of airlift and commercial transportation utilization. 10.12.12. The AEFC is responsible for ensuring AEF rotations are accomplished in accordance with air force policy and guidance. 10.12.12.1. The AEFC will identify to AF/A5XW those organizations that are utilizing the functionality in an unauthorized manner. 10.12.12.2. AF/A5XW will disable access to DCAPES and permissions based on identified users. 10.13. AETF Combat Wing Structure. The AETF force module concept is based on the Air Force‘s combat wing structure. Air Force component headquarters will work with the AETF/NAF and AEFC to structure their forward operating locations into expeditionary units using the AETF force module template. AF/A3/5 is the approval authority for a deviation or change to the AETF Combat Wing Structure. 10.13.1. DELETED 10.13.2. Approved changes from the AETF combat wing structure are for the duration of the activation. In all cases, changes to the AETF combat wing structure will be renewed upon reactivation. 10.14. (DELETED). 10.14.1. (DELETED) . 10.14.2. (DELETED) . 10.14.3. (DELETED) . 10.15. Posturing Tailored UTCs. 10.15.1. Under limited circumstances, tailored UTCs may be postured in UTC Availability. Posturing tailored UTCs in UTC Availability will only be allowed with AF/A5XW concurrence and waiver. The Tailored UTC Posturing waiver will only be effective through the end of the applicable AEF Cycle. 10.15.1.1. Typically, the only tailored UTC that will be allowed is where a unit is providing the entire manpower portion of the UTC and the entire equipment portion is tailored out (reference paragraph 7.17.1.4). 10.15.1.2. If the force provider plans on posturing the manpower portion of a UTC only, a formal waiver is not required. However, the MAJCOM FAM must notify AF/A5XW and the Air Staff FAM of their intent to posture a tailored UTC in lieu of an Associate UTC.

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10.16. Posturing Fragged UTCs. 10.16.1. Posturing fragmented (fragged) UTCs in UTC Availability will only be allowed with AF/ A5XW concurrence and waiver. The "Approval of a Fragged UTC Posturing" waiver will only be effective through the end of the applicable AEF Cycle, after which a new waiver will have to be submitted. 10.16.2. MAJCOM FAMs and/or plans offices request the required waiver. The following information is required to process the waiver. 10.16.2.1. The "primary" unit. The primary unit is the unit that will provide the preponderance of the capability. If one unit is providing all of the manpower and another unit is providing all of the equipment, the manpower-providing unit will be considered the primary. 10.16.2.2. The augmenting unit(s). 10.16.2.3. Why the primary unit cannot fulfill the entire UTC. 10.16.2.4. The line level detail for each unit. 10.16.2.5. The planning document (e.g., DOC Statement, Functional Manager Letter, etc.) that operationally links the primary and augmenting units. 10.16.2.6. If augmenting units are from another MAJCOM, that MAJCOM‘s concurrence is required. 10.16.3. All UTC records that make up the whole UTC must have the same UTC, posturing code and AEF Library alignment. Also, the sum of the authorizations must constitute an entire UTC. 10.16.4. AF/A5XW, in coordination with applicable Air Staff FAM(s), will review and approve request. AF/A5XW will enter the fragged records into the UTC Availability database and inform the MAJCOM FAM, the Air Staff FAM, and, if applicable, augmenting MAJCOM FAMs, of the fragged identifier in UTC Availability. 10.17. Posturing Manning Overages. 10.17.1. Functional areas that have manning overages (i.e. more assigned than authorized) may posture the excess manning into UTCs in accordance with the process outlined below. A Manning Overage Posturing deviation will only be effective through the end of the applicable AEF Cycle, after which a new deviation will have to be submitted. Note: Having multiple personnel assigned to one UMD position while having other UMD positions unfilled does not constitute manning overages. 10.17.2. At the beginning of each cycle, functional areas with manning overages will determine if any of the overages should be postured in UTCs. This information should be included in the FAM‘s Posturing Guidance. 10.17.3. Air Staff FAMs will include the career field manager, AF/A1P, AF/A1M, and AF/A5XW as a minimum on their coordination package. 10.17.4. The Air Staff DCS will approve the use of manning overages for their functional area. The Air Staff FAM will notify AF/A5XW, applicable MAJCOM FAMs, and AEFC of the use of manning overages.

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10.17.5. Rule Sets for Manning Overages : 10.17.5.1. Manning overages can be combined with authorizations in A-UTCs to make a standard, deployable UTC or can constitute a complete standard deployable UTC. 10.17.5.2. Manning overages should not be used to posture additional Associate UTCs or standard UTC records that would be coded D*X. 10.17.5.3. All other rule sets for posturing UTCs (see paragraph 7.17) will be followed. 10.17.5.4. UTC records with manning overages should be annotated in ART with comments that identify the AFSC, position, and number of additional personnel. 10.18. DELETED. 10.18.1. DELETED. 10.18.2. DELETED. 10.18.3. DELETED. 10.18.4. DELETED. 10.18.5. DELETED. 10.18.6. DELETED. 10.19. Dual Posturing Authorizations. Under limited circumstances, dual-posturing of authorizations in UTC Availability will be authorized with AF/A5XW concurrence and waiver. The Dual-posturing waiver will only be effective through the end of the applicable AEF Cycle. 10.19.1. Typically, the only dual-posturing waivers that will be authorized are where forces have a unique secondary mission and the UTCs postured for the primary mission cannot be utilized to support the secondary mission (e.g. conventional and OPLAN 8044 tasked aviation assets). 10.19.2. The MAJCOM OFAMO, in coordination with applicable Air Staff FAM(s), will submit request to AF/A5XW. Justification should include: 10.19.2.1. Why the primary UTCs cannot be used to fulfill secondary mission. 10.19.2.2. Proposed measures, to include readiness reporting, to ensure that both UTCs could not be tasked simultaneously. 10.19.2.3. Proposed posturing strategy to readily ―flag‖ records in UTC Availability that UTCs are secondary UTCs. 10.19.3. Note: Dual posturing of ―faces‖ to account for special qualification of individuals (e.g. linguists, inspector general, etc) will not be captured in UTC Availability. 10.20. Other Deviations or Changes. Deviations or changes to procedures not specifically outlined in this chapter or elsewhere in this instruction may still be obtained. Personnel seeking such waivers should contact AF/A5XW through either the MAJCOM planning office or applicable Air Staff FAM.

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Table 10.1. Deviation/Change Approval Authority. DEVIATION/CHANGE

APPROVAL AUTHORITY

AEF Operational Policy

CSAF

Extended Estimated Tour Lengths (EETLs)

CSAF

Two-Hit Policy

HAF DCS

Non-Standard or Mid-Tour Rotations

COMAFFOR

Change of individual‘s AEF association (see 11.18.)

MAJCOM/CV

AEF Pivot Date

AFPC/CC

AETF Combat Wing Structure

AF/A3/5

ECS Target Base Alignment Template

AFPC/CC

Consolidated Planning Schedule

CAF SIPT

Mobility Air Forces AEF Schedule (prior to SecDef AMC/A3O approval of comprehensive AEF rotational schedule) Comprehensive AEF Rotational Schedule

AF/A3/5 (unless CSAF, SecDef redlines crossed)

TPFDD Line Level Detail

Deployed Group Commander

Posturing Fragged UTCs

AF/A5XW

Posturing Tailored UTCs

AF/A5XW

Posturing Manning Overages

Air Staff Functional Area DCS

Posturing Assigned vs. Authorized UTCs

AF/A5XW

Dual Posturing Authorizations

AF/A5XW

Section 10C—Shortfall, Reclama and UIC Change Process. 10.21. The Shortfall/Reclama/UIC. Change decision process begins when a tasking is received at either the MAJCOM or wing level and it is discovered that a ‗shortfall‘ condition exists that may prevent deployment of all or part of the required asset. Reclamas will only be submitted under the most extenuating circumstances and when all other actions/options to preclude submitting a reclama have occurred. All Condition 1-5 reclamas and UIC changes

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initiated at wing level will be approved by the wing commander (or equivalent); for direct MAJCOM or HAF-level taskings, the MAJCOM/HAF will use the same process as the wing/unit, with applicable 3-digit endorsement in the wing commander approval/disapproval block of the Reclama Processing Tool. All Condition #5 (severe mission impact) reclamas require MAJCOM/CV approval or disapproval. Refer to paragraphs 10.21.1 and 10.21.2. below for definitions. FAMs/Units will ensure UTC Availability and ART are accurate and up to date at all times in order to minimize shortfall issues. Shortfalls for requirements sourced by AFPC/DPW will be transmitted into the Reclama Processing Tool (RPT) in a timely manner (see Table 10.2). The RPT User Manual is available on both RPT websites (NIPR/SIPR). For all other shortfall issues refer to MAJCOM specific guidance. 10.21.1. Reclama : the process to ―request to duly constituted authority to reconsider its decision or its proposed action‖ (JP 1-02). Reclamas will be submitted when a valid shortfall exists (i.e., insufficient capability to meet a specific requirement.) The reclama process may be initiated at the unit, wing, MAJCOM, Air Staff or equivalent level. Note: AFRC and ANG will develop procedures to manage the reclama process to enable volunteerism. 10.21.1.1. UIC Change: Although not considered a reclama, wing commanders, MAJCOM (or equivalent) FAMs, and HAF FAMs (when HAF/FOA provides centralized management of functional area) may request that AEF Operations change the unit originally sourced to support a deployment requirement using the Reclama Processing Tool (RPT) (see paragraph 10.21.7 for UIC change procedures). Note: AFRC and ANG will develop procedures to manage UIC changes internally to enable volunteerism. 10.21.2. Shortfall : The lack of forces, equipment, personnel, material, or capability reflected as the difference between the resources identified as a plan requirement [or Service asset] and those apportioned to a combatant commander [or assigned to the Service] for planning that would adversely affect the command‘s ability to accomplish its mission. The Air Force considers the following conditions as resulting in a shortfall: 10.21.2.1. Condition #1 : Insufficient authorized (1A), assigned (1B), eligible (1C), qualified (1D), or trained (1E) personnel within a tasked unit or supporting units when identified on the Designed Operational Capability (DOC). Supporting units are traditionally identified on Aviation DOC statements. 10.21.2.1.1. Supporting Units : DOC statements may list supporting units by unit identification codes (UIC). When sourcing UTCs with supporting UICs, consideration must be taken to ensure the assets are not postured in a different AEF pair. If a MAJCOM/FOA or unit is unable to fill a UTC tasking from one UIC and the same requirement is available in a supporting UIC, as identified on the DOC statement, the unit may fill the original tasking as long as the available resource is postured in the same AEF pair. Personnel swaps between AEF pairs are discouraged and require MAJCOM/CV or equivalent approval. 10.21.2.2. Condition #2 : Insufficient on-hand (2A) or serviceable (2B) equipment within the tasked unit or supporting units when identified on the DOC. Supporting units are traditionally identified on aviation DOC statements (see 10.21.2.1.1).

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 10.21.2.3. Condition #3 : No capability available in the on-call AEF blocks/pair or in the available Enabler force within the tasked unit or supporting unit. This condition is not applicable when AFPC is sourcing via ―reaching forward.‖ 10.21.2.4. Condition #4 : Desired capability not inherent within the tasked unit or supporting unit. 10.21.2.5. Condition #5: Wing or tasked unit has the capability, has sufficient personnel to meet requirements as defined by P-coding, but deployment of personnel would cause a severe adverse impact on the wing/unit mission. This condition is generally used when the unit is tasked to deploy personnel that would result in less than the minimum required to accomplish CCDR and/or Air Force in-place mission. Note: Commanders‘ use of Condition #5 reclama to reflect anything other than severe impact to unit mission is not authorized.

10.21.3. Wing/Unit Level Reclama & UIC Change Process. 10.21.3.1. Wing commanders will develop and implement concepts of operation (CONOPs) and supporting plans to allow functional areas to make the maximum capability available during their deployment period (i.e., use of IMAs, execute services contracts, defer work orders, use of civilian over-hires, close/consolidate/defer activities, etc.) to mitigate impact of supporting the AEF. 10.21.3.1.1. Wing commanders will advise parent MAJCOM of activities specified by wing or base-level agencies that might restrict or delay AEF operations from either home or deployed locations. Recommend alternative plans as required. 10.21.3.1.2. Wing commanders will ensure unit is able to meet all deployment taskings. Forward reclama request to MAJCOM/CV or equivalent when unit is able to meet tasking, but filling tasking would cause sever mission degradation (Condition #5). 10.21.3.2. Unit commander determines if shortfall Condition #‘s 1 through 5 exists. If a TPFDD line-level detail/DRMD waiver (see paragraph 10.11) cannot be obtained, the unit commander will fill out the reclama template via RPT. Table 10.2. Reclama/UIC Change Submission Timelines (Calendar Days) Standard Short Notice >30 days <=30 days from from RDD RDD

Action Sourced requirement added to Verification Force Module by AFPC/DPW Wing/CC (or equivalent) approves baselevel Condition #1-5 reclamas MAJCOM/CV approves Condition #5 reclama –or—Name-in-System 10.21.3.2.1. DELETED. 10.21.3.2.1.1. DELETED.

Day 0

Day 0

Day 10

Day 5

Day 15

Day 10

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10.21.3.2.1.2. DELETED. 10.21.3.2.1.3. DELETED. 10.21.3.2.2. Unit forwards reclama request to the IDO on 4th duty day by completing Reclama Template within the Reclama Processing Tool. 10.21.3.2.3. Request will include confirmation that all unused (fragmented or tailored) portions of postured UTCs and Associate UTCs were reviewed as possible fills and that ART is current/correct for all UTCs per AFPD 10-4. Request will also include manning statistics by UTC for personnel reclamas or equipment UTC status for equipment reclamas. The request will also include complete justification for release (e.g., personnel assigned but not available (include why not available); assigned personnel do not meet requirement qualifications; personnel unavailable because they are assigned to another UTC in another AEF pair; etc) and mission degradation statement, if applicable. 10.21.3.3. The IDO (or equivalent) can fill the requirement with an alternate in the following sequence: associate UTCs in the on-call AEF blocks/pair, unused (fragmented or tailored) portions of standard UTCs in the on-call AEF blocks/pair, or standard UTCs in the on-call AEF blocks/pair that are not already tasked to deploy. If an alternate exists, the IDO will submit a UIC change request to AEF Operations via RPT with an informational copy to the wing commander (or equivalent) and appropriate squadron and group commanders (see paragraph 10.21.7 for UIC change procedures). If no alternate exists continue to process the shortfall. Note: If ARC associate UTCs are identified the tasked IDO will submit a UIC change action as outlined paragraph 10.21.7 to have UIC changed to reflect the ARC unit‘s UIC filling the tasking. Host IDO and ARC Wing Deployment Office (WDO) coordination will occur prior to reclama to minimize transition delays and ensure smooth transition. AFRC units will process UIC changes and reclamas through their NAFs to AFRC AEF Cell which will forward to AFPC/DPW if unable to resolve within the command. 10.21.3.3.1. IDO may convene the Shortfall Validation Team for any reclama condition. The team is established by the IDO and consists of members who can recommend/identify mitigating steps and/or alternative solutions to the wing commander (i.e., Manpower Office, Military Personnel Flight, Plans and Integration Office; AFSC Manager, or Logistics Readiness Squadron for equipment). The IDO will convene only those members necessary for valid input. 10.21.3.3.2. IDO endorses the Reclama Template via the Reclama Processing Tool to the wing commander for approval/disapproval for Condition #‘s 1 through 4. Include a summary of the Shortfall Validation Team‘s recommendation for Condition #5 reclama requests. A copy is provided to the tasked unit. 10.21.3.3.3. If the DRMD waiver process was initiated and waiver request response has not been reviewed within 2-duty days of waiver request submission, the IDO will contact the PRF. The IDO will recommend the PRF contact the deployed PERSCO team for an answer. If waiver is denied by the deployed group commander, the IDO will continue on with the reclama process. The reclama request will include status of the DRMD waiver request.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 10.21.3.3.4. IDO forwards Reclama Template package via the Reclama Processing Tool to the wing commander by the 5th duty day with recommended alternate or mitigation strategies, if applicable. IDO will also send informational copies to appropriate squadron and group commanders. 10.21.3.4. The wing commander will review the Reclama Template within the Reclama Processing Tool and determine whether to concur with the reclama or the recommendation of the Shortfall Validation Team. 10.21.3.4.1. If the wing commander nonconcurs with the reclama, The IDO will inform the unit of the wing commander‘s decision and any necessary actions recommended to fill the tasking. 10.21.3.4.2. If the wing commander concurs with a Condition #1 - #4 reclama, the IDO will forward the Reclama Template to the AEF Center via the Reclama Processing Tool, with informational copies to the wing and group commanders (or their equivalents), within 1 duty day. The applicable MAJCOM FAM‘s email address should be included in the email notification field so that the FAM may take any proactive actions required. The AEFC schedule will allow MAJCOM FAMs 3 duty days prior to re-sourcing to another unit. 10.21.3.4.3. The IDO will forward Condition #5 reclama requests to the appropriate MAJCOM(s).

10.21.4. MAJCOM Level Reclama Process. 10.21.4.1. The MAJCOM will use the same reclama process as the wing/unit for direct MAJCOM taskings, with directorate 3-digit endorsement in the wing commander approval/disapproval block of the Reclama Processing Tool for Condition #‘s 1 through 4. Condition #5 reclama requests require MAJCOM/CV or equivalent approval/disapproval. DRUs will follow the same procedures as direct MAJCOM taskings. 10.21.4.2. The MAJCOM office of primary responsibility (OPR) will monitor the AEF Cell organizational e-mail box for Wing Condition #5 reclama requests and inform the applicable MAJCOM FAM(s) of any shortfalls actions required. 10.21.4.2.1. MAJCOM FAMs should monitor Wing Condition #1 - #4 reclamas and take proactive measures if applicable. 10.21.4.2.2. Condition 5 reclamas will be processed as follows: 10.21.4.2.2.1. The MAJCOM/CV may delegate to their ECS-SIPT representative authority to re-source Condition 5 reclamas that are approved by the wing commander and then marked by the MAJCOM FAM (via MAJCOM FAM Recommendation/Comments in the RPT template) for re-sourcing (UIC Change) within the same MAJCOM. These reclamas will remain as Condition 5s in RPT. 10.21.4.2.2.2. If the MAJCOM does not have a sourcing solution "within the same MAJCOM" for a Condition 5 reclama, it is then forwarded to the MAJCOM/CV for approval or disapproval. 10.21.4.2.2.2.1. MAJCOM/CV approval of a Condition 5 reclama for

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individual personnel who are sourced via MilPDS data (e.g. I-TDY, Institutional Forces) will contain a non-availability start and stop date in RPT not to exceed a 6-month period from RDD of the applicable reclama tasking. Justification must be provided in the RPT Justification (free text) field (see paragraph 10.21.2.5 above). If no start/stop date is provided, the member will be given a 6-month deferment period with a stop date equal to 6 months after the RDD of the applicable reclama tasking. AFPC/DPA will update the MilPDS Assignment Availability Code (AAC) with the applicable Date of Availability (DOA). For Condition 5 reclamas from Institutional Force, AFPC/DPW will update an appropriate deployment availability (DAV) code in MilPDS. The AAC will ―freeze‖ the Airman in place for the duration of the deferment period. These procedures should allow sufficient time for units to prepare for the Airman‘s potential deployment once the AAC expires. The initiating unit commander may request early removal of the deferment at any time by submitting a written request to AFPC/DPA. 10.21.4.2.2.3. The MAJCOM/CV is briefed on all Condition 5 reclamas according to the MAJCOM internal process, including those Condition 5 reclamas re-sourced by the ECS-SIPT representative, as indicated by the paragraph above. 10.21.4.3. MAJCOM FAM prepares and forwards Reclama Request Package for MAJCOM/CV review and decision within 3 duty days of IDO forwarding Reclama Template. 10.21.4.4. MAJCOM/CV reviews the package and makes a decision within 2 duty days of receiving reclama submission package. 10.21.4.5. MAJCOM will ensure a reply, via the Reclama Template, with CV decision to AEFC or IDO by the 5th duty day of IDO reclama posting. The AEFC will notify MAJCOMs of non-compliance with timeline, by functional area, via an accountability metric titled "MAJCOM Timeline Compliance". 10.21.4.6. If MAJCOM/CV disapproves the Condition #5 reclama, IDO is informed and the tasked unit will fill requirement. 10.21.4.7. If MAJCOM/CV approves, the AEFC will begin the re-sourcing process. 10.21.4.8. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OP is the OPR for the command Reclama process will monitor the organizational e-mail box for Condition #5 Reclamas and inform the applicable Functional Area Manager(s) (FAMs) of required Reclama actions as outlined in AFI 10-401, Para 10.21. 10.21.4.8.1. (Added-ACC) The following information will be included in the Reclama submitted by your wing/agency. 10.21.4.8.1.1. (Added-ACC) The justification will be fully articulated, explaining what caused the shortfall condition, and when the shortfall condition occurred; e.g. a member is retiring isn‘t sufficient. The Reclama must include when the member was approved for retirement. Below are some of the more common reasons for shortfalls and what should also be included in the justification:

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 10.21.4.8.1.1.1. (Added-ACC) 3-Day Option -- Include when member was notified of deployment and when they signed their 3-day option. 10.21.4.8.1.1.2. (Added-ACC) Denied or Declined to Obtain Retainability -Include when member was denied or declined to obtain the required retainability. 10.21.4.8.1.1.3. (Added-ACC) Failed or Unable to Complete PreDeployment Training -- Include when member failed/was unable to complete pre-deployment training. 10.21.4.8.1.1.4. (Added-ACC) Failed PT Testing -- Include when member failed their PT test. 10.21.4.8.1.1.5. (Added-ACC) Filled an Emergent Requirement -- Include what requirement was filled and when member filled it (NOTE: This may require a Condition 5 to be submitted). 10.21.4.8.1.1.6. (Added-ACC) Line Remarks Added After Receipt of Tasking and Does Not Meet the New Requirement(s) -- Include when the new line remarks were received. 10.21.4.8.1.1.7. (Added-ACC) Medical -- Include when the medical condition was diagnosed/medical authority declared member ineligible. 10.21.4.8.1.1.8. (Added-ACC) Retirement -- Include when member was approved for retirement. 10.21.4.8.1.1.9. (Added-ACC) Retraining (Mandatory or Voluntary) -Include when member was identified for mandatory retraining or when member was approved voluntary retraining. 10.21.4.8.1.1.10. (Added-ACC) Security Clearance Revoked -- Include when member‘s clearance was pulled. 10.21.4.8.1.1.11. (Added-ACC) Selected by AFPC/DPW to Fill a Higher Priority Tasking -- Include the higher priority ULN and when the new tasking was received. 10.21.4.8.1.1.12. (Added-ACC) Separation -- Include when member was approved for separation. 10.21.4.8.1.1.13. (Added-ACC) Waiver Request Disapproved -- Include when the waiver request was sent and the date it was disapproved. 10.21.4.8.1.2. (Added-ACC) If the date of when the shortfall condition occurred and/or was discovered is not included in the justification, we will assume that the condition existed prior to the receipt of the tasking and therefore was within the wing‘s control. It will be reported as such. 10.21.4.8.1.3. (Added-ACC) Submitting a waiver does not automatically ―buy‖ extra time to submit a Condition 1 Reclama. If a waiver is requested, you should expect to receive a response back within 24 hours/1 day. If not, begin checking on the status. If no decision on your waiver request is received within 72 hours/3

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days, submit the Condition 1 Reclama and mention that you submitted a waiver request on (date), but no decision was received. Reclama should be submitted immediately after disapproval is received or 72 hours have passed with no decision. 10.21.4.9. (Added-ACC) Refer to paragraph 13.7.1 for information on submitting Reclamas for ACC sponsored exercises. 10.21.5. AEF Operations Reclama Process: This process is used once a unit/organization reclama (or UIC change) is received by AEF Operations. 10.21.5.1. Entire ULN/UTC Reclama/UIC Change : When the reclama or UIC Change is for an entire UTC, AEF Operations, in coordination with the affected force provider, will remove the original unit tasking and verification data (PROJ Code) by clearing base level tasking code and Social Security Number SSN (if applicable) in DCAPES Line Level Detail (LLD) and remove ULN from the applicable verification Force Module in DCAPES. This will reset the appropriate trigger fields in DCAPES to ensure a clean record is flowed to the new tasked MAJCOM. 10.21.5.2. Personnel (Line number) Reclama/UIC Change : When the reclama or UIC Change is only for a specific line number within the ULN/UTC, AEF Operations will remove the original unit tasking and verification data (PROJ code), update the PAS information in DCAPES. This will allow new MAJCOM authentication/pre-verification, verification and flow to the base updating the tasking information. This ensures visibility of actions taken at all levels. 10.21.5.3. Equipment Reclama/UIC Change : When the reclama or UIC Change request is submitted for just the equipment portion of the ULN/UTC the AEF Operations Functional Area Scheduler will review the residual capability in the on-call AEF libraries to see if a whole UTC is available. When a whole UTC is not available, AEF Operations will frag the UTC (i.e., personnel on one frag with original sourcing and verification retained and equipment on another frag.) AEF Operations will apply a new UIC in DCAPES to the equipment frag. 10.21.5.4. In some cases a previously accepted tasking may require a Reclama or UIC Change (e.g. medical emergency) to be submitted and the ULN is already locked by TRANSCOM (SSF code in JOPES/DCAPES). The AEF Operations Reclama Manager will post a newsgroup to the applicable component headquarters requesting the ULN be unlocked for re-sourcing. Once the ULN is unlocked AEF Operations will follow resourcing procedures. 10.21.5.5. AEFC Re-Sourcing Process 10.21.5.5.1. After the wing submits a reclama (Category 1-4) to the AEFC, the MAJCOM FAM will have 3 duty days to notify the AEFC scheduler of a recommended replacement unit. After notification, or after the 3 duty days, the AEFC will re-source rotational requirements Note: NLT 12 hours for crisis/surge requirements. The AEFC Reclama Manager will notify the applicable AEFC Functional Area Scheduler who will re-source. Valid requests will be re-sourced in accordance with the following AEF sourcing and tasking rule sets.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 10.21.5.5.1.1. When re-sourcing, the AEF Functional Area Scheduler will consider the UTC‘s ART status, ―teaming,‖ and the AEFC Installation to Forward Operating Location (FOL) Alignment Template. 10.21.5.5.1.2. Full or unused portions of fragmented (fragged) or tailored UTCs, from the installation(s) targeted to the FOL. 10.21.5.5.1.3. AFRC or ANG volunteer(s), with approval of the respective ARC AEF Cell. 10.21.5.5.1.4. Full or unused portions of fragged or tailored UTCs from the installation(s) within close proximity of the installation(s) targeted to the FOL. 10.21.5.5.1.5. Full or unused portions of fragged or tailored UTCs from the remaining installations in the sourced AEF blocks/pair. 10.21.5.5.1.6. After coordination with HAF FAM, a mitigation plan that utilizes a combination of (1) full or unused portions of fragged or tailored UTCs from the available Enabler libraries, (2) UTCs from the next AEF block/pair, (3) mobilized ARC forces, and/or (4) AFSCs from the Institutional Force, in the current AEF vulnerability period, that could be aggregated into a UTC (see paragraph 8.14.8.2.2 for details). 10.21.5.5.1.7. DELETED. 10.21.5.5.2. The AEFC will consider the UTC readiness assessment reflected in ART and the P-code of all UTCs considered for sourcing. The AEFC will select a "red" or "yellow" UTC as long as the rationale for the assessment does not preclude the UTC from meeting the theater requirement. 10.21.5.5.3. The AEFC scheduler will initially consider residual UTCs coded DWS, AWS, DXS, AXS or DPS. When unable to find an available, qualified UTC, the AEFC scheduler will consider the remaining P-coded UTCs, not to exceed the unit‘s maximum sustainable capability as indicated by the total number of DW* coded UTCs and all A-coded UTCs. The AEFC scheduler will gain MAJCOM approval for all UTCs whose availability code requires prior coordination and approval to source. 10.21.5.5.4. If re-sourcing is determined, the AEFC scheduler will update the UIC/PAS in DCAPES for MAJCOM verification. The AEFC scheduler will also update Enhanced Contingency/Rotational AEF Sourcing Tool (E-CAST) to ensure accuracy of the functional area list of residual AEF capability. 10.21.5.5.5. When the UIC change request is submitted with re-sourcing from the same base and MAJCOM (see paragraph 10.21.7), AEF Operations Functional Area Schedulers will review the ART status of swapping UTC and ensure that no tasking has been levied upon that UTC since the time of the original tasking. The AEF Operations Functional Area Scheduler will also update E-CAST (DCAPES EST) to ensure accuracy of the functional area list of residual AEF capability. 10.21.5.6. If alternate sourcing cannot be found, AFPC/DPW will inform AF/A3/5 via the AFCAT (AFOG) that the USAF cannot fill the requirement and that a Service reclama may be required. AFPC/DPW will provide the following information:

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10.21.5.6.1. The data included in the initial reclama. 10.21.5.6.2. Forces in AEF tempo bands and Enabler force as well as capability in Institutional Force. 10.21.5.6.3. Forces currently tasked to support contingency operations highlighting those tasked outside on-call AEF blocks/pair. 10.21.5.6.4. ART and P-code status of residual forces in on-call AEF blocks/pair. 10.21.5.6.5. ART and P-code status of untasked forces in subsequent AEF blocks/pair. 10.21.5.6.6. Analysis on implications of emerging COAs on current operations, determining sustainability of AEF rotations, and replacement/rotation ability once personnel or weapon systems enter surge operations. 10.21.5.6.7. Options, if any, for meeting the requirement if CSAF or SecDef redlines are crossed. 10.21.6. Air Staff Level Reclama Process. 10.21.6.1. If sourcing of the requirement cannot be filled, AFPC/DPW will notify AF/A3/5 via the AFCAT (AFOG) of conditions requiring shortfall resolution. The AF/A3/5, in coordination with the applicable Air Staff two-letter owning the affected FAMs, as well as AF/A1 (for personnel reclamas) and AF/A4/7 (for equipment reclamas), will explore available options to resolve the shortfall. This may be to (1) identify sourcing requiring CSAF or SecDef redlines to be crossed or (2) request to the Joint Staff that the Air Force be relieved from the tasking. 10.21.6.1.1. The AFCAT (AFOG) will ensure pertinent information, as described in paragraph 10.21.5.6, is passed from AFPC to the applicable HAF FAM or CAT functional representative. The HAF FAM will validate data from AFPC and, through their respective Air Staff two-digit, recommend to AF/A3/5 alternate sourcing from options listed in paragraph 10.21.6.2 or prepare a reclama message for AF/A3/5 release to the Joint Staff (see paragraph 10.21.6.3). 10.21.6.1.2. (DELETED) . 10.21.6.1.3. Air Staff FAMs/CAT functional representatives must coordinate all reclamas with AF/A5XW (CAT-WMP when CAT is activated), AF/A1P and AF/A1M for personnel shortfalls, and AF/A4R for equipment shortfalls. 10.21.6.2. The following options are available to AF/A3/5 to resolve the shortfall prior to submitting an Air Force reclama to J-1; however, each of these constitutes nonstandard tasking and would require approval by CSAF or SecDef. 10.21.6.2.1. Utilizing Extended Estimated Tour Lengths (EETLs) for new rotations (see paragraph 10.9) or "freezing" forces in place. 10.21.6.2.2. (DELETED) . 10.21.6.2.3. (DELETED) . 10.21.6.2.4. Request use of ARC forces via mobilization, if available.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 10.21.6.2.5. Use of civilians and/or contractors. 10.21.6.3. If the Air Force cannot resolve the shortfall, AF/A3/5, or designated representative (e.g. CAT Director), will send Joint Staff a formal reclama message requesting relief from tasking. The reclama message will: 10.21.6.3.1. Be sent to Joint Staff J-1 (Personnel and Manpower) for manning shortfalls, or J-4 (Logistics) for equipment shortfalls. 10.21.6.3.2. Contain as an Info addressee the supported combatant command operations (J-3) and personnel (J-1) or logistics (J-4) staffs, the supported component headquarters A-3 and A-1/A-4, JFCOM J-3 and J-1/J4, and COMACC. Other combatant commands and air components that may be affected by the shortfall resolution will also be addressed. 10.21.6.3.3. Identify the specific PID/ULN(s) that the Air Force cannot support, the UTC(s), and the required delivery date(s). 10.21.6.3.4. Contain appropriate justification (e.g., manning, PERSTEMPO, mission degradation, etc.) as to why the Air Force cannot provide the capability. 10.21.6.4. AF/A3/5 will ensure applicable supported component headquarters, Air Force force provider (AF FP), and AFPC/DPW are notified of Joint Staff decision on shortfall action and direct appropriate action. 10.21.6.5. The supported component headquarters will ensure the TPFDD Service Reserve Code is updated to reflect the U.S. Air Force is no longer tasked to support the requirement for all JCS-approved Service reclamas.

10.21.7. UIC Change Process. After verification, the IDO submits UIC changes on behalf of the wing commander (or equivalent) in accordance with Table 8.1. A unit replacement must be from the same wing and aligned in the same AEF vulnerability period as the originally tasked unit. If the deployment tasking has not been verified and the MAJCOM has an alternate sourcing recommendation, then the MAJCOM FAM or AEF Cell submits UIC changes that must be from the same MAJCOM and AEF vulnerability period. Personnel moves between AEF blocks/pairs to fill taskings must be approved by the MAJCOM/CV or equivalent (not applicable to ARC). 10.21.7.1. Although DCAPES permissions provide the ability to change a UIC at wing level, installations will only use that capability during wing exercises. IDOs will submit a change request via RPT only after completing formal coordination between affected unit commanders. The IDO must place coordination remarks in the justification block when submitting the request. 10.21.7.1.1. There are situations (e.g. TCN Escort) when a wing or MAJCOM is not required to complete UIC changes in RPT. Contact the Reclama Manager at AEF Operations for these exceptions. 10.21.7.2. The AEF Operations Functional Area Scheduler, upon receipt of a valid change request will change the UIC in DCAPES, relieving the originally tasked unit of the requirement and reset the appropriate trigger fields in DCAPES to ensure a clean record is flowed (i.e., clearing base level tasking code and SSN in DCAPES LLD). Until relieved, the originally tasked unit will continue to take all measures to fulfill the

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requirement. The AEF Operations Functional Area Scheduler will re-source the requirement within 2 days to allow sufficient notification for the newly sourced unit. 10.21.8. UIC Change for Individuals Sourced via MilPDS Method. The tasked force provider may provide an alternate sourcing solution by making a UIC/name change within established timeframes via RPT (see paragraph 9.8.1. and Table 10.2.). The individual initially selected by AFPC/DPW remains eligible for future requirements unless personal data changes affect eligibility or the commander submits an operational deferment request (see AFI 36-2110, attachment 24). Note: For organizations ―outside‖ the Air Force, servicing IDRCs will not change the UIC/name without prior approval from AFPC.

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Chapter 11 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES Section 11A—Purpose 11.1. Purpose. This chapter outlines roles and responsibilities of all agencies involved in the planning and execution of deployment operations. Section 11B—Background 11.2. Background. The increasing global demand for Air Force capabilities precludes the Air Force from effectively meeting all combatant commander needs with combat coded units apportioned for planning purposes. The U.S. Air Force has transformed the way it meets current and emerging national security objectives by centrally managing all Air Force forces in order to meet a combatant commander‘s needs with both theatre assigned forces and forces assigned to other combatant commanders. The global management of all Air Force forces requires coordination and cooperation between the Department of Air Force, the Joint Staff, and combatant commanders to ensure the effective deployment of Air Force capabilities. The roles, responsibilities, and expectations of the various parties are outlined in this chapter. Section 11C—Direction 11.3. Secretary of Defense (SecDef). The SecDef is the principal defense policy adviser to the President and is responsible for the formulation of general defense policy and policy related to all matters of direct concern of the Department of Defense and for the execution of approved policy. Under the direction of the President, the Secretary exercises authority, direction, and control over the Department of Defense. 11.3.1. The SecDef is in the operational chain of the Unified Commands and therefore assigns, approves, and directs missions of the unified combatant commanders (UCC) in support of national security objectives. The SecDef also approves combatant commander requests for forces/requests for capabilities (RFF/RFC) needed to accomplish assigned missions. In accordance with Global Force Management (GFM) policy, the SecDef is responsible for the Global Force Management Schedule (GFMS), which directs forces available to combatant commanders. Each Service is responsible for developing an annex to the GFMS indicating their plan for supporting the global requirements of all combatant commanders. The Air Force comprehensive AEF rotational schedule conveys the U.S. Air Force‘s plan for supporting both the build up of forces in support of the range of military operations (ROMO) and rotational operations designed to sustain the combatant commander‘s mission over a period of time. This schedule is included in the WMP 3, Part 4. 11.3.2. Once the GFMS is approved by the SecDef, it is authoritative and directive to all military departments and commands involved in the planning and deployment of forces. Changes to the annex affecting the scheduling of forces assigned to a combatant commander must be coordinated through the CJCS to SecDef. The SecDef approves and directs the U.S. Air Force to surge in response to combatant commander requests for capabilities. Once approved by SecDef, Chief of Staff, United States Air Force (CSAF) will issue a tasking

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order that serves as authority for COMACC, through the AEFC, to flow sourced requirements to the appropriate MAJCOM/unit for fill in accordance with established AEF procedures. 11.4. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) and the Joint Staff. The CJCS is the principal military adviser to the President, SecDef, and the National Security Council (NSC). The CJCS is provided a Joint Staff to assist in accomplishing responsibilities for: the unified strategic direction of combatant forces; the operation of forces under unified command; and for the integration of forces into an efficient team of land, naval, and air forces. A role of the CJCS and the Joint Staff is to facilitate the resolution of matters between Services and combatant commanders and act as a conduit for information flow requiring SecDef decision or validation. Neither the Chairman nor the Joint Staff exercise executive authority over combatant or Service forces. 11.4.1. The CJCS approves the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP) provided by the Joint Staff. The JSCP contains guidance to combatant commanders and the Service Chiefs for the accomplishment of military tasks. Resulting combatant commander OPLANs, including the TPFDDs, are forwarded to the CJCS for review and approval. 11.4.2. The CJCS forwards communication and direction from the President and SecDef to the combatant commanders regarding current operations and plans by issuing warning, planning, alert, prepare to deploy, deployment, and execute orders. 11.4.3. The Joint Staff manages the GFM process. 11.4.3.1. Develops and staffs the Forces For Combatant Commanders Memorandum (Forces For), outlining the assignment of forces. 11.4.3.2. Develops and staffs the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP), outlining the CCDRs‘ specific tasks and OPLAN/CONPLAN to be developed. 11.4.3.3. Chairs the Global Force Management Board (GFMB). The GFMB provides recommendations to the Commander, Joint Forces Command (CDRJFCOM) as the Joint Force Provider (JFP) for the allocation of forces. 11.4.3.3.1. Develops policy and guidance to support the JFP. 11.4.3.3.2. Develops the Global Force Management (GFM) Allocation Schedule Annexes for SecDef approval. 11.4.3.3.3. Receive and validate requests for forces/capabilities (RFFs/RFCs) from combatant commanders. Joint Staff will pass the validated RFF/RFC to JFP for action. 11.4.3.3.4. Adjudicate contentious issues arising from Services and/or combatant commanders. 11.4.4. The Joint Staff is responsible for allocating blocks of PIDs to all unified and specified commanders. 11.4.5. If detailed plan briefings to key civilian officials within the Department of Defense are required, then the Joint Chiefs of Staff, on a case-by-case basis, is responsible for determining the extent to which sensitive data will be included.

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11.5. Commander, Joint Forces Command (CDRJFCOM) as the Primary Joint Force Provider(JFP) 11.5.1. Based on recommendations from the GFMB, Services, and combatant commanders, is responsible for the allocation of conventional combat, combat support, and combat service support forces, less designated forces sourced by USTRANSCOM, USSOCOM, and USSTRATCOM. 11.5.2. In coordination with the Services, provides trained and ready forces and capabilities for allocation by the Global Force Management Board to support combatant command requirements. 11.5.3. Recommends global joint sourcing solutions to satisfy validated combatant command RFFs/ RFCs and prepare the DEPORD to forward, through the CJCS, to the SecDef for approval. 11.5.4. Recommends to the Global Force Management Board actions to sustain the level of capabilities of globally available forces to satisfy combatant commander requirements. 11.5.5. In coordination with the Services, orchestrates the force flow of allocated units. 11.6. Unified Combatant Commands (UCCs) 11.6.1. Provide requests for forces/capabilities (RFFs/RFCs) to Joint Chiefs for consideration by GFMB 11.6.2. Identify immediate response and ready response forces/requirements to support JSCP Assigned missions 11.7. Secretary of the Air Force (SECAF). The SECAF is responsible for the affairs of the Department of the Air Force, including the organizing, training, equipping, and providing for the welfare of its active duty force, Air National Guard, Air Force Reserve, civilians, and their families. The SECAF is responsible for the U.S. Air Force‘s functioning and efficiency, the formulation of its policies and programs, and the timely implementation of decisions and instructions of the President of the United States and the SecDef. 11.7.1. The SECAF assigns Air Force forces to the combatant commands, except those necessary to meet its statutory functions, as directed by SecDef and documented in the Forces For Unified Commands (Forces For) memorandum. SECAF retains authority over all forces not specifically assigned to CCDRs. The Forces For reflects force assignment, not force apportionment for planning or force allocation for execution. 11.7.2. SECAF establishes Air Force tempo management policy and approves any deviations or waivers to established policy. 11.8. Headquarters, United States Air Force 11.8.1. Chief of Staff, United States Air Force (CSAF). The CSAF is the principal adviser to the SECAF on Air Force activities and provides assistance for organizing, training, and equipping air and space forces to meet combatant commander requirements. The CSAF presides over the Air Staff, transmits Air Staff plans and recommendations to the SECAF and acts as the Secretary's agent in carrying them out. The CSAF is responsible for the efficiency of the Air Force and the preparation of its forces for military operations.

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11.8.1.1. CSAF supervises the administration of Air Force personnel allocated to combatant commands using the AEF schedule and limits established by the GFMB. 11.8.1.2. The CSAF conveys instructions to all Air Staff, MAJCOM, ANG, and subordinate units to be ready to deploy at any time during their AEF deployment period per the approved AEF schedule. 11.8.1.3. The CSAF approves deviations to the AEF operational practice (e.g., the AEF battle rhythm) for meeting and sustaining combatant commander requirements. The CSAF may direct extended estimated tour length (EETLs) for selected individuals, units, or functional areas when necessary to meet combatant commander mission requirements. The CSAF must approve/disapprove all requests to deploy on a rotation tour length greater than 179 days. 11.8.1.4. Vice Chief of Staff, United States Air Force (VCSAF) assists the CSAF in the administration of U.S. Air Force forces by chairing the VCSAF Forum. The forum consists of MAJCOM/CVs (to include ANG), HAF DCSs, and invited guests. Collectively, they oversee the U.S. Air Force‘s efforts to organize, train, equip, and provide the most combat ready and skilled forces to the combatant commander. 11.8.2. Deputy Chief of Staff (DCS), Air Space, & Information Operations, Plans & Requirements (AF/A3/5). The AF/A3/5 is responsible to the Secretary of the Air Force and the Chief of Staff for formulating policy supporting air, space, intelligence, nuclear, counter proliferation, homeland security, weather, and information operations. As the Assistant Air Force Operations Deputy to the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he determines the operational requirements, capabilities and training necessary to support national security objectives and military strategy. The AF/A3/5 oversees and issues policy, guidance, and procedures for mission directives on Air Force war planning and readiness. The AF/A3/5 oversees AEF operational planning and concept development and assists the AEFC and Air Force component headquarters with contingency, crisis action, and rotational planning. AF/A3/5 represents the Air Force to the joint community and the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) on all AEF policy and doctrine to include all matters involving the scheduling, sourcing, operations planning, and presentation of AEF capabilities. AF/A3/5 plans, programs, and budgets for operational exercises and coordinates operational training events. AF/A3/5 conducts analysis of operational concepts supporting AEF operations through the Studies and Analyses, Assessments and Lessons Learned (AF/A9). AF/A3/5 is responsible for overseeing recovery and reconstitution efforts that result from surge operations above the normal AEF battle rhythm and is the waiver authority for deviations from the Air Force Combat Wing structure of an air expeditionary wing (AEW). 11.8.2.1. Communicates SecDef and CSAF direction on such matters as surge, approval to use EETLs, directed taskings, execution orders, and tour lengths exceeding the Service‘s standard. 11.8.2.2. The AF/A3/5 will send out the AEF Schedule Planning, Preparation, and Posturing Guidance memo approximately 13 months prior to the start of the AEF Schedule. This memo is the keystone document for all AEF Schedule implementation and outlines the necessary steps and timeline that must occur to facilitate AEF Schedule planning.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 11.8.2.2.1. The AF/A3/5 will be approval authority for any request for a functional area to realign its forces from one Tempo Band to a more stringent Tempo Band either during the AEF Schedule band evaluation process or during the AEF Schedule as a result of an increase in CCDR requirements. 11.8.2.2.2. The AF/A3/5 will be approval authority for a functional area to reach forward to the next AEF block when the functional area is aligned in Band ―C.‖ Note: AFPC, after coordination with HAF, may source forces from next AEF block without AF/A3/5 approval in order to fulfill SecDef-approved GFMAP taskings (see paragraph 8.14.8.2.2 for details). AFPC/CC will notify AF/A3/5, AF/A1, and applicable HAF DCS of such sourcing via a deviation report. 11.8.2.3. Directorate of Operational Plans and Joint Matters (AF/A5X). AF/A5X is the U.S. Air Force focal point for developing and integrating worldwide AEF operational strategies, requirements, policies, guidance, and plans in support of combatant commands. AF/A5X assesses the ability of AEF scheduled forces to support combatant commander planning initiatives and requests for capability or forces to accomplish assigned missions. AF/A5X maintains an interface with the Commander, Air Combat Command (COMACC) and the AEFC on scheduling, sourcing, and execution issues impacting the AEF battle rhythm. AF/A5X monitors, assesses, and provides guidance related to MAJCOM issues and inconsistencies, Air Staff Functional Area Manager (FAM) functional area issues, and AEF relationship to operation plan guidance. 11.8.2.3.1. Responsible for recommending AEF policy and conducting outreach activities inside and outside the U.S. Air Force as directed. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.2. The Air Force office primarily responsible for policies and procedures related to the presentation of Air Force capabilities to the combatant commands, OSD, and the joint community. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.3. Coordinates with MAJCOMs and component headquarters to ensure unity in AEF planning, preparation, and execution. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.4. Executive agency for the VCSAF Forum and responsible for carrying out the administrative and logistical needs of the forum. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.5. Develops general policies regarding all facets of the management of UTCs and guidelines for assigning available UTCs in the DCAPES UTC Availability and is responsible for managing the UTC Availability in DCAPES, but not for the actual update of available UTCs. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.6. Serves as the primary U.S. Air Force representative on the Prioritization and Sourcing Review Board (PSRB), in accordance with CJCSI 1301.01C, responsible for conveying the U.S. Air Force‘s ability to meet the individual augmentation (IA) requirements of all combatant commanders. Along with AF/A1PR, coordinates combatant commander IA requests with the applicable Air Staff FAM and the AEFC to determine availability of needed capability to meet IA request. Coordination is accomplished between AF/A5X and A1PR using the Joint Actions Brief Sheet (JABS). AF/A5X is responsible for communicating the results of the PSRB to all affected and interested parties. (A5XJ)

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11.8.2.3.7. Primary U.S. Air Force point of contact for coordinating U.S. Air Force recommendations to the GFMB. Assists component headquarters develop RFC recommendations for the combatant commander by identifying available capabilities and UTCs. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.8. Provides contingency, crisis action, and rotational planning policies, guidance, procedures, and systems to support planning and execution processes and mobilization issues consistent with Air Force strategic direction, long-range planning, and joint planning architectures. AF/A5X is responsible for managing the Deliberate and Crisis Action Planning and Execution Segments (DCAPES) and serving as the Air Force functional office of responsibility for Joint Operation Planning and Execution System (JOPES). (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.9. Provides AEF expertise and continuity to the U.S. Air Force in operational and expeditionary combat support (ECS) areas. AF/A5X assists in the development of Air Force FAM training course material AF/A5X coordinates AEF issues across functional areas and MAJCOMs as directed by the CSAF. Where no Air Staff FAM exists, AF/A5X performs the minimum duty of providing posturing, coding, and sequencing strategy for the affected functional area. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.10. Acts as the U.S. Air Force office primarily responsible for mobilization and demobilization planning and is responsible for forwarding MAJCOM/CC requests for mobilization and demobilization to the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) (SAF/MR) as a coordinated request to SecDef. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.11. Responsible for ensuring the CJCS exercise schedule includes deployment exercises and are managed in accordance with AEF procedures for stating, maintaining and sourcing requirements. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.12. Office of primary responsibility for developing and integrating worldwide AEF operational strategies, requirements, policies, guidance, and plans to include developing and maintaining this instruction. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.13. Primary focal point for U.S. Air Force planning and execution community for: JSCP/WMP actions, Contingency Planning, UTC Availability, UTC Management, force modules, Mobilization, DCAPES, and FAM Management. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.13.1. The MEFPAK Manager for the Air Force, including the proving and coordinating agency for all UTC requests. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.13.2. Responsible for the War and Mobilization Plans, providing the WMP-3 Part1 for review during the JSCP development process and updates WMP-3 Part 1 database as necessary with component headquarters and MAJCOM comments. (A5XW) 11.8.2.3.13.3. Responsible for reviewing component headquarters TPFDDs and validating the combat forces to ensure forces match the WMP-3 Part 1 apportionment, source the TPFDD using the automated sourcing programs and provide the completed sourcing to the component headquarters. (A5XW)

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 11.8.2.3.13.4. Sponsors for the Air Force sourcing conference, if deemed necessary, and participates in the joint force flow conferences as the Air Staff representative. (A5XW) 11.8.2.4. Directorate of Current Operations and Training (AF/A3O). Provides the Current Operations function for the Air Force. As such, AF/A3O integrates the efforts of A5X, A4/7 and A1 in the execution phase of providing forces to combatant commanders. 11.8.2.4.1. Current Operations reside in AF/A3OO (Air Force Operations Group (AFOG)). Current Operations is responsible for the coordination of draft CJCS PLANORDS, DEPORDS and EXORDS in both peacetime and crisis operations. In peacetime AFOG coordinates orders with HAF FAMs, AEFC (through ACC) and MAJCOMs. When the AFCAT is activated during crisis operations, AFOG employs the CAT to perform necessary coordination. Direct liaison with the Joint Staff and combatant commander staffs is authorized. 11.8.2.4.2. Individual Augmentee shortfalls will be vetted through the CAT Director or AF/ A3O. Current Operations will maintain visibility on IA requests. 11.8.2.4.3. As Global Force Management evolves, AF/A3O will continue to provide HAF guidance, policy and direction to ACC and the AEFC in the sourcing of Air Force assets in the execution phase. 11.8.2.4.4. DELETED.

11.8.3. DCS, Manpower and Personnel (AF/A1). Establishes policy and provides guidance for organizational structures, manpower impacts, military personnel, Department of the Air Force (DAF) civilians, and required manpower services to support AEF operations. AF/A1 establishes policy and monitors competitive sourcing and privatization (CS&P) studies to ensure they do not impact the Air Force‘s ability to execute AEF operations and deployment requirements. AF/A1 integrates personnel policies and strategic objectives throughout the development and coordination of plans and programs supporting AEF operations. AF/A1 establishes policies and procedures that fully support the AEF, commanders, Air Force members and their families. AF/A1 serves as the U.S. Air Force office primarily responsible for managing the U.S. Air Force‘s Tail Number Accounting Program. 11.8.3.1. Directorate of Force Management Policy (AF/A1P). AF/A1P is the U.S. Air Force focal point for developing global Air Force personnel policy. 11.8.3.1.1. Provides a personnel presence with the Air Force CAT via the Manpower & Personnel Readiness Center (MPRC) during crisis operations. The AFCAT-MPRC is tasked with integrating personnel and manpower guidance and is the Air Force OPR for global personnel accountability for the Total Air Force. (A1PR). 11.8.3.1.2. Along with AF/A5XJ, is responsible for coordinating combatant commander Individual Augmentation (IA) requests with the applicable Air Staff FAM and the AEFC to determine availability of capability needed to meet IA requirement requests. Coordination is accomplished between AFCAT-MPRC (AF/A1PR when the MPRC is not activated) and A5XJ using the Joint Actions Briefing Sheet (JABS), in accordance with CJCSI 1301.01C. Serves as an U.S. Air

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Force representative on Prioritization & Sourcing Review Boards (PSRB) in conjunction with AF/A5XJ. (A1PR). 11.8.3.1.3. Serves as the OPR for the personnel functions of DCAPES. (A1PR). 11.8.3.1.4. Ensures PCS and TDY assignment and promotion/separation policies are synchronized to the maximum extent possible with AEF deployment policies. (A1PP). 11.8.3.1.5. Serves as the Air Force Office of FAM Oversight for Personnel (OFAMO-P). In this role they are the office of primary responsibility for Air Staff FAMs and MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU OFAMOs concerning all personnel related functions. They are responsible for developing FAM training for FAMs at all echelons; additionally they provide support and personnel analysis for HAF FAMs. (A1PR) They are responsible for tracking, training and providing support and personnel analysis for Air Staff FAMs as well as developing FAM training for FAMs/OFAMOs at all levels. 11.8.3.2. Directorate of Manpower, Organization and Resources (AF/A1M). AF/A1M is the Air Force OPR for developing and administering the global Air Force manpower program as an integral part of the Planning, Programming, Budgeting & Execution (PPBE) System. 11.8.3.2.1. Through the Air Force Manpower Agency, serves as the Master Manpower Force Packaging System (MANFOR) office of primary responsibility for the Air Force. Oversees the MANFOR database and ensures the system interfaces with other automated planning systems. Serves as the OPR for the manpower functions of DCAPES. (AF/A1MR and AFMA). 11.8.3.2.1.1. Reviews and registers new UTC data in the MANFOR database. 11.8.3.2.1.2. Reviews UTC update dates to ensure all UTCs are being revalidated on a regular basis. 11.8.3.2.1.3. Creates MANFOR file for ultimate submission in the TUCHA. 11.8.3.2.2. Provides policy and guidance to assist MAJCOM and FOA staffs to quantify and document wartime manpower contingency and deployment planning requirements; deployment execution, employed at home station, and in-place requirements; and employment contingency organization structures in support of total force accountability and force management. (AF/A1MR and AFMA 11.8.3.2.3. Updates MISCAPs and manpower detail based on inputs from MEFPAK Responsible Agency and/or Air Staff FAM. 11.8.3.2.4. Establishes policies and procedures for review and validation of JCS Unit Descriptor Codes (UDC). 11.8.3.3. Air Force Personnel Center (AFPC). AFPC is a field operating agency to AF/A1. AFPC is a supporting agency to ACC in its force providing role. AFPC executes AEF sourcing, scheduling policy and provides visibility and accountability over deployed USAF forces to assess readiness and projected reconstitution requirements. AFPC/CC

