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BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE

AIR FORCE INSTRUCTION 38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 Manpower and Organization AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION

COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available on the e-Publishing website at www.e-publishing.af.mil for downloading or ordering. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication.

OPR: HQ USAF/A1MO Supersedes:

AFI 38-101, 16 March 2011

Certified by: SAF/MR (Mr. Daniel R. Sitterly) Pages: 117

This Instruction implements AFPD 38-1, Organization and Unit Designations. It describes the objectives and principles of Air Force organization. It prescribes various levels and standard structures for organizations and it outlines procedures for establishing and modifying organizations. This publication applies to Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC) and the Air National Guard (ANG) to the extent that it has the organizations and functions discussed herein. In collaboration with the Chief of Air Force Reserve (AF/RE) and the Director of the Air National Guard (NGB/CF), the Deputy Chief of Staff for Manpower, Personnel and Services (AF/A1) develops policy for the Air Force Organization. This AFI may be supplemented at any level; all MAJCOM level supplements must be approved by the Human Resource Management Strategic Board (HSB) prior to certification and approval. Supplements (other than ANG and AFRC) are routed to Headquarters United States Air Force (HQ USAF) Manpower, Organization and Resources, Organization Division (AF/A1MO) for coordination prior to further staffing. AFI content changes related to ANG and AFRC should be approved by NGB/CF through the ANG Manpower, Organization and Resources Division (NGB/A1M); or AF/RE through the AFRC Manpower, Organization and Resources Division (AFRC/A1M), respectively. Refer recommended changes and questions about this publication to AF/A1MO using the AF Form 847, Recommendation for Change of Publication; route AF Forms 847 from the field through the Major Command (MAJCOM) manpower, organization and resources division. Ensure that all records created as a result of processes prescribed in this publication are maintained in accordance with Air Force Manual (AFMAN) 33-363, Management of Records, and disposed of in accordance with Air Force Records Information Management System (AFRIMS) Records

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017

Disposition Schedule (RDS). The authorities to waive wing/unit level requirements in this publication are identified with a Tier (“T-0, T-1, T-2, T-3”) number following the compliance statement. See AFI 33-360, Publications and Forms Management, for a description of the authorities associated with the Tier numbers. Submit requests for waivers through the chain of command to the appropriate Tier waiver approval authority, or alternately, to the publication OPR for non-tiered compliance items. The use of a name or mark of any specific manufacturer, commercial product, commodity, or service in this publication does not imply endorsement by the Air Force. SUMMARY OF CHANGES This revision makes a number organizational updates, clarifications and administrative and formatting changes. Specific administrative and formatting changes include: adding tiering requirements; updating publication references, examples and offices symbols; numbers the narrative parts of the standard structures for ease of reference and to facilitate future updates; and adding descriptions for the standard squadrons depicted in this AFI. The revision updates organization size guidance to incorporate specialized organization size guidance for Air Reserve Component, medical and comptroller units. It also adds a note to the organization size guidance regarding upcoming changes to the source for contractor information, clarifies guidance on student population included in organization sizing, adds guidance on Foreign National Indirect Hire civilians, and renumbers sections as needed. The revision incorporates approved changes to functional organization structures: makes Wing Staff changes to update responsibilities for Inspector General and Plans functions; updates Information Protection and Equal Opportunity descriptions; realigns the Antiterrorism Officer from wing level to the Security Forces Squadron; adds Installation Resilience Program reference; updates the Comptroller Squadron to reflect realignment of resource advisors; adds options regarding alignment of Intelligence in the Operations Group and Operations Support Squadron; adds detail and standardized Office Symbol Codes to the Operations Squadron; updates the operations squadron structure for Missile Squadrons; realigns Ground Radar and Airfield Systems responsibilities from the Communications Squadron to the Operations Support Squadron; eliminates the Maintenance Operations Squadrons, adds Maintenance Squadron for Missile Organizations and updates the Maintenance Group to reflect realignment of maintenance operations functions to it; revises Missile Maintenance Squadron flight descriptions; changes the Office Symbol Codes in the Contracting Squadron; updates the Civil Engineer (CE) Squadron due to CE transformation; changes Honor Guard alignment within the Force Support Squadron; and revises the Logistics Readiness Squadron due to functional updates. The revision makes a number of minor updates to the medical unit structures including: addressing functional advisors; reflecting realignment of the Drug Demand Reduction Program from the Mental Health Flight in the Medical Operations Squadron to under the wing commander; updating Aerospace and Operational Physiology Flight name in Medical Operations Squadron and Aerospace Medicine Squadron; eliminating Trainee Health flights from the Aerospace Medicine Squadron and Health and Wellness Centers from the Health Promotion Flight in the Aerospace Medicine Squadron; and updating the Inpatient Operations Squadron and Surgical Operations Squadron Perioperative Flight and Surgical Services Flight descriptions, respectively, to change central sterile supply to sterile processing department. The revision updates Office Symbol Code (OSC) guidance, including updating the character limit for office OSC titles in data systems and adding guidance

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relevant to OSCs as used in MPES that was recently deleted from AFMAN 33-326, Preparing Official Communications. It adds or modifies information for certain types of organizations based on recent reorganizations (Component MAJCOM, Complex, Center, Named Component Headquarters, Air Operations Centers, and Commanders Support Staff). It clarifies named activity information and adds a triennial review. It adds a note to HQ USAF definition advising that additional information on HQ USAF can be found in AFMD 1, Headquarters Air Force. It modifies Figure 2.1, Organizational Schemes, to reflect addition of complexes and make formatting changes for clarity. It clarifies: language concerning commandants and fixes paragraph numbering; that standard structures apply to units designated as flights vs. squadrons due to organization size guidance and to similarly named units that include Special Operations in their designations; that guidance concerning attachment of wing staff personnel to Comptroller Squadrons also applies to Regular Air Force (RegAF) Comptroller Flights; authority for detachment and operating location actions; language on linking A-staff OSCs in MAJCOM headquarters; wording on certain Organization Change Request (OCR) questions (3, 6 and 8); guidance for reassignment of units between commands; guidance on when an OCR is not required for a unit action due to inclusion in a Program Action Directive, force structure inactivation, etc.; and some aspects of action effective dates as they relate to DAF/A1M letters. In addition, it clarifies and updates some areas of the provisional unit guidance. It adds a reminder about various types of notification requirements. It adds reference to appropriate AFIs for management headquarters activity guidance. It updates size guidance associated with establishment of squadron sections. It revises language on Air Force Elements to clarify that it does not apply to other types of elements. Status Change is added to the Organizational Terminology. It updates detachment & operating location information. It deletes references to A7. Chapter 1— AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION OBJECTIVES, PRINCIPLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

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1.1.

Organization Objectives..........................................................................................

9

1.2.

Organization Principles...........................................................................................

9

1.3.

Responsibilities Assigned: ......................................................................................

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Chapter 2— STANDARD LEVELS OF AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION & ASSOCIATED TERMS

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2.1.

Organizational Entities. ..........................................................................................

11

2.2.

Standard Levels of Air Force Organization. ...........................................................

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Figure 2.1.

Organizational Schemes..........................................................................................

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Table 2.1.

Decision Levels for Waivers to Wing, Group and Squadron Size Guidance. ........

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2.3.

Standard Elements of Air Force Organization. .......................................................

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Chapter 3— STANDARD ORGANIZATIONS 3.1.

Organization Structure. ...........................................................................................

24 24

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 3.2.

Numbered/Named Air Force (NAF). ......................................................................

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Figure 3.1.

Basic NAF Structure (Applies to NAFs that are not C-NAFs). ..............................

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Figure 3.2.

Component NAF Structure. ....................................................................................

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3.3.

Standard Wing. .......................................................................................................

26

Figure 3.3.

Wing Structure. .......................................................................................................

26

3.4.

Wing Staff. ..............................................................................................................

27

Figure 3.4.

Wing Staff Structure. ..............................................................................................

27

3.5.

Comptroller Squadron.............................................................................................

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Figure 3.5.

Comptroller Squadron Structure. ............................................................................

30

3.6.

Operations Group. ...................................................................................................

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Figure 3.6.

Operations Group Structure. ...................................................................................

31

3.7.

Operations Support Squadron. ................................................................................

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Figure 3.7.

Operations Support Squadron Structure. ................................................................

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3.8.

Operations Squadron...............................................................................................

34

Figure 3.8.

Operations Squadron Structure. ..............................................................................

34

3.9.

Operations Squadron Structure for Space Launch Squadrons. ...............................

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Figure 3.9.

Operations Squadron Structure for Space Launch Squadrons. ...............................

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3.10.

Operations Squadron Structure for Missile Squadrons. ..........................................

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Figure 3.10.

Operations Squadron Structure for Missile Squadrons. ..........................................

36

3.11.

Operations Squadron Structure for Space Operations and Space Warning Squadrons.................................................................................................................

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Operations Squadron Structure for Space Operations and Space Warning Squadrons.................................................................................................................

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3.12.

Operations Squadron Structure for Aeromedical Evacuation Squadrons. ..............

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Figure 3.12.

Operations Squadron Structure for Aeromedical Evacuation Squadrons. ..............

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3.13.

Maintenance Group.................................................................................................

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Figure 3.13.

Maintenance Group Structure. ................................................................................

38

3.14.

Maintenance Squadron for Missile Organizations. .................................................

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Figure 3.14.

Maintenance Squadron Structure for Missile Organizations. .................................

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Figure 3.11.

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017

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3.15.

Aircraft Maintenance Squadron. .............................................................................

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Figure 3.15.

Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Structure. .............................................................

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3.16.

Maintenance Squadron. ..........................................................................................

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Figure 3.16.

Maintenance Squadron Structure. ...........................................................................

41

3.17.

Missile Maintenance Squadron. ..............................................................................

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Figure 3.17.

Missile Maintenance Squadron Structure. ..............................................................

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3.18.

Equipment Maintenance Squadron. ........................................................................

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Figure 3.18.

Equipment Maintenance Squadron Structure. ........................................................

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3.19.

Component Maintenance Squadron. .......................................................................

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Figure 3.19.

Component Maintenance Squadron Structure. .......................................................

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3.20.

Munitions Squadron. ...............................................................................................

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Figure 3.20.

Munitions Squadron Structure. ...............................................................................

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3.21.

Mission Support Group. ..........................................................................................

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Figure 3.21.

Mission Support Group Structure. ..........................................................................

46

3.22.

Contracting Squadron. ............................................................................................

46

Figure 3.22.

Contracting Squadron Structure. .............................................................................

46

3.23.

Logistics Readiness Squadron. ...............................................................................

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Figure 3.23.

Logistics Readiness Squadron Structure. ................................................................

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3.24.

Force Support Squadron. ........................................................................................

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Figure 3.24.

Force Support Squadron Structure. .........................................................................

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3.25.

Security Forces Squadron. ......................................................................................

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Figure 3.25.

Security Forces Squadron Structure........................................................................

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3.26.

Civil Engineer Squadron. ........................................................................................

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Figure 3.26.

Civil Engineer Squadron Structure. ........................................................................

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3.27.

Communications Squadron. ....................................................................................

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Figure 3.27.

Communications Squadron Structure. ....................................................................

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3.28.

Medical Group. .......................................................................................................

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Figure 3.28.

Medical Group Structure.........................................................................................

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3.29.

Medical Support Squadron. ....................................................................................

56

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017

Figure 3.29.

Medical Support Squadron Structure. .....................................................................

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3.30.

Medical Operations Squadron.................................................................................

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Figure 3.30.

Medical Operations Squadron Structure. ................................................................

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3.31.

Aerospace Medicine Squadron. ..............................................................................

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Figure 3.31.

Aerospace Medicine Squadron Structure................................................................

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3.32.

Dental Squadron. ....................................................................................................

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Figure 3.32.

Dental Squadron Structure. .....................................................................................

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3.33.

Inpatient Operations Squadron. ..............................................................................

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Figure 3.33.

Inpatient Operations Squadron Structure. ...............................................................

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3.34.

Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron. ................................................................

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Figure 3.34.

Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron Structure. ................................................

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3.35.

Surgical Operations Squadron. ...............................................................................

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Chapter 4— TERMINOLOGY AND PROCEDURES FOR ORGANIZATION ACTIONS

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4.1.

Organization Actions. .............................................................................................

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4.2.

Organization Terminology: .....................................................................................

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4.3.

Organization Procedures. ........................................................................................

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4.4.

Office Symbol Codes. .............................................................................................

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Figure 4.1.

Standard 2-Letter A-Staff OSCs. ............................................................................

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Chapter 5— PROCEDURES FOR NAMING AND NUMBERING UNITS

76

5.1.

Nomenclature. .........................................................................................................

76

5.2.

General Guidelines. ................................................................................................

76

Figure 5.1.

Unit Designation Examples. ...................................................................................

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5.3.

Unit Number: ..........................................................................................................

76

5.4.

Unit Kind: ...............................................................................................................

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5.5.

Unit Type: ...............................................................................................................

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5.6.

New Nomenclature. ................................................................................................

77

5.7.

Procedures for Unit Designation:............................................................................

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Chapter 6— ORGANIZATION CHANGES 6.1.

Actions Requiring AF/A1M Approval. ..................................................................

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017

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Table 6.1.

OCR Approval Levels for Actions Submitted to AF/A1M. ...................................

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6.2.

Organization Change Request (OCR). ....................................................................

80

6.3.

Testing New Organizations.....................................................................................

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Chapter 7— ORGANIZATION DOCUMENTATION

85

7.1.

Implementation Authority. ......................................................................................

85

7.2.

Distribution Requirements ......................................................................................

87

7.3.

Headquarters Department of the Air Force Organization Chart. ............................

87

Figure 7.1.

Sample DAF/A1M Letter--Constitute and Assign for Activation. .........................

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Figure 7.2.

Sample DAF/A1M Letter--Reconstitute and Assign for Activation.......................

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Figure 7.3.

Sample DAF/A1M Letter--Redesignation. .............................................................

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Figure 7.4.

Sample DAF/A1M Letter--Inactivation. .................................................................

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Figure 7.5.

Sample DAF/A1M Letter—Reassignment Between Commands. ..........................

92

Figure 7.6.

Sample Special Order--Activate. ............................................................................

93

Figure 7.7.

Sample Special Order--Redesignate. ......................................................................

93

Figure 7.8.

Sample Special Order--Inactivate. ..........................................................................

94

Figure 7.9.

Sample Special Order—Multiple Unit Actions. .....................................................

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Figure 7.10.

Sample Special Order—Reassign Within a MAJCOM, FOA or DRU. .................

96

Figure 7.11.

Sample Special Orders—Reassign Between MAJCOMs, FOAs or DRUs. ...........

97

Figure 7.12.

Sample Special Order—Activate/Inactivate Detachment/Operating Location.......

98

Chapter 8— ORGANIZING PROVISIONAL UNITS

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8.1.

Provisional Unit. .....................................................................................................

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8.2.

Types of provisional units.......................................................................................

99

8.3.

PAS Codes ..............................................................................................................

100

8.4.

History ....................................................................................................................

100

8.5.

Designations............................................................................................................

101

8.6.

Air Expeditionary Task Force (AETF). ..................................................................

101

8.7.

Air Expeditionary Force (AEF) Organization: .......................................................

102

Figure 8.1.

Expeditionary Unit Naming & Numbering Guidelines. .........................................

103

8.8.

Attaching/Assigning Provisional Units...................................................................

105

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 8.9.

Administrative Control (ADCON) .........................................................................

105

8.10.

UCMJ authority resides concurrently with the commanders in the assigned and attached units, and does not need to be explicitly stated in G-series orders. ...........

105

G-Series Orders.......................................................................................................

105

Figure 8.2.

Example of a DAF Letter Assigning Rainbow Units to a MAJCOM. ...................

107

Figure 8.3.

Example of G-Series Order for Traditional Provisional Unit. ................................

108

Figure 8.4.

Example of G-Series Order for Exercise, Major Force Provider Unit. ...................

109

Figure 8.5.

Example of G-Series Order for Major Force Provider Expeditionary Unit. ...........

110

Figure 8.6.

Example of G-Series Order for Major Force Provider Expeditionary Unit. ...........

111

8.11.

Attachment 1— GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION

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Chapter 1 AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION OBJECTIVES, PRINCIPLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 1.1. Organization Objectives. Air Force organizations are designed to achieve the characteristics outlined in AFPD 38-1. 1.2. Organization Principles. Air Force organizational structure follows these management principles: 1.2.1. Emphasis on Wartime Tasks. Organizations are structured to accomplish wartime tasks without reorganizing. 1.2.2. Functional Grouping. Organizations have these characteristics: a clear-cut purpose, goal and scope, with one individual in charge; parts that form a logical, separable activity; a close relationship among the parts, constituting a complete entity; and natural divisions of work that clearly define where responsibility begins and ends. 1.2.3. Lean Organizational Structures. Organizations should encourage rapid decision making, so they should be flat structures without intermediate levels, unless mission requirements cannot otherwise be met. When used, intermediate organizations should consist of tactical functions only, without a full range of staff functions. Organizational levels that exist only to review and transmit information or tasking should be eliminated. Both the number of supervisors and the number of internal subdivisions within organizations should be designed to minimize layers and maximize worker-to-supervisor ratios. 1.2.4. Skip-Echelon Structure. Major commands (MAJCOM) sit on top of a skip-echelon staffing structure. MAJCOMs, wings and squadrons possess the full range of staff functions needed to perform required tasks. Numbered/named air forces (NAF), groups and flights have no or minimal staff. These tactical echelons are designed to increase operational effectiveness rather than to review and transmit paperwork. The chain of command and responsibility for mission accomplishment runs through commanders at all levels. Problems, however, often are solved by staff communication through the functional chain, bypassing echelons where the function is not found. (Note: Component NAFs (C-NAFs) possess a broader staff to support the Air Force component commander; see Paragraph 2.2.5.2 and Figure 3.2.) 1.2.5. Standard Levels. The Air Force uses the standard levels described in Chapter 2 to design organizations. Establish organizations at the lowest level required to successfully accomplish the primary mission. Factors such as scope of responsibility, span of control and functional grouping of related missions/activities are the predominant factors that determine organizational type. 1.3. Responsibilities Assigned: 1.3.1. Headquarters US Air Force (HQ USAF) and the MAJCOMs, field operating agencies (FOA), and direct reporting units (DRU) work toward meeting Air Force organizational goals. The Director of Manpower, Organization and Resources (AF/A1M) is responsible for

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 leading and monitoring progress. HQ USAF functional chiefs give assistance in their functional areas. 1.3.2. AF/A1M is responsible for the administrative control of all units in the Air Force. It publishes Department of the Air Force (DAF/A1M) letters, which are the legal authority for a unit and authorize such actions as unit activations, redesignations and inactivations. 1.3.3. MAJCOMs, FOAs, and DRUs must follow the organizational procedures and standard structures described herein. (T-1) A MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU must have AF/A1M approval to deviate from a standard structure and to activate, redesignate, or inactivate units (see Chapter 6 for procedures). (T-1). MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs approve non-standard organizational structures while adhering to applicable guidance. HQ USAF offices, designated FOAs and other supported organizations work with the HQ USAF Resources Directorate (SAF/AAR) for approval of non-standard organizational structures. 1.3.4. Individual unit commanders must use the standard organizational structures found in this Instruction. (T-1). If a unit's unique mission or location requires a different structure, a waiver to the standard structure can be requested using the organizational change procedures found in Chapter 6. Units work with their servicing Manpower and Organization activity on such requests (for most field units, this activity is in the Manpower and Personnel Flight of the base Force Support Squadron).

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Chapter 2 STANDARD LEVELS OF AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION & ASSOCIATED TERMS (Note: See Chapter 4 for related terminology and procedures.) 2.1. Organizational Entities. The Air Force is comprised of establishments, units, and nonunits. 2.1.1. Establishment. An organizational entity consisting of a headquarters unit and its subordinate units. The name of the establishment is in the name of the headquarters unit. For example, Air Mobility Command (AMC) is an establishment; HQ AMC is its headquarters. Subordinate units are assigned to the establishment and not to the headquarters unit. 2.1.1.1. A group with subordinate squadrons is generally the lowest-level establishment. Lower-level establishments are assigned to higher-level ones; for example: groups to wings, wings to NAFs, NAFs to MAJCOMs, MAJCOMs to HQ USAF. This arrangement (units reporting to establishments, subordinate establishments to superior ones) sets up the chain of command, through which all control and accountability flow. 2.1.1.2. Establishments facilitate organizational actions. For example, the reassignment of a wing (establishment) from one NAF to another automatically reassigns the wing's subordinate units. 2.1.2. Unit. A military organization constituted by HQ USAF or, for provisional units only, designated by a MAJCOM, FOA or DRU. A unit is either named or numbered. 2.1.2.1. A unit helps provide for an unbroken chain of command since military personnel are assigned to a unit at all times. Normally, a unit having military members has an officer designated as its commander. A civilian may lead a unit in approved circumstances, and provide supervision to military and civilian personnel in the unit. Appointment of a civilian to lead a unit designates that unit as civilian-led. When a civilian is appointed to lead a unit, that individual is the director of that unit. (In the case of a civilian-led unit, the chain of command is maintained by having it reside with the first military unit commander above the civilian-led unit.) 2.1.2.1.1. Civilians cannot assume military command or exercise command over military members within the unit. Units designated to be led by directors will not have commanders and alternative arrangements for functions, which are performed by commanders, are required (see AFI 51-604, Appointment to and Assumption of Command). (T-0). A civilian director of a unit is authorized to perform all functions normally performed by a unit commander of like position and authority except as required by law (e.g., Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ)) or controlling superior authority (e.g., Department of Defense (DoD) guidance, instruction by a superior commander). For guidance concerning whether an authority or action is explicitly reserved for military commanders, contact the servicing staff judge advocate. 2.1.2.2. The following terms apply to a unit:

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 2.1.2.2.1. Active Unit. A MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU constituted and activated by HQ USAF; or a subordinate unit constituted by HQ USAF, assigned to a MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU and activated by special order. 2.1.2.2.2. Inactive Unit. A unit constituted by HQ USAF but not yet activated or a unit constituted, activated and subsequently, inactivated. 2.1.2.2.3. Disbanded Unit. A unit whose legal authority for existence is withdrawn by HQ USAF. Its designation is retired and preserved in historical records. 2.1.2.2.4. Parent Unit. An organization that directly administers units, detachments, or operating locations assigned to it. 2.1.2.2.5. Provisional Unit. A temporary unit organized to perform a specific task. (See Chapter 8 for guidance on provisional units.) 2.1.2.2.6. Attached Unit. A unit, or part of a unit, placed under the control of another organization for a specific purpose such as operational control, administrative control, or logistic support. It is still assigned to the parent unit. 2.1.2.2.7. Detached Unit. A unit serving away from its organization of assignment. It may function independently, or may be attached to another organization. 2.1.2.2.8. Primary Subordinate Unit (PSU). A unit that performs part or all of the primary mission of the organization to which it is assigned. The unit reports to the commander of the parent organization and has full authority to execute its assigned mission. A PSU’s purpose is to perform part of its parent organization’s main mission and not to provide support functions for its parent headquarters. Under a MAJCOM, examples include NAFs, Air University (AETC) and the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center (AFMC). Similarly, under a wing, squadrons are PSUs of their group and the groups are PSUs of the wing. 2.1.3. Nonunit. An organizational entity that is not constituted by HQ USAF as a unit. 2.1.3.1. The following terms apply to a nonunit: 2.1.3.1.1. Named Activity. A part of a unit whose mission can be identified better by assigning it a definitive name (for example, the Civil Engineer School is part of a unit, the Air Force Institute of Technology). HQ USAF is responsible for administering the designation, redesignation and inactivation of named activities and authorizes them by issuing DAF/A1M letters. Every three years, AF/A1MO will conduct a review with the MAJCOMs, FOAs, DRUs and SAF/AAR to validate the continuing requirement and proper alignment of named activities. Note: Activity should not be used in unit designations to avoid confusion with named activities (which are nonunits). 2.1.3.1.2. Detachment. Part of a unit that is separated geographically from its parent unit. Although not a unit for organizational purposes, if a commissioned officer is assigned and appointed on orders as a commander, the commander has nonjudicial punishment authority under the UCMJ unless withheld by superior competent authority (see AFI 51-202, Nonjudicial Punishment).