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11.8.4. DCS, Logistics, Installations and Mission Support (AF/A4/7). Develops policy and provides guidance for all logistics plans, transportation, supply and fuels, maintenance and munitions, civil engineer, and services support. HAF lead for developing Agile Combat Support (ACS) capabilities, and appropriately sizing these capabilities as ECS, to support AEF operations. 11.8.4.1. Provides direction and functional advocacy for development and funding of deployment and distribution automated information systems, deployment equipment, related studies and initiatives. Establishes policy and provides guidance to MAJCOMs on the training and equipping of personnel to support crisis operations. 11.8.4.2. Performs as the U.S. Air Force point of contact for in-transit visibility issues, policies, and programs. 11.8.4.3. Develops and implements U.S. Air Force personal property movement and passenger policies and procedures for the SECAF and the CSAF in support of the AEF. AF/A4/7 is responsible for developing and implementing Service unique personal property movement through OSD. AF/A4/7 represents Air Force MAJCOMs and installation TMOs as executive board member on the Personal Property Coordinating Council and the Passenger Advisory Group. In addition, serves as the U.S. Air Force focal point and program manager for personal property and privately owned vehicles. U.S. Air Force focal point and program manager for passenger border clearances and customs requirements, passenger forecasting, and government-wide city-pair program requirements. 11.8.4.4. Serves as the U.S. Air Force office primarily responsible for the Integrated Deployment 11.8.4.5. Serves as the LOGFOR office of primary responsibility for UTC development and maintenance. Receives, updates, and reviews LOGDET data from MEFPAK Responsible Agency; provides TYPREP submission to Defense Systems Support Organization for updating TUCHA. Detailed responsibilities are outlined in Chapter 5. 11.8.5. Secretary of the Air Force Office of Warfighting Integration and Chief Information Officer (SAF/XC). 11.8.5.1. Develops policy and provides guidance for all communication and information. 11.8.5.2. SAF/XC is designated the Air Force Executive Agent (AFEA) for Joint Expeditionary Force Experiments (JEFX). The Air Force Command and Control and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Center (AFC2ISRC), as its subordinate AFEA, acts as the Air Force lead for planning and conducting JEFXs and small-scale experiments such as Advanced Process Technology Experiments (APTX). To accomplish the tasks, the AFEO coordinates, synchronizes, and integrates experimentation events in JEFXs and APTXs. 11.8.6. Headquarters Air Force Functional Area Managers (HAF FAMs). The HAF FAM acts as a central coordinator of the actions of their MAJCOM counterparts to ensure their applicable functional area UTCs are postured, coded, and aligned in UTC Availability in

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accordance with current Air Force policy and instructions. The HAF FAM will update their Functional Area Prioritization and Sequencing Guidance in accordance with the instructions set forth in the AF/A3/5 AEF Schedule Planning, Preparation, and Posturing Guidance Memorandum. FAM Guidance will be approved by applicable HAF Functional Director (may be delegated to no lower than General Officer). HAF FAMs, in coordination with MAJCOMs and AFPC/DPW, are responsible for ensuring the capabilities represented by their UTCs are correctly balanced across the applicable AEF blocks/pairs and support the functional capabilities identified in the AETF force modules. HAF FAMs will not make changes to the UTC Availability but will coordinate with appropriate MAJCOM and APFC/DPW to ensure the guidance provided in this instruction is correctly applied throughout the functional area. The HAF FAM is responsible for continually evaluating the functional area‘s ability to perform its primary objective, which is to meet the combatant commander‘s needs. The HAF FAM will determine the appropriate Tempo Bands for their capability areas to include mitigation strategies to remain in that Tempo Band. The HAF FAM will identify and suggest remedies for problems or issues requiring deviations or waivers to current policies or procedures. The HAF FAM will identify to the AF/A3/5, instances of inconsistent application of policies, procedures, or stated strategy. HAF FAMs validate the development and maintenance of UTCs within their functional area and assign a MEFPAK Responsible Agency. See Chapter 12 for additional HAF FAM responsibilities. 11.8.7. Air Staff Deputy Chiefs of Staff (HAF DCS). HAF DCSs, or equivalents, are responsible for the overall health of the functional areas within their various directorates. 11.8.7.1. HAF DCSs will approve placement of functional areas into the appropriate Tempo Band as part of the AEF Schedule reset. 11.8.7.2. HAF DCSs will be the approval authority for a functional area to reach forward to the next AEF block when the functional area is aligned in Bands ―A‖ or ―B‖ or to reach deeper when operating in Bands ―C‖ or ―D.‖ Note: AFPC, after coordination with HAF, may source forces from next AEF block without HAF DCS approval in order to fulfill SecDef-approved GFMAP taskings (see paragraph 8.14.8.2.2 for details). AFPC/CC will notify AF/A3/5, AF/A1, and the applicable HAF DCS of such sourcing via a deviation report. 11.8.7.3. HAF DCSs will approve deviations to the ECS Target Base Alignment and Two-Hit Policy. 11.8.7.4. HAF DCS will approve UTC realignment within an AEF Tempo Band during the execution of the AEF Schedule. 11.8.8. Air Staff Functional Directors. Air Staff functional directors are typically the first general officer within the HAF FAM‘s organizational chain. As such, the director provides senior leadership to one or a few functional areas. 11.8.8.1. Approve applicable Functional Area Prioritization and Sequencing Guidance. 11.8.8.2. Adjudicate risk assessments from MAJCOMs to provide surge sourcing if multiple MAJCOMs assess risk at Significant or High. 11.8.8.3. Approve use of personnel in augmentee UTCs if capability area is postured in Band ―D‖ or ―E.‖

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11.9. Commander, Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC/CC) and Director, Air National Guard (NGB/CF). Establishes policy and provides guidance for the participation of AFRC and ANG forces, respectively in AEF operations. Note: HQ AFRC/CC is dual-hatted as the AF/RE. 11.9.1. AFRC/CV and NGB/CF will ensure ARC FAMs are involved in development of ARC utilization plans. AFRC/CV and/or NGB/CF may implement the ARC 2-year utilization plan and re-align the applicable ARC UTCs into the appropriate mobilization band (Band ―M‖ or ―N‖) when requirements exceed or are forecast to exceed available AC UTCs postured in Tempo Band ―D‖ or ―E.‖ AFRC/CV and NGB/CF will also approve re-aligning of ARC UTCs to Band ―A‖ when AD UTCs go to a greater dwell than 1:2. 11.10. Component Headquarters. Although Air Force forces are assigned to different combatant commanders, all Air Force units and associated capability are part of the AEF and are centrally managed to best meet the overall requirements of all combatant commands in support of the national defense strategy. For rotational operations, the component headquarters will provide all requirements (ECS, aviation, and equipment) to the AEFC for sourcing in accordance with the timelines established in Chapter 9. For crisis operations, the supported component headquarters will only source assigned forces, all other requirements will be provided to AEFC for sourcing solution. 11.10.1. Establish and identify AEF manpower, airframe, and equipment requirements, from the Air Force capabilities presented to the combatant commanders in the form of AETF force modules. Coordinate deployment planning activities and combatant commander requirements with the AEFC to assist identification of AETF capabilities and available UTCs in the AEF and Enabler libraries. Develop supporting plans with corresponding JOPES TPFDD and DCAPES line level detail as required to meet theater and supported combatant commander mission requirements. 11.10.2. Promote diplomatic relations for host nation support (HNS) with foreign governments to ensure base accessibility, overflight, and landing rights. Assist lead units in establishing HNS for required items. Identify in-theater prepositioned and host nation materiel available to supporting MAJCOMs to allow them to prepare required deployment packages. 11.10.3. Coordinate with combatant commander staffs to identify employment locations. Develop a Base Support & Expeditionary (BaS&E) Planning Tool for approved employment locations. Plan and coordinate communications and information support. Coordinate theaterspecific intelligence preparation of the battlespace (IPB) for deploying forces and incorporate deploying forces into theater intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) dissemination architecture. 11.10.4. Provide access to theater targeting lists and coordinate availability of theater targeting products, to include target system analysis, target materials, and tailored targeting products. Establish the ater-level C2 nodes and responsibilities. 11.10.5. Ensure all deployed forces working in a joint or coalition organization, or those filling "in lieu of" requirements, know their Air Force command structure. Ideally, this information is provided in the AOR reporting instructions so the member is aware prior to departure.

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11.10.6. Establish policy, guidance, and instructions (normally in the form of reporting instructions) to facilitate the efficient employment of forces within the theater of operation. As new FOLs are established, policy, guidance and instructions should be established and disseminated as soon as possible. 11.10.7. Responsible for ensuring that all MAJCOMs, which are tasked or might be tasked in their plan, receive sufficient copies of the plan to be supported. 11.10.8. Review WMP-3 Part 1 to ensure most current wartime beddowns and RDDs and to ensure apportioned forces are sufficient to accomplish wartime tasks. 11.10.9. Source contingency planning TPFDDs from in-theater assets, provide TPFDDs to AF/ A5XW for sourcing, and provide the sourced TPFDD to the MAJCOMs for review and validation. 11.10.10. Coordinate completion of TPFDD routing data, C-dates, and any additional time phasing based on combatant commands requirements. 11.10.11. Ensure that contingency and crisis planning factors comply with HN agreements and the DOD Foreign Clearance Guide (FCG). This planning must include deployment, employment and sustainment requirements across the regional combatant command area of responsibility (AOR), including en route countries as necessary. Ensure that US Embassy or US Defense Representative receive a copy of CJCS Orders to assure that U.S. Embassies have sufficient time, input and manpower to support coordination with HN. 11.11. Commander, Air Combat Command (COMACC). COMACC, through ACC as the Air Force component to JFCOM, coordinates with all Air Force force providers and HQ USAF to identify Air Force recommended sourcing solutions for all Air Force conventional forces in support of USJFCOM‘s role as Primary JFP, in accordance with GFM guidance. ACC coordinates and prepares recommended sourcing solutions and military risk assessments for the Joint Staff (JS) to be submitted to SecDef for final approval. 11.11.1. COMACC, in coordination with the AEFC, will task organize and transfer ready, fully mission capable AETF forces to combatant commanders in accordance with the SecDef approved AEF rotational force schedule. G-series orders and expeditionary unit designations will be in accordance with AFPD 10-4 and AFI 38-101. 11.11.2. Upon receipt of a SecDef tasking order, COMACC, through the AEFC, will pass sourced AETF requirements to force providers. 11.11.3. COMACC will maintain and provide HQ USAF, through the AEFC, total asset visibility of forces tasked to deploy, deployed forces, Air Force residual capability, readiness of forces, projected reconstitution requirements, and recommendations to reset the AEF battle rhythm after periods of surge. 11.11.4. COMACC adjudicates scheduling, sourcing, posturing, coding, and capability requirements with the affected component headquarters and MAJCOM commander when they cannot be resolved by the AEFC/CC. 11.11.5. COMACC will source conventional Air Force capabilities assigned to AFSOC, through the AEFC, to meet AEF requirements, except for those capabilities that provide unique capabilities for supported SOF forces and/or are funded by US Special Operations Command (USSOCOM).

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11.11.6. COMACC will source Service capabilities assigned to AETC and AFMC, through the AEFC, to meet AEF requirements. 11.11.7. COMACC, in support of JFCOM‘s role as the primary JFP, will assume duties as the primary conventional USAF force provider to develop recommended global service sourcing solutions for forces and capabilities worldwide. COMACC will develop these recommended sourcing solutions with guidance from HAF, sourcing solutions from the AEFC, and risk assessments from the nominated MAJCOM(s). 11.11.8. (Added-ACC) COMACC delegates day-to-day operations to the ACC/A3 who relies on the ACC/A3O to manage USAF force provisioning. 11.12. AFPC Directorate of AEF and Personnel Operations (AFPC/DPW) (formerly AEF Center). AFPC/DPW is responsible for executing the AEF battle rhythm by centrally managing the scheduling and sourcing of forces to meet combatant commander requirements. 11.12.1. The AEFC executes the AEF battle rhythm as the enabler that delivers versatile and responsive total force air and space power to meet the warfighter‘s global security requirements. The AEFC incorporates AEF related processes in every step of operational planning, preparation, and execution from crisis to sustainment actions with emphasis on identifying functional trigger points that stress or break the AEF operational policy and force sourcing outside the on-call resources. The AEFC/CC establishes the AEF pivot date for each AEF rotation. 11.12.2. The AEFC coordinates with component headquarters planners during deployment/redeployment TPFDD construction. The AEFC assists the component headquarters in identifying capabilities and UTCs required in the AETF. The AEFC assists with maintenance of TPFDDs for all operations supported with AEF scheduled forces. The AEFC maintains the master rotational TPFDD after initial TPFDD build by the component headquarters. 11.12.3. AFPC/DPW coordinates the efforts of the Expeditionary Combat Support (ECS) and Combat Air Forces (CAF) Scheduling Integrated Product Teams (SIPTs) and the MAF Scheduling Process and is responsible for developing a comprehensive AEF rotation schedule that supports GFM. AFPC/DPW identifies scheduling disconnects and discrepancies and initiates the process for resolution. AFPC/DPW develops and publishes the ECS Target Base Alignment Template and the Installation to FOL Alignment Template used to schedule the deployment of all deployable units and personnel per AEF deployment period. 11.12.4. AFPC/DPW coordinates, integrates, and publishes the timelines, plans, and tasks required for the AEF Schedule and each AEF rotation to include monitoring the scheduling of deployment transportation. AFPC/DPW provides continuity throughout critical AEF prepare-to-deploy, deployment, redeployment, and transition phases of the AEF Schedule. AFPC/DPW distributes relevant and timely deployment preparation information to the field and provides a comprehensive database of AEF-focused material through the AEF Online web page. 11.12.5. The AEFC monitors the scheduling of deployment transportation. The AEFC works with the component headquarters and USTRANSCOM to resolve any transportation

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problems. Provides AF/ A3/5 (through COMACC), visibility over deployed forces to assess location, readiness and projected reconstitution requirements. 11.12.6. The AEFC influences the education and training of U.S. Air Force personnel through coordination with Air University, AETC, HQ USAF, and Public Affairs offices. The AEFC recommends policy to the appropriate office of responsibility and ensures the applicable publications reflect the most current information related to the planning, scheduling, sourcing, deployment, and execution process. 11.12.7. AFPC/DPW, in conjunction with AF/A5XW, is responsible for the overall management of the AEF Capability Library data in UTC Availability. This includes acting as the point of contact to resolve all non-policy related problems associated with the AEF Capability Library. 11.12.8. The AEFC manages the data pattern traffic (DPT) levy flow process for AEF sourced requirements as identified in crisis and rotational TPFDDs. AEF Library aligned resources are used to source TPFDD requirements, including ECS UTCs scheduled by the ECS SIPT, maintenance, munitions, and aviation UTCs scheduled by the MAF and CAF SIPTs. 11.12.8.1. AMC, PACAF and USAFE will coordinate with the AEFC when accomplishing DPT levy flow processes to ensure the AEFC maintains visibility of forces in accordance with AFPD 10-4 responsibilities. 11.12.9. The AEFC provides quantitative and qualitative data to the appropriate agencies to guide efforts to configure the forces to meet the AEF operational policy. The AEFC provides a monthly report to the CSAF, through AF/A3/5, detailing UTCs not reported "green" in the AEF UTC Reporting Tool (ART). The AEFC provides Functional Area Managers (FAMs) with recommendations for reconfiguring standard UTCs into right-sized, modular, and scaleable UTCs. The AEFC identifies opportunities to maximize alignment of the available, deployable total force with UTCs and identifies disconnects between resources and requirements to U.S. Air Force leaders in order to affect appropriate force structure changes. The AEFC provides the medium to assess the readiness of postured Air Force forces with ART. 11.12.10. AFPC/CC recommends to Air Force senior leadership courses of action to meet emerging crisis, sustain rotational requirements, redeploy forces, reset or deviate from the current AEF battle rhythm, and to repopulate the AEF after periods of surge. AFPC/DPW also coordinates with MAJCOMs to request mobilization of ARC forces. 11.12.11. The AEFC centrally manages the Air Force Deployment Processing Discrepancy Reporting Program. It articulates related processes, roles, and responsibilities of all involved agencies (i.e., the AEFC, MAJCOMs, Installation Deployment Officers, Military Personnel Flights, Unit Deployment Managers, PERSCO teams, and deployed commanders). The AEFC maintains the Deployment Processing Discrepancy Reporting Tool (DPDRT) and produces metrics to track and report discrepancies for corrective actions. The AEFC is responsible for monitoring the corrective action taken by the supporting commands through the DPDRT program.

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11.12.12. The AEFC oversees and manages the UTC and IA reclama process when taskings must be reassigned between MAJCOMs. The AEFC is the central agency for adjudicating Air Force reclama and forwarding to Headquarters, Air Force as required. 11.12.13. AFPC/DPW performs as the administrative agent for the AEF Steering Group (AEFSG) and the ECS SIPT. 11.12.13.1. Air and Space Expeditionary Force Steering Group (AEFSG). MultiMAJCOM and HAF, cross-functional team of colonels or civilian equivalents appointed by each MAJCOM, the ANG, and the Deputy Chiefs of Staff for Operations, Manpower and Personnel, and Installations and Logistics (includes executive agents for the ECS SIPT, CAF SIPT and MAF Scheduling Process). AFPC/CC and AF/A5X chair the AEFSG. The AEFSG will address AEF issues that require MAJCOM-level or above supervisory review/intervention. The AEFSG provides a link in a logical, sequential chain of peer review organizations to include base-level deployment process working groups, scheduling organizations, COMACC, VCSAF AEF Forum and CORONA. The AEFSG operates with a strategic focus to provide a forum for reviewing and recommending policy, introducing and evaluating new ideas and concepts, and resolving problems inhibiting AEF execution. 11.12.13.2. Expeditionary Combat Support Scheduling Integrated Product Team (ECS SIPT). The AFPC/CC chairs the ECS SIPT. The ECS-SIPT is a multi-MAJCOM, cross-functional team of colonels or civilian equivalents, appointed by their respective MAJCOM commander or vice commander to represent the MAJCOM commander and functional ECS UTC resource managers concerning ECS scheduling and sourcing related issues. AFPC/DPW is designated the executive and administrative agent for the ECS SIPT. The ECS SIPT develops the ECS Target Base Alignment Template, reviews deviation requests and provides recommendations for approval/disapproval to applicable HAF DCS (or AF/A3/5 for deviations across multiple functional areas) for final decision. The MAJCOM ECS SIPT representative will recommend approval/disapproval to the MAJCOM/CV regarding all MAJCOM reclamas for re-sourcing to another MAJCOM and, if delegated, may approve UIC Changes within the MAJCOM. The Chairman represents the interests of FOAs and other agencies capable of providing forces and not represented on the ECS SIPT as non-voting members. The Chief, AEF Operations Plans Division (AFPC/DPWP) is the ECS SIPT Executive Secretary responsible for the day-today business of the ECS SIPT. 11.13. Force Providers (Air Force Major Commands (MAJCOMs), Field Operating Agencies (FOAs), Direct Reporting Units (DRUs), and Air National Guard (ANG)). Note : In a force provider role, HQ USAF is considered a MAJCOM; the AF/CVA, or applicable DCS (if delegated), will fulfill MAJCOM/CV responsibilities. Where MAJCOMs, FOAs, DRUs, or the ANG have established AEF cells to centrally manage deployment processes they may delegate the following responsibilities: When tasked during contingency planning stage, MAJCOMs will develop supporting plans in support of combatant commander operation plans (OPLANs), concept plans (CONPLANs), or functional plans. The supporting plans, mobilization plans, Base Support & Expeditionary (BaS&E) Planning Tools, or deployment/redeployment plans will identify needed capability using the sourcing procedures described in paragraph 8.13 Specific units to fulfill the needed capability will be identified in the comprehensive AEF rotational force schedule. MAJCOMs will synchronize planned activities (e.g., training,

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exercises, inspections, PME, etc.,) with the AEF battle rhythm to ensure forces are ready during their scheduled AEF deployment period. MAJCOM must ensure subordinate units understand their primary objective during their scheduled deployment period is to make the maximum capability available. MAJCOM commanders and FAMs will clearly identify to subordinate agencies and organizations those operational or support activities that may be suspended, delayed, closed, consolidated, or outsourced during their fore- casted deployment windows. MAJCOM FAMs must maintain close coordination with their Air Staff FAM and the AEFC to ensure the application of UTCs to the AEF construct is consistent with the actions of similar FAMs in other commands. They are also responsible for executing and supplementing Air Staff FAM posturing and coding guidance. See Chapter 12 for specific MAJCOM FAM responsibilities 11.13.1. Ensure all assigned units are designated with the appropriate JCS Unit Descriptor Code (UDC). Ensure units with postured UTCs are equipped and trained to meet the mission capability statement (MISCAP) of postured UTCs. Continually monitor, assess, and report personnel, training, equipment, and supply status. Advise, through SIPT membership, AFPC/DPW, HAF, and applicable agencies of critical impacts to on-call operations, the AEF schedule, and OPLAN/TPFDD execution. MAJCOMs will ensure POM requests and UTC Designed Operational Capability (DOC) statements are prepared and submitted to allow eligible forces to maintain the required AEF capabilities. 11.13.2. Develop, register, coordinate, cancel, posture, align, code, assess, and verify UTCs for systematic planning and execution of force packages. Ensure procedures are in place to track taskings, shortfalls, reclamas, verification timeliness, ART assessment, AEF association, and report status through command metrics. 11.13.3. Maintain the UTC Availability data within DCAPES. Update AEF Capability Library data in accordance with HAF FAM guidance prior to the start of each AEF Schedule and as needed for maintenance. Ensure the UTC Availability data are kept current and reflect the full compliment of ECS, aviation, and equipment UTCs. MAJCOM OFAMOs (or AEF Cells) will act as the central focal point in each MAJCOM for updating UTC Availability. MAJCOMs will ensure requests to place UTCs in one of the Enabler categories that do not meet the established criteria are submitted to applicable lead agencies. 11.13.4. Provide timely verification of all TPFDD taskings and, through established mechanisms, ensure tasked units are ready and prepared to deploy. Work with the AEFC and component headquarters to identify availability of pre-positioned materiel to support theater operations. Coordinate with the AEFC and the ANG and AFRC ARC liaison to ensure only the needed ARC capability is mobilized and ARC forces are demobilized in a timely manner to ensure personnel are returned to homestation for leave and downtime prior to demobilization. Maintain accountability of mobilized ARC forces to ensure demobilization is accomplished in accordance with established guidelines. 11.13.5. Provide guidance for personnel and equipment recovery, to include leave policy, prioritization of equipment purchase or replacement, and unit readiness reporting procedures. Assimilate unit reconstitution requirements and coordinate inputs through AF/A3/5, AF/A1, and the AEFC. All functional areas must consider CS&P studies and reengineering efforts to ensure they do not conflict with the ability to meet the warfighter‘s needs.

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11.13.6. Establish procedures to ensure all assigned individuals are correctly associated with an AEF in the Military Personnel Data System (MilPDS) (Not applicable to ARC members) and approval is gained in accordance with section 14.4.1. to deploy individuals outside their associated AEF prior to departure. 11.13.7. Monitor the newsgroup messages and bulletins posted on the Air Staff, combatant commander, and component headquarters servers. Monitor AEF Online on the AEFC web site. 11.13.8. MAJCOMs will appoint a primary and alternate representative to the AEFSG, ECS SIPT, CAF SIPT, and MAF SIPT in accordance with the membership criteria established by each organization. The MAJCOM representation will have the full support of the MAJCOM/CC to act and speak on behalf of the command on related issues. 11.13.9. The MAJCOM/CV will approve reclamas for submission to the AEFC. Note: Reclamas will only occur under the most extenuating circumstances and require MAJCOM/CV approval. Reclamas are minimized when UTC Availability and ART are properly maintained. Units will ensure UTC Availability and ART are accurate and up to date. 11.13.10. MAJCOM/CV will be approval authority for changing individuals‘ AEFIs other than for the reasons outlined in paragraph 14.4.1. 11.13.11. MAJCOMs are responsible for ensuring subordinate wings/units research Deployment Processing Discrepancies Items reported by the deployed commander/PERSCO Team and ensure that the supporting base take immediate corrective action. 11.13.12. When designated as MEFPAK Responsible Agency, develops and maintains detailed data on applicable UTCs for use throughout the Air Force. Detailed responsibilities for the MEFPAK Responsible Agency‘s OPR, Supply, Manpower, LOGDET Manager, and FAM are outlined in Chapter 5. 11.13.13. Review WMP-3 Part 1, at the request of AF/A5XW, to ensure most current data is available, to include UTCs, UICs, PMAI, DOCID, Avl Date, Special Capabilities, and specific Unit taskings. . 11.13.14. Ensure UTC Availability is current and that tasked UTCs (i.e. those in combatant commanders‘ TPFDDs) have corresponding records in the UTC Availability. 11.13.15. Review TPFDD sourcing for contingency planning, provide corrections/changes to AF/ A5XW, and participate in the joint force flow conferences. 11.13.16. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OP (AEF Cell) centrally manages all TPFDD actions in regards to AEF Operations, AEF Execution, AEF Rotations of ACC Forces, and Exercises; may delegate any of the responsibilities listed in AFI 10-401, Para 11.13. 11.14. Combat Air Forces Scheduling Integrated Product Team (CAF SIPT). Multicommand organization comprised of colonels or civilian equivalents representing the CAF. The CAF SIPT is responsible for maintaining the CAF AEF aviation unit alignment and developing the CPO to meet operational commitments and training requirements. The HQ ACC Scheduling and Aerial Events Division (ACC/ DOO)(ACC/A3O) serves as the Executive Secretariat for the CAF SIPT with the division chief acting as the CAF SIPT Executive Secretary. The Executive Secretariat has support branches responsible for maintaining the CAF AEF aviation alignment,

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building and coordinating the CPO, maintaining the CPO database software, improving CPO software, drafting planning and deployment orders for CAF aviation contingency tasking, and developing courses of action for various scheduling-related issues. The CAF SIPT achieves its objectives through electronic means and semi-annual participation from ACC, USAFE, PACAF, AFSOC, AFRC, and the ANG and operates under the constraints of existing memoranda of agreement. Following MAJCOM commander (MAJCOM/CC) and ANG approval, ACC forwards the CPO to United States Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM) for coordination with affected combatant commanders. Following combatant commander approval, USJFCOM forwards the CPO to CJCS for information. The CAF SIPT will ensure the CAF aviation schedule is provided to the AEFC in accordance with the established AEF TPFDD development timeline in Chapter 9 for preparation of the TPFDDs line-level detail in DCAPES. The CAF Aviation schedule will be included in the comprehensive AEF rotational force schedule. 11.15. Air Mobility Command (AMC). AMC fills validated transportation and air-refueling requirements as passed on by United States Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM) to support AEF operations. AMC will identify substitute units from the sourced AEF to replace AEF scheduled and sourced capability tasked by USTRANSCOM to meet emerging Air Mobility Operations requirements as part of, or outside the AEF rotation schedule. 11.15.1. Mobility Air Forces Scheduling Integrated Product Team (MAF SIPT). The MAF SIPT is chaired by AMC/A3 and consists of representatives in the grade of Colonel or civilian equivalent from AMC, USAFE, PACAF, ANG, and AFRC. AMC/A33 prepares and maintains the MAF aviation schedule of units identified to fill combatant commander contingency and exercise requirements. The MAF SIPT will synchronize the MAF aviation schedule with the AEF battle rhythm and the AEF pivot date established by the AEFC/CC. The MAF SIPT will ensure the MAF aviation schedule is provided to the AEFC in accordance with the established AEF TPFDD development timeline in Chapter 9 and updated as required. 11.15.2. AMC Tanker Airlift Control Center (TACC). AMC is the office of primary responsibility for air mobility actions related to support and execution of AEF deployments. Schedules, coordinates, commands and controls air mobility forces in response to USTRANSCOM-validated movement requirements. Conducts air mobility crisis action planning and execution in response to unexpected contingencies. Purchase and publish passenger bookable AEF contingency missions for rotating ECS passengers in accordance with the TPFDD development timeline in Chapter 9. 11.15.2.1. AMC/TACC will adhere to DOD FCG requirements and HN agreements. 11.16. Air Force Material Command (AFMC)(OC-ALC/GBMUUB). AFMC administers management functions for publication of Joint Technical Coordinating Group for Munitions Effectiveness documents, and use publications (primarily the Joint Munitions Effectiveness Manuals) to analyze attack missions, develop weapons requirements and conduct war game exercises. 11.17. Air and Space Expeditionary Force Battlelab (AEFB). The AEFB focuses on the mission of rapidly identifying and proving the worth of innovative and revolutionary operations and logistics concepts. The resulting Battlelab efforts provide the Air Force opportunities to quickly reach investment decisions and to organize, train, equip, and program more effectively. The mission of the AEFB is to advance Air Force core competencies by identifying and rapidly

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delivering innovative AEF operational and logistical concepts to provide theater combatant commander real-time global engagement capabilities. 11.18. Wing and Base-Level Organizations. The primary mission during the scheduled deployment period is to support the needs of the warfighter as mandated by the SecDef. All other activities must be suppressed or suspended during this period. Wing and base-level organizations will synchronize planned activities (e.g., training, exercises, inspections, PME, non-deployment related TDYs, leaves, etc.,) with the AEF battle rhythm to ensure forces are ready during their scheduled AEF deployment period. Deploy whole UTC teams with the expectation that home station will be significantly impacted during AEF deployments. Develop and implement concepts of operation (CONOPs) and supporting plans to allow functional areas to make the maximum capability available during their deployment period (i.e., use IMAs, execute services contracts, defer work orders, use civilian over hires, close, consolidate, or defer activities, etc., to mitigate impact of "giving until it hurts.") 11.18.1. Wing Commander. Provides guidance to groups and squadrons as to operational imperatives and identifies functions that may reduce operations during AEF deployments. Responsible for training within the wing. Certifies wing‘s combat capability through ART. Advises MAJCOMs of activities specified by wing or base-level agencies that might restrict or delay AEF operations from either home or deployed locations. Recommends alternative plans as required. Ensure every reasonable attempt is made to meet taskings with ready and trained forces. Based on recommendations of MAJCOM FAMs, validates P-coding of assigned UTCs. 11.18.1.1. Ensures unit is able to meet all deployment taskings. Forwards reclamas or UIC changes to MAJCOM or AEF Operations, respectively when unit is unable to meet tasking. 11.18.1.2. When designated as a pilot unit by the MEFPAK Responsible Agency OPR, responsible for developing and maintaining standard manpower and logistics detail for each UTC it has been assigned. Detailed pilot unit responsibilities are outlined in Chapter 5. 11.18.2. Squadron Commander. Ensures assigned personnel meet mission training requirements and plan for deployment in accordance with AFI 10-403 and this directive. Responsible for identifying personnel to UTCs and ensuring the status of those UTCs are accurately reflected in ART. Responsible for rotational cycle equity at the unit level. Advises wing commander of resource changes that may impact unit capabilities. Ensure all personnel are given an appropriate AEFI in MilPDS (Note: Reserve components will determine component-specific AEFI policy). Unit commanders will implement and ensure compliance with the following guidance. 11.18.2.1. Commanders will give all unit members a specific AEFI code in MilPDS within 15 days of being assigned to the unit. For units with postured UTCs, the AEFIs must correspond to the AEF block/pair alignment in UTA. 11.18.2.2. Once associated with an AEF, individuals will remain in the same AEF for the duration of their assignment to the unit except as outlined in paragraph 14.4.1. Waiver authority for this requirement is the MAJCOM vice commander (MAJCOM/CV) or equivalent. (Exception: Individuals may be moved from the Enabler force to one of the

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Tempo Band AEF blocks without MAJCOM/CV waiver). Establish procedures to ensure all unit personnel are associated with an AEF in MilPDS. The AEF association for individuals who voluntarily deploy outside their associated AEF is not changed in MilPDS. 11.18.2.3. Commanders will not select individuals outside their associated AEF deployment period to fill UTC taskings without first gaining a MAJCOM/CV waiver. Approved waivers must be maintained on file in the unit. (Not applicable to ARC members) 11.18.2.4. If unable to fill AEF requirements, AEF reclama rule sets apply. See Chapter 10. Note: Reclamas will only occur under the most extenuating circumstances and require MAJCOM/ CV approval. Reclamas are minimized when UTC Availability and ART are properly maintained. Units will ensure UTC Availability and ART are accurate and up to date. 11.18.2.5. Unit commanders must continue to update MilPDS to capture newly gained and departing personnel. AEF temporary duty (TDY) history should be considered when assigning new personnel to an AEF. Commanders should attempt to assign gained personnel to the latest AEF deployment period in the current AEF cycle. Each individual‘s TDY history can be found in the Tempo Management and Tracking System (TMTS) on the AFPC web page. 11.18.2.6. Where a member has recently deployed, the gaining commander will not assign the individual to a position that would require the individual to deploy violating CSAF deploy-to-dwell redlines (EXCEPTION: Does not apply to capability areas aligned in Tempo Band ―E‖). MAJCOM/CV or equivalent must approve deployment of newly allocated individuals (PCA/PCS actions) with less than the 1:2 rotational requirements. Commanders must continually track individual tempo rates and gain appropriate approval to deploy prior to exceeding SECAF established tempo thresholds. 11.18.2.7. Commanders should make every reasonable effort to de-conflict Professional Military Education (PME) and AEF deployment periods. A scheduled AEF deployment is not justification for an operational deferment from officer PME. As Air Force resident PME is restructured to allow multiple start times throughout the year, more flexibility will be available to de-conflict PME with scheduled AEF eligibility windows. 11.18.2.8. The Air Force assignment process will be managed to coincide with the AEF rhythm to the maximum extent possible. Commanders will make every effort to schedule voluntary PCS/ PCA departure dates, terminal leave dates for retirement, and separation dates, to occur during the3-month period immediately following the unit‘s deployment eligibility period. See AFPD 10-4, paragraph 6.2.1 and AFI 36-2110, Chapter 4 (paragraph 4.6 and Table 4.2). 11.18.2.9. Commanders will ensure the timely and accurate reporting of unit and UTC readiness status in SORTS and ART, respectively. 11.18.2.10. For Individual Mobilization Augmentees (IMAs) filling AEF taskings, the Program Manager verifies qualification to mobilization standards (Individual Medical Readiness (IMR), fully qualified in AFRC and current security clearance). IMAs must out-process through the local PRU in accordance with governing directives and

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Chapter 12 THE FUNCTIONAL AREA MANAGER (FAM) Section 12A—Purpose 12.1. Purpose. This chapter outlines the general management, roles, responsibilities, and training (formal, suggested and required) of Air Force Functional Area Managers (FAMs). More detailed FAM responsibilities and actions relative to the specific processes described in this instruction are found in other chapters in this document. Section 12B—Background 12.2. Functional Area Managers. The significance of the FAM has increased ten-fold since the Air Force evolved from a forward-deployed force structure to our current AEF structure. Because of this, FAMs have become even more critical to the Air Force‘s ability to plan and execute its portion of the Nation‘s National Security Strategy. 12.2.1. Commanders, managers, and supervisors at all levels must ensure the right people are selected to be FAMs based upon knowledge and experience. In order for FAMs to be efficient and effective as well as enable them to respond to time-sensitive planning requirements, commanders, managers, and supervisors must ensure that once selected, FAMs are provided the tools, time, and training required to do their job. 12.3. The Role of the FAM. The FAM‘s continual involvement in the planning process is essential to accomplishing the Air Force‘s mission. The FAM is responsible for developing and managing all planning and execution requirements to support all possible contingencies. 12.3.1. FAM definition. The FAM is the individual accountable for the management and oversight of all personnel and equipment within a specific functional area to support operational planning and execution. Responsibilities may include developing and reviewing policy; developing, managing and maintaining UTCs; developing criteria for and monitoring readiness reporting; force posturing, analysis, and execution activities which are crucial to the management and execution of our AF readiness programs. 12.3.2. In some small functional areas, the individual assigned as the FAM may also perform duties as the Career Field Manager (CFM). 12.3.2.1. The CFM is the focal point for a designated career field within a functional community. The CFM serves as the primary advocate for the career field, addressing issues and coordinating functional concerns across various staffs. Additionally, the CFM is responsible for the career field policy and guidance. For more information on the role of the CFM, refer to AFI 36-2201 Volume III, On The Job Training Administration. 12.3.2.2. The FAM and CFM must work closely together to ensure functional area manpower, training, and sustainment support functional area readiness requirements. 12.3.3. FAMs and CFMs are vital components to effectively managing programs within their MAJCOM. However, it is essential MAJCOM programming, command and control, readiness, AEF scheduling, requirements, and planning functions assist the FAM in the accomplishment of their duties.

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12.4. Where are FAMs? Within the planning and execution process, FAMS are found at the Air Staff, MAJCOM/ARC, component headquarters, DRUs, and FOAs. 12.4.1. Air Staff: The Air Staff FAMs represent the highest level of functional management responsibility. These individuals are responsible for all wartime planning policies and procedures that affect the entire functional area. They oversee all aspects of the planning process and must fully understand the responsibilities of both the supported and supporting command functional planners. 12.4.2. Supporting MAJCOM/FOA: Supporting MAJCOM/FOA and ARC FAMs play a vital role in the plan execution process. They are the accountants of the planning process, keeping close track of the availability of forces and equipment and providing UTC availability to MAJCOM/FOA war planners and AEFC functional schedulers, as well as tracking readiness status and training levels. They also coordinate with other FAMs on all wartime and exercise matters that affect their functional area. The FAM, working through their MAJCOM/FOA directorates (or equivalent) and in coordination with subordinate wing and unit commanders, are responsible for determining which unit(s)/individual(s) or type and amount of equipment will be selected to fill TPFDD requirements. 12.4.2.1. (Added-ACC) ACC FAMs are the liaisons in the planning process between Air Staff and the units. They respond to Air Staff taskings or guidance and relay appropriate taskings to field units. They also coordinate with the other MAJCOM FAMs on wartime matters that affect their functional units. However, FAMs must work closely with each unit (UIC) prior to sourcing for the next AEF rotation in order to provide the AFPC/DPW AEF Operations accurate information regarding the availability of ACC personnel postured in their respective Associate-Unit Type Codes (A-UTCs). 12.4.3. Component Headquarters: Supported component headquarters FAMs are an integral part of the contingency and crisis action planning processes. Supported component headquarters FAMs maintain contact with like FAMs at all levels to maintain continuity. 12.4.4. Unit Level. At the unit level, the Installation Deployment Officer (IDO) and the unit deployment managers (UDMs) are responsible for day-to-day management of unit functions. Many of their responsibilities are accomplished with the assistance of other unit agencies such as the logistics, manpower, personnel, or operations plans office. While these individuals perform duties IAW AFI 10-403 that are closely related to FAM duties and responsibilities, they are not technically considered FAMs. Section 12C—Guidance 12.5. FAM Appointment. FAMs play a significant part in the Air Force operation planning process and their continual involvement in the war planning process is essential to accomplishing the Air Force‘s wartime mission. 12.5.1. Managers and supervisors will ensure only the most highly knowledgeable and experienced people in the grade of E-7 and above are selected and assigned to be FAMs. With Office of FAM Oversight (OFAMO) prior concurrence, managers and supervisors may assign individuals in the grade of E-6. 12.5.1.1. (Added-ACC) Manning Contingency Action Team (CAT).

Requirements.

Reference

ACCI

10-255,

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12.5.2. When unit manning allows, commanders, managers and supervisors will consider appointing a civilian to serve as either the primary or alternate FAM to preserve functional area continuity. 12.5.2.1. Contractors will not be appointed primary FAM; however, they may serve in the capacity of an alternate FAM. 12.5.3. Due to the critical nature of the FAM‘s duties and the lengthy spin-up time required to become proficient, FAM appointment must be for a period of no less than 18 months. 12.5.3.1. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3 has the responsibility to provide a FAM (and alternate) for every Mission Design Series as well as AOC and Air Force Forces UTCs. ACC/A3O is responsible to assign the A-UTC rated FAM duties to an A3O rated officer (or formerly rated civilian). Replacement FAMs should be appointed prior to the departure of the current FAM with enough overlap to allow for training and continuity. It is the current FAMs duty to ensure a replacement has been selected and in place before departure. ACC/A3OR will maintain a current listing of all ACC FAMs. 12.5.4. The FAM‘s integral role in Air Force operations requires that FAM duties and responsibilities take precedence over all other assigned duties. 12.5.5. Immediately upon assignment as a FAM or to the OFAMO, individuals must become a member of the FAM CoP at http://afkm.wpafb.af.mil/community/views/home.aspx?Filter=AF-LG-00-05. The FAM CoP hosts the FAM roster, access to FAM training links as well as tools and systems applicable to the duties of a FAM. The CoP provides a forum for FAM communication, updates, meeting notifications, policy and guidance changes, as well as access to the FAM database and FAM web-based training (WBT). 12.5.5. (ACC) Security Clearance. Reference ACCI 10-255, Contingency Action Team (CAT). 12.5.5.1. (Added-ACC) Operational Capability. ACC FAMs must be capable of operating under all types of battle staff configurations from response cell up to fully manned battle staff. 12.6. FAM Management. To facilitate the appointment, identification, and training of FAMs, Air Staff directorates, MAJCOM/CV (or equivalent), components, FOAs, DRUs, and all other agencies with FAMs will designate an OFAMO, in writing, to the AF/A3/5. These offices will ensure appointed FAMs are capable of efficiently and effectively conducting their responsibilities. 12.6.1. AF/A5XW is designated the Air Force Office of FAM Oversight and AF/A1PR is designated as the OFAMO-Personnel (OFAMO-P). In these roles they will intercede when needed to address problems between HAF FAMs and MAJCOM, component, FOA, DRUs, and all other agencies‘ OPR. 12.6.2. Below the Air Staff, the OFAMO, along with office responsible for UTC management, i.e. MEFPAK Responsible Agency OPR, should be in the same directorate. Whenever there is MAJCOM staff disagreement on FAM responsibilities, the OFAMO will be the final arbitrator and decision authority (per MAJCOM/CV authority) as to which

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Directorate or Agency in the MAJCOM will be the Office of Primary Responsibility (OPR) for any UTC or UTC series. 12.6.2.1. The OFAMO will assist in scheduling FAM training requirements, determining additional training requirements, and tracking appointment status of all FAMs in the command or agency. 12.6.2.2. Air Staff and MAJCOM/ARC directorates, component directorates, FOAs, DRUs, and all other agencies with FAMs, will designate in writing to their respective OFAMO, a primary and alternate FAM for each functional area. The appointment letter, signed by the commander or equivalent, must include name, rank, office symbol, phone number, email and functional area of responsibility. See Table 5.1 for functional areas. 12.6.2.3. In some functional areas, it may be necessary to appoint more than one FAM to effectively manage a large or complex functional area. For example, in the JFXXX UTC series (Fuels and Supply) appointment of one FAM to manage Fuels and one FAM to manage Supply may be necessary. 12.6.2.4. The OFAMO, working with their MAJCOM or equivalent OPRs, will ensure all FAMs have convenient access to systems and tools required to perform their duties. 12.6.2.4.1. This includes, but is not limited to GCCS and SIPRNET access, which will be loaded on each FAM‘s desktop computer where feasible. GCCS access is required to access DCAPES. 12.6.2.5. At a minimum, the OFAMO will hold quarterly FAM meetings to discuss FAM issues disseminate policy and guidance and/or conduct MAJCOM specific training. Issues that cannot be resolved at the MAJCOM level will be forwarded to AF/A5XW for review and action as necessary. The OFAMO will act as the facilitator for crossfunctional UTC matters (e.g., 9AAX HQ UTCs). 12.6.2.6. The OFAMO will maintain a current roster of FAMs for their organization. The current roster will be based upon Directorate FAM Appointment Letters that will be maintained by the OFAMO. The FAM Directorate appointment letter will mandate FAMs to attend meetings and conferences scheduled by the OFAMO. 12.6.2.6.1. The OFAMO will maintain a database of current FAMs to determine formal and informal training. For new FAMs, the OFAMO will provide an inprocessing checklist. Specifics in the checklist will be determined by the OFAMO. 12.6.3. The OFAMO initiates action with the respective Manpower function to ensure the UMD positions of assigned FAMs are coded to reflect the R-prefix. 12.6.4. The OFAMO serves as the critical interface between FAMs and the other staff readiness support offices. Readiness support offices are defined as those traditional "X" functions (operations, logistics, manpower, and personnel) and readiness program OPRs such as readiness reporting (SORTS/ART), MEFPAK, or Reserve management. The OFAMO: 12.6.4.1. Intercedes to address problems between FAMs and program OPRs. 12.6.4.2. Develops command supplemental policies to ensure the smooth application of this instruction with command-unique requirements.

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12.6.4.3. Establishes and directs protocols for ensuring readiness support offices and FAMs achieve their responsibilities as efficiently as possible. 12.6.5. The OFAMO, upon receipt of the AF/A3/5 Cycle Posturing Guidance message, will coordinate with MAJCOM FAMs to ensure force posturing activities are accomplished in accordance with established timelines. OFAMOs may provide MAJCOM-specific supplemental guidance for MAJCOM FAMs to follow. 12.6.5.1. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OR is the OPR for Office of FAM Oversight process. 12.7. General FAM Responsibilities. FAMs at each level are concerned with the same broad planning areas; however, the specific activities accomplished at each level are unique. FAM duties and responsibilities are listed below. Note: Organizations may assign limited FAM responsibilities to other organizations (e.g., operations planning office). When this occurs, the FAMs must remain fully engaged in all functional area matters and the assigned organization must comply with this FAM guidance. For organizations above base level, each division or division equivalent may decide to establish an AEF Cell to coordinate the below requirements listed more effectively. Attend required training to perform daily responsibilities and duties within 3 months of FAM appointment or as directed by the OFAMO. 12.7.1. Functional Area Guidance. FAMs issue guidance, consistent with Air Force policy, with the primary purpose of maximizing their functional area‘s operational readiness and responsiveness to mission requirements. FAM guidance is authoritative and helps provide consistent mission-ready capabilities to the supported commander. Functional area guidance enhances the commander‘s ability to make informed decisions on the proper employment of a particular capability and should not limit the commander‘s discretion or control over members under his or her command. Functional area guidance at all levels should preserve commander prerogatives and endeavor to provide clear direction on the optimal use and employment of a functional area‘s capabilities. When drafting functional guidance, FAMs should consider the needs of the supported commander, the ability of a functional area to implement the guidance, the effect the guidance will have on the supporting command, and the degree to which the guidance will enhance the readiness and availability of personnel and equipment. In the event that functional guidance conflicts with a commander‘s intent or ability to support mission requirements, differences should be resolved through the issuing FAM. 12.7.2. Interpret, develop, and apply joint, Air Force, MAJCOM, or Air Force Component operational/exercise planning and execution policies. 12.7.2.1. FAMs at all levels should have an understanding of Air Force doctrine and policies regarding Air Force force presentation and the planning policies, processes and systems used to support the joint planning process. 12.7.2.2. FAMs at all levels will use DCAPES for all facets of Air Force war planning and execution. 12.7.3. OPLAN/OPORD development. 12.7.3.1. FAMs at all levels will stay fully engaged and involved with end to end TPFDD management processes to establish proper integration and harmonization at all

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 functional levels, to include actual responsibilities to perform tasks and ensure proper actions. 12.7.3.2. FAMs at all levels will ensure they routinely check applicable newsgroups to stay engaged in actions relative to their functional community.

12.7.4. Unit Type Code (UTC) development, management, and maintenance activities. 12.7.4.1. FAMs at all levels will be familiar with and understand their roles and responsibilities in the UTC development, management, and maintenance process. This process is outlined in Chapter 5. 12.7.4.2. FAMs at all levels will ensure they routinely check MEFPAK newsgroups to stay engaged in actions relative to their functional community. 12.7.5. Force posturing activities. 12.7.5.1. FAMs at all levels will be familiar with and understand guidance and procedures for the posturing of Air Force capabilities in UTCs. This process is outlined in Chapter 7. 12.7.6. Develop criteria for readiness reporting and monitoring. 12.7.6.1. FAMs at all levels will be familiar with and understand guidance and procedures for force readiness reporting and monitoring. This includes Status Of Resources and Training System (SORTS) criteria and reporting in accordance with AFI 10-201 and AEF Reporting Tool (ART) criteria and reporting, in accordance with AFI 10-244. 12.7.6.1.1. (Added-ACC) At a minimum, FAMs are required to review their UTC ratings in the ART database. FAMs will ensure all UTCs are reviewed and updated in ART by the unit commander according to the instructions and timelines established in AFI 10-244. Any assessments affecting the deployment status of the UTC must include get-well dates. 12.7.6.1.2. (Added-ACC) Prior to coordinating with AFPC/DPW Functional Scheduler on a tasking assigned, ACC FAMs will check and verify status of the UTC(s) in ART. See Para 12.9.8.4 of this supplement. 12.7.6.1.3. (Added-ACC) Problems identified in the ART database must be immediately reported to the ACC ART Manager (A3OR). 12.7.6.1.4. (Added-ACC) The overall base-wide allocation must be reviewed to ensure the proper total number of UTCs are assigned to the base and allocated to the appropriate AEF in the Base Alignment Template. Note: Exception Aviation Maintenance/Munitions may be aligned with Iron flow. 12.7.6.1.5. (Added-ACC) ACC/A3OR is available to provide guidance and answer any questions that may arise. ACC/ A3OR can be reached at DSN 574-5515, or commercial (757) 764-5515. 12.7.7. Perform execution activities. 12.7.7.1. FAMs at all levels must ensure the TPFDD accurately reflects and is consistent with resources that actual units will deploy.

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12.7.7.2. FAMs at all levels, when acting as force providers, will use DCAPES and the Air Force Verification Capability (AFVC) tool to support sourcing and verification process for their responsible forces. 12.7.7.3. FAMs at all levels, when acting as force providers, will ensure timelines established to support the sourcing, verification, and validation processes are met. 12.7.7.4. FAMs at all levels will ensure they routinely check applicable newsgroups to stay engaged in execution actions relative to their functional community, specifically, the sourcing, verification, and validation of functional requirements. 12.7.7.5. FAMs at all levels will often be the initial responders when the Crisis Action Team(CAT) is activated. 12.7.8. Perform analysis activities. 12.7.8.1. FAMs at all levels must be capable of reviewing detailed planning data; analyzing the information for trends; and directing appropriate corrective actions if necessary. 12.8. Air Staff FAM Responsibilities. The Air Staff FAM works on behalf of their Air Staff Deputy Chief of Staff and directorate. The wartime readiness of a functional area begins at the Air Staff FAM level. Air Staff FAM responsibilities are below. 12.8.1. Interpret, develop, and apply joint, Air Force, MAJCOM, or Air Force Component operational/exercise planning and execution policies. 12.8.1.1. Review, understand, and comply with joint and Service planning guidance. Provide recommended changes to planning documents and guidance to the responsible Air Staff agency. 12.8.1.2. Review JOPES documents to ensure Air Force functional planning concerns are properly addressed. 12.8.1.3. Review the JSCP basic volume and supporting functional supplements to identify changes in strategy, planning concepts, and joint planning guidance that might affect their specific functional areas. 12.8.1.4. Develop Air Force policy, guidance, and oversight in accordance with established joint and Service doctrine, to include the JSCP, SPG, and WMP Volumes. 12.8.1.5. Ensure Air Force functional area instructions and directives contain adequate guidance to direct the wartime functions for the given functional area. 12.8.2. OPLAN/OPORD development. 12.8.2.1. Work with component headquarters FAMs to understand what is needed to meet combatant commander requirements in each theater. 12.8.2.2. Ensure supported command FAMS properly apply functional planning guidance contained in WMP-1 and other functional guidance documents in developing OPLAN TPFDD functional requirements in preparation for sourcing.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 12.8.2.3. Review OPLAN TPFDDs for proper force mix during the force requirements determination stages to ensure functional UTCs are being properly used, tasking is consistent with UTC MISCAPs, and no unit is over tasked. 12.8.2.4. Review all OPLAN TPFDDs for functional requirements. Ensure postured functional UTCs can meet requirements identified in the OPLAN. Where deficiencies exist, work with supported command FAMs to determine if UTC requirements can be met with another existing UTC, or if additional functional capability is required. 12.8.2.5. Review all OPLAN TPFDDs after sourcing to ensure MAJCOM UTC requirements do not exceed the number made available by each MAJCOM. 12.8.2.6. Ensure wartime missions are identified for their functional area.

12.8.3. Perform Unit Type Code (UTC) development, management, and maintenance activities. 12.8.3.1. Air Staff FAMs will complete MEFPAK responsibilities listed in Chapter 5. 12.8.3.2. Ensure proper coordination with other FAMs on development of crossfunctional UTCs prior to submitting UTC request to AF/A5XW. 12.8.3.3. To ensure accurate and complete standard deployment data, FAMs will review, validate, and correct as necessary, standard UTC data within planning databases at least biennially. 12.8.4. Perform force posturing activities. 12.8.4.1. Air Staff FAMs provide ultimate oversight for the availability of capability within their functional area to meet AEF commitments. 12.8.4.1.1. The MAJCOM/FOA/ANG FAM‘s UTC availability, and its documentation within WMP-3, Part 2 is a valid wartime tasking for worldwide contingency operations, regardless of whether a tasked unit‘s UTCs are sourced in an OPLAN during the contingency planning cycle. 12.8.4.2. Air Staff FAMs will identify functional contributions to support the range of military operations. 12.8.4.3. Air Staff FAMs will update FAM priority and sequencing guidance in accordance with the instructions set forth in the AF/A3/5 AEF Schedule Planning, Preparation, and Posturing Guidance Memorandum to allow time for posturing by MAJCOM FAMs. OFAMO/OFAMO-P will provide a template for each AEF Schedule. As a minimum, FAMs must address the areas listed in the FAM posturing guidance template; FAMs may add more areas as required. This guidance will be approved by the Air Staff functional 3-digit or equivalent. 12.8.4.3.1. Prioritization and sequencing refers to the guidance provided to MAJCOM FAMs to maximize the number of UTCs postured based on units‘ authorizations. Air Staff FAMs will provide guidance on what UTCs MAJCOMs will posture and how many of each type will be postured. This includes firm numbers of specific UTCs when that is appropriate, but it will also include what additional UTCs will be postured as additional capability is identified. This guidance will ensure posturing meets AETF force module requirements.

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12.8.4.3.2. Guidance will include recommendations on home station impacts mitigation strategies to implement during AEF deployment periods. Air Staff FAMs will provide commanders at the MAJCOM and below level, suggestions on what is the minimum capability required at home station to sustain AEF rotational operations and what is the minimum capability required to directly support conflict/war operations from the home station during wartime surge operations. While the final determination is a commander responsibility, the Air Staff FAM input is critical to the commander's understanding of the functional area. 12.8.4.3.2.1. Guidance should provide suggestions for contract support, expectations of acceptable levels of home station requirements, what standards of home station performance can be adjusted, i.e., extended work days, inspection relief, lowered readiness or customer service standards, etc. 12.8.4.4. Air Staff FAMs will ensure functional-specific posturing guidance meets the AETF FM objective. See Chapter 6 for specific posturing goals for the AETF FMs. 12.8.4.5. Air Staff FAMS will formally notify affected MAJCOMs when availability changes due to reorganizations, equipment changes, or other reasons. Ensure that new taskings are clearly identified to each MAJCOM. 12.8.4.6. Air Staff FAMS will work with their CFMs to ensure functional area manpower, training, and sustainment support functional area readiness requirements. 12.8.4.6.1. This includes determining deployment criteria for 3-skill level personnel. 12.8.5. Readiness reporting and monitoring 12.8.5.1. Will provide AFCAT (AFOG) and AEFC an overall assessment on whether a need for reconstitution exists. 12.8.5.2. In coordination with AF/A3OR and the AEFC, establish ART reporting criteria. 12.8.6. Perform execution activities. 12.8.6.1. Air Staff FAMs, acting as force providers, will ensure the TPFDD accurately reflects and is consistent with resources that actual units will deploy. 12.8.6.2. Air Staff FAMs acting as force providers will verify AEFC sourcing. 12.8.6.3. Air Staff FAMs acting as force providers will use DCAPES and AFVC to support sourcing and verification process for their responsible forces. 12.8.6.4. Air Staff FAMs, acting as force providers, will ensure timelines established to support the sourcing, verification and validation process are met. 12.8.6.5. Air Staff FAMs will coordinate Service reclama actions for their functional area. 12.8.6.6. Participate as member of the Air Force CAT during crisis operations. As functional expert and central point of contact for the functional area, the Air Staff FAM will maintain continual liaison with MAJCOM FAMs to ensure functional area TPFDD requirements are sourced and validated within established timelines.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 12.8.6.7. When emerging requirements are received, Air Staff FAMs will determine if the tasking can be met from within the current AEF block. If new requirements cannot be sourced with rotationally available forces in the current AEF block, the HAF FAM will coordinate with AFPC/DPW and applicable MAJCOMs to make a recommendation to enter surge (see paragraph 3.7.5.2 and Table 2.1).