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2.1.3.1.3. Operating Location. Part of a unit that is separated geographically from its parent unit. It is used to account for personnel by location. Personnel remain assigned to the parent unit. An operating location has none of the administrative attributes of a unit and does not have nonjudicial punishment authority under the UCMJ. 2.1.3.1.4. Squadron Section. A function responsible for the administrative control of all members assigned to a unit. A squadron section is created by appointing a section commander on special orders in accordance with guidance in AFI 51-604. A squadron section commander has nonjudicial punishment authority under the UCMJ unless withheld by superior competent authority (see AFI 51-202). Section commanders at other organizational levels may use a term reflecting their unit level, e.g., Group Section Commander, etc. 2.1.3.1.5. Commanders Support Staff. A function responsible for providing direct support for a unit or section commander, primarily in administering unit personnel and administrative programs. In squadrons, the function uses the office symbol code (OSC) “CCQ” and OSC title “Orderly Room.” Above the squadron level, the OSC is “CSS” and the office title is “Commanders Support Staff.” When there is a squadron section, this function falls under it. 2.1.3.1.6. Air Force Element. A non-unit nomenclature used to account for manpower authorizations and to identify Air Force personnel on duty with organizations outside the Air Force, such as defense agencies, defense field activities and Air National Guard units not in federal service. Although not a unit for organizational purposes, an Air Force Element may function as a unit if so designated by competent authority, an eligible commissioned officer either assumes command or is appointed to command and Air Force members are assigned or attached to the Air Force Element (see Paragraph 4.3.3.5). 2.2. Standard Levels of Air Force Organization. The following standard levels of organization are used in structuring and designating Air Force units: (Note: Consult AFI 38-204, Programming USAF Manpower, and AFI 38-202, Air Force Management Headquarters and Headquarters Support Activities, for direction on how Major DoD Headquarters Activities guidance affects certain types of USAF organizations, in particular, HQ USAF, MAJCOMs, FOAs, DRUs and NAFs.) 2.2.1. Headquarters US Air Force (HQ USAF). The senior headquarters of the Air Force, consisting of two major entities: the Secretariat (including the Secretary of the Air Force and the Secretary's principal staff) and the Air Staff, headed by the Chief of Staff. Note: Detailed information on HQ USAF’s mission, command structure and responsibilities can be found in Air Force Mission Directive (AFMD) 1, Headquarters Air Force. 2.2.2. Major Command (MAJCOM). A major subdivision of the Air Force that is assigned a major part of the Air Force mission. A MAJCOM is directly subordinate to HQ USAF. Most MAJCOMs have the word Command as part of their designation; Command should not be used in the designation of any unit that is not a MAJCOM. MAJCOM headquarters have the full range of functional staff (excluding functions that have been centralized elsewhere for Air Force-wide execution). MAJCOMs, in turn, may be subdivided according to either of the organizational schemes shown in Figure 2.1. The levels in each scheme are in

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 descending order and represent levels of assignment. A unit cannot be assigned to an organization of equivalent or lower level. For example, a group can be assigned to any organization listed above it, but a group cannot be assigned to another group or to a squadron.

Figure 2.1. Organizational Schemes. Unit Oriented Scheme Major Command NAF Wing Group Squadron Flight Scheme with Major Non-Unit Organizations - The terms below “Complex” represent internal staff structure and are not units as defined in Paragraph 2.1.2. Major Command Center Complex Directorate (limited use) Division Branch Section 2.2.2.1. Lead MAJCOM. A type of MAJCOM that consolidates responsibilities for a particular function in a single MAJCOM, supporting the entire Air Force as applicable. For example, Air Education and Training Command is the Lead MAJCOM for education and training. 2.2.2.2. Component MAJCOM (C-MAJCOM). A type of MAJCOM that is the USAF component to a Unified Combatant Command. For example, Pacific Air Forces (PACAF) is a C-MAJCOM that is the USAF component to United States Pacific Command (USPACOM). A C-MAJCOM is commanded by the Commander of Air Force Forces (COMAFFOR) and includes supporting staff and all assigned and attached forces. A C-MAJCOM may have one or more C-NAFs through which it presents its forces to the Combatant Commander (CCDR). The C-MAJCOM integrates, at the strategic level, component activities across all phases of conflict. The C-MAJCOM staff should not duplicate the functions of the C-NAF AFFOR staff or Air Operations Center (AOC) (see Figure 3.2). The C-MAJCOM commander is the CCDR’s theater COMAFFOR and may function as a theater Joint Force Air Component Commander (JFACC) when required. Refer to Air Force Doctrine Volume 3, Command, for additional information on component relationships and roles. Note: A MAJCOM can be both a C-MAJCOM and a Lead MAJCOM. 2.2.3. Direct Reporting Unit (DRU). A subdivision of the Air Force, directly subordinate to the Chief of Staff, US Air Force. A DRU performs a mission that does not fit into any of the MAJCOMs. A DRU has many of the same administrative and organizational responsibilities as a MAJCOM.

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2.2.3.1. Major Command Direct Reporting Unit (MAJCOM DRU). DRU also applies to a subdivision of a MAJCOM. A MAJCOM DRU reports directly to the MAJCOM commander and performs a mission that does not fit into any of the MAJCOM's primary subordinate units. (Note: See Paragraph 6.2.4. for additional guidance on establishment of DRUs or MAJCOM DRUs.) 2.2.4. Field Operating Agency (FOA). A subdivision of the Air Force, directly subordinate to a HQ USAF functional manager. A FOA performs field activities beyond the scope of any of the major commands. The activities are specialized or associated with an Air Force-wide mission and should minimize staff functions. Air Force FOAs usually have the word Agency as part of their designation; Agency should not be used in the designation of any unit that is not a FOA directly under HQ USAF. Note: Organization guidance for MAJCOMs also applies to the large Air Force FOAs that are structured along MAJCOM lines. 2.2.4.1. Major Command Field Operating Agency (MAJCOM FOA). FOA also applies to a subdivision of a MAJCOM. A MAJCOM FOA reports directly to a MAJCOM functional principal (e.g., 2-letter office such as director) and performs specialized field activities beyond the scope of any of the MAJCOM's primary subordinate units. The activities are specialized and are associated with MAJCOM or theater-wide missions that transcend the scope of routine wing functions. FOAs should minimize staff functions. (Note: See Paragraph 6.2.4. for additional guidance on establishment of FOAs or MAJCOM FOAs.) 2.2.5. Numbered/Named Air Force (NAF). A level of command directly under a MAJCOM. NAFs provide operational leadership and supervision. A NAF is assigned subordinate units, such as wings, groups and squadrons. They do not have complete functional staffs. 2.2.5.1. NAFs designated as component NAFs (C-NAF) support the Air Force component commander (COMAFFOR) at the operational and tactical level. When designated as the Air Force component to a Unified Combatant Command (UCC), the component NAF will function at the strategic, operational and tactical level. A C-NAF is authorized a broader staff as depicted in Figure 3.2. 2.2.5.2. The number of persons assigned to a NAF headquarters varies from case to case, but, with the exception of C-NAFs, should not exceed 99 manpower authorizations without an approved waiver from AF/A1M. The size of the C-NAF headquarters staff is not limited to 99 manpower authorizations. 2.2.6. Wing. A level of command below the NAF or higher headquarters. A wing has a distinct mission with significant scope. A wing is usually composed of a primary mission group (e.g., operations, training) and the necessary supporting groups. By pulling together the mission and support elements, a wing provides a significant capability under a single commander. It is often responsible for maintaining the installation. A wing will have several squadrons in more than one dependent group. (T-1). Wings will have a minimum adjusted population of at least 1,000 per Paragraph 2.2.15. (T-1). A wing may be either an operational wing, an air base wing, or a specialized mission wing. 2.2.6.1. Operational Wing. A wing that has an operations group and related operational mission activity assigned to it. When an operational wing performs the primary mission of the base, it usually maintains and operates the base. In addition, an operational wing is

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 capable of self-support in functional areas like maintenance, supply and conventional munitions, as needed. When an operational wing is a tenant organization, the host organization provides it with varying degrees of base and logistics support. 2.2.6.2. Air Base Wing. A wing that performs a support rather than an operational mission. It maintains and operates a base. An air base wing sometimes provides functional support to a MAJCOM headquarters. 2.2.6.3. Specialized Mission Wing. A wing that performs a specialized mission and usually does not have aircraft or missiles assigned to it. For example, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance wing; training wing and so on. This wing may be either a host wing or a tenant wing, depending on whether it maintains and operates the base. 2.2.7. Group. A level of command between wings and squadrons. Groups bring together multiple squadrons or other lower echelon units to provide a broader capability. For instance, a mission support group pulls together several squadrons in a variety of areas to provide a full spectrum mission support capability. A group is generally a tactical echelon without significant staff support. A group has two or more subordinate units. (T-1). Groups will have a minimum adjusted population of at least 400 per Paragraph 2.2.15. (T-1). 2.2.7.1. Dependent Group. A dependent group is a mission, maintenance, mission support, medical, or large functional unit (e.g., communications) that encompasses a number of related squadrons to provide the specified capability to a parent wing. Such groups may possess small supporting staff elements, such as standardization and evaluation or quality control that are organized as sections. 2.2.7.2. Independent Group. An independent group has the same functions and responsibilities as a like-type wing but its scope and size do not warrant wing-level designation and associated overhead costs. 2.2.8. Squadron. The basic unit in the Air Force. Squadrons are the basic “building block” organizations in the Air Force, providing a specific operational or support capability. A squadron may be either a mission unit, such as an operational flying squadron, or a functional unit, such as a civil engineer, security forces, or maintenance squadron. A squadron has a substantive mission of its own that warrants organization as a separate unit based on factors like unity of command, functional grouping and administrative control, balanced with efficient use of resources. Squadrons vary in size according to responsibility, but will have a minimum adjusted population of at least 35 per Paragraph 2.2.15. (T-1). Do not fragment a capability into multiple squadrons when a single squadron provides a parent wing or group commander the best approach in terms of a coordinated, focused capability under single direction. In extreme cases, when squadron population exceeds 700 manpower authorizations, MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs may request establishment of two squadrons. Functional squadrons will employ the 7-series numbering convention in these instances; i.e., “XX” and “7XX” Squadrons. (T-1). 2.2.9. Flight. If internal subdivision is required, a flight may consist of sections, then elements. A flight may be either a numbered flight, named flight, alpha flight, or a functional flight. 2.2.9.1. Numbered/Named Flight. The lowest level unit in the Air Force. A numbered or named flight primarily incorporates smaller elements into an organized unit that is