12.8.7. Perform analysis activities. 12.8.7.1. Air Staff FAMs will need to conduct many different forms of analysis to determine the wartime readiness of their functional area. Different analyses include but are not limited to the following. 12.8.7.1.1. Air Staff FAMs, in coordination with MAJCOMs and AFPC/DPW, will analyze UTC posturing and ensure the capabilities represented by their UTCs are correctly balanced across the applicable AEF blocks/pairs. 12.8.7.1.2. When capability cannot be balanced, the Air Staff FAM will coordinate requests for waivers as described in Chapter 10. 12.8.7.1.3. As required, Air Staff FAMs will participate in activities to address wartime size and composition of support forces and thus that function‘s ability to complete its mission requirements. 12.8.7.1.4. When evolving requirements exceed the functional capabilities within the Air Force, Air Staff FAMs will ensure appropriate programming actions are initiated to correct the situation. If programming actions are not taken, then changes in the functional area‘s concept of operations may be required to compensate for functional shortfalls. 12.8.7.1.5. Analyze final sourced OPLAN TPFDDs of all plans sourced during the planning cycle to determine functional UTC shortfalls and overages. Where significant shortfalls exist, initiate actions to correct the situation in future planning cycles. Actions may include programming for additional functional assets, adding additional training for existing personnel, directing MAJCOMs to reconfigure units to different UTCs to balance the functional capabilities, or simply tasking MAJCOMs for additional UTCs from existing assets. Where overages exist, consider military to civilian conversion or outsourcing and privatization (CS&P), but only after thorough analysis and staffing. 12.9. MAJCOM (to include AFRC and ANG) FAM Responsibilities. Supporting MAJCOM FAMs play a vital role in the plan execution process. MAJCOM FAMs are accountants of the planning process and track availability of forces and equipment, provide UTC availability, track readiness and training, respond to Air Staff guidance / taskings and verify taskings of functional field units. Note: Organizations may assign limited FAM responsibilities to other organizations (e.g., operations planning office). When this occurs, the FAMs must remain fully engaged in all functional area matters and the assigned organization must comply with this FAM guidance. 12.9.1. Interpret, develop, and apply joint, Air Force, MAJCOM, or Air Force Component operational/exercise planning and execution policies.

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12.9.1.1. Review, understand, and comply with joint and Service planning guidance. Provide recommended changes to planning documents and guidance to their Air Staff functional manager or responsible Air Staff agency. 12.9.1.2. Supplement Air Staff guidance and address specific unique aspects within their commands. Review and update or add, as necessary, MAJCOM unique information. 12.9.1.2.1. (Added-ACC) ACC FAMs are responsible for issuing command planning guidance to members of their functional areas concerning doctrine, employment, deployment and unit configurations. All deployable personnel and their associated equipment fall under the oversight of the ACC FAM. The FAM operates as an integral part of the ACC deployment process. During contingency operations and exercises, the ACC FAMs will work with ACC/A3OP (AEF Cell) as the JOPES Support Element to coordinate all UTC taskings and all phases of the deployment process involving the use of functional resources. 12.9.1.3. (Added-ACC) FAMs will establish and maintain a continuity binder and or electronic file for their functional area. The following documents should be included in the continuity binder: 12.9.1.3.1. (Added-ACC) Copy of ACC FAM listing. 12.9.1.3.2. (Added-ACC) General correspondence to include current guidance for FAMs, messages from Air Staff, etc. 12.9.1.3.3. (Added-ACC) AFI Expeditionary Forces.

10-244,

Reporting

Status

of

Aerospace

12.9.1.3.4. (Added-ACC) ACC Supplement to AFI 10-244. 12.9.1.3.5. (Added-ACC) AFI 10-401, Air Force Operations Planning and Execution. 12.9.1.3.6. (Added-ACC) ACC Supplement 1 to AFI 10-401. 12.9.1.3.7. (Added-ACC) AFI 10-201, Status of Resource and Training Systems. 12.9.1.3.8. (Added-ACC) ACC Supplement 1 to AFI 10-201. 12.9.1.3.9. (Added-ACC) ACCI 10-255, Contingency Action Team Operations 12.9.1.3.10. (Added-ACC) ECS Base Alignment Template. 12.9.1.3.11. (Added-ACC) FOL Alignment Template 12.9.1.3.12. (Added-ACC) FAM Handbook. Note: See Functional Area Manager (FAM) Tool Kit at http://www.a3a5.hq.af.smil.mil/a5x/a5xw/index.htm; click on Force Gen tab; under the FAM heading select Training. 12.9.1.3.13. (Added-ACC) Points of Contact. 12.9.1.3.14. (Added-ACC) UTC Manpower Force Element Detail Full. 12.9.2. OPLAN/OPORD development. 12.9.2.1. Verify the war planner‘s sourcing of OPLAN TPFDD during supporting command reviews for contingency and crisis action planning.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 12.9.2.2. Notify the supported component headquarters FAM and MAJCOM/FOA war plans OPR when units that are sourced to that command‘s OPLAN TPFDD can no longer fill the tasking. Note: The MAJCOM/FOA war plans OPR will notify AF/A5XW.

12.9.3. Perform Unit Type Code (UTC) development, management, and maintenance activities. 12.9.3.1. MAJCOM FAMs will complete MEFPAK responsibilities listed in Chapter 5. 12.9.3.2. Ensure proper coordination with Air Staff FAM other MAJCOM FAMs on development of cross-functional UTCs prior to submitting UTC request to AF/A5XW. 12.9.3.3. To ensure accurate and complete standard deployment data, FAMs will review, validate, and correct as necessary, standard UTC data at least biennially (See Chapter 5). 12.9.4. Perform force posturing activities. 12.9.4.1. For organizations designated as combat/combat support/combat service support, posture all available manpower authorizations in accordance with Chapter 7. Conduct a comparison of the UTC availability and the unit manpower document authorized strength on at least an annual basis. 12.9.4.2. Ensure units are manned, trained, and equipped to maintain the postured capability. Coordinate all changes to UTC posturing and coding with units. 12.9.4.3. Be aware of wartime requirement changes (mobility and/or in-place) and changes driven by announced force structure changes; UTC/UMD mismatches, unit reorganizations, and functional reorganizations. Notify Air Staff FAMs of changes to availability due to reorganizations, conversions, deactivations, etc., and notify MAJCOM/FOA war planners who, in turn, will notify AF/A5XW. 12.9.4.4. Verify UMD support for changes to manpower requirements/authorizations. If there is a UTC/UMD mismatch, work with command manpower representatives to further investigate possible causes/deficiencies or alternatives for correction. 12.9.4.4.1. (Added-ACC) Notify the AFPC/DPW Functional Scheduler and ACC/A3OR when significant changes in ACC‘s UTC availability occur due to reorganizations, deactivations, or other force structure changes. The FAM will ensure that all non D-UTC billets are postured in A-UTCs and coded in accordance with Air Staff Guidance. Any changes in Designed Operational Capability Statement must be coordinated with the appropriate FAM to determine the status of the positions changing. 12.9.4.5. Coordinate with units when manpower conflicts/shortfalls occur. If unable to resolve discrepancies, contact MAJCOM manpower representative to request additional information and assistance. Attempt to determine projected get-well date for UMD support when shortfalls occur, and notify all affected units. 12.9.4.6. Identify and provide military workload mitigation plans to maximize deployable capability within the functional area. 12.9.5. Readiness reporting and monitoring

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12.9.5.1. MAJCOM FAMs will monitor the readiness status of all functional units on a continual basis. This includes Status Of Resources and Training System (SORTS) reporting and ART report-ing. 12.9.5.1.1. (Added-ACC) Document the UTC Availability (UTA) Listing, and submit all changes to ACC/A3OP for updating in the UTA Listing database. 12.9.5.2. Initiate, coordinate, and review SORTS designed operational capability (DOC) statements and ensure units report status in SORTS in accordance with AFI 10-201. Assist in resolving reporting issues and problems and respond to questions regarding content of unit reports. 12.9.5.2.1. Ensure DOC statements are accurate and identify specific standards against which the units must be measured. Validate mission identification section. To validate refer to mission directives, UTC MISCAP statements and any additional major command or combatant commander‘s requirements. Validate DOC response time. 12.9.5.2.1.1. Submit a revised DOC statement immediately when a unit tasking is changed to either add or delete UTC(s) required to support the DOC. Any changes to DOC content, such as unit data, UTC information require a new/revised DOC Statement. 12.9.5.2.2. Coordinate reporting guidance with command reporting organization. 12.9.5.3. Analyze SORTS data for information on trends and deficiencies such as shortfalls in manpower, equipment, and training. For example, does the unit manpower document (UMD) fully support the UTCs reflected on the DOC statement, does the unit have all necessary equipment, and are the personnel adequately trained? FAMs will develop solutions to identified deficiencies and direct appropriate actions. Elevate limiting factors that require action or support from Air Staff FAMs as necessary 12.9.5.4. Monitor and review UTC readiness in ART database. Ensure all UTCs are reviewed and updated in ART by the unit commander according to the instructions and timelines established in AFI 10-244. Any assessments affecting the deployment status of the UTC must include reasonable get-well dates. 12.9.5.4.1. Establish ART reporting procedures based on Air Staff FAM criteria and ensure units are properly trained in data reporting procedures. 12.9.5.4.2. Ensure timeliness, accuracy, and validity of subordinate units‘ data, to include sampling, reviewing, and assessing adequacy of the remarks and challenging inadequate remarks. 12.9.5.4.3. Assist in correcting deficiencies and discrepancies and elevate limiting factors that require action or support from Air Staff FAMs, as necessary. 12.9.5.4.4. Manage/report the status of UTCs postured and tracked from the FAMs own immediate staff/organization. 12.9.6. Perform execution activities. 12.9.6.1. At the initial indication of a crisis, review UTC Availability and compare Availability against current ART and unit SORTS report.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 12.9.6.2. Review the execution TPFDD and ensure it accurately reflects and is consistent with resources that actual units will deploy. 12.9.6.3. Maintain dialogue with the AEFC functional schedulers to ensure taskings are correct and sourced to the appropriate units, based on postured UTCs, availability coding, and ART assessments. 12.9.6.4. Determine functional area requirements for mobilization. 12.9.6.5. Use DCAPES and AFVC to support sourcing and verification process for their responsible forces. Ensure timelines established to support the sourcing, verification, and validation processes are met. 12.9.6.6. Ensure installation deployment officers (IDOs) are informed of wing AEFC sourcing. 12.9.6.7. Resolve tasking problems that are identified by units during TPFDD execution, i.e., a unit's inability to fill a tasking. Actions may include changing the tasked unit or substituting a UTC in the same AEF eligibility period that can meet the mission capability and transportation requirements. 12.9.6.8. Notify the AEFC when the MAJCOM is unable to source requirements from available UTCs. Coordinate MAJCOM reclama actions. 12.9.6.9. When UTCs tasked are to be sourced from units with C-levels other than C-1, determine what resource actions would be required to fill the UTC tasking. 12.9.6.10. MAJCOM FAMs will advise the Air Staff FAM and MAJCOM/FOA war plans OPR when significant changes in availability occur.

12.9.7. Perform analysis activities 12.9.7.1. MAJCOM FAMs will need to conduct many different forms of analysis to determine the wartime readiness of their functional area. Different analyses include, but are not limited to the following. 12.9.7.1.1. In coordination with Air Staff FAMs, analyze the ECS target base alignment and ensure units and the capabilities represented by their UTCs are correctly aligned. 12.9.7.1.2. As required, participate in activities to address wartime size and composition of support forces and thus that function‘s ability to complete its mission requirements. 12.9.7.1.3. When evolving requirements exceed the functional capabilities of the command, work with Air Staff FAMs to ensure appropriate programming actions are initiated to correct the situation. If programming actions are not taken, then changes in the functional area‘s concept of operations may be required to compensate for functional shortfalls. 12.9.7.1.4. Analyze final sourced OPLAN TPFDDs of all plans sourced during the planning cycle to identify MAJCOM taskings and UTC shortfalls and overages. Where significant shortfalls exist, initiate actions with Air Staff FAM to correct the situation in future planning cycles. Where overages exist, consider military to civilian

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conversion or outsourcing and privatization (CS&P), but only after thorough analysis and staffing. 12.9.8. (Added-ACC) AEF Planning. 12.9.8.1. (Added-ACC) FAMs will be the focal point for all AEF rotational, joint, personnel and/or equipment sourcing requirements. The FAM is the MAJCOM approval authority for verifying sourcing of equipment and personnel to support all requirements. 12.9.8.2. (Added-ACC) During adaptive or crisis planning, once the FAMs receive a sourced requirement; they will first review the UTC status in ART for the sourced UIC. If that unit is unable to fulfill the requirement based on a RED assessment, the FAM will contact the unit to ensure the assessment is correctly reflected in ART. If they are indeed unable to fill the requirement, the FAM will check the status on other UTCs in the command from bases in the same window of vulnerability on the AEF alignment template. If another base has that UTC in an available status, the FAM will submit UIC changes through Reclama Process Tool (RPT). AFPC/DPW Functional Scheduler will then change the UIC based on the MAJCOM FAMs recommendation. If the FAM determines that no other unit assigned to the required AEF is capable of providing the required UTC, the FAM will Reclama the requirement back to the AFPC/DPW. 12.9.8.3. (Added-ACC) When a Geographically Separated Unit (GSU) is tasked to provide personnel, equipment, or both to support rotational operations, the FAM will notify the GSU of the requirement and then contact the host wing Installation Deployment Officer (IDO) where the GSU tasking is located. The IDO is the single individual responsible for identification, coordination and execution of all deployment taskings and requirements for the base where the GSU is located. 12.9.8.4. (Added-ACC) Notify AFPC/DPW functional schedulers during contingency execution when ACC is unable to source requirements from available UTCs. 12.9.8.5. (Added-ACC) Each FAM will validate the accuracy of the information for each sourced UTC in the OPLAN TPFDD. The validated UTC requirements will be reflected in the Deployment Requirements Manning Document (DRMD) for the affected OPLAN. The TPFDD data simultaneously populates the DRMD. 12.10. Component Headquarters FAM Responsibilities. 12.10.1. Interpret, develop, and apply joint, Air Force, or Air Force Component operational/exercise planning and execution policies. 12.10.1.1. Review, understand, and comply with joint and Service planning guidance. Provide recommended changes to planning documents and guidance to the responsible Air Staff agency. 12.10.2. OPLAN/OPORD development. 12.10.2.1. Supported component headquarters FAMs‘ major responsibility lies in OPLAN and functional Annex development. When reviewing OPLANs/CONPLANs/OPORDs, component headquarters FAMs must advise or recommend to the war planners specific needs to establish requirements (verbiage) in the plan to properly execute the combatant commander‘s intent using Air Force capabilities. Many component headquarters FAMs have the additional responsibility for developing

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 their functional area‘s Annex supporting OPLANs/CONPLANs/OPORDs; if that is the case, the FAM is ―acting‖ as a component planner. The supported component headquarters FAM will develop force support requirements in response to combatant commander requests for capability in accordance with Chapter 8 of this instruction. 12.10.2.2. Develop the initial ECS force list based on the AETF force modules in accordance with Chapter 6 and Chapter 8. Component headquarters FAMs, in coordination with the component headquarters planners, will determine additional functional area requirements at each wartime beddown location in the component‘s portion of the TPFDD. With AEF Cycle 6 implementation, all FOL rotational UMD requirements will be identified using the AETF force modules as the template. 12.10.2.3. Coordinate with MAJCOM (in force provider role) planners to ensure the accuracy of force requirements and modify as necessary. This includes ensuring TPFDD requirements can actually be met by postured capability. 12.10.2.4. Coordinate with the force provider and Air Staff counterparts to ensure maximum use of standard UTCs postured in the UTC availability and registered in MEFPAK. 12.10.2.5. Ensure, in coordination with planners, that accurate and valid UTCs are used when maintaining an OPLAN TPFDD and will ensure supported OPLAN TPFDDs are maintained according to guidance in Chapter 8.

12.10.3. Perform Unit Type Code (UTC) development, management, and maintenance activities. 12.10.3.1. When a supported commander or unified command submits a request for a capability not defined as a UTC to their Service component, the component headquarters should evaluate the need to establish a standard UTC and coordinate action with the appropriate MAJCOM FAM. 12.10.4. Perform execution activities. 12.10.4.1. Determine all rotational and surge operation TPFDD requirements in accordance with Chapter 8 12.10.4.2. As necessary, man forward headquarters staffs during crisis operations. 12.10.4.3. As necessary, support forward operating location (FOL) requirements for manning assistance, rotations, and equipment. 12.10.4.4. Determine the appropriate organization to assign TPFDD requirements against to ensure accurate personnel accountability and proper organizational structure. If an approved organization (provisional or permanent) has not been established for each employment location, request one from the appropriate supported Air Component agency. 12.10.5. Perform analysis activities. 12.10.5.1. Component headquarters FAMs will need to conduct many different forms of analysis to determine the wartime requirements of their functional area. Different analyses include but are not limited to the following.

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12.10.5.1.1. Component headquarters FAMs, working with AEFC and MAJCOM FAMs, will continually assess their ability to meet current operations. This assessment must also consider the need to reconstitute any force that entered surge operations. 12.11. FAM Training. 12.11.1. Air Force FAM training is key for FAMs and is critical to successful AEF execution. FAMs at all echelons must complete the Air Force FAM WBT within 3 months of assignment as a FAM. OFAMO-P is the OPR for development and oversight of all FAM training; the MAJCOM OFAMO is responsible for individual MAJCOM FAM training and must ensure that their MAJCOM FAMs have the proper level of training necessary to successfully accomplish their assigned duties. . The FAM WBT is located on the FAM CoP. 12.11.2. FAM training provides an understanding of the duties, responsibilities, systems, tools, and processes associated with the position of FAM. In addition to this course, there are a few other courses that provide FAMs additional tools to complete their tasks for their functional areas. 12.11.2.1. Contingency Wartime Planning Course (CWPC) (Optional). Attendance at CWPC is highly recommended for all new FAMs. CWPC provides an overview of joint and Air Force planning processes and touches on all levels of planning from the President down to the base level. The course will provide FAMs with foundation knowledge in both joint and Air Force planning processes and the systems required to do their job. CWPC is in extremely high demand and may not be available to all personnel who wish to attend. FAMs should work through their OFAMO to obtain a slot. 12.11.2.2. DCAPES (Mandatory). A formal DCAPES course is taught at Keesler AFB and gives FAMs in-depth training on DCAPES functionality and capabilities. This course teaches FAMs how to use the applications with the understanding that the student is aware of the planning processes. Attendance at this course will require pre-requisites. These pre-requisites can be reviewed in the AETC Course Catalogue. 12.11.2.3. MAJCOM/FOA unique training is another tool that could provide FAMs with training for that respective MAJCOM/FOA. Development of these courses will be at the discretion of such agencies. 12.12. (DELETED) . 12.12. (ACC) MAJCOM FAM Orientation All ACC FAMs (primary and alternate[s]) will be scheduled for training within 90 days of their appointment. ACC/A3OR will be conducting mandatory UTC FAM Orientation for newly appointed UTC FAMS. Contact ACC/A3OR for scheduling. Furthermore, training will be provided on an as needed basis to ensure all FAMs are prepared for their duties.

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Chapter 13 EXERCISE SOURCING PROCESS Section 13A—Purpose 13.1. Purpose. To provide an outline of the sourcing process and interrelationships of force providers (MAJCOMs/FOAs/DRUs), AEF Operations and all Combatant Commands for CJCS-, Joint-, Air Force-, and MAJCOM-level exercises, experiments, and tests. The major systems affecting the development of joint exercise plans are the Deliberate and Crisis Action Planning and Execution Segment (DCAPES) and Joint Operations Planning and Execution System (JOPES). 13.1. (ACC)Purpose. To provide an outline of the roles and responsibilities of ACC in Joint, Air Force, MAJCOM and NAF level exercises. The major systems affecting the development of joint exercise plans are DCAPES, JOPES and Joint Exercise Management Information System. Subsequent sections in this instruction will provide detailed planning guidance. Section 13B—Background 13.2. Planning Processes. Planning is a continuous and highly structured process that allows for an orderly transition from concept development to employment. A proper sourcing process prevents incorrect force usage and ensures force visibility to all major players in the exercise course of action. An effective sourcing process enables proactive, informed force management decisions resulting in the timely and efficient allocation of forces/capabilities necessary to execute assigned mission and it ensures the systematic deployment, employment, and redeployment of assigned forces. For all exercises, experiments, and tests, planners are directed to use DCAPES/JOPES. 13.2. (ACC)Planning Processes. Planning is a continuous and highly structured process that allows for an orderly transition from scenario development to actual mobilization. Planning enables proactive, informed force management decisions resulting in the timely and efficient allocation of forces/capabilities necessary to execute assigned mission and it ensures the systematic deployment, employment, and redeployment of assigned forces. For exercise, planning this process is a deliberate planned process where the mission is known in advance and the planning process should be efficient and well managed. For all ACC-sponsored exercises, experiments, and tests, exercise planners are directed to use JOPES. Section 13C—Guidance 13.3. Roles and Responsibilities. 13.3.1. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) and the Joint Staff. The CJCS approves the Joint Training Master Schedule (JTMS) provided by the Joint Staff. The JTMS contains guidance to combatant commanders and the Service Chiefs for the accomplishment of CJCS and Joint Exercises. Resulting combatant commander EXPLANs, including TPFDDs, are forwarded to the CJCS.

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13.3.2. Commander, United States Joint Forces Command (CDRUSJFCOM) as the Primary Joint Force Provider (JFP). Based on recommendations from the GFMB, Services, and combatant commanders, CDRUSJFCOM is responsible for providing recommended sourcing solutions for conventional combat, combat support, and combat service support forces in support of the Joint Exercise Schedule. In coordination with the Services, provides trained and ready forces and capabilities for allocation by the SecDef via the Joint Staff Manager to support combatant command exercise requirements. 13.3.3. Unified Combatant Commands (UCCs). Identify forces/requirements to support Joint Exercises. Provide commanders force flow guidance via an exercise TPFDD Letter of Instruction (LOI). 13.3.4. Chief of Staff, United States Air Force (CSAF). CSAF is the "Global Force Provider" of Air Force air and space power capabilities for exercises. CSAF conveys instructions to all Air Staff, MAJCOM, ANG, and subordinate units to be prepared to support exercises during their AEF training period or AEF vulnerability period. 13.3.5. Warfighting Integration (SAF/XC). Designated the Air Force Executive Agent (AFEA) for Joint Expeditionary Force Experiments (JEFX). Coordinates, synchronizes and integrates experimentation events in JEFXs. 13.3.6. Deputy Chief of Staff (DCS), Operations, Plans & Requirements (HQ AF/A3/5) . Oversees and issues policy, guidance, and procedures for mission directives on Air Force exercises. HQ AF/A3/5 provides oversight for AF sponsored exercises and AF participation in CJCS exercises. HQ AF/A3O is the office of primary responsibility for the Air Force Exercise Program (AFEP) and carries out the responsibilities in accordance with AFI 10-204, Readiness Exercises and After-Action Reporting Program. 13.3.7. Air Staff Functional Area Managers (FAMs). Air Staff FAMs, in coordination with force providers and AEF Operations, are responsible for ensuring the capabilities represented by their UTCs are adequately balanced across the AEFs. The Air Staff FAM is responsible for continually evaluating the functional area‘s ability to perform its primary objective, which is to meet the combatant commander‘s needs. The Air Staff FAM will identify and direct remedies for problems or issues requiring deviations or waivers to current policies or procedures. 13.3.7.1. (ACC) (Added) ACC Functional Area Manager (FAMs). 13.3.7.1.1. (Added-ACC) Determine asset availability for filling validated exercise augmentation and source the requirement. ACC FAMs serve in this capacity by both sourcing ACC assets and coordinating support from other MAJCOM FAMs. 13.3.7.1.2. (Added-ACC) Task units to fill the validated exercise requirements based on AEF training windows of tasked units or guidance provided by appropriate authority. 13.3.7.1.3. (Added-ACC) Evaluate and process Reclamas IAW Para 13.7.1 of this supplement. 13.3.7.1.4. (Added-ACC) Monitor sourced requirement to ensure either the requirement is filled or Reclama‘d.

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13.3.8. Commander, Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC/CC) and Director, Air National Guard (NGB/CF). Establish policy and provide guidance for the participation of AFRC and ANG forces in exercises. 13.3.9. Air Force Component Headquarters. Although Air Force forces are assigned to different combatant commanders, all Air Force units and associated capability are part of the AEF and are centrally managed to best meet the overall requirements of all combatant commands in support of exercises. Supported component headquarters: 13.3.9.1. Establish and identify exercise resource requirements (financial, manpower, airframe, supply, equipment, etc.) from Air Force capabilities. Coordinate exercise planning activities and combatant commander requirements with AEF Operations and other USAF agencies as appropriate. 13.3.9.2. Ensure all exercise forces working in a joint or coalition organization know their Air Force command structure via the exercise reporting instructions so the member is aware prior to departure. 13.3.9.3. Establish exercise policy, guidance, and instructions to facilitate the efficient communication and employment of forces within the theater of operation. 13.3.9.4. Source exercise requirements from organic, in-theater assets to the maximum extent possible and provide TPFDDs to AFPC OSC for situational awareness. Notify sourced wings/bases via AFVC. The component headquarters must shortfall all requirements not sourced from within their command. The shortfalls will include any active duty or ARC volunteers outside of their command, and all pre-sourced units and names of individuals in the line remark field only. 13.3.9.5. Provide Jointand CSAF-level exercise shortfalls to AFPC OSC via TPFDD/DRMD in JOPES by Force Module (FM) no later than 120 days before Required Delivery Date (RDD). Shortfalls should only be submitted after exhausting all efforts to fill from assigned forces. This allows AEF Operations the opportunity to source all shortfall requirements and the owning MAJCOMS to verify their respective requirements. 13.3.9.6. Provide exercise specific reporting instructions, to include POCs, and provide position descriptions for any nonstandard UTCs. Note: Component planners will only put UTCs in the TPFDD that are registered in Manpower and Equipment Force Package (MEFPAK). Component FAMs should coordinate with force provider and Air Staff counterparts to ensure force providers either already have these UTCs postured in UTC Availability or intend to posture these UTCs in UTC Availability. 13.3.10. Directorate of Air and Space Expeditionary Forces (AEF) and Personnel Operations(AFPC/DPW) 13.3.10.1. Provides sourcing solutions for real world deployments in support of a CCDR request for forces. For exercise support, sources CJCSand CSAF-experiments/exercise shortfalls in addition to coordinating with component planners regarding exercise TPFDDs as necessary. 13.3.10.2. Coordinates, integrates, and publishes the timelines, plans, and tasks required to support shortfalls for CJCSand CSAF-level exercises and experiments.

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13.3.10.3. Posts messages to newsgroup to announce the appropriate exercises newsgroup and MAJCOM verification information. The appropriate exercise newsgroup will be used to post all required actions after the initial announcement. 13.3.10.4. Coordinates with supported component headquarters to ensure the shortfalled TPFDD is received. Upon receipt, AEF Operations will make shortfall requirements available to the Air Reserve Components (ARC) to solicit volunteers with a maximum 30-day suspense. AEF Operations Functional Area Schedulers will negotiate a different suspense with ARC if required. 13.3.11. Force Providers (Air Force Major Commands (MAJCOMs), Field Operating Agencies (FOAs), Direct Reporting Units (DRUs), and the Air National Guard (ANG)). Specific units to fulfill the exercise will be synchronized with the AEF battle rhythm to ensure forces are ready. Force providers must ensure subordinate units understand their primary objective during their scheduled deployment period is to make the maximum capability available for contingency and rotational operations. Force provider FAMs must maintain close coordination with their Air Staff FAM and AEF Operations to ensure visibility of exercise participation. 13.3.11.1. Ensures timely verification of all exercise TPFDD taskings and, through established mechanisms, ensure tasked units are ready and prepared to deploy. 13.3.11.2. Monitors the newsgroup messages and bulletins posted on the Air Staff, combatant commander, and component headquarters servers. Monitors AEF Online on the AEF Operations web site. 13.3.11.3. Handles reclamas and/or UIC change requests in accordance with established guidelines using Reclama Processing Tool (RPT). 13.3.11.4. (Added-ACC) HQ ACC Exercises and Joint Operations Division (HQ ACC/A3Y). 13.3.11.4.1. (Added-ACC) Initiate and lead the planning for each exercise to include informing ACC/A3OP and AFPC/DPW (AEF Operations) staff of the JOPES Plan ID (PID) and planning milestones for exercises which are ACC or CJCS level. Additionally, HQ ACC/A3Y will provide classification and downgrade instructions for all exercises IAW CJCSM 3122.02D, JOPES Volume III (Crisis Action TPFDD Development and Deployment Execution), 17 Mar 11. 13.3.11.4.2. (Added-ACC) If the exercise is CJCS-sponsored, coordinate with appropriate NAF component, planners to place force requirements into the JOPES PID so, AFPC/DPW (AEF Operations) or ACC/A3OP managers can construct the DRMD. 13.3.11.4.3. (Added-ACC) Ensure transportation validation is accomplished by the component as required by the CJCS JOPES planning milestones. 13.3.11.4.4. (Added-ACC) Coordinate with HQ ACC Staff functional managers, AFPC/DPW (AEF Operations), ACC/A3OP, and unit exercise planners for exercise DRMD sourcing. 13.3.11.4.5. (Added-ACC) Provide input for the exercise reporting instructions to include fund cites for travel, per diem, lodging, and rental vehicles, as required.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 13.3.11.4.6. (Added-ACC) Accumulate, within the ACC Joint Exercise Control Team process, participant critiques that highlight mismatched or invalid DRMD requirements to ensure those and all similar billets get special attention on future exercise DRMD reviews. 13.3.11.5. (Added-ACC) - HQ ACC Force Provisioning Branch (HQ ACC/A3OP). 13.3.11.5.1. (Added-ACC) Oversee and manage all aspects of ACC involvement in the exercise manning and sourcing process. Act as the ACC liaison to NAF staffs, other MAJCOMs, and DoD exercise representatives for exercise plan management. Attend planning conferences as required in coordination with ACC/A3Y. Coordinate DRMD changes with exercise planners that affect funding or sourcing. 13.3.11.5.2. (Added-ACC) Follow and enforce the DRMD timeline established IAW Para 13.6 of AFI 10-401. 13.3.11.5.3. (Added-ACC) Disseminate appropriate ACC FAMs.

validated

exercise

changes

to

all

13.3.11.5.4. (Added-ACC) Obtain reporting instructions from exercise planners and post to A3OPs unclassified and classified web sites, as required. 13.3.11.5.5. (Added-ACC) Monitor the FAM tasking process. Ensure the Installation Personnel Readiness flight sends Augmentee identification information (i.e., full name, rank, social security number, and security clearance) via the deployed personnel data within DCAPES per AFI 36-3802. 13.3.11.5.6. (Added-ACC) Coordinate Reclamas with ACC FAMs IAW Para. 13.7.1. of this supplement. 13.3.11.5.7. (Added-ACC) Consolidate all exercise requirements in a master DRMD for ACC exercises. Enter information into DCAPES/JOPES. Take appropriate action to resolve DRMD shortfalls. Verify tasking requirements identified on the DRMD to tasked unit PRF per timeline IAW Para 13.11 of AFI 10401. 13.3.11.5.8. (Added-ACC) Provide the exercise PID number to tasked units via NIPRNET/SIPRNET email. For all classified exercises contact wing Manpower Office (MO) using the Secure Telephone Unit III (STU-III) or classified email in SIPRNET and provide DRMD build information. 13.3.11.6. (Added-ACC) - Flag Exercise Planner 13.3.11.6.1. (Added-ACC) Follow the DRMD timeline established in AFI 10-401 Para 13.6. 13.3.11.6.2. (Added-ACC) Coordinate TPFDD inputs with ACC/A3Y or other OPRs and provide DRMD requirements to ACC/A3OP for development and sourcing following established procedures in AFI 10-401 Chapter 8. The DRMD will become the master database within DCAPES. 13.3.11.6.3. (Added-ACC) Assist requirements for funding purposes.

ACC/A3Y

in

coordinating

Flag

exercise

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13.3.11.6.4. (Added-ACC) In coordination with supporting MO, planners will maximize the use of standard Manpower Force Packaging System listed UTCs. 13.3.12. Wing and Base-Level Organizations. Support the needs of the warfighter as mandated by the SecDef. 13.3.12.1. Task units to fill the validated exercise requirements based on AEF training windows of tasked units or guidance provided by appropriate authority. 13.3.12.2. Identify shortfalls and initiate reclamas and UIC change requests using RPT. 13.3.12.2.1. Unit project officer/exercise planners will provide the supporting manpower office with the requirements to build the DRMD. 13.3.12.3. Supporting Manpower Office (MO) (may be a wing organization that fulfills this function). 13.3.12.3.1. The MO works with their IDO and deploying unit(s) and determines the requirements from the standard UTC database where possible. Once accomplished, the DRMD will be forwarded to JOPES/DCAPES exercise support NLT 120 days prior to RDD. 13.3.12.3.2. Coordinates, as necessary, the exercise DRMD changes with the deployment project officer. 13.3.12.3.3. Follow the DRMD timeline established in paragraph 13.6. of this instruction. 13.3.12.4. Personnel Readiness Function (PRF). PRFs play a vital role in the success of force accountability. Accurate force accountability depends on PRFs efficiently updating and disseminating personnel data via DCAPES within the timelines specified in AFI 36-3802 (formerly AFI 10-215). The PRF: 13.3.12.4.1. Processes the current exercise DRMD. Enters the individual‘s name and other required personnel identification into DCAPES. 13.3.12.4.2. Processes the LOGMOD Plan Update File (when populated with name/SSN information provided by the UDM) and updates any personnel changes as required into DCAPES to produce CED orders and associated personnel deployment actions. 13.3.12.4.3. Notifies UDMs of exercise reporting instructions and clarifies any AF line remarks that may be listed against positions on the DRMD. 13.3.12.5. Unit Exercise Project Officer. 13.3.12.5.1. Works closely with the wing exercise project officer, the deploying units‘ unit deployment manager(s), affected Commander‘s Support Staff(s), LRS Contingency Programs and Plans section (Host Installation Deployment Officer), and Manpower/Personnel Readiness Unit to ensure deployment requirements are identified in time to meet the DRMD timeline established in paragraph 13.6 of this instruction. 13.3.12.5.2. Once the names have been loaded into LOGMOD, the LOGMOD levy file is extracted by the IDO to the PRF for upload into DCAPES.

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 13.3.12.5.3. Evaluates and processes reclamas and UIC change requests using RPT in accordance with Section 10C of this instruction.

13.4. AEF Sourcing and Tasking Priority. The Air Force prioritizes its sourcing requirements when responding to and supporting CJCSand CSAF-sponsored experiment/exercise shortfalls. When developing sourcing solutions, the Air Force attempts to minimize impact to other combatant commander requirements. See paragraph 9.3 for priority. 13.5. AEF Sourcing and Tasking Process. AEF Operations will develop the sourcing rule sets to support shortfalled CJCSand CSAF-sponsored experiment/exercise requirements. 13.5.1. Tasking for exercises/experiments with estimated tour length (ETLs) of 30 days or greater will normally come from the on-call AEF blocks/pair. Note: Units/personnel who deploy for 45 days or less are eligible to deploy again within their AEF vulnerability period. 13.5.2. Tasking for exercises with ETLs of less than 30 days will be sourced from the UTCs in the AEF training window. 13.5.3. Once ULNs are built and captured in the applicable exercise requirements force module, AEF Operations sources the requirement and populates the applicable verification FMs and establishes suspense via HQAF.SOURCE or HAF designated newsgroup. AEF Operations monitors DCAPES while the force providers initiate the verification process (see paragraph 8.14.9.) or, if unable to support the ULN, begin the reclama process (see Section 10C--Shortfall and Reclama Process). Note: After requirements have been verified, reclamas will only occur under the most extenuating circumstances. 13.5.4. AEF Operations centrally manages the Air Force Deployment Processing Discrepancy Reporting Program for exercises. 13.5.5. AEF Operations oversees and manages the UTC and Individual Augmentee (IA) reclama process when taskings must be reassigned between MAJCOMs. AEF Operations is the central agency for adjudicating Air Force reclamas and forwarding to HQ USAF as required. 13.6. DRMD Development. Exercise DRMD Development will be in accordance with the following timeline: 13.6.1. Exercise planners will establish and validate exercise requirements NLT 180 days before RDD. Component-sponsored exercise requirements should either be manually updated in DCAPES by the supporting Manpower POC or provided to JOPES/DCAPES exercise support for processing. Joint exercise requirements should be provided to JOPES/DCAPES exercise support for processing. Provide all line remarks at the same time the DRMD flows. Planners will use Air Force standard line remarks for all exercises. Unique requirements not included in the standard remarks will be placed in the reporting instructions. 13.6.2. Coordinate with supported FAMs to address detail required, to fully define requirements (AFSC, suitable substitutions, Line Remarks, job/position description, position POC and exercise POC). Planners, in coordination with supported and supporting manpower offices, will use standard UTCs where possible and tailor as necessary. All non-standard UTCs will be functional (i.e., 4FZ99, HFZ99, etc) and contain AFSC and grade requirements.

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13.6.3. NLT 150 days before RDD, JOPES/DCAPES exercise support will release requirements to FAMs for sourcing of requirements supported by the component or AD/ARC volunteers. JOPES/DCAPES exercise support will use the Standard Air Force Line Remarks for all exercises. 13.6.4. NLT 120 days before RDD, ULNs sourced with non-assigned forces identified during planning are forwarded to AFPC OSC via Force Module to coordinate with owning commands to verify requirements. Supported components will not validate to the applicable CCDR without supporting component verification. 13.6.5. NLT 120 days before RDD, shortfalled requirements are submitted to AFPC OSC via Force Module for sourcing. This will be accomplished with accompanying justification from directorate level. Supported components will not validate to the applicable CCDR without supporting component verification. 13.6.6. NLT 103 days prior to RDD, MAJCOMs will complete verification for all requirements. JOPES/DCAPES exercise support will levy verified requirements to Destination/Central Site as system capabilities dictate, and provide detailed reporting instructions to each PRF when published by the component headquarters. 13.6.7. NLT 90 days prior to RDD, changes to the DRMD that require fill action, outside the previously tasked units/NAF. 13.6.8. NLT 60 days prior to RDD, Service components will validate all sourced requirements to their combatant commander. 13.6.9. NLT 30 days prior to RDD, JOPES/DCAPES exercise support will verify all tasked requirements filled and shortfall to the lead exercise planner. All new requirements with a RDD of 30 days or less will not be accepted by AFPC OSC unless certified critical to the exercise and approved by a general officer. This does not apply to deletions to the DRMD. 13.7. Reclama Procedures. Reclama and UIC change requests procedures as outlined in Section 10C of this instruction will be used. If ULN/LNR is unavailable in RPT, follow MAJCOM guidance for manual reclama process. 13.7.1. (Added-ACC) Reclama Procedures (Table 13.1. ACC Sponsored Exercises) 13.7.1.1. (Added-ACC) ACC sponsored exercises (see Table 13.1.) are not sourced by AFPC/DPW (AEF Operations). All Reclama requests must be processed ―out-ofsystem‖ (RPT), Attachment 8 Reclama/Shortfall request. Note: For Joint or Non-ACC sponsored exercises, follow procedures outlined in AFI 10-401, Chapter 10; Section 10C. 13.7.1.2. (Added-ACC) ACC ECS-SIPT representative is approval/disapproval authority for ACC-sponsored exercises. If the ACC ECS-SIPT representative does not concur with the shortfall, the disapproval is forwarded to the tasked wing commander. If approved, the ACC ECS-SIPT representative via ACC/A3OP notifies the exercise manager to change the tasking, or the requirement is a No-Fill. Table 13.1. (Added-ACC) ACC Sponsored Exercises. EXERCISE

LOCATION

NUMBER OF EXERCISES EACH YEAR

322 ANGEL THUNDER

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MacDill AFB FL and Avon Park FL 1 (East) or Davis-Monthan AFB AZ and Douglas AZ (West) ATLANTIC STRIKE Avon Park FL 1 BLUE FLAG (See Note) Barksdale AFB LA (8 AF) or Davis1 to 3 Monthan AFB AZ (12 AF) or Shaw AFB SC (9 AF) or Tyndall AFB FL (1 AF) GREEN FLAG Ft Polk LA (East) or 10 (East) Ft Irwin CA (West) 10 (West) MAPLE FLAG Cold Lake CANADA 1 RED FLAG Nellis AFB NV 4 VIRTUAL FLAG Kirtland AFB NM and Various other 4 locations Note: BLUE FLAG is ACC sponsored, it may be conducted as a joint service exercise and the requirements may be tasked via a joint PID. In this case, Reclamas may be submitted via RPT. 13.8. DELETED.

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Chapter 14 *AEF AND THE INDIVIDUAL Section 14A—Purpose 14.1. Purpose. The purpose of this chapter is to establish policy and procedures for the management of individuals in support of the AEF. This encompasses individual AEF association, force management with respect to individuals, and sourcing individuals to fulfill individual augmentation (IA) requirements. Section 14B—Background 14.2. Force Presence. All Air Force personnel contribute to the AEF. AFPC (or other designated force manager) supports AEF operations by identifying the most ready and available forces as part of UTCs or as individuals to meet the stated requirement. Airmen are eligible for deployment during their scheduled AEF vulnerability period; however, increased requirements in a particular theater or mission may require Airmen to deploy outside their vulnerability period to meet the crisis. Section 14C—Guidance 14.3. Associating Individuals. All Airmen are warriors, trained and equipped to provide the required capabilities enabling the CCDR to accomplish the mission. Airmen also make up the staff of Service organizations and therefore are required to accomplish the mission of the assigned organization. Air Force organizations are categorized based on their broad mission of Combat (C), Combat Support (CS), Combat Service Support (CSS), or ―Other‖ via the JCS Unit Descriptor Code (UDC) (see Attachment 8 for details). Airmen assigned to C, CS, and CSS organizations are organized, trained and equipped to meet the mission capabilities stipulated in postured UTCs and therefore are the Air Force‘s primary warfighting forces. Airmen assigned to ―Other‖ organizations constitute the Institutional Force and are required to manage the programs and operations of the Service and are not identified with UTCs; however, these Airmen are eligible for deployment. All Airmen, regardless of assignment to C, CS, CSS, or Institutional Force will be associated to an AEF vulnerability period as follows and will be given a corresponding AEF Indicator (AEFI) in MilPDS in accordance with Table 14.1 (Note: Reserve components will determine component-specific AEFI policy). Commanders or equivalent are responsible for determining the appropriate AEFI code for all assigned personnel. HAF FAMs will monitor AEFIs to ensure the AFSCs normally associated with their functional area are distributed as evenly as possible throughout the associated vulnerability periods. 14.3.1. AEFIs for Individuals Assigned to Combat, Combat Support, or Combat Service Support Organizations. Individuals will be given an AEFI corresponding to the AEF block or Enabler category (see Table 14.1) in which their organization has UTCs postured. 14.3.2. AEFI for Individuals Assigned to ―Other‖ Air Force Organizations. Individuals assigned to organizations designated as ―Other‖ will be given an AEFI; however, it will not be based on a UTC Tempo Band. AC personnel assigned to these organizations will receive an AEFI based on a 6-month AEF vulnerability period at a 1:4 deploy-to-dwell ratio (X1 to

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X5). At a 1:4 deploy-to-dwell ratio, there are five vulnerability periods and each vulnerability period will contain approximately 20% of the population assigned to ―Other‖ Air Force organizations. Recognizing current CCDR requirements require some stressed capabilities to use individuals assigned to ―Other‖ organizations at a greater frequency than a 1:4 deploy-to-dwell ratio, temporary exceptions to the 1:4 ratio will be granted on a case-bycase basis by AF/A3/5 with AF/A1 and appropriate HAF DCS coordination (see paragraph 10.2.1). Before applying for the deviation, consideration must be given to the fact many of these organizations are small and/or have a critical Air Force-level organize, train, or equip mission and a more rapid deploy-to-dwell ratio could impact force sustainability. In addition, it is the intent of this process for warfighting forces to be at or below 1:2 dwell before a deviation is considered and approved for ―Other‖ forces. 14.3.2.1. Key and critical personnel will be given an AEFI of X1 to X5; however, these individuals will be codified with a DAV Code of ―64‖ (Operational Deferment) in accordance with AFI 10-403, Attachment 2. Key and critical personnel for Institutional organizations will be approved at the HAF/MAJCOM directorate-level in accordance with HAF DCS/MAJCOM CV (or equivalent) policy. These individuals are not exempt from deployment but should not be included in the normal rack-and-stack tasking methodology. 14.3.2.2. Organizations coded as ―Other‖ that have an approved waiver to posture UTCs (see paragraphs 7.5. and 10.2.1.) will determine AEFIs according to the rule sets for Combat, Combat Support, or Combat Service Support Organizations (see paragraph 14.3.1.). 14.3.2.3. AFSOC ―Other‖ funded by USSOCOM are tasked primarily by USSOCOM. They will be AEFI-coded for administrative purposes in accordance with paragraph 14.3.2., but their actual vulnerability for deployment will be as required by USSOCOM or coordinated with AFSOC. 14.3.3. AEFIs for Individuals Assigned to Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) Components, Defense Agencies, DoD Field Activities, or Joint/Combined Organizations. Individuals assigned to OSD components, defense agencies, DoD field activities, or Joint/Combined organizations (see Table A8.3) will be given an AEFI of XX to indicate they are not to be considered part of the Air Force‘s readily available deployment pool. Their availability is determined by the owning organization, not the Air Force. The AEFI of XX will be automatically updated in the system based on MAJCOM code. 14.3.3.1. Air National Guard personnel assigned to a state mission will receive an AEFI of RX to indicate they are not to be considered part of the AF‘s readily available deployment pool. 14.3.4. AEFIs for Reserve Component. Reserve components will determine componentspecific AEFI policy. 14.3.4.1. Reserve Component - AGRs and IMAs. All IMAs (whether they are attached to an Institutional organization or not) and AGRs at Institutional organizations will be given an AEFI code of X1 to X5. AFPC Functional schedulers must include File Type, Civilian-ART-ID, AFR-Section-ID and Functional-Cat in their data pull to ensure they are indentifying AGRs and IMAs. AGRs and IMAs cannot be tasked in the same manner

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as their AC counterparts. Once functional mobilization trigger is anticipated or reached, AEFIs for these individuals will be changed to correspond with Band ―M‖ (M1 to M9) or Band ―N‖ (N1 to N8). 14.3.5. AEFIs for Students, Trainees, Patients and Prisoners. Individuals in a transitory status of student, trainee, patient or prisoner will be given an AEFI of XL to indicate they are not available for deployment. This AEFI code will be updated automatically in MilPDS based upon member‘s functional category code and reporting identifier. 14.3.6. AEFIs for Individuals in Transition (PCS or PCA). An individual‘s AEFI is not changed until the individual is gained at the new organization or actual DOS. Gaining commanders are responsible for updating AEFIs for newly assigned personnel within 15 days of being assigned to the unit. Table 14.1. Organization Type and Individual AEF Indicator Component

Active Component

Organization Type Combat, Combat Support, Combat Service Support Tempo Bands (see note 1) A1-A0 B1-B5 C1-C4 D1-D3 E1-E2 E3-E4 (see note 2)

―Other‖

―Outside‖ the AF

X1-X5 (see note 1)

XX

Enabler Force EA (E-ARY) EG (E-GRL) ES (E-SOR) ET (E-TBM) EV (E-EIS) EU (E-GSA) EC (E-ISR) EF (E-CAF) A1-A0 3 Not applicable Not applicable Traditional 3 M1-M9 Guard or N1-N8 3 Reservist X1-X5 X1-X5 XX IMA XL XL XL STP Note 1: Although all individuals in these categories receive an AEFI indicating a specific AEF vulnerability period, 100% of them will not be available during this period. Personal circumstances and mission-related activities will reduce the deployable pool. Individuals who are not available due to personal circumstances must have a corresponding deployment availability (DAV) or duty status code in MilPDS and supporting documentation to validate member‘s deployment availability date as required

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by AFI 10-403, Deployment Planning and Execution. Units are also required to conduct UTC assessments per AFI 10-244, Reporting Status of Aerospace Expeditionary Forces (applies to tempo band and Enablers only). Commanders or equivalents will use the reclama process when a valid shortfall exists (i.e., insufficient capability to meet a specific requirement). Reclamas must be limited to a documented lack of resources, change in mission requirements, or where severe risk results from deployment of the requested force. Note 2: Functional areas can only align UTCs in AEF Blocks E3 and E4 with AF/A5XW concurrence. Note 3: Only if applicable component determines that individuals will be given AEFIs via MilPDS. 14.3.7. AEFI Association Review. A review of each Airman‘s AEF association will be conducted by the unit commander at the start of each GFM cycle to ensure sufficient numbers and types of Airmen are associated to support the unit‘s postured and aligned UTCs; in the case of the Institutional Force, this will ensure an appropriate number of personnel are identified for each vulnerability period. 14.3.8. An Airman may voluntarily deploy outside the associated AEF block/pair in accordance with the guidance outlined in paragraph 9.19. When doing so, the Airman‘s AEFI will not change. The Airman remains vulnerable to deploy during his/her associated AEF block/pair unless doing so violates SecDef deploy-to-dwell policy. 14.4. Force Management of Individuals (Predeployment). Airmen will be associated to an AEF vulnerability period in accordance with paragraph 14.3. This association will be documented in MilPDS and the Airmen will be notified by unit commander of the association. The AEF vulnerability period is the period of time the forces aligned in a specific AEF block are susceptible to initial deployment and will mirror the vulnerability period (AEF block) to which their unit‘s UTCs are aligned. Only one AEF block from each Tempo Band will be vulnerable at a time. Individuals will not be selected for taskings with an RDD outside of their AEF vulnerability period except in cases of reach forward. However, Airmen may be tasked to attend predeployment training prior to the start of their vulnerability window or deploy for an extended period beyond the established vulnerability timeframe. Alternate AEF battle rhythms may dictate an accelerated deployment schedule. 14.4.1. Changing an Individual‘s AEFI. Once associated, changing an individual‘s AEFI will only be done under extenuating circumstances as follows. Individuals will be notified, in writing, by unit commander of AEFI change. If an Airman has recently deployed, the Airman should not be associated with an AEFI within the Tempo Band that would require the Airman to deploy at a rate greater than the tempo rate of the band. If wing commanders, or equivalent, approve a second deployment with less than the dwell for their capability Tempo Band, they will inform their respective MAJCOM/CV (or, in the case of FOAs/DRUs, the first general officer or civilian equivalent in the organization‘s chain of command). Note: This applies to Airmen who have deployed; no waiver is required if Airmen did not deploy during their AEF vulnerability period. 14.4.1.1. Permanent Change of Station (PCS). When PCSing, the gaining commander will, within the provisions of paragraph 14.3., associate the individual with an AEFI that allows the most time between AEF vulnerability periods from previous AEFI while

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deconflicting the projected AEF vulnerability window from the Airman's DEROS or Maximum Controlled Tour Expiration Date when applicable. 14.4.1.2. Permanent Change of Assignment (PCA). The Airman should be associated to the same Tempo Band as previously associated, if possible. If not possible, the rule sets for PCSing will be followed. 14.4.1.3. HAF-directed Realignment (e.g. capability area rebalanced or rebanded). HAF functional director may direct UTC realignment either within (e.g. to better balance functional capabilities across a particular Tempo Band) or between Tempo Bands as part of the AEF Schedule band evaluation. When executing these realignments, every effort should be made to realign AEF vulnerability periods for as few Airmen as necessary. Furthermore, commanders should make every effort to deconflict realigned vulnerability periods with the Airman's projected DEROS or Maximum Controlled Tour Expiration Date, when applicable. No waiver is required to change the resulting association in MilPDS. 14.4.1.4. Temporary Non-Deployable Status. Airmen who become temporarily disqualified during their AEF vulnerability period may be utilized upon return to deployable status to meet unit deployment requirements. Immediately upon return to deployable status the disqualified Airman may be utilized to fill out-of-cycle requirements or short notice individual augmentation requests. Unit commanders, with wing commander approval, may also realign the Airman with an upcoming vulnerability period. Wings will report these changes to MAJCOM/CV in accordance with MAJCOM direction. 14.4.1.5. Professional Development. Wing commanders, or equivalents, may approve a change in an individual's AEF association when the change is to facilitate career progression (e.g., individual is promoted and moved to a position commensurate with the new grade). To minimize re-sourcing actions, changes to AEFI should be made at least 6 months prior to previous associated AEF block/pair, when feasible. Every effort will be made to assign the individual to a position that will provide the greatest amount of time between AEF vulnerability periods while deconflicting the realigned vulnerability periods with the Airman's projected DEROS or Maximum Controlled Tour Expiration Date when applicable. Wings will report these changes to MAJCOM/CV in accordance with MAJCOM direction. 14.4.1.6. Voluntary re-association. In cases as depicted in paragraph 14.4.1.4., unit commanders may seek Airmen to voluntarily deploy outside the AEF vulnerability period to fill the tasking of the individual who is temporarily nondeployable. In such instances, the wing commander may approve a swap of individuals‘ AEFIs. Furthermore, two individuals from the same unit with the same qualifications may voluntarily request a swap of AEFIs as long as the needs of the unit are still met. This type of swap must be approved by the wing commander. Only one approved request per individual per AEF Schedule should be allowed. Wings will report these changes to MAJCOM/CV in accordance with MAJCOM direction. 14.4.1.6.1. (ACC) (Added) Voluntary Re-Association. Airmen from the same unit with the same qualifications may voluntarily request to swap their respective Air Expeditionary Force Indicator (AEFI) and trade deployment vulnerability periods as long

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 as the needs of the unit are still met. Requests of this nature must ultimately be approved by the home station wing commander to include notifying the MAJCOM/CV of the final re-association action. To keep the ACC staff fully informed, all AEFI changes will go through ACC/A3OP (ACC/A3OP AEF Provisioning Branch [email protected]). ACC/A3OP will, in turn, provide a quarterly report through the ECS-SIPT, then will be briefed to ACC/CV during the AEF Debriefs. 14.4.1.7. UTC-to-AEFI Misalignment. For units with UTCs postured in tempo bands, it is imperative that individuals are appropriately associated with the postured UTCs. In cases where there is a misalignment between individuals‘ AEFIs and postured UTCs, unit commanders will direct changing an Airmen‘s AEFI. Wings will report these changes to MAJCOM/CV in accordance with MAJCOM direction. 14.4.1.8. Any other instances requiring a change in an Airmen‘s AEFI requires MAJCOM/CV approval. This includes involuntary deployment of Airmen outside their associated AEF deployment period (except in cases of AFPC/DPW sourced UTCs in approved surge mode).