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constituted by a DAF/A1M letter. Its administrative characteristics, such as strength reporting, are like those of a squadron. As a unit, it is authorized a commander. Functions requiring unit status that are not large enough to be squadrons may be considered for numbered/named flight level. Because a numbered/named flight is a unit, it must be assigned to an establishment at group level or higher rather than to a squadron. (T-1). Examples: 497th Combat Training Flight, Air Mobility Command Contracting Flight. 2.2.9.2. Alpha Flight. Part of a squadron (usually a mission squadron) and composed of several elements performing identical missions. Because an alpha flight is not a unit, it is not subject to unit reporting. Example: A Flight in an operations squadron. 2.2.9.3. Functional Flight. Usually part of a squadron and composed of elements performing specific missions. Because a functional flight is not a unit, it is not subject to unit reporting. Example: Manpower and Personnel Flight in a force support squadron. 2.2.10. Center. A named unit that performs a specialized mission. Typically used for a larger function that performs most of its mission at one location and has few subordinate units such as the Space and Missile Systems Center. However, extremely large centers such as those for sustainment, life cycle management and test may have multiple subordinate units and non-units at several locations. 2.2.11. Laboratory. An organization that performs a research or advanced development mission. 2.2.12. Region. A term sometimes used when organization is geographic. 2.2.13. Complex. A named unit that performs a related set of missions within a number of specialized facilities predominantly on one installation. Predominantly used for sustainment, research or development missions; for example, the air logistics complexes and the Arnold Engineering Development Complex. 2.2.14. Named Component Headquarters. A named unit that serves as an Air Force component to a Unified Combatant Command (UCC). It is a command echelon under a MAJCOM. Named component headquarters plan, command, control, execute and assess air, space, and information operations across the full range of military operations. Air Force forces and units are assigned or attached as required to support the UCC. 2.2.15. Organization Size Guidance for Wings, Groups and Squadrons. 2.2.15.1. Adjusted population minimums are 1,000 for wings, 400 for groups and 35 for squadrons. Adjusted populations include: 2.2.15.1.1. Manpower authorizations as reflected in the Manpower Programming and Execution System (MPES). 2.2.15.1.2. Average daily student load (ADSL) or, for the USAF Academy, cadets or preparatory school cadet candidates. For the purpose of figuring adjusted populations for this AFI:

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Note: ADSL can be included only for training courses approved at MAJCOM level or higher and for which the unit has significant student oversight responsibilities. 2.2.15.1.3. A percentage of the contractor workforce. Specifically, one-third of the Contract Manyear Equivalents (CME) reflected in MPES for a unit may be counted when: 2.2.15.1.3.1. The CME portion counts for no more than 30% of the adjusted population used to meet unit size minimums. In other words, before CMEs may be considered, adjusted populations are at least 700 for wings, 280 for groups and 25 for squadrons. 2.2.15.1.3.2. The Contracting Officer’s Representative resides in the unit. (Also referred to as Contracting Officer’s Technical Representative. For more information see AFI 38-203, Commercial Activities Program; the Federal Acquisition Regulation; and the Defense Acquisition Regulation Supplement.) 2.2.15.1.3.3. This guidance recognizes the role of contractors in mission accomplishment while reflecting the reduced supervisory responsibilities. It also ensures USAF units are made up of predominantly USAF assets. (Note: SAF/AQ is developing guidance for Contractor Full-time Equivalent (CFTE) reporting which is anticipated to replace CME information at a later date. When this occurs, use CFTE information in place of CME information for the guidance in Paragraph 2.2.15.1.3.) 2.2.15.2. Additional specialized guidance: 2.2.15.2.1. A unit reflected as a squadron in the Force Tabs may maintain its squadron status regardless of size. (The Force Tabs are maintained by SAF/FMP as part of the Program Data System per AFI 16-402, Aerospace Vehicle Programming, Assignment, Distribution, Accounting and Termination.) 2.2.15.2.2. A wing with other dependent groups may have an operations group if it has multiple squadrons reflected in the Force Tabs, regardless of the operations group’s size. 2.2.15.2.3. An Associate unit may be a squadron if the unit whose weapons system(s) it shares is a squadron. Refer to AFI 90-1001, Responsibilities for Total Force Integration, for further information on associated units. 2.2.15.2.4. Additional specialized guidance for ANG and AFRC units. The use of standard wing/group organization structures in the Air Reserve Components (ARC) enhances their ability to transition smoothly to the expeditionary environment and interface with Regular Air Force (RegAF) duty forces, although ARC wings and groups are often smaller due to factors such as a more experienced work force with a smaller trainee population, fewer aircraft at a location, and smaller installation

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support infrastructure. ARC units follow standard unit size and organizational guidance in all other respects, except: 2.2.15.2.4.1. Specialized adjusted population minimums for ANG and AFRC units are 750 for wings and 200 for groups. 2.2.15.2.4.2. An ANG or AFRC wing with other dependent groups may have an operations group if it has at least one operations squadron that is reflected in the Force tabs or is an associate squadron, plus at least one other unit (e.g., operations support squadron). This is similar to the guidance for RegAF operations groups but reflects that many ARC wings have only one flying unit. 2.2.15.2.4.3. Adjusted populations for ANG units may include a percentage of the state employees. This recognizes the contribution of state employees while reflecting the differing roles and supervisory aspects. 2.2.15.2.4.3.1. Specifically, one-third of the state employees for a unit may be counted when the state employee portion counts for no more than 30% of the adjusted population used to meet unit size minimums. In other words, before state employees may be considered, adjusted populations (excluding CMEs) are at least 525 for wings, 140 for groups and 25 for squadrons. 2.2.15.2.4.3.2. CMEs are excluded from the adjusted population when assessing if the state employee portion counts for no more than 30% to ensure units are made up predominantly of assets directly associated with USAF. The specified percentages of state employees and CMEs may be included in the final total adjusted population if the minimums have been met. 2.2.15.2.5. Additional specialized guidance for medical units: 2.2.15.2.5.1. Medical squadrons will follow the standard size guidance and applicable standard structures in this AFI. (T-1) 2.2.15.2.5.2. Regardless of size, medical groups are authorized when all of the following are met: 2.2.15.2.5.2.1. The organization reports to a wing per Figure 3.3 (Wing Structure) in this AFI. 2.2.15.2.5.2.2. The organization is structured per the medical group standard structures in this AFI. 2.2.15.2.5.2.3. The organization has multiple subordinate squadrons that meet standard size guidance and follow the standard structures in this AFI. 2.2.15.2.5.3. Medical wings will follow the standard size guidance for wings and have multiple subordinate groups. (T-1). [Note: The specialized medical unit guidance does not apply to ARC units per Figure 3.29 of AFI 38-101 which specifies the standard medical group structures do not apply to the ARC. As a result of the organization threshold review (OTR) of medical units, AF/SG addresses the ARC medical units and their structure in the Medical Flight Path.] 2.2.15.2.6. Additional specialized guidance for comptroller squadrons. This additional guidance applies to comptroller squadrons to recognize their fiduciary

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 requirements and responsibility for wing staff administration. Comptroller squadrons that provide administrative and UCMJ support to their parent wing headquarters staff IAW AFI 38-101, Paragraph 3.4.11, may adjust their population to include one-third of that wing staff’s funded military manpower authorizations. This additional population can account for no more than 30 % of the adjusted population needed to meet squadron size minimums. In other words, before wing staff may be considered, a comptroller squadron has at least 25 funded manpower authorizations. 2.2.15.2.7. Additional specialized guidance for overseas units with Foreign National Indirect Hire civilian employees. Adjusted populations for overseas units may include a percentage of Foreign National Indirect Hire employees. This recognizes the contribution of those employees while reflecting the differing roles and supervisory aspects. 2.2.15.2.7.1. Specifically, one-third of Foreign National Indirect Hire employees for a unit may be counted when the Foreign National Indirect Hire employee portion counts for no more than 30% of the adjusted population used to meet unit size minimums. In other words, before they may be considered, adjusted populations (excluding CMEs) are at least 700 for wings, 280 for groups and 25 for squadrons. 2.2.15.2.7.2. CMEs are excluded from the adjusted population when assessing if the Foreign National Indirect Hire employee portion counts for no more than 30% to ensure units are made up predominantly of assets directly associated with USAF. The specified percentages of Foreign National Indirect Hire employees and CMEs may be included in the final total adjusted population if the minimums have been met. 2.2.15.3. MAJCOM/A1Ms will monitor unit sizes on an ongoing basis to ensure units are named and organized per the guidance in this Instruction. 2.2.15.4. AF/A1M will review wing, group and squadron sizes every two years to ensure compliance with organization size guidance. Approval levels for waivers to wing, group and squadron size guidance are shown in Table 2.1. AF/A1M provides guidance on how to submit waiver requests during the biennial reviews. Paragraph 6.2.1.4. provides guidance on requesting wing, group and squadron size waivers that are needed as part of an Organization Change Request at other times.

Table 2.1. Decision Levels for Waivers to Wing, Group and Squadron Size Guidance. Type of Unit Approval Level Disapproval Level Squadron AF/A1 VCSAF Dependent Group AF/A1 VCSAF Independent Group VCSAF CSAF Wings CSAF CSAF SECAF and CSAF are informed of all wing, group and squadron size waivers. 2.2.15.5. Expeditionary Units. MAJCOMs should strive to organize expeditionary units per the organization size guidance but may authorize variances when necessary due to factors such as operational needs, relationships with other Service or coalition forces, or

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to avoid turbulence due to population fluctuations. (See Chapter 8 for general guidance on provisional units.) 2.3. Standard Elements of Air Force Organization. The following terms describe the organizational elements within command and staff functions. 2.3.1. Command: 2.3.1.1. Commander. An officer who occupies a position of command pursuant to orders of appointment or by assumption of command according to AFI 51-604. This designation is used in all Air Force units except: 2.3.1.1.1. US Air Force Academy, which is commanded by a superintendent. 2.3.1.1.2. Other school organizations, which may be commanded by commandants. (Note: Commandants of non-unit school organizations are not commanders.) 2.3.1.1.3. A unit with a civilian leader. When a civilian is appointed to lead a unit, that individual is the director of the unit. A unit designated to be led by a civilian director will not have a commander, section commander or detachment commander. (T-0). (Note: Internal functional flight heads using the duty title of “flight commander” may continue to use this title since they are not unit commanders with commensurate legal command authority.) 2.3.1.1.3.1. MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU headquarters may approve designation of a unit to be led by a civilian director instead of a military commander subject to the restrictions within this AFI or other applicable guidance. HQ USAF approval under the waiver process in this AFI is required for approval under any other circumstances. 2.3.1.1.3.2. Civilian unit directors must be full-time Department of the Air Force appropriated fund employees who have completed any applicable probationary periods. (T-1). Civilian unit directors must be United States citizens. (T-1). 2.3.1.1.3.3. A unit will not have a civilian unit director and must have a military commander if: (T-1). 2.3.1.1.3.3.1. The unit is committed as a unit to a combat mission or to fill a mobility requirement. (T-1). 2.3.1.1.3.3.2. The unit or an organization subordinate to the unit has a flying mission. (T-1). 2.3.1.1.3.3.3. The unit has a medical mission. (T-1). 2.3.1.1.3.3.4. The unit is above wing level. (This restriction does not apply to Air Force FOA and MAJCOM FOA headquarters units.) (T-1). 2.3.1.1.3.3.5. The unit is one whose leader would normally function as an installation commander. (T-1). 2.3.1.1.3.3.6. The unit is an expeditionary or provisional unit. (T-1). 2.3.1.1.3.3.7. The unit is in the Air Force Reserve Command or Air National Guard. (This restriction does not limit traditional Reserve and ANG

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 Technician arrangements; see AFI 51-604 for additional guidance specific to Air Reserve Component commanders.) (T-1). 2.3.1.1.3.4. Since civilians cannot exercise command over military members, and no member of the unit or subordinate unit can assume command of the unit, a succession plan for leadership of the unit should be established in the event the civilian leader is incapacitated. Refer to AFI 51-604 for guidance on command authority matters for units led by civilian directors. 2.3.1.1.3.5. Civilian unit leaders will use an Office Symbol Code (OSC) of CL, Civilian Unit Leader. (T-1). Civilian unit leaders will not use the title Commander nor an OSC of CC (Commander). (T-1). 2.3.1.1.3.5.1. Since units with civilian leaders do not have commanders, the titles and OSCs for Vice Commander (CV) and Deputy Commander (CD) cannot be used for either military or civilian members in such units. When authorized, a primary subordinate who shares the civilian director’s duties and acts for the director in the director’s absence will use the title Deputy Director and the OSC of DD. (T-1). The title Vice Director and OSC of DV may be used for such a primary subordinate at center or wing level. 2.3.1.1.3.5.2. Civilians who are subordinates in units commanded by officers cannot use the titles Vice Commander, Deputy Commander, Deputy to the Commander or any similar title which denotes or implies the ability to exercise command authority in a Commander’s absence. Such civilians may use a title of Deputy and OSC of DD. 2.3.1.2. Vice Commander. An officer who shares a commander's duties and acts for the commander during the commander's absence. If eligible and command is properly assumed or appointed under the provisions of AFI 51-604, a vice commander may exercise all command authority during the assigned commander’s absence. This designation is used at major command through wing level only. 2.3.1.2.1. Where the Air Force is the lead service at a joint base, the officer (irrespective of branch of military Service) designated the "Deputy Joint Base Commander" performs the functions of vice commander at wing level. 2.3.1.3. Installation Commander. The host unit commander responsible for maintaining and operating the installation. This individual discharges the duties directed by US statutes or Air Force directives to be performed by the installation commander. 2.3.1.4. Deputy Commander. An officer who shares the commander’s duties and acts for the commander during the commander’s absence. If eligible and command is properly assumed or appointed under AFI 51-604, a deputy commander may exercise all command authority during the assigned commander’s absence. This designation is used at group level. 2.3.2. Staff: 2.3.2.1. Chief of Staff (CSAF). Title held by the Chief of Staff, US Air Force, with the only variance for Component NAFs. (See Figure 3.2 for variance for Component NAFs.)

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2.3.2.2. Deputy Chief of Staff (DCS). An officer who oversees a major portion of the Air Staff and who reports directly to the CSAF. A DCS supervises the activities of directorates and field operating agencies. 2.3.2.3. Director of Staff (DS) A staff element reporting directly to the MAJCOM Vice Commander. The function oversees executive services, orderly room and command section activities. Wings may use this title when authorized under Air Force Manpower Standards (AFMS). 2.3.2.4. Directorate. A staff element at HQ USAF or major command level. This is a decision making level which performs a range of related staff functions. Normally, a directorate supervises the activities of divisions and field operating agencies. 2.3.2.4.1. Directorates are also authorized in large HQ USAF field operating agencies and in large centers and laboratories (approximately 500 authorizations) which oversee major mission areas and key Air Force programs or support functions. 2.3.2.5. Division. Normally aligned as a staff element in HQ USAF, a MAJCOM, NAF, center, FOA or equivalent. Divisions supervise the activities of branches if the organization is large enough to require branches. Organizations that hold squadron status in the wing structure can be aligned as divisions when the head of the organization is a civilian (e.g., Services Divisions). 2.3.2.6. Branch. A staff element that performs a specific portion of a division's mission. Branches may be further subdivided into sections and elements. Branches supervise the activities of sections and elements. However, sections and elements are only authorized if the organization performs technical, highly specialized workload or if the supervisor-toworker ratio exceeds 1:10. If further subdivision of a branch is required, a team-leader approach is the preferred arrangement.

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Chapter 3 STANDARD ORGANIZATIONS 3.1. Organization Structure. This chapter prescribes standard organizational structures for use to the lowest level shown. Illustrative figures include approved organizational titles (Figure 3.1 through Figure 3.36). Organization structures are illustrated to the lowest mandatory levels. HQ USAF and MAJCOM functional and Manpower, Organization and Resources focal points are authorized to develop standard organization structures below the mandatory level. This chapter also reflects standard office symbol codes. 3.1.1. Organizational Variations. Each figure depicts a standard organizational structure for a particular unit or function. AF/A1M must approve any variations from standard structure. Variations from standard structures should have a clear, overriding purpose that has easily recognizable and defensible organizational and cost benefits. MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs submit variation requests as described in Chapter 6 of this Instruction when a standard function does not exist at a location, when functions are combined due to small size, or when units are responsible for activities not accounted for in standard structures. 3.1.2. Functions and Responsibilities. Each figure depicts the standard organizational structure and accompanying paragraphs list typical functions and responsibilities performed by an organization. These functions and responsibilities are not comprehensive, but are intended to give an understanding of activity that fits in each organizational block. 3.1.3. The standard squadron organizational structures prescribed in Chapter 3 also apply to units with the respective unit kinds that are organized as numbered flights due to organization size guidance. When the unit is a numbered flight, the internal subdivisions are sections. 3.1.4. The standard organizational structures prescribed in Chapter 3 also apply to similarly named units that include Special Operations in their designations. 3.2. Numbered/Named Air Force (NAF). The NAF is a command echelon directly under a MAJCOM that is focused on ensuring the readiness of assigned forces. It prepares forces for deployment and employment. 3.2.1. Basic NAF Structure. The basic NAF structure is in Figure 3.1. Figure 3.1. Basic NAF Structure (Applies to NAFs that are not C-NAFs).

3.2.2. Component NAF Structure. The C-NAF structure is in Figure 3.2.

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Figure 3.2. Component NAF Structure.

3.2.2.1. A component NAF (C-NAF) is a specialized category of NAF that is structured to perform an operational and warfighting mission in support of a Unified Combatant Command (UCC). The C-NAF is a command echelon directly under a MAJCOM. The C-NAF will plan, command, control, execute and assess air, space and information operation capabilities across the full range of military operations. The C-NAF normally consists of an AFFOR staff and an AOC as depicted in Figure 3.2. Air Force forces and units are assigned or attached as required to support the UCC. 3.2.2.2. Organization Variations. Elements of Personal Staff should be reduced or eliminated as much as practical through support agreements and reachback. The Personal Staff may include Protocol (CCP), Political/Military Advisor (CCT), Staff Judge Advocate (JA), Public Affairs (PA), Historian (HO), Chaplain (HC), Safety (SE), Surgeon (SG), Financial Management (FM), Reserve Affairs (RE), Information Protection (IP) and Inspector General (IG). The rest of the C-NAF staff should consist of the standard Air Force A1-A9 staff functions (see Figure 4.1 and Paragraph 4.4.3 for information on A-staff OSCs). A-staff 2-digit functions may be linked (e.g., A3 and A5 as A3/5), but separate functional staffs are maintained. C-NAFs are authorized to use the Chief of Staff (CS) title as a variance to Paragraph 2.3.2.1 of this Instruction. C-NAF responsibilities may vary depending on the capabilities provided by the MAJCOM.

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3.3. Standard Wing. Figure 3.3. Wing Structure.

3.3.1. Standard Wing Structure and Responsibilities. The standard wing generates and employs combat capability. One commander has the authority and responsibility to command the wing. The standard operational wing structure is a wing with four dependent groups (operations, maintenance, mission support and medical) with related functions and disciplines aligned under the appropriate group. Generally, only the wing staff, comptroller unit and the four group commanders report directly to the wing commander. Thus, the wing commander concentrates on the wing's primary mission and delegates authority to subordinates so they can accomplish their responsibilities. Major wing functions are divided among a few principal subordinates, each accountable for carrying out a specific part of the wing mission. Responsibilities are clearly defined and duplication is avoided. Note: While the standard wing is organized for combat operations, its basic structure is applied to all types of wings (for instance, air base and specialized mission wings). 3.3.2. Organization Variations. Where applicable, Air Control Squadrons are part of the Operations Group. Where applicable, Munitions Squadrons are part of the Maintenance Group. Where applicable, Aerial Port Squadrons are part of the Mission Support Group. (Note: Aerial Port Squadron alignment is under review). 3.3.3. Staffing of a Standard Wing. A wing is organized as an operational unit with manpower requirements set at those levels required for mission success. A standard or core manpower level exists for each organization defined in this Instruction (see AFI 38-201, Determining Manpower Requirements).

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3.4. Wing Staff. Figure 3.4. Wing Staff Structure.

3.4.1. Wing Staff Organization. Wing staff functions report to the wing commander. A wing staff function may be referred to as an office, for example: a public affairs office. The senior staff member is referred to as the chief. (Note: the below reflects separate wing staff functional offices; it does not reflect individual positions/activities immediately under the CC or CV as reflected by CC_ or CV_ office symbol codes, such as the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (CVS), Drug Demand Reduction Program (CVD), or Installation Resilience Program (CVB).) 3.4.1.1. Public Affairs (PA). Delivers candid counsel and guidance to commanders to communicate timely, truthful, accurate, and useful information about Air Force activities to DoD, Air Force, domestic and international audiences. Provides visual information (VI) services and VI documentation of significant events. Gives commanders awareness of the public information environment and the means to use it as part of Air Force air, space, cyberspace, and information operations. Provides expert advice to assist leaders in making and communicating decisions affecting mission accomplishment. Employs communication tools to link Airmen and their leaders. Plans, develops, executes, and evaluates strategies and activities to obtain informed public understanding and support on issues impacting Air Force operations. Directs media and community relations activities. Provides security and policy review of publicly releasable information. Only wings with host installation responsibilities are authorized a PA office without SAF/PA waiver. 3.4.1.2. Safety (SE). Advises commanders and supervisors on safety requirements and issues. Manages wing USAF mishap prevention program to help preserve vital resources and enhance mission capability. 3.4.1.3. History (HO). Provides commanders and staffs with research services; prepares official histories and other publications.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 3.4.1.4. Staff Judge Advocate (JA). Advises wing and subordinate commanders on military justice and disciplinary matters. Prosecutes courts-martial and represents the government in administrative separation hearings. Provides personal legal assistance. Provides legal advice to military investigative agencies. Represents Air Force interests in environmental, civilian labor and utility rate matters and advises on contract law and related civil law issues. Acts as Air Force liaison with Federal, state and local legal authorities. Advises commanders and staffs on international law matters. Drafts and reviews operation and exercise contingency plans for compliance with the law of armed conflict. 3.4.1.5. Command Post (CP). Implements emergency action and quick reaction checklist procedures and controls assigned forces; operates communications systems; maintains and provides communications security and area security; monitors alert force status; monitors airfield, weather and navigational aid status. Coordinates and reports maintenance actions. There is only one command post on each installation unless otherwise approved under AFI 10-207, Command Posts. 3.4.1.6. Chaplain (HC). Provides spiritual care and the opportunity for authorized personnel to exercise their constitutional right to the free exercise of religion by conducting religious observances and providing pastoral care. Advises leadership on spiritual, ethical, moral, morale, core values and religious accommodation issues. 3.4.1.7. Information Protection (IP). Wing’s principal advisor on the implementation of the Air Force’s Personnel, Industrial, and Information Security programs used to define risk associated with the protection of collateral classified national security, controlled unclassified, and other sensitive information. The Personnel Security Program concerns matters related to processing security clearances and documenting derogatory information on cleared personnel. The Industrial Security Program concerns national security matters related to contractors performing work on projects that require them to have access to classified information. The Information Security Program includes working with original classification authorities; marking of and defining protection standards and risks associated with classified national security, controlled unclassified, and sensitive information; and training regarding wing information protection security programs. 3.4.1.8. Plans (XP). Develops, coordinates and publishes wing plans. Acts as the exercise administrator of the Crisis Action Team (CAT), Installation Command Center (ICC) and Emergency Operations Center. Note: Wing commanders may approve eliminating Plans as a separate office and merging its responsibilities and resources into the wing Inspector General office. 3.4.1.9. Equal Opportunity (EO). Assists commanders at all levels to proactively engage all Airmen in the pursuit of equal opportunity by fostering and supporting equal opportunity, the Air Force Core Values and the Airman’s Creed through day-to-day actions and implementation of various EO programs (e.g., complaint program, human relations program, climate assessment program, Alternate Dispute Resolution (ADR) program – including conflict consulting, Affirmative Employment Program, Disability Program and Special Emphasis Programs). Educates and trains all Airmen to make

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workplace professionalism a top priority and to take proactive steps to prevent, correct and eliminate unlawful discriminatory behavior. 3.4.1.10. Inspector General (IG). Plans, directs, conducts and monitors inspector general programs. Executes the Complaints Resolution and the Fraud, Waste and Abuse (FWA) programs in accordance with AFI 90-301, Inspector General Complaints Resolution. Manages the wing Commander's Inspection Program (CCIP) and evaluates the wing's self-assessment program in accordance with AFI 90-201, The Air Force Inspection System. Is the wing gatekeeper for all inspections. Inspects and reports on the wing's management of resources, leadership, improving the unit and mission execution to the commander. Evaluates wing plans through the execution of exercise scenarios to allow inspection in accordance with the commander's intent. Trains and oversees the Wing Inspection Team (WIT) members. Responsible for the overall administration of the IG Evaluation Management System (IGEMS) and oversight of the Management Internal Control Toolset (MICT). Analyzes deficiency trends and tracks deficiencies to closure. 3.4.2. Wing staff personnel are attached to the Comptroller Squadron for administrative and UCMJ purposes. 3.4.2.1. For wings that do not have a Comptroller Squadron or that have a civilian-led Comptroller Squadron, wing staff personnel are attached to the Force Support Squadron. In this case, if the Force Support Squadron is civilian-led, the wing staff personnel are attached to the Mission Support Group headquarters unit. 3.4.2.2. MAJCOM/A1s, in coordination with their MAJCOM/JAs, may approve variances to the above wing staff attachments if necessary to avoid inappropriate reporting relationships such as between spouses. The variances should last the minimum time needed to avoid the inappropriate relationship. 3.4.2.3. If a wing does not have any of the units specified in Paragraphs 3.4.11. or 3.4.11.1, the wing commander may attach wing staff personnel to another unit for administrative and UCMJ purposes 3.4.2.4. Guidance in Paragraph 3.4.2 concerning attachment of wing staff personnel to Comptroller Squadrons also applies to RegAF comptroller units designated as flights instead of squadrons due to organization size guidance in Paragraph 2.2.15 of this AFI.