14.4.2. Associating Airmen with an Enabler. Airmen associated with an Enabler category are not restricted by the number of times they may deploy or the lengths of a deployment as long as SecDef deploy-to-dwell rule sets are adhered to; however their PERSTEMPO rate should be equitably managed amongst those providing like capability. Every effort should be made, by the organization responsible for managing the Enabler category, to provide the Airmen in the Enabler an on-call/deployment schedule and accompanying guidance. 14.4.2.1. An Airman‘s association may be changed from an Enabler category to a Tempo Band without a MAJCOM/CV waiver. 14.4.3. AEF Vulnerability and On-call Status. The AEF vulnerability period provides Airmen a degree of predictability in each GFM cycle, but does not guarantee the Airmen the same predictability from one GFM cycle to the next (e.g. a capability may be postured at a 1:4 tempo for one GFM cycle then shift to a 1:3 or 1:2 tempo for the next based on emerging requirements). During AEF operations, eligible Airmen will deploy or remain on-call for the duration of their associated vulnerability period (Note: ARC personnel are not considered to be in an ―on-call‖ status and can only be utilized in a volunteer or mobilized status). Airmen may be tasked to deploy for a period beyond the established vulnerability timeframe. Airmen will be ready to immediately deploy during their AEF eligibility period as new CCDR requirements can be sourced any time during the AEF period. If deployed near the end of the AEF eligibility period, the Airman must be prepared to remain deployed through the end of the next AEF rotation. 14.4.4. Personnel Force Management. The Air Force assignment process will be managed to coincide with the AEF battle rhythm to the maximum extent possible. Commanders will make every effort to schedule voluntary PCS/ PCA departure dates, terminal leave dates for retirement, and separation dates, to occur during the 3-month period immediately following the Airman‘s deployment eligibility period or return from deployment. See AFI 36-2110, Chapter 4. The assignment process will formally track AEF deployments on individual personnel records and provide visibility of individuals to all commanders. When nominating Airmen for Professional Military Education or Developmental Education (PME/DE), commanders must make every reasonable effort to deconflict PME/DE with AEF

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vulnerability periods when determining the timing of school attendance. A scheduled AEF deployment is not justification for operational deferment from PME/DE. Airmen should not be relieved from deployed duty if alternate school start dates are available which would allow deployment. 14.5. Force Management of Individuals (Post-deployment). Force management of personnel during the deployment and employment process are covered in AFI 10-403, Deployment Planning and Execution and AFI 36-3802, Personnel Readiness Operations. AEF deployment force management policies are covered in paragraphs 9.17. through 9.21. 14.6. Sourcing Individuals to Fulfill CCDR Requirements. Note: This section does not apply to sourcing individuals to fill indeterminate TDY (ITDY) taskings; ITDY guidance is in AFI 36-2110. The following will be used as the sourcing process for those personnel assigned to ―Other‖ Organizations. It provides a systematic approach to source, following the appropriate path based on tasking type. It will match the resource request with the most appropriate pool of resources and provide a method to tap into additional pools should resources be unavailable. 14.6.1. Evaluating Tasking Type and Determining Appropriate Resource Pool. The pool from which requirements are drawn will be guided by the first character of the tasking type code assigned to each requirement in accordance with paragraph 1.10.4.1.10.1. and Table 1.1. If the tasking type is ―K‖ the MilPDS sourcing methodology will be followed; if the tasking type is other than ―K‖ the UTC sourcing process (see paragraph 9.9.) will be followed. ―Unit-like‖ requirements will primarily be sourced to combat, combat support, or combat service support organizations; requirements for individual qualifications will be tasked to organizations designated as ―Other.‖ 14.6.1.1. Functional areas that must routinely deviate from this business rule should state as such in the FAM prioritization and sequencing guidance. Although every effort will be made to task within the appropriate resource pool, there may be situations that require tasking to an alternate pool, in which case a risk assessment will determine final sourcing. 14.6.1.2. Ad hoc sourcing solutions are typically considered ―unit-like‖ and therefore are sourced through the UTC sourcing process. However, some ad hoc sourcing solutions may be better suited to the MilPDS sourcing methodology. The AFPC functional scheduler should coordinate with the HAF FAM to determine the preferred sourcing methodology for ad hoc requirements. 14.6.2. Selection of Individuals Using MilPDS Data. MilPDS data will be filtered to create a pool of personnel available and qualified to meet the combatant commander‘s requirement. For specialized taskings, the AFPC functional scheduler will follow the business rules mutually agreed upon with the HAF FAM to determine appropriate filters; for all other taskings the standard MilPDS business rules will be followed. Functional area specific business rules should be included in the FAM prioritization and sequencing guidance. Schedulers must include applicable ARC qualifiers to ensure RC members are/are not considered for sourcing. Students, trainees, patients and prisoners will not be tasked for deployment. 14.6.2.1. Individuals assigned to OSD components, defense agencies, and DoD field activities (see Table A8.3) will not be tasked without prior written approval from the Office of the Secretary of Defense Director of Administration and Management

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 (OSD/A&M). In accordance with DoDD 1315.07, it is OSD/A&M‘s responsibility to ―assign, reassign, and release members to and from OSD and DoD Field Activities.‖ Individuals assigned to CCDR staffs will be requested through the appropriate J1 staff. 14.6.2.2. Due to the size, nature, and mission of Air Force units designated as ―Other,‖ many will face mission degradation that does not allow full accessibility to those personnel within the AEF vulnerability period. The Air Staff will determine a Service planning factor for sourcing from institutional organizations prior to each GFM cycle. 14.6.2.3. Standard MilPDS Sourcing Business Rules. Personnel availability and qualification will be based on the following factors: (1) An individual‘s MilPDS AEFI; (2) DRMD stated AFSC, grade, and restrictive line remarks; and (3) existing nondeployable DAV codes (see AFI 10-403, Attachment 2). Individuals are expected to be available during their AEF vulnerability period or must have an appropriate DAV code, with appropriate expiration date, in MilPDS. 14.6.2.3.1. To create a sufficient pool of available and qualified personnel, AFPC/DPW will initially follow the agreed upon business rules (see paragraph 14.6.2.) and, if necessary, coordinate with HAF and/or AF FP FAM to expand criteria including, but not limited to, AFSC and/or grade substitution or DRMD inclusive line remarks. If necessary, the AFFOR will be contacted to negotiate substitutions not already identified in the requirement. If sufficient resources do not exist in the given AEF vulnerability period, AFPC/CC will inform AF/A3/5 of their sourcing efforts (e.g., number of associated reclamas). AF/A3/5, in coordination with the applicable DCS, will make a mitigation determination (e.g. including individuals outside the Institutional Force and/or the current AEF vulnerability period, determining a "force to source" sourcing solution based on MAJCOM reclamas, or proceed with a Service reclama. 14.6.2.3.2. Similarly, if a large pool of available and qualified personnel exists after initial filtering, AFPC/DPW may add additional filters (e.g. excluding commander‘s choice DAV codes) to better prioritize eligible personnel).

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Figure 14.1. AFPC Sourcing Process.

14.6.2.4. Prioritizing Eligible Personnel. The pool of available and qualified personnel will be evaluated by AFPC/DPW based on input criteria, sorted by number of contingency deployments (as defined by Duty Status 20, Contingency Deployment), earliest deployment return date, number of short tours, and earliest short tour return date (STRD). 14.6.2.5. AFPC will enter the tasked PAS and SSAN of the identified most eligible person into DCAPES and place the ULN in the designated FM for verification (see paragraph 9.9.3.). In the event the organization seeks to make a name change, upon request, AFPC/DPW can provide a list of other personnel who meet the requirement criteria within the organization.

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14.6.3. Evaluation of Tasking. Upon receipt of a deployment tasking from AFPC, the tasked MAJCOM/DRU/FOA will follow similar procedures for UTC taskings: accept the sourcing solution (see paragraph 8.14.9.); initiate a UIC change or name change (see paragraph 10.21.8); or submit a reclama (see section 10C). All actions must be taken in accordance with Table 8.5 timelines. 14.7. Forms Adopted. AF Form 601, Equipment Action Request; AF Form 723, SORTS DOC Statement; AF Form 847, Recommendation for Change of Publication.

CARROL H. CHANDLER, Lt Gen, USAF DCS, Air, Space, and Information Operations, Plans and Requirements (ACC) WILLIAM M. FRASER, General, USAF Commander

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Attachment 1 GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION References (Added-ACC) CJCSM 3122.02D, JOPES Volume III Crisis Action TPFDD Development and Deployment Execution, 17 Mar 11 Guidance for Employment of the Force (GEF), Apr 08 Global Force Management Implementation Guidance (GFMIG), Feb 08 E.O. 12861, Elimination of One-Half of Executive Branch Internal Regulations, 11 Sep 93 E.O. 12866, Regulatory Planning and Review, 30 Sep 93 Title 10, U.S.C., Armed Forces, Mar 04 CJCSI 1301.01C, Individual Augmentation Procedures, 1 Jan 04 CJCSI 3010.02B, Joint Operations Concepts Development Process, 27 Jan 06 CJCSI 3100.01A, Joint Strategic Planning System, 1 Sep 99 CJCSI 3110.01G, Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP), 1 Mar 08 CJCSI 3110.02E, Intelligence Planning Objectives, Guidance, and Tasks, 31 Jul 07 CJCSI 3110.03C, Logistics Supplement to the JSCP, 14 Jun 05 CJCSI 3110.04B, Nuclear Supplement to the JSCP (Classified Document), 31 Dec 04 CJCSI 3110.05D, Joint Psychological Supplement to the JSCP, 8 Nov 07 CJCSI 3110.06C, Special Operations Supplemental to the JSCP, 29 Dec 06 CJCSI 3110.07C, Guidance Concerning Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Defense and Employment of RIOT Control Agents and Herbicides, 22 Mar 06 CJCSI 3110.08C, Geospatial Information and Services Supplemental Instruction to JSCP, 30 Jan 05 CJCSI 3110.10D, Command, Control, Communications, and Computer (C4) Systems Supplement to the JSCP, 31 Aug 07 CJCSI 3110.11F, Mobility Supplement to JSCP, 22 Aug 08 CJCSI 3110.12D, Civil Affairs Supplement to the JSCP, 15 Apr 07 CJCSI 3110.13C, Mobilization Guidance for the JSCP, 8 Jan 07 CJCSI 3110.15A, JSCP Special Technical Operations Supplement (Classified Document), 1 Apr 03 CJCSI 3110.16A, Military Capabilities, Assets, and Units for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and High Yield Explosive Consequence Management Operations, 10 Jan 07 CJCSM 3122.01A, JOPES Volume I (Planning Policies and Procedures), 29 Sep 06

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CJCSM 3122.02C, JOPES Volume III (Crisis Action TPFDD Development and Deployment Execution), 22 Mar 04 CJCSM 3122.03C, JOPES Volume II (Planning Format) 17 Aug 07 CJCSI 3137.01C, The Functional Capability Board Process, 12 Nov 04 CJCSI 3141.01D, Responsibilities For the Management and Review of Operation Plans, 24 Apr 08 CJCSM 3150.01B, Joint Reporting Structure General Instructions, 16 Jun 08 CJCSM 3150.16C, JOPES Reporting Structure (JOPESREP), 16 Mar 07 CJCSM 3150.23C, Joint Reporting Structure (JRS) Logistics Factors Report, 30 Aug 07 CJCSM 3150.24C Type Unit Characteristics Report (TUCHAREP), 30 Mar 07 JP 1-02, DOD Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms, 26 Aug 08 DOD 4500.54-G, DOD Foreign Clearance Guide (FCG), 21 Nov 03 DOD Directive 7045.14, Planning, Programming, and Budgeting Execution System (PPBE), 22 May 84 AFDD 1, Air Force Basic Doctrine, 17 Nov 03 AFDD 2, Operations and Organizations, 3 Apr 07 AFDD 2-4, Combat Support, 23 Mar 05 AFDD 2-8, Command and Control, 1 Jun 07 (Added-ACC) AFI 10-201, Status of Resource and Training Systems, 13 Apr 06 (Added-ACC) AFI 10-401, Air Force Operations Planning and Execution, 12 Aug 09 (Added-ACC) AFI 10-403, Deployment Planning and Execution, 16 Dec 09 (Added-ACC) AFI 36-3003, Military Leave Program, 26 Oct 2009 (Added-ACC) AFI 10-244, Reporting Status of Aerospace Expeditionary Forces, 12 Sep 05 AFPD 10-4, Operations Planning: Air & Space Expeditionary Force, 30 Apr 09 AFPD 38-1, Air Force Organization, 1 Jun 96 AFI 10-201, Status of Resources and Training System (SORTS), 13 Apr 06 AFI 10-209, RED HORSE Program, 13 May 08 AFI 10-210, Prime Base Engineer Emergency Force (BEEF) Program, 21 Mar 08 AFI 10-215, Personnel Support for Contingency Operations (PERSCO), 15 Nov 02 (superseded by AFI 36-3802) AFI 10-244, Reporting Status of Aerospace Expeditionary Forces, 12 Sep 05 AFI 10-402, Mobilization Planning, 9 Aug 07 AFI 10-403, Deployment Planning and Execution, 13 Jan 08 AFI 10-404, Base Support and Expeditionary Site Planning, 9 Mar 04

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AFI 25-101, War Reserve Material (WRM) Program Guidance and Procedure, 2 May 05 AFI 33-328, Administrative Orders, 16 Jan 07 AFI 36-507, Mobilization of the Civilian Work Force, 21 Jul 94 AFI 36-2110, Assignments, 20 Apr 05 AFI 36-2201 Volume 3, On the Job Training Administration, 4 Feb 05 AFI 36-2629, Individual Mobilization Augmentee Management, 10 Dec 07 AFI 36-3802, Personnel Readiness Operations, 23 Feb 09 AFI 38-101, Air Force Organization, 4 Apr 06 AFI 38-204, Programming USAF Manpower, 1 Aug 99 AFI 38-205, Manpower and Quality Readiness and Contingency Management, 18 Jun 02 War and Mobilization Plan, Volume 1 (WMP-1), Basic Plan and Supporting Supplements, Feb 07 War and Mobilization Plan, Volume 2 (WMP-2), Plans Listing and Summary, Apr 06 War and Mobilization Plan, Volume 3 (WMP-3), Combat and Support Forces, Sep 08 War and Mobilization Plan, Volume 4 (WMP-4), Wartime Aircraft Activity (WAA), Mar 07 War and Mobilization Plan, Volume 5 (WMP-5), Basic Planning Factors and Data, Apr 99 Abbreviations and Acronyms (Added-ACC) GS—General Schedule (civilian employee) AALPS— Automated Air Load Planners System AAR— After Action Report AC— Active Component ACC— Air Combat Command ACR— Authorization Change Request ACS— Agile Combat Support ADCON— Administrative Control ADP— Automated Data Processing ADVON— Advanced Echelon (also known as Initial Support Element) AEF— Air & Space Expeditionary Force AEFI— AEF Indicator AEFC— AEF Center – Superseded See AFPC/DPW AEFPP— Air & Space Expeditionary Force Presence Policy AEFSG— AEF Steering Group

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AEG— Air Expeditionary Group AES— Air Expeditionary Squadron AETC— Air Education and Training Command AETF— Air & Space Expeditionary Task Force AEW— Air Expeditionary Wing AF— Air Force AFCC— Air Force Component Command - Superseded See AFCHQ AFCENT (9 AF)— Air Forces Central AFCHQ— Air Force Component Headquarters - Superseded AFEMS— Air Force Equipment Management System AFEODESL— Air Force EOD Equipment and Supply Listing AFEUR (3 AF)— Air Forces Europe AFFOR— Air Force Forces AFI— Air Force Instruction AFISRA— Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Agency AFKOR (7 AF)— Air Forces Korea AFMA— Air Force Manpower Agency AFMC— Air Force Materiel Command AFNORTH (1 AF)— Air Forces Northern AFOG— Air Force Operations Group AFOSI— Air Force Office of Special Operations AFPAC (13 AF)— Air Forces Pacific AFPC— Air Force Personnel Center AFPC/DPW— AFPC Directorate of AEF Operations AFPEC— Air Force Planning and Execution Community AFPM— Air Force Planners Memorandum AFRC— Air Force Reserve Command AFSC— Air Force Specialty Code AFSLMO— Air Force Senior Leader Management Office AFSOC— Air Force Special Operations Command AFSOF (23 AF)— Air Forces Special Operations Forces AFSOUTH (12 AF)— Air Forces Southern

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 AFSPC— Air Force Space Command AFSTRAT—GS (8 AF) - Air Forces Strategic - Global Strike AFSTRAT—SP (14 AF) - Air Forces Strategic - Space AFTRANS (18 AF)— Air Forces Transportation AFVC— Air Force Verification Capability AFWUS— Air Force-Wide UTC Availability System - Superseded See UTC Availability AI— Air Interdiction AIA— Air Intelligence Agency - Superseded See AFISRA ALD— Availability to Load Date AMC— Air Mobility Command ANG— Air National Guard AOC— Air and Space Operations Center AOR— Area of Responsibility APOD— Aerial Port of Debarkation APOE— Aerial Port of Embarkation ARC— Air Reserve Component ART— AEF UTC Reporting Tool AS— Allowances Standards ASPEN— AeroSpace Planning and Execution Network ATC— Air Traffic Control A-UTC— Associate UTC AUTH— Authorized Personnel BDR— Battle Damage Repair BEAR— Basic Expeditionary Airfield Resources BES— Budget Estimate Submission BIDES— Basic Identity BLA— Base Level Assessment BOS— Base Operating Support (see also Expeditionary Combat Support) BSE— Base Support Element BSP— Base Support Plan - Superseded See IGESP C-MAJCOM— Component MAJCOM C-NAF— Component Numbered Air Force

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C2— Command and Control C2ISR— Command & Control, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance CAF— Combat Air Forces CAF/LSC— Combat Air Forces Logistics Support Center- Superseded See GLSC CAS— Close Air Support CAT— Crisis Action Team CBRNE— Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High Yield Explosives CCDR— Combatant Commander CDC— Career Development Course CED— Contingency, Exercise, and Deployment CEI— Critical Employment Indicator CENTAF— - Superseded AFCENT CFAST— Collaborative Force Analysis, Sustainment and Transportation CFM— Career Field Manager CFR— Code of Federal Regulations CIN— Cargo Increment Number CJCS— Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff CJCSI— CJCS Instruction CJCSM— CJCS Manual CMD— Command CMOS— Cargo Movement Operations System COA— Course of Action COMACC— Commander, Air Combat Command COMAFFOR— Commander, Air Force Forces CONOPs— Concept of Operations CONPLAN— Concept Plan CONR— CONUS NORAD Region CPG— Contingency Planning Guidance CPO— Consolidated Planning Order - Superseded See CPS CPS— Consolidated Planning Schedule CRC— Control and Reporting Center CRD— (Supported) Commander‘s Required Delivery Date

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CRG— Contingency Response Group CRGE— - Contingency Response Group Element CRM— Command Remarks CRM— Command Remark Code CS&P— Competitive Sourcing and Privatization CSAF— Chief of Staff, United States Air Force CSAR— Combat Search and Rescue CTK— Combined Tool Kits CUP— Core UTC Package - Superseded See MUG DCA— Defensive Counterair DCAPES— Deliberate and Crisis Action Planning and Execution Segments DCC— Deployment Control Center DCS— Deputy Chief of Staff DEPID— Deployment Indicator DEPORD— Deployment Order DII COE— Defense Information Infrastructure Common Operating Environment DIMHRS— Defense Integrated Military Human Resource System DISA— Defense Information Systems Agency DMLSS— Defense Medical Logistics Standard Support DOC— Designed Operational Capability DOCID— DOC Identifier DOD— Department Of Defense DODAAC— Department of Defense Address Activity Codes DOTMLP—F - Doctrine, Organization, Training, Materiel, Leadership & Education, Personnel, and Facilities DPT— Data Pattern Traffic DRI— Date Required In-place DRMD— Deployment Requirements Manning Document DRU— Direct Reporting Unit EAD— Earliest Arrival Date ECS— Expeditionary Combat Support ECAST— Enhanced Contingency-Rotational AEF Scheduling Tool EETL— Extended Estimated Tour Lengths

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EM— Equipment Management EME— Equipment Management Element EOD— Explosive Ordnance Disposal ESL— Equipment and Supply List ESP— Expeditionary Site Plan EST— Enroute Support Team ESTA— Enroute Support Team - A ESTB— Enroute Support Team - B ETL— Estimated Tour Length EXORD— Execution Order FAB— Field Assistance Branch FAC— Functional Account Code FAM— Functional Area Manager FEDLOG— Federal Logistics Record FM— Force module FM— Functional Manager FMID— Force Module Identification Code FOA— Field Operating Agency FOL— Forward Operating Location FRAG— Fragment or Fragmentation FRN— Force Requirement Number FSC— Federal Stock Class FUNCPLAN— Functional Plan GCCS— Global Command and Control System GEO— Geographic GEOLOC— Geographic Location GFM— Global Force Management GFMAP— Global Force Management Allocation Plan GFMB— Global Force Management Board GLSC— Global Logistic Support Center GMC— Global Mobility CONOPS - Superseded. See Air Mobility Operations GMFP— Global Military Force Policy

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 GMTF— Global Mobility Task Force - Superseded. See GMC GRL— Global Reach Laydown - Superseded. See GMTF GSORTS— Global Status of Resources and Training System GTN— Global Transportation Network HAF— Headquarters Air Force HNS— Host Nation Support HQ— Headquarters HUMRO— Humanitarian Relief Operations IA— Individual Augmentee IBP— Intelligence preparation of the battlespace IDO— Installation Deployment Officer IDRC— Installations Deployment Readiness Cell IGESP— In-Garrison Expeditionary Site Plan IL— Intermediate Level ILO— In-Lieu-Of ILOC— Intermediate Location IMA— Individual Mobilization Augmentee IO— Information Operations IOC— Initial Operating Capability IPB— Illustrated Parts Breakdown ISR— Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance ISU— Internal Slingable Unit IT— Information Technology JABS— Joint Action Brief Sheet JACO— (Service) Joint Action Coordinating Office JCS— Joint Chiefs of Staff JDTC— Joint Deployment Training Center JET— Joint Expeditionary Tasking JET— JOPES Editing Tool JFCOM— Joint Forces Command JFP— Joint Force Provider JMD— Joint Manpower Document

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JOPES— Joint Operation Planning and Execution System JOPESREP— Joint Operation Planning and Execution System Reporting Structure JPEC— Joint Planning and Execution Community JPERMS— JOPES Permissions Software JPG— Joint Planning Guidance JPP— Joint Presence Policy JS— Joint Staff JSCP— Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan JSPS— Joint Strategic Planning System JTF— Joint Task Force LAA— Limited Asset Availability (Enabler) LAD— Latest Arrival Date LCOM— Logistics Composite Model LD/HD— Low Density/High Demand - Superseded. See LS/HD LLD— Line Level Detail LOGDET— Logistics Detail LOGFOR— Logistics Force Packaging Module LOGMOD— Logistics Module LOI— Letter of Instruction LSA— LOGMOD Stand Alone LSA— Logistics Sustainability Analysis LS/HD— Limited Supply/High Demand MAC— MAJCOM Code MAF— Mobility Air Forces MAJCOM— Major Command MANFOR— Manpower Force Packaging System MANPER— B - Manpower and Personnel Module - Base Level MDS— Manpower Data System - Superseded See MPES MDS— Mission Design Series MEDLOG— Medical Logistics (USAF AIS) - Superseded See DMLSS MEFPAK— Manpower and Equipment Force Packages MFE— Manpower Force Element

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 MFEL— Manpower Force Element List MilPDS— Military Personnel Data System MISCAP— Mission Capability (Added-ACC) MO—-Manpower Organization MOG— Maximum on Ground MOOTW— Military Operations Other Than War MPES— Manpower Programming and Execution System MPE— Military Personnel Element MPF— Military Personnel Flight- Superseded See MPE MPRC— Manpower & Personnel Readiness Center MRA— MEFPAK Responsible Agency MRE— Meals Ready - to - Eat MUG— Multiple UTC Group NAF— Numbered Air Force NBC— Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical NEAF— Numbered Expeditionary Air Force NEO— Noncombatant Evacuation Operation (Added-ACC) NIPRNET—Non-Secure Internet Protocol Router Network NMS— National Military Strategy NORTHAF— Northern Command Air Forces - Superseded See AFNORTH NSC— National Security Council NSCS— National Security Council System NSN— National Stock Number NSS— National Security Strategy OCA— Offensive Counter Air OCI— Offensive Counterintelligence - Superseded See IO OCP— Operational Capabilities Package OFAMO— Office of FAM Oversight (Added-ACC) OI—Operational Instruction OMB— Office of Management and Budget OPLAN— Operation Plan OPORD— Operation Order

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OPR— Office of Primary Responsibility OPTEMPO— Operations Tempo OSD— Office of the Secretary of Defense PAA— Primary Aircraft Authorized - Superseded See PMAI PACAF— Pacific Air Forces PAS— Personnel Accounting Symbol PAX— Passengers PB— President‘s Budget PBD— Program Budget Decisions PC— Project Code P-Code—Posturing Code PDS— Personnel Data System PERS— Personnel Strength Authorized PERSCO— Personnel Support for Contingency Operations PERSTEMPO— Personnel Tempo PID— Plan Identification Designator PIN— Personnel Increment Number PLANORD— Planning Order PMAI— Primary Mission Aircraft Inventory PME— Professional Military Education POC— Point of Contact POD— Port of Debarkation POE— Port of Embarkation POL— Petroleum, Oils, and Lubricants POM— Program Objective Memorandum POTUS— President of the United States PPBE— Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution PR— Personnel Recovery PRF— Personnel Readiness Function PRU— Personnel Readiness Unit - Superseded. See PRF PSRB— Prioritization and Sourcing Review Board PTDO— Prepare to Deploy Order

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 RC— Reserve Component RDD— Required Delivery Date RecNum— Record Number RFAP— Rotational Forces Allocation Process RFC— Request for Capabilities RFF— Request for Forces (Added-ACC) RI—Reporting Instructions RLD— Ready to Load Date ROMO— Range of Military Operations (Added-ACC) RPT—Reclama Processing Tool RSP— Readiness Spares Package RSS— Regional Supply Squadron - Superseded. See CAF/LSC SA— Strategic Attack SBSS— Standard Base Supply System SDDG— Shipper‘s Declaration for Dangerous Goods SEAD— Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses SECAF— Secretary of the Air Force SecDef— Secretary of Defense SEI— Special Experience Identifier SHI— Special Handling Indicator SIOP— Single Integrated Operational Plan SIPRNET— Secret Internet Protocol Router Network SIPT— Scheduling Integrated Product Team SITREP— Situation Report SOF— Special Operations Forces SORTS— Status of Resources and Training System SOS— System of Systems SOUTHCOM— Southern Command SPG— Strategic Planning Guidance SPOD— Seaport of Debarkation SRC— Service Reserved Code SSAN— Social Security Account Number

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SSG— Standard Systems Group ST— Short Tons TACC— Tanker/Airlift Control Center TAG— The Adjutant General TALCE— Tanker/Airlift Control Element - Superseded. See CRG TCN— Transportation Control Number TCN— Third Country National TFA— Total Force Assessment TOA— Table of Allowance TPFDD— Time - Phased Force Deployment Data TPFDL— Time - Phased Force Deployment List TSE— Tactical Support Element TUCHA— Type Unit Characteristics TYPREP— Type Unit Data Report UAM— User Account Maintenance UCC— Unified Combatant Commander UDM— Unit Deployment Manager UIC— Unit Identification Code ULC— Unit Level Code ULN— Unit Line Number UMD— Unit Manning Document URF— Unit Request Form USAFA— United States Air Force Academy USAFE— United States Air Forces in Europe USCENTAF— United States Central Command Air Forces - Superseded See AFCENT USCENTCOM— United States Central Command USEUCOM— United States European Command USNORTHCOM— United States Northern Command USPACOM— United States Pacific Command USSOCOM— United States Special Operations Command USSOUTHCOM— United States Southern Command USSTRATCOM— United States Strategic Command

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USTRANSCOM— United States Transportation Command UTA— Unit Training Assembly UTA— UTC Availability UTC— Unit Type Code UTM— UTC Management WFHQ— Warfighting Headquarters - Superseded WG— Wing WMP— War and Mobilization Plan WPARR— War Plans Additive Requirements Report WPES— War Planning & Execution Systems WRM— War Reserve Materiel WRMO— War Reserve Materiel Officer WSTA— Weapons System Table of Allowances Terms AEF Capability Library— Consists of 100% of the USAF‘s postured capability and encompasses one iteration of each of the 41 AEF blocks plus the Enabler force AF Shortfall— The lack of forces, equipment, personnel, materiel or capability, reflected as the difference between the resources identified as a plan requirement (or Service asset) and those apportioned to a combatant commander (or assigned to the Service) for planning that would adversely affect the command‘s ability to accomplish its mission. Alignment— The determination of which AEF block/pair or Enabler a specific UTC/UIC record is postured against. Associate UTC— Unit manpower that provides a capability that is not captured in a standard UTC will be postured into an "Associate" UTC (A-UTC). A-UTCs do not have a mission capability statement and do not have a defined manpower detail. They are placeholders for all deployable positions that cannot be described or do not fit into an existing standard deployable UTC. Backfill— Reserve Component units and individuals recalled to replace deploying active units and/or individuals in the continental United States and outside the continental United States. Break the Base— A Base or Wing Commander‘s assessment, by function, of a deployed forces level at which he/she can no longer operate critical, base level, functions. Examples of such functions are base security and airfield operations. Code— 1. Any system of communication in which arbitrary groups of symbols represent units of plain text of varying length. Codes may be used for brevity or for security. 2. A cryptosystem in which the cryptographic equivalents (usually called "code groups") typically consisting of letters or digits (or both) in otherwise meaningless combinations are substituted for plain text elements which are primarily words, phrases, or sentences.