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3.5. Comptroller Squadron. Figure 3.5. Comptroller Squadron Structure.

3.5.1. Comptroller Squadron (FM) Functions and Responsibilities. Provides financial analysis and services, including budget development and execution, cost and economic analysis, pay and travel services and liaison with the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS). 3.5.2. Comptroller Management (FMD). Functions include oversight to unit training, management of unit authorizations and management of personnel and additional duties. 3.5.3. Nonappropriated Funds Financial Analysis (FMN). Provides independent financial management oversight and analysis of Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) and lodging programs and activities on the base, along with other special nonappropriated fund programs. Supports the installation commander, the comptroller, and force support squadron management. 3.5.4. Quality Assurance (FMQ). Develops and maintains a viable Quality Assurance Program for squadron operations. Includes performing quality review inspections, developing internal review checklists and ensuring squadron internal controls are in place and working. 3.5.5. Local Area Network Support (FMZ). Installs, configures, administers and provides for the maintenance of squadron computer systems and equipment. 3.5.6. Resource Advisors (FMH). For supported organizations, provides day-to-day budget functions, provides decision support on financial matters, prepares a variety of financial reports, and participates in financial management meetings. 3.5.7. Financial Analysis Flight (FMA). Plans, develops and presents all budget and fund requirements for the installation to the major command or other higher headquarters.

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Responsibilities for financial analysis encompass economic analysis and execution of appropriated Air Force funds, including applicability and propriety of fund usage, to ensure their most effective use in support of Air Force programs and priorities. Updates accounting data. Provides financial management function accounting for host and tenant unit commanders in the execution of funding authorities and liaison service among units, vendors and DFAS. Performs commitment accounting and fund certification for the Government Purchase Card Program, Fund Cite Authorizations, Fund Control Messages and other funding authorizations. Obligates and authenticates TDY and emergency leave orders and performs follow-up on outstanding orders and advances. 3.5.8. Financial Operations Flight (FMF). Provides military, travel and civilian pay services for all personnel. Performs in and out processing for PCS, separations and retirements pay, and assistance with the Defense Travel System. Manages debt programs, dependency determinations and recertification of entitlements. Processes documents to update pay, allowance, leave, allotment and tax information. Audits TDY travel claims, trains and oversees unit leave monitors and timekeepers, processes time and attendance records for updates to the Defense Civilian Pay System and performs disbursing and cashier functions. 3.6. Operations Group. Figure 3.6. Operations Group Structure.

3.6.1. Operations Group Functions and Responsibilities. The operations group operates primary mission equipment. 3.6.2. Standardization/Evaluation (OGV). standardization/evaluation program functions.

Performs

group

aircrew

3.6.3. Intelligence (OGI). Provides intelligence support for the wing during all phases of conflict and decision making. Trains aircrew/operators and prepares the wing for

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 contingency and wartime missions. Provides intelligence tailored to the wing's operational mission and base support activities. Provides full-spectrum threat assessments and mission planning in support of deployments, contingencies, and combat operations. Note: MAJCOMs may align Intelligence in the operations group headquarters (Figure 3.6) or the operations support squadron (Figure 3.7). MAJCOMs will notify AF/A1MO and AF/A2DF when changing a wing's Intelligence organizational alignment. 3.6.4. Organization Variations. 3.6.4.1. With the exception of the lettered flights, the Operations Group Commander has the discretion to combine operations squadron functions with like functions in the Operations Support Squadron or in the Operations Group staff in cases where effectiveness and/or efficiency would be improved. 3.6.4.2. Where applicable, Air Control Squadrons are part of the Operations Group. 3.6.4.3. The Operations Group Commander may attach individual OGI-assigned ISR Airmen to the operations squadrons under OGI administrative control or assign individual ISR Airmen to the operations squadrons.

3.7. Operations Support Squadron. Figure 3.7. Operations Support Squadron Structure.

3.7.1. Operations Support Squadron (OS) Functions and Responsibilities. Provides support to operations squadrons in designated areas. 3.7.2. Weapons and Tactics Flight (OSK). Develops procedures and unit tactics for planning and employing operational mission and wing assets. Advises wing staff on operational capabilities, limitations and status of resources. 3.7.3. Airfield Operations Flight (OSA). Provides airfield management and air traffic operations services to the base flying wing transient and civil users. These services can include control tower, radar operations and base operations functions. 3.7.4. Current Operations Flight (OSO). Responsible for all wing flying operations. Monitors and directs flying, scheduling and training. Manages the flying hour program and flight simulator systems and provides centralized flight records support. Coordinates wing

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combat mission planning and sortie allocation. Provides inspection support and coordinates deployment requirements for the Operations Group. 3.7.5. Aircrew Flight Equipment (AFE) Flight (OSL). Performs functions that enhance aircrew performance and preserve human lives through proper equipment integration of the human and the weapons system. Issues, fits, repairs, and maintains critical mission performance and lifesaving equipment such as parachutes, helmets, nuclear flash/thermal protection devices, oxygen equipment, anti-gravity garments, anti-exposure suits, aircrew ocular devices, survival kits, life preservers, rafts, electronic communications, helmet mounted weapons integration devices, and aircrew Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) equipment. Instructs aircrew on the proper use and care of equipment under normal, contingency, and CBRN operations. Responsible for aircrew contamination mitigation; maintains and sets up aircrew contamination control areas, and processes aircrew through them. 3.7.6. Weather Flight (OSW). Provides weather services for all operations on base, all activities supported by the base and Reserve component activities as directed. Prepares and disseminates weather information for base resource protection from severe weather and other environmental effects. Provides weather inputs into DoD databases to support DoD operations worldwide. Provides tailored weather input to satisfy specific combat operations and weapon system requirements. 3.7.7. Intelligence (IN). Provides intelligence support for the wing during all phases of conflict and decision making. Trains aircrew/operators and prepares the wing for contingency and wartime missions. Provides intelligence tailored to the wing's operational mission and base support activities. Provides full-spectrum threat assessments and mission planning in support of deployments, contingencies, and combat operations. Note: MAJCOMs may align Intelligence in the operations group headquarters (Figure 3.6) or the operations support squadron (Figure 3.7). MAJCOMs will notify AF/A1MO and AF/A2DF when changing a wing's Intelligence organizational alignment. 3.7.8. Operations Plans Flight (OSX) (Optional). All MAJCOMs are authorized a variation to perform operations plans functions in the Operations Support Squadron to accommodate their deployment missions. 3.7.9. Air Traffic Control and Landing Systems (ATCALS) Maintenance Flight (OSM) (Optional). Provides ATCALS maintenance in support of wing, transient and civil air operations. These services include maintenance of legacy radar, navigational aids, weather, and ATC radio systems. Flight personnel also provide limited support for systems maintained by Regional Maintenance Centers. Note: All MAJCOMs are authorized a variation to realign these activities from the Airfield Operations Flight to create this flight if size and workload warrant. At a minimum, the ATCALS Maintenance Flight is led by a SMSgt or GS-9.

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3.8. Operations Squadron. Figure 3.8. Operations Squadron Structure.

3.8.1. Operations Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Provides flying weapons system crews and mission/mobility planning, weapons and tactics, scheduling, training, standardization/evaluation, C4 (command, control, communications, and computer), aviation resource management, squadron medical element, and administration. Applies to all kinds of squadrons operating aircraft (e.g., fighter, airlift, bomb, flying training, special operations, flight test, reconnaissance, etc.). 3.8.2. Operations Officer (DCO). Oversees daily operations. 3.8.3. Weapons and Tactics (DCOK). Ensures assigned personnel are familiar with unit mission/taskings and expected enemy threats. Assesses unit combat capability, provides inputs to unit training programs, ensures appropriate tactics related study materials are available, ensures tactics information is disseminated to unit personnel and develops procedures and materials required for mission planning. 3.8.4. C4 (DCOC). Provides C4 support as required to conduct the unit mission. 3.8.5. Scheduling (DCOS). Determines, obtains, and implements flight, ground, and simulator scheduling requirements for upgrade, initial qualification, re-qualification, transition, currency, and continuation training based on syllabus requirements, student progression, weather, equipment and range availability, and commander directed programs. 3.8.6. Mobility/Plans (DCOX). Develops contingency plans which include mobilizing and deploying the squadron and associated equipment in support of higher headquarters taskings and operations orders. 3.8.7. Training (DCOT). Maintains training records for individual training and evaluations.

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3.8.8. Aviation Resource Management (DCOR). Manages flying resources. Provides guidance and procedures for rated officers, career enlisted aviators, non-rated aircrew, missileers, and aviation resource management. 3.8.9. Standardization/Evaluation (DOV). Performs functions as directed in AFI 11-202 Volume II, Aircrew Standardization/Evaluation Program, and associated AFI 11-2 MDSSpecific, Volume II instructions. 3.8.10. Safety (SE). Manages the unit’s safety program per applicable 91-series AFIs. 3.8.11. Squadron Medical Element (SME). Flight and Operational Medicine Clinic personnel assigned to and integrated into the operations squadron. This element performs medical duties per AFI 48-149, Flight and Operational Medicine Program (FOMP). 3.8.12. Lettered Flights (DOFA/B/C, etc.). Provide aircrews to perform the unit mission. If only a single flight is needed it will be designated “Forces” (DOF). 3.8.13. Organization Variations. The number of lettered flights may be varied to adjust flight size for optimum mission capability. Also, see “Organization Variations” under paragraph 3.6., Operations Group. 3.9. Operations Squadron Structure for Space Launch Squadrons. Figure 3.9. Operations Squadron Structure for Space Launch Squadrons.

3.9.1. Space Launch Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Conducts launch base processing of spacecraft and boosters and performs launch operations. Provide program management for major Department of Defense and Department of Commerce space programs. 3.10. Operations Squadron Structure for Missile Squadrons.

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Figure 3.10. Operations Squadron Structure for Missile Squadrons.

3.10.1. Missile Squadrons Functions and Responsibilities. Provides crews for strategic missile operations. 3.11. Operations Squadron Structure for Space Operations and Space Warning Squadrons. Figure 3.11. Operations Squadron Structure for Space Operations and Space Warning Squadrons.

3.11.1. Space Operations Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Supports satellite programs including the Global Positioning System, Defense Satellite Communications System, Wideband Global Satellite Communications, Milstar, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, Space Based Space Surveillance, Operationally Responsive Space-1,

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Advanced Extremely High Frequency and the worldwide Air Force Satellite Control Network. 3.11.2. Space Warning Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Provides early warning of strategic and theater ballistic missile attacks and foreign space launches. Tracks and catalogs man-made objects in space, from those in near-Earth orbit to objects up to 22,300 miles above the earth's surface. 3.11.3. Organization Variations. Geographically separated units add special staff functions as necessary (i.e., Chaplain, Comptroller, Safety and Equal Opportunity). 3.12. Operations Squadron Structure for Aeromedical Evacuation Squadrons. Figure 3.12. Operations Squadron Structure for Aeromedical Evacuation Squadrons.

3.12.1. Aeromedical Evacuation (AE) Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Provides for safe and expeditious evacuation of patients to save life, limb, and eyesight; prevent undue suffering; and preserve military strength. Provides time-critical enroute care of patients to and between medical treatment facilities with medical aircrew trained explicitly for this mission. 3.12.2. Standardization and Evaluation (AEV). Manages and conducts flight and emergency procedures evaluations. Responsible for the aircrew examination, flight publication, and flight evaluation folder maintenance and review programs. Conducts review and certification boards. 3.12.3. Operations Officer (DO). Directs operations within the squadron to include organizational flying, aircrew/ground Unit Type Code (UTC) training, and operations support functions. The MAJCOM (may be delegated to the squadron commander) may direct that the Operations Officer supervise the Operations, Operations Support and Training Flights. 3.12.4. Chief Flight Nurse (CN). Directs nursing services within the squadron. Exercises primary responsibility for the nursing standards of care. Provides clinical oversight of organizational flying, training, and readiness functions within the squadron. The MAJCOM (may be delegated to the squadron commander) may direct that the Chief Flight Nurse supervise the Clinical Management Flight.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 3.12.5. Operations Flight (AEO). Provides scheduling, mission planning and mission management for operational and aeromedical readiness missions. Coordinates pre-mission requirements with supporting agencies, provides ground support during execution of AE missions for assigned and transient AE crews/Critical Care Air Transport Teams, and processes all required post-mission documentation. 3.12.6. Training Flight (AET). Responsible for the aircrew and ground UTC training requirements of all assigned personnel. 3.12.7. Operations Support Flight (AER). management, and readiness support.

Provides C4 systems, logistics, resource

3.12.8. Clinical Management Flight (AEC). Responsible for the clinical training, patient safety, and clinical quality programs. 3.13. Maintenance Group. Figure 3.13. Maintenance Group Structure.

3.13.1. Maintenance Group Functions and Responsibilities: The maintenance group supports the primary mission with weapon system maintenance. This includes maintenance training, on-equipment and off-equipment maintenance. 3.13.2. Weapons Standardization (MXL). Comprised of the superintendent, the loading standardization crew (LSC), academic instructor and lead crews. A LSC may be formed for each Mission Design Series (MDS) in multiple MDS units. One lead crew is normally formed for each Aircraft Maintenance Unit (AMU). Weapons Standardization does not need to be formed in organizations that do not load munitions requiring certification, providing the requirements of the weapons task qualification program are met. In organizations such as this, the weapons function is responsible for applicable weapons manager responsibilities and the weapons task qualification program.

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3.13.3. Quality Assurance (MXQ). Primary technical advisory agency for maintenance, helping production supervisors and the maintenance group commander resolve quality problems. Evaluates and analyzes deficiencies and problem areas to identify underlying causes and recommend corrective actions. 3.13.4. Maintenance Operations (MXO). Provides the group with the following fleet health support functions: maintenance operations control, analysis, plans, scheduling, documentation, engine management and supply liaison. Directs, monitors and schedules training for all group personnel. Provides Air Force Engineering and Technical Services. Manages group programs, including deployment, support plans and agreements, facilities, budget, commercial contracts, manpower, communications and status of resources and training (SORTS) reporting. Maintenance Supply Liaisons (MSL) are authorized in the Logistics Readiness Squadron and are matrixed to Maintenance Operations. (In the ANG, Maintenance Operations is organized as a numbered Maintenance Operations Flight.) 3.13.5. Organization Variations. 3.13.5.1. Where authorized, munitions squadrons are also in the maintenance group. 3.13.5.2. If a maintenance squadron has over 700 manpower authorizations, MAJCOMs may approve splitting the maintenance squadron into a component maintenance squadron and an equipment maintenance squadron. MAJCOMs may also approve merging the component maintenance squadron and equipment maintenance squadron into a maintenance squadron if the combined manpower authorizations are 700 or less. To receive a DAF/A1M letter for such actions, MAJCOMs submit them on the RCS: HAFA8X(M) 9227 report IAW AFI 16-403, Updating the USAF Program Installations, Units, and Priorities and Movement of Air Force Units, at least two months before implementation; this paragraph and the applicable current and future unit sizes should be annotated in the “Remarks” section. If the resulting units wish to vary from the standard structures in this chapter, an Organization Change Request must be submitted for HQ USAF/A1M approval instead. 3.14. Maintenance Squadron for Missile Organizations. Figure 3.14. Maintenance Squadron Structure for Missile Organizations.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 3.14.1. Maintenance Squadron (MXM) for Missile Organizations Functions and Responsibilities. Maintains status of all launch facilities and missile alert facilities, Functions as centralized manager for manpower, mission support equipment facilities and long-range planning. Coordinates training for applicable maintenance personnel. Performs off-equipment maintenance on electrical, environmental, power generation, pneumatic and hydraulic systems associated with the ICBM weapon system. Centrally stores, issues, inspects and repairs ICBM support equipment, guidance systems and special purpose vehicles. 3.14.2. Maintenance Supervision (MXM). Overall management and supervision of daily maintenance activities including production supervision. 3.14.3. Maintenance Operations Flight (MXMO). Maintains status of all launch facilities and missile alert facilities, provides leadership with key information to assist in determining maintenance requirements and priorities. Functions as centralized manager for manpower, mission support equipment facilities and long-range planning. Provides expertise to solve unique weapon system problems that are beyond the normal scope of technical data. 3.14.4. Maintenance Training Flight (MXME). Conducts, directs, monitors and schedules training for all group personnel. 3.14.5. Programs and Resources Flight (MXMU). Performs off-equipment maintenance on electrical, environmental, power generation, pneumatic and hydraulic systems associated with the ICBM weapon system. Centrally stores, issues, inspects and repairs ICBM support equipment, guidance systems and special purpose vehicles.

3.15. Aircraft Maintenance Squadron. Figure 3.15. Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Structure.

3.15.1. Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Provides direct mission generation support by consolidating and executing on-equipment activities necessary to produce properly configured, mission ready weapon systems to meet operational,

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 contingency or training mission requirements. maintain, launch, and recover aircraft.

41 Squadron personnel service, inspect,

3.15.2. Maintenance Supervision (MXA). Overall management and supervision of daily maintenance activities. 3.15.3. Debrief (MXAF). Tracks discrepancies, deviations, utilization and applicable flight data for each aircraft at the termination of sorties/missions. (For Mobility Air Forces (MAF) and Low Density-High Demand (LD-HD) aircraft organizations. In Aircraft Maintenance Units (AMU) in Combat Air Forces (CAF) organizations.) 3.15.4. Aircraft Maintenance Units (AMU) (MXAA/B/C, etc., with the fourth character being any letter not already used in this squadron). Responsible for servicing, inspecting, maintaining, launching, and recovering assigned aircraft and ensuring all mobility requirements are met. There is one AMU for each supported operations squadron. In order to maximize efficient use of resources, MAJCOMs have the option to organize an AMU to support multiple flying squadrons. (Note: This organization is a flight internal to the Aircraft Maintenance Squadron.) 3.15.5. Aircraft Support Flight (MXAS). Provides support to flight line maintenance and generation activities. Functions include: maintaining technical orders, hazardous materials and bench and operating stocks; preparing equipment/supplies for deployment; controlling and maintaining TMDE; and ensuring maintenance, control and storage of Alternate Mission Equipment, Dash-21 equipment and Maintenance, Safety and Protective Equipment. (For MAF and LD-HD aircraft organizations. In AMUs in CAF organizations.) 3.15.6. Organization Variations. In MAF and LD-HD organizations, the debrief and aircraft support activities are centralized for the squadron as shown. Combat Air Forces (CAF) squadrons have debrief and support sections in each AMU. 3.16. Maintenance Squadron. Figure 3.16. Maintenance Squadron Structure.

3.16.1. Maintenance Squadron (MXM) Functions and Responsibilities. Provides back shop support to perform on and off-equipment maintenance tasks that are assigned to a specific

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 back shop function. Provides both organizational and intermediate level maintenance and supports Repair Network Integration (RNI) operations when assigned by the MAJCOM. 3.16.2. Maintenance Supervision (MXM). Overall management and supervision of daily maintenance activities including production supervision. 3.16.3. Fabrication Flight (MXMF). Performs inspection, repair and fabrication of aircraft components; non-destructive inspection of aircraft and components; and aircraft structural repair. 3.16.4. Accessories Flight (MXMC). Performs off-equipment maintenance on pneudralic systems, aircraft and support equipment electrical systems, batteries and environmental systems. Maintains aircraft fuel and egress systems. 3.16.5. Avionics Flight (MXMV). Performs diagnostic and off-equipment maintenance on communication-navigation, electronic warfare, guidance control, airborne photographic and sensor systems and repairs Type 4 precision measurement equipment. 3.16.6. Aerospace Ground Equipment (AGE) Flight (MXMG). Performs inspections, maintenance, pickup and delivery and time compliance technical orders of AGE. Stores or prepares AGE for shipment. 3.16.7. Armament Flight (MXMR). Performs off-equipment maintenance of weapons release systems, guns, munitions racks, adapters, pylons and launchers. 3.16.8. Maintenance Support Flight (MXMT). Services transient aircraft, performs repair and reclamation (large component repair) and builds up and services wheels and tires. 3.16.9. Munitions Flight (MXMW). Performs maintenance on and accounts for conventional munitions, containers, dispensers, training items and associated support equipment. Maintains, receives, stores, delivers and obtains disposition instructions for munitions. Inspects munitions and storage facilities. 3.16.10. Propulsion Flight (MXMP). Performs off-equipment inspection, maintenance and testing of engines and associated engine support equipment.

repair,

3.16.11. Test Measurement Diagnostics Equipment (TMDE) Flight (MXMD). Performs onsite or in-laboratory testing, repair and calibration of precision measurement equipment. 3.16.12. Organization Variations. If a maintenance squadron exceeds 700 authorizations, two squadrons may be established. If two maintenance squadrons are needed, they are designated Equipment Maintenance Squadron (Figure 3.18.) and Component Maintenance Squadron (Figure 3.19.) and use flight office symbols as shown above.

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3.17. Missile Maintenance Squadron. Figure 3.17. Missile Maintenance Squadron Structure.

3.17.1. Missile Maintenance Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Maintains the immediate launch readiness of ICBMs and corresponding missile alert facilities and launch facilities. Includes the maintenance of munitions, missiles, reentry systems, guidance sets, security and electrical systems, coding, corrosion control, and power and environmental control systems. 3.17.2. Generation Flight (MXSG). Generates and maintains assigned Inter-continental Ballistic Missiles (ICBM) by removing, installing, and transporting Minuteman aerospace vehicle equipment, re-entry systems, and missiles. Performs repair and troubleshooting on electrical; electro-mechanical; security; and weapon command, control, and communications systems. Performs coding of the ICBM. 3.17.3. Facilities Flight (MXSF). Performs on-site repair of ICBM launch facility; missile alert facility power and environmental control systems; and weapon system command, control and communication systems. Performs periodic maintenance inspections, corrosion control and preventive maintenance actions. Maintains the Hardened Intersite Cable System. 3.18. Equipment Maintenance Squadron. Figure 3.18. Equipment Maintenance Squadron Structure.