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Coding— The act of assigning availability codes to postured UTCs in the AEF availability library. Contingency Planning— (DOD) 1. The Joint Operation Planning and Execution System process involving the development of joint operation plans for contingencies identified in joint strategic planning documents. Deliberate planning is accomplished in prescribed cycles that complement other Department of Defense planning cycles in accordance with the formally established Joint Strategic Planning System. 2. A planning process for the deployment and employment of apportioned forces and resources that occurs in response to a hypothetical situation. Contingency planners rely heavily on assumptions regarding the circumstances that will exist when the plan is executed. See also Joint Operation Planning and Execution System; Joint Strategic Planning System. Crisis Action Planning— (DOD) 1. The Joint Operation Planning and Execution System process involving the time-sensitive development of joint operation plans and orders in response to an imminent crisis. Crisis action planning follows prescribed crisis action procedures to formulate and implement an effective response within the time frame permitted by the crisis. 2. The time-sensitive planning for the deployment, employment, and sustainment of assigned and allocated forces and resources that occur in response to a situation that may result in actual military operations. Crisis action planners base their plan on the circumstances that exist at the time planning occurs. Also called CAP. See also Joint Operation Planning and Execution System. Cross functional UTC—A cross-functional UTC is one made up of manpower and/or equipment from different functional areas. Members of cross-functional UTCs work together and represent their functional expertise towards a common mission goal. When functional entities in a cross functional UTC only perform functionally-unique duties, then the capability should be defined in a standard UTC with a functional mission. Single functional areas that are inherently linked to an organization UTC (e.g. a First Sergeant in a squadron-level UTC) do not constitute a cross-functional UTC. Degree of Risk— (DOD) As specified by the commander, the risk to which friendly forces may be subjected from the effects of the detonation of a nuclear weapon used in the attack of a closein enemy target; acceptable degrees of risk under differing tactical conditions are emergency, moderate, and negligible. Deliberate Planning— Superseded (see Contingency Planning). Enabler— In addition to those forces in the AEF Tempo Bands, the AEF includes strategic ―enabler‖ or common user assets, such as long-range mobility, special operations forces (SOF), space forces, and other uniquely categorized forces that provide support to authorized organizations within and outside of the Department of Defense (DOD), including Air Force movements of AEF forces. Forces postured in the Enabler categories are not given stability and predictability, and therefore should be kept to a minimum. Force Structure— Numbers, size, and composition of the units that comprise our Defense forces; e.g., divisions, ships, air wings. Hazard— (DOD) A condition with the potential to cause injury, illness, or death of personnel; damage to or loss of equipment or property; or mission degradation.

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In Place Support Requirement—A requirement that is needed at home station to conduct dayto-day operations while a base has forces deployed. In-place requirements are the absolute minimum requirements needed to keep critical base level functions operating at minimum capability. In Place Wartime Mission— - A capability that is intended to perform its wartime mission from home station. Wartime mission is considered that capability that is providing direct support to a combatant commander. These requirements should be identified in a combatant commander‘s OPLAN, or as a minimum, a Service‘s CONUS-based TPFDD. Military Capability— (DOD) The ability to achieve a specified wartime objective (win a war or battle, destroy a target set). It includes four major components: force structure, modernization, readiness, and sustainability Modernization— Technical sophistication of forces, units, weapon systems, and equipment. Readiness— The ability of forces, units, weapon systems, or equipment to deliver the outputs for which they were designed (includes the ability to deploy and employ without unacceptable delays). Sustainability— The ability to maintain the necessary level and duration of operational activity to achieve military objectives. Sustainability is a function of providing for and maintaining those levels of ready forces, materiel, and consumables necessary to support military effort. Mitigation— Actions taken to make capability available while minimizing the effect to the home station mission. Operational Capability Package (OCP)— A method of packaging command and control, operational mission, and ECS forces for presentation to a CCDR through the COMAFFOR. The OCPs provide pre-packaged capability playbooks to optimize planning. Posturing— The act of converting the unit manpower document into Unit Type Codes (UTC) and aligning them to a specific AEF block/pair. Posturing Codes (P-Codes)— Posturing codes indicate the number of UTCs that a unit has postured that are needed at homestation (either for CCDR or Service support) or are available for deployment (ref paragrah 7.13.1.1). The codes are located in the ―P-Code‖ column of the UTC Availability. The specific procedures and guidelines for determining a UTC record‘s P-Code are outlined in paragraphs 7.14. and 7.16. Range of Military Operations (ROMO)— The general categories of operations within which the military participates to fulfill the general strategic goals of the US government. These operations are broadly defined as War and Operations Other Than War. War involves combat operations and has as its general goal the ability to fight and win. Operations Other Than War may involve noncombat or combat operations; the general goals of these operations are, respectively, promote peace and deter war/resolve conflict. Reachback— (DOD) The process of obtaining products, services, and applications, or forces, or equipment, or material from organizations that are not forward deployed Reclama— A request to duly constituted authority to reconsider its decision or its proposed action (AFI 10-401). The reclama process is the process to ―request to duly constituted authority to reconsider its decision or its proposed action‖ (JP 1-02) when a valid shortfall exists or in the

350

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event the wing or tasked unit has the capability, but fulfilling the tasking would cause a severe adverse impact on the wing/unit mission (AFTTP: AF Reclama Process). It is the means for communicating the inability to meet the Combatant Commander‘s requirements when an initial requirement cannot be met. Risk— 1. Probability and severity of loss linked to hazards. 2. See degree of risk. See also hazard; risk management. Risk Assessment— (DOD) The identification and assessment of hazards (first two steps of risk management process). Risk Management— (DOD) The process of identifying, assessing, and controlling, risks arising from operational factors and making decisions that balance risk cost with mission benefits. Also called RM. See also risk. Rotational Operations— Known on going operations where a requirement is needed at a deployed location for longer than the standard, four month, AEF tasking. Forces will normally be required to deploy for a standard tour and at the completion of that tour, will be replaced by the same capability which, in turn, will be replaced. Rotational operations can be sustained indefinitely. All requirements must meet the following rotational criteria: established supported Combatant Commander rotational requirements; requirements expected to exist for greater than one calendar year; must have a PID/TPFDD/DRMD network. Steady State— The situation where a military involvement is perceived as long-term, on going and continuous. Surge— 1. An increase in the production or repair of defense goods of limited duration. (DOD Dictionary of Military Terms); 2. The condition where rotational requirements exceed the available D*S capability within the currently deployed AEF pair (AFI 10-401). Surge operations are only sustainable for a limited duration, and require greater than normal recovery/reconstitution. This may reduce the future level of capability the AEF can provide. Therefore, a surge is not authorized to support exercises or rotational presence. A surge may involve up to all AEF blocks/pairs. Surge Operations are described in AFPD 10-4, Section 4. Sustainment— (DOD) The provision of personnel, logistic, and other support required to maintain and prolong operations or combat until successful accomplishment or revision of the mission or of the national objective. Unit Type Code (UTC)— (DOD) A Joint Chiefs of Staff developed and assigned code, consisting of five characters that uniquely identify a "type unit." Unit Type Code Shortfall— When a wing or tasked installation does not possess sufficient equipment or qualified personnel to support a UTC tasking they will submit a UTC shortfall through the Installation Deployment Officer/Installation Deployment Readiness Cell via Reclama Processing Tool (RPT). Waiver— Specifications. A written authorization to accept a configuration item (CI) or other designated item, which, during production, or after having been submitted for inspection, is found to depart from specified requirements, but nevertheless is considered suitable as is or after rework by an approved method. Waiver— Decision to not require certain criteria to be met for certain reasons, such as national security.

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Attachment 2 OPERATIONAL CAPABILITIES PACKAGE TEMPLATE PLAYBOOK For OPERATIONAL CAPABILITIES PACKAGE ABC XXX.123 Title Page: SelfExplanatory

Long

Title:

Self-

Explanatory Short Title:

Self-

Explanatory OPR: Self-Explanatory Last Validation: Self-Explanatory Executive Summary: This provides the General Officer level overview the purpose of the OCP including capabilities, organization structure, scope, personnel and cargo delivery within X amount of time. IOC/ FOC. 1. Purpose: When directed by the Secretary of Defense (SecDef), the US military will..... 2. Capabilities Summary: The functional unit level detail of capabilities in the OCP, e.g. one civil engi- neering squadron, public affairs, air traffic control. 3. Org Summary: The package expressed in air expeditionary terms and intended command relation- ships. 4. Trigger Points: Events that would necessitate the activation of OCP. For example the HurCon status, landfall, 72, 24, 12-hours out, or earthquake has occurred, Presidential declaration of National emer- gency/disaster. 5. General pax/cargo summary: X PAX, X Short Tons (bulk, out size, over size, NAT) (This will come out of the executable TPFDD) 6. Estimation of execution timeline: Based on transportation and MISCAP. 7. Cost/Resources: If required include equipment reconstitution costs, per diem, lodging, and movement costs (air, and land), rental of equipment, fuel, vehicles, ETC.) Establish an ESP code to capture and track all costs. 8. Considerations/Assumptions: Site assessment must be accomplished: 8.1. Operating Location: Where will the operation take place? Existing infrastructure? 8.2. Environment: Threat assessment, terrain, weather, public health 8.3. Duration: How long will the operation last? Estimated tour length? 8.4. Power: Is there electrical power, when will it be restored?

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8.5. Water: Is there a source that can be made potable? 8.6. Food: Is it readily available? MREs? 8.7. Runway: What is its status of the airfield? Does it need to be prepared? Who is the airfield control authority? 8.8. Accessibility: What are the lines of communication, status of air, land, and sea? 8.9. Civil Situation: Are civilian authorities in control? Is there continuation of local government? 8.10. Communication: What are the communication requirements (e.g., # of telephone lines, # of unclas- sified and unclassified computer users, # of radios and frequencies)? 8.11. Security: Force protection of requirements of the deployed forces? 8.12. Fuel: Quantities and status of storage, distribution and servicing systems? 8.13. Title 32/State Active Duty Utilization: Air Reserve Component (ARC) 8.14. Legal, diplomatic considerations and interagency issues: As required 9. Capabilities Detail: Examples listed below: 9.1. Air Expeditionary Wing 9.1.1. Command Element 9.1.2. Wing Staff 9.1.3. Special Staff 9.2. Operations Group (Command Element) 9.2.1. MDS Squadron 9.2.2. Operations Support Squadron 9.2.3. Maintenance Squadron 9.3. Mission Support Group (Command Element) 9.3.1. Logistics Readiness Squadron 9.3.2. Civil Engineer Squadron 9.3.3. Security Forces Squadron 9.3.4. Communication Squadron 9.3.5. Services Squadron 9.3.6. Contracting Squadron 9.3.7. Mission Support Squadron 9.4. Medical Group 9.4.1. Medical Operation Squadron 9.4.2. Medical Support Squadron

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

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9.5. Other assigned/attached units 10. Command Relationships: See Appendix A 11. Detailed Org Chart: See Appendix A 12. UTCs/FMs provided: See DCAPES PID# XXXXX 13. Reference database: See DCAPES 14. Sequencing: Identified UTC‘s sequencing by planning and direction 15. Variations: See Matrix 1 Table A2.1. Variation Matrix Capability

Bare Base

CSL

MOB

Small

AEG

AEG Light

AES

Medium

AEW

AEW Light

AEG

Large

2X AEW

AEW Heavy

2X AEG

16. Enabling capabilities: List capabilities that FAMs believe may be needed but are not included in the OCP, e.g. Red Horse, CRG, Combat Comm, Medical 17. FAQs 17.1. Who is the OPR for cost analysis and estimate? 17.2. Who is the lead agency? 17.3. Who authorizes movement of IA forces to CAT? 17.4. When is the closure? 17.5. What are my reporting requirements? 17.6. Is sustainment required? If yes, then how long? 18. Glossary: Insert Full Glossary Appendix A: Organizational Summary

354

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

Figure A2.1. Sample OCP Organizational Structure

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 Attachment 3 DELETED

355

356

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 Attachment 4 UTC DEVELOPMENT INSTRUCTION

(To be used as a guide. MAJCOMs may develop local process/systems as long as each step below is addressed) 1. designation.

UTC

Enter the proposed UTC designation IAW AFI 10-401 Table 5.1. UTC can include the full five positions or any part thereof; e.g., 3F, 3FQ, 3FQC1 UTC 2. UTC title. The title is constructed using the instructions in Table 5.2 and is standardized for data automation pur- poses. The title is built using the Aviation or non-aviation templates in the UTM tool in DCAPES. Use approved acronyms in JP 1-0, Joint Doctrine for Personnel Support to Joint Operations. If acronym or abbreviation is new, spell out MISCAP statement. UTC Title 3. (DEPID).

Deployment indicator code

Identifies the deployment capability and composition of the UTC (Table 5.3.). DEPID 4. Unit code (ULC).

level

Indicates the relative organizational level of the unit or element (Table 5.4.). ULC 5. strength.

Approximate authorized

Include hours of operation if not included in MISCAP. Note: For aviation UTCs organic passengers equate to Aircrew and should not be included in this total. Auth Strength 6. For aviation UTCs. Indicate the number of crew members that must be subtracted from authorized personnel to obtain an accurate passenger count. No. Crew

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 7. short tons).

357

Summary level logistics data (approximate number of

Short Tons 8.Pilot unit. Provide Pilot Unit four digit PAS Code and name. A pilot unit is responsible for developing and maintain- ing standard manpower and logistics detail for each UTC it has been assigned. The goal is a uniform capability for all units that will use the UTC. Refer to 5.15.12. of this instruction for more details about Pilot Unit Responsibilities. Pilot Unit (PAS/Name/DSN phone) 9.

Type and Amount of Workload of UTC.

Capability of performance; i.e. 12/24 hour days, number of days, population served, aircraft supported. Type Amt of Workload 10.

Base Type(s).

Where the UTC may be employed - bare base, main operating base, forward operating base, or advanced operating base in accordance with JP 1-02, DOD Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. Base Type(s) 11.

Supporting UTC(s).

UTCs that are supporting this UTC. Use approved UTCs listed in the MEFPAK or input UTCs under development. Supporting UTC(s) 12.

Supported UTCs.

UTCs that are supported by this UTC. Use approved UTCs listed in the MEFPAK or input UTCs under development. Supported UTC(s) 13.

MISCAP.

The MISCAP defines the mission the UTC is capable of accomplishing. Clearly define substitution rules, as needed, i.e. AFSC, skill level requirement, grade, SEIs, equipment. Spellout all acronyms and abbre- viations used in the title and MISCAPs. Include any other pertinent information. Aviation UTCs must ref- erence to the WMP 5 rates will be entered also. Note: The MISCAP is the only part of the UTC that could be classified. Air Force UTCs are generally not classified, but if they must be classified, MISCAPs con- taining crew ratios and monthly flying hour utilization must be classified at least CONFIDENTIAL. Clas- sification of MISCAPs must not exceed SECRET. Executive Order (EO) 12958 requires originator data to be contained in all

358

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

classified MISCAPS. MISCAP

14.

Rationale or justification for UTC development.

This entry requires 1 of 5 reasons listed within paragraph 5.12.1., AFI 10-401. Rationale or Justification 15.

HAF FAM.

With whom the requirement or the HAF agency directing the development. HAF FAM/Office Symbol/DSN 16.

Command FAM.

MEFPAK Responsible Agency (MRA) FAM responsible for the request and can answer specific ques- tions concerning request activities. Command FAM/Office Symbol/DSN 17.

Cross Functional Areas.

Listing of points of contact at the command for all cross-functional UTCs. Cross Functional POC(s)/Office Symbols/DSN 18.

AETF Force Modules (FMs) impacted.

Validate if the UTC will be in an AETF FM (See Chapter 6, AFI 10-401 for details). Indicate the AETF Force Module Title and state the impact. If there are none, so state.

19.

MFEL.

Input MFEL (Manpower Force Element Listing) (if required): The MANFOR provides Air Force plan- ners with standardized force capability outlining manpower requirements for operations planning, execu- tion documents, and readiness measurement. It also provides an easy way to communicate standard planning manpower requirements to all Air Force units. MANFOR lists the specific manpower required to perform the mission defined in the UTC‘s MISCAP. Note: For assistance contact Manpower Office. FAC AFSC SEI Grade To t a l PP/GR C M D SAR PRP DTY Qty RMK

20. LOGDET. Input LOGDET (if required). Contact LOGDET Manager for assistance.

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 ATTACHMENT 5 (DELETED)

359

360

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 Attachment 6 (DELETED)

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 Attachment 7 (DELETED)

361

362

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 Attachment 8 JCS UNIT DESCRIPTOR CODES (UDCS

A8.1. JCS Unit Descriptor Codes (UDC). The mechanism for differentiating between organizations fulfilling USC Title 10 responsibilities and those designated for USC Title 10 CCDR warfighting support will be the JCS UDC. Every organization (defined by a personnel accounting symbol (PAS)) is described by a JCS UDC as Combat, Combat Support, Combat Service Support, or ―Other‖. The JCS UDC applies to the entire unit, not the AFSCs or the authorization/personnel assigned to the organization. A8.1.1. Every organization is assigned a JCS UDC when registered in the PAS table, providing the source data for registering organizations in Basic Identity Data Element (BIDE) of Global Status of Resources (GSORTS). AF/A1M is responsible for establishing policies and procedures in determining UDCs. MAJCOMs, Direct Reporting Units (DRU), and Field Operating Agencies (FOA) will coordinate changes to an organization‘s UDC through applicable HAF DCS to AF/A1M. A8.2. Determining JCS UDC for Air Force Organizations. Organizations will have only one UDC and should select the UDC that most closely describes the organization‘s primary mission. If a MAJCOM determines that an organization can be ―Other‖ or one of the ―combat‖ categories, the MAJCOM should select the combat category that most closely describes the organization‘s primary mission. The codes and definitions outlined in Tables A8.1 and A8.2 will be used to identify Air Force organizations: Table A8.1. JCS Unit Descriptor Code Type Unit

Warfighting Organizations  Combat  Combat Support  Combat Service Support Institutional Organizations  Combat/CS/CSS Resource Unit (Not used for USAF Units)  ―Other‖

Active Component

Reserve & Guard (non-EAD)

Reserve (EAD)

Guard (EAD)

A D T

G L J

1 3 5

2 4 6

W

P

7

8

X

Q

9

0

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

363

Table A8.2. UDC Unit Type Definition Type Unit Combat (C)

Definition1 Forces expected to fire weapons, conduct reconnaissance, or engage in other activities directly related to combat operations.

Combat Support (CS)

Forces whose primary mission is to provide combat support to combat forces and is a part or prepared to become a part, of a theater, command, or task force formed for combat operations (e.g., munitions, maintenance, intelligence, weather, medical, communications, etc.).

Combat Service Support (CSS)

Forces whose primary mission is to provide essential capabilities, functions, activities, and tasks necessary to sustain all elements of combat and combat support forces at all levels of war.

Includes (but not limited to) 1 All Fighter, Bomber, Reconnaissance, Special Tactics, Rescue (Guardian Angel), Special Ops, Missile, and Airborne Command and Control squadrons regardless of MAJCOM. Airlift, Refueling, Aircraft Maintenance, Munitions, Security Forces, Rescue (Aviation), Numbered AF, Air Operations, Air Control, Weather, Space (Operations, Communications, Reconnaissance, etc), Communications, Logistics Readiness, Aerial Port, Aerospace Evacuation, RED HORSE, Prime BEEF (includes engineer, fire protection, EOD, and CE Readiness personnel), Intelligence, Medical, and any FOA that has consolidated all of their resources and deploys them into theater (e.g., AF Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI) and AF Public Affairs Agency) Mission Support, Force Support, Contracting, Wing Staff Agencies, Comptroller, and select FOAs providing reach back support (e.g., AF Flight Standards Agency (AFFSA), AF Operations Group (AFOG), AF Intelligence, and Surveillance & Reconnaissance Agency (AFISRA)).

364

―Other‖

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

Any organization not designated as Combat, Combat Support, or Combat Service Support. 1. Primary functions are to recruit, organize, train, and equip Air Force members for assignment to a C/CS/CSS unit.

HQ USAF, MAJCOM support staff, Numbered AFs organized for AF support only (2nd AF), Colleges, Training, Cadets, Civil Air Patrol, Air Logistics Centers, Test/Eval, Recruiting and FOAs not considered CS or CSS.

2. Individuals assigned support the war effort according to their AFSC, experience, skills, training, and other personal qualifying factors.

Note 1: Additional codes will be added as necessary for reporting of Status of Resources and Training (SORTS). For a complete list of JCS UDC codes used throughout the Services, refer to CJCSM 3150.02. Definitions and inclusions are AF-specific and capture the unique aspects of Air Force organizations; for a more inclusive list of combat, combat support, and combat service support units, refer to AFI 10-201, Attachment 2. A8.3. JCS UDC for Organizations ―Outside‖ the Air Force. The UDC for an organization ―outside‖ the Air Force will be determined by its parent organization. If its parent organization has not designated a JCS UDC, the Air Force will assign it a JCS UDC characterized as ―Other‖ (the code itself varies depending on component, see Table A8.1). A8.3.1. Organizations ―outside‖ the Air Force can be identified by their MAJCOM code and, in some cases, by their PAS code. The MAJCOM codes listed in Table A8.3. are considered ―outside‖ the Air Force.

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 Table A8.3. Organizations ―Outside‖ the Air Force Code 1R 26 2S 30 31 33 35 37 38 39 3A 3C 3D 3G 3K 3M 3N 3O 3P 3Q 3T 3V 41 4D

Abbreviation ZFR ZBM NOR ZBE ZBD ZBF ZBG ZTR ZBK ZBL CMA ZEC ZVA EUR EUC ZSA ZLA ZPA IFA SAJ ZSD ELM ZBR NCD

Title US AFRICA Command AFELM Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) AFELM NORAD AFELM Defense Information Systems Agency AFELM Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) AFELM Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) AFELM Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) AF Element Defense Threat Reduction Agency AFELM Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) AFELM Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) Defense Contract Management Agency AFELM US Central Cmd AFELM US Special Operations Command AF Element NATO AFELM USEUCOM AFELM US Southern Command AFELM US Joint Forces Command AFELM US Pacific Command Counter Intelligence Field Activity AFELM USSTRATCOM AFELM USTRANSCOM AF Element National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency AFELM US Northern Command

365

366

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012 Attachment 9 (Added-ACC) SAMPLE ACC SPONSORED EXERCISE RECLAMA/SHORTFALL REQUEST LETTER UNCLASSIFIED (SECRET when filled in)

(Date) MEMORANDUM FOR (Address element will be the next level in the chain of command) FROM: (Tasked Commander) SUBJECT: Reclama/Shortfall Action 1. Request this Wing/Unit be relieved of subject tasking(s). Per AFI 10-401, paragraph 10.20.3.4.2 the following information is provided to support this request: a. PID: b. ULN/LNR: c. UTC: d. Line Remarks: e. Date Required In-place (DRI): f. AFSC: g. SEI: h. Date Tasking Received: i. SORTS/ART Assessment at Time of Tasking: j. SORTS/ART Assessment in System Now: 2. Provide specific reasons why assigned qualified personnel are unavailable to deploy: a. Authorized/Assigned Manning Stats (by AFSC/Skill Level) b. List assigned personnel by grade/name and provide specific reasons why each is

AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

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unavailable to support tasking. c. Provide information/emails supporting request for line remark waivers that were disapproved by the gaining commander, and/or, disapproved request for PCS delay/cancellation actions (IAW MPFM 02-28) that preclude filling of the tasking. d. (If Applicable) Additional rationale (as deemed appropriate to assist group/wing commander in making final decision on approval/disapproval) on why Wing/Unit is unable to fill the billet to include mission degradation statement (if applicable). 3. Per AFI 10-401, Para 10.21.2 and this ACC Sup paragraphs 10.21.4.8.1-10.21.4.8.1.3, the Air Force considers the following conditions as resulting in a shortfall (please check the applicable condition for this action): a. [ ] Condition #1: Insufficient authorized, assigned, trained, qualified, or eligible personnel. b. [ ] Condition #2: Insufficient authorized, on-hand, or serviceable equipment. c. [ ] Condition #3: No appropriate capability available in the on-call AEF pair or Enabler. d. [ ] Condition #4: Desired capability not inherent within unit, MAJCOM, or U.S. Air Force. e. [ ] Condition #5: Wing or tasked unit has the capability but fulfilling the tasking would cause a severe adverse impact on the wing/unit mission or sourcing the tasking would require min-surge (tasking DWX or DXX). 4. Any question on this matter should be directed to (ensure a POC with phone number is listed).

(SIGNATURE BLOCK OF TASKED COMMANDER) 1st Ind, GROUP COMMANDER, Shortfall Request, (date of memo) MEMORANDUM FOR WING COMMANDER Recommend approval/disapproval (prior to forwarding to next level, disapproval must be lined through)

(SIGNATURE BLOCK

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AFI10-401_ACCSUP_I 21 FEBRUARY 2012

W/DATE OF GROUP/CC) 2nd Ind WING COMMANDER MEMORANDUM FOR MISSION SUPPORT SQ/PERSONNEL READINESS UNIT Submit Reclama/shortfall action for MAJCOM approval.

(SIGNATURE BLOCK W/DATE OF WING/CC) 3rd Ind, MEMORANDUM FOR HQ ACC/A3OP Shortfall request is forwarded for your action/processing with the ACC FAM.

(SIGNATURE BLOCK W/DATE OF PRF REP) NOTE: This template provides the minimum information required to allow the ACC FAM to render a decision on your Reclama action. Modify or add to it as needed to ensure sufficient information is provided for the decision process. REMEMBER, once info UNCLASSIFIED (SECRET when filled in)

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BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE AIR FORCE INSTRUCTION 10-401 7 DECEMBER 2006 Incorporating Through Change 3, 20 July 2010 AIR COMBAT COMMA...

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