3.18.1. Equipment Maintenance Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Maintains assigned AGE (support equipment) and repairs select aircraft components. Performs

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 extensive on-equipment aircraft maintenance tasks identified by the lead command for the assigned weapons system. 3.18.2. See Figure 3.16., Maintenance Squadron Structure, for flight descriptions and office symbols.

3.19. Component Maintenance Squadron. Figure 3.19. Component Maintenance Squadron Structure.

3.19.1. Component Maintenance Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Provides offequipment repair of aircraft and support equipment maintenance beyond the capability of the Aircraft Maintenance Squadron and Equipment Maintenance Squadron; e.g., material fabrication, precision measurement equipment calibration, reprogramming of Line Replaceable Units, electronic combat pods, and other avionics pods. May perform the function as an RNI repair node when designated by the MAJCOM. 3.19.2. See Figure 3.16., Maintenance Squadron Structure, for flight descriptions and office symbols. 3.20. Munitions Squadron. Figure 3.20. Munitions Squadron Structure.

3.20.1. Munitions Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Receives, stores, maintains, assembles, disassembles, delivers and loads conventional munitions and nuclear weapons,

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and performs off-equipment maintenance/management of Alternate Mission Equipment directly supporting training and combat operations. 3.20.2. Munitions Supervision (MXW). Provides overall management and supervision of daily activities of munitions maintenance production and support. 3.20.3. Production Flight (MXWP). Assembles, disassembles, delivers and maintains conventional munitions, missiles, containers, dispensers, assigned Munitions Materiel Handling Equipment (MMHE) and training items. Administers and conducts the Combat Munitions Training (CMT) Program (may be aligned in Systems Flight at local option). 3.20.4. Materiel Flight (MXWC). Stores, handles, inspects, ships, receives, disposes locally and accounts for conventional munitions, containers, dispensers and training items and coordinates transportation. 3.20.5. Systems Flight (MXWK). Provides broad command and control, direction and support for all munitions squadron activities to include training, resources, munitions information systems, facilities and mobility programs. Plans, schedules, coordinates, controls and directs all munitions activities. 3.20.6. Armament Systems Flight (MXWR). Performs off-equipment maintenance of weapons release systems, guns, munitions racks, adapters, pylons and launchers. (If assigned.) 3.20.7. Conventional Air-Launched Cruise Missile (CALCM) Flight (MXWM). Performs on-equipment and off-equipment maintenance on assigned CALCM and associated equipment. 3.20.8. Special Weapons Flight (MXWS). Performs on-equipment and off-equipment maintenance on assigned nuclear weapons, missiles, reentry systems, reentry vehicles and associated equipment. 3.20.9. Organization Variations. Because AFMC munitions activities are not organized for direct combat operations, they are authorized to organize according to MAJCOM guidance instead of the structure in this AFI.

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3.21. Mission Support Group. Figure 3.21. Mission Support Group Structure.

3.21.1. Mission Support Group Functions and Responsibilities. The mission support group provides base support and services. 3.21.2. Noncommissioned Officer (NCO) Academy. At overseas locations with an NCO academy, the academy is a functional flight assigned to the mission support group commander. CONUS academies are aligned under Air Education and Training Command (AETC). An NCO academy is named after its host base and established as a named activity; an example is the Lackland NCO Academy. 3.21.3. Organization Variations. Where applicable, Aerial Port Squadrons are part of the Mission Support Group (Note: Aerial Port Squadron alignment is under review). 3.22. Contracting Squadron. Figure 3.22. Contracting Squadron Structure.

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3.22.1. Contracting Squadron (PK) Functions and Responsibilities. The Contracting Squadron provides acquisition planning and business advice; leads market research for solicitation, contract award and contract administration; and ensures performance management in support of installation contracting requirements and deployment contingency contracting. 3.22.2. Contingency Support (PKX). Contingency support provides planning, programming, training and execution of all contingency contracting operations. 3.22.3. Acquisition Flights (PKA/B/C, etc.). The acquisition flights lead market research; provide business advice and acquisition planning for solicitation, execute award and perform contract administration; and ensure performance management for all installation acquisition requirements. 3.22.4. Plans and Programs Flight (PKP). The Plans and Programs Flight includes all functions in support of the contracting squadron. This may include functions such as Information Technology support, administration of the Government-wide Purchase Card Program, Quality Assurance Evaluator Program, contract review committee, focal point for squadron training, squadron performance metric development and trend analysis. 3.22.5. Performance Management Flight (PKM) (Optional). This flight may perform consolidated contract quality/specialist functions needed to provide complete performance management support to the acquisition flight(s). In addition to quality assurance, this flight may include the quality assurance program coordinator, contract specialists and additional multi-functional expertise (additional acquisition personnel, program management, engineers, quality assurance specialist, etc.) as determined by wing senior leadership. Under this option, the flight performs pre-award planning, solicitation and source selection and post award functions as a multi-functional unit under the squadron commander for a single multifunctional service contract or group of services contracts. One or more performance management flight(s) may be added with the approval of the wing commander. 3.22.6. Organization Variations. If Acquisition Flight A and Acquisition Flight B together exceed 30 manpower authorizations, the squadron commander may establish additional acquisition flights. Additional acquisition flights may be added with Head of Contracting Activity (HCA) approval. In addition, a Performance Management Flight may be established with the approval of the Wing Commander with an information copy to the HCA.

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3.23. Logistics Readiness Squadron. Figure 3.23. Logistics Readiness Squadron Structure.

3.23.1. Logistics Readiness Squadron (LGR) Functions and Responsibilities. Plans, organizes, directs and manages all logistics support activities. Activities include materiel and traffic management functions inherent to the receiving, shipping, movement, storage and control of property and equipment. Activities also include efficient and economical vehicle operations and management services as well as installation planning and execution of unit movement, reception, and bed down and redeployment operations. 3.23.2. Operations Officer (LGR). Provides direct support to the squadron commander, oversees squadron programs, associated business processes and unit operation compliance. 3.23.3. Materiel Management Flight (LGRM). Responsible for stocking, storing, issuing, managing, inventorying and inspecting DoD supplies and equipment. This flight is the primary liaison between customers and the responsible AFMC centralized supply chain management commodity function. 3.23.4. Deployment and Distribution Flight (LGRD). Responsible for the centralized command and control, planning and execution of all wing deployment operations and the distribution of cargo, passengers and personal property. The Installation Deployment Officer (IDO) is appointed from within the Deployment and Distribution Flight. The flight is responsible for the execution of squadron Air and Space Expeditionary Forces (AEF) Management, squadron UTC management, In-Garrison Expeditionary Site Planning and Installation Deployment Planning. The Deployment and Distribution Flight also operates a Deployment Control Center (DCC), Reception Control Center (RCC) and Installation Deployment Readiness Cell (IDRC), as necessary. This flight is responsible for the management of the wing’s War Reserve Materiel (WRM), Support Agreements. Additionally, the flight is the single installation transportation authority responsible for planning, managing and executing the movement of personnel; the shipment and receipt of DoD cargo; acquisition and arrangement of Personal Property movement services; and operation of Small Air Terminals for Cargo and Passenger Movement functions at locations with no Aerial Port Squadron or other host support. Provides vehicle operations functions,

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responsible for providing efficient and economical transportation services to support the mission, including licensing, dispatch, pick up and delivery operations, and vehicle and equipment support. Single authority for vehicle official use and permissible operating distance guidance and programs. 3.23.5. Vehicle Management Flight (LGRV). Single authority and source for maintenance and management of an installation’s motor vehicle fleet. Responsible for overall management and maintenance of the wing’s vehicle fleet and assigns, accounts for and maintains vehicle assets so they are safe, efficient and environmentally sound and meet the wing’s needs. Responsible for the management, repair and accountability of the Air Force vehicle fleet. 3.23.6. Fuels Management Flight (LGRF). Ensures quality petroleum products, cryogenics fluids and missile propellants are acquired or produced and issued safely and efficiently to using organizations. 3.24. Force Support Squadron. Figure 3.24. Force Support Squadron Structure.

3.24.1. Force Support Squadron (FS) Functions and Responsibilities. Provides personnel, manpower, morale and recreation services, food service and lodging support, child care, training, education and family readiness functions to military personnel, their dependents and other eligible parties. 3.24.2. Resource Management (FSR). Responsible for appropriated and nonappropriated fund financial management, private organizations, squadron logistics and property management, and squadron information technology. 3.24.3. Marketing (FSK). Provides day-to-day functional oversight and advice on marketing, commercial sponsorship and market research programs that supports both appropriated and nonappropriated fund activities within the squadron. Marketing also works with the Public Affairs office to administer publicity.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 3.24.4. Operations Officer (FSO). Responsible for Unit Training and the Readiness & Plans functions. Also focuses on day-to-day squadron operations, e.g., suspense response and problem solving. May also be in charge of activities such as internal squadron awards. 3.24.5. Honor Guard (FSOH). Provides for military funeral honors; provides honor guard training on military customs, courtesies, movements, protocol, heraldry, and heritage for the professional development of Airmen; and supports military and civilian protocol and ceremonial functions as permitted by time and resources. 3.24.6. Unit Training (FSOT). Develops, manages, conducts and oversees training for all military and appropriated and nonappropriated fund civilian employees in the squadron. 3.24.7. Readiness and Plans (FSOX). Contains Unit Readiness and Installation Personnel Readiness functions. Unit Readiness focuses internally and encompasses the unit deployment manager (UDM) (manages staffing/readiness for all of the squadron UTCs), WRM and unit deployable equipment management, and the squadron’s portion of base plans. Installation Personnel Readiness is externally focused and provides installation-wide personnel deployment planning and execution and personnel support in matters pertaining to deployment availability information, personnel accountability, and duty status reporting for contingencies, exercises, and deployments. 3.24.8. Manpower and Personnel Flight (FSM). Provides the installation with Manpower and Organization services and Personnel support for both military and appropriated and nonappropriated fund civilians. 3.24.9. Sustainment Services Flight (FSV). Provides life sustaining functions like food, fitness and lodging services for the installation. Also includes food and beverage operations like clubs, casual/formal dining, banquet/catering operations; and stand-alone nonappropriated fund food operations. 3.24.10. Airman and Family Services Flight (FSF). Provides programs that respond to the needs of military members and their families. This includes child development, family care and youth programs. In addition, provides referral counseling, leadership consultation, base family action plans and assistance programs for Relocation and Transition Assistance. Also provides casualty and personal/family readiness functions. 3.24.11. Force Development Flight (FSD). Provides all elements of voluntary education, training and professional development. These functions are supported with professional and recreational library services for the installation. 3.24.12. Community Services Flight (FSC). Provides recreational activities such as community centers, arts and crafts, outdoor recreation programs, activities and equipment checkout. Also provides food, beverage and entertainment programs through bowling centers and golf courses. Has retail operations and hosts a number of special interest clubs such as aero clubs, rod and gun clubs, stables, etc.

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3.25. Security Forces Squadron. Figure 3.25. Security Forces Squadron Structure.

3.25.1. Security Forces Squadron (SF) Functions and Responsibilities. Protect installations, personnel, and resources from terrorism, criminal acts, sabotage and acts of war. (Note: S-1 is the office symbol used by the Commander’s Support Staff in this squadron instead of CCQ.) 3.25.2. Security Forces Management (SFM). Functions include senior SF enlisted leader and standardization and evaluation of Security Forces functional mission performance. 3.25.3. Intelligence Flight (S-2). Functions include force protection intelligence (FPI) liaison and investigations. 3.25.4. Operations and Training Flight (S-3). Functions include day-to-day installation security, confinement program management and military working dog management. Administers all SF training programs and performs unit scheduling. 3.25.5. Logistics Flight (S-4). Functions include SF resource advisor, mobility (unit deployment) management, armory, combat arms training, weapons maintenance, supply management, vehicle management and electronic system security management. 3.25.6. Plans and Programs Flight (S-5). Functions include pass and ID; reports and analysis; plans administration; installation security; resource protection; physical security; crime prevention; antiterrorism program; police services planning; Security Forces Management Information System (SFMIS); and contractor oversight.

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3.26. Civil Engineer Squadron. Figure 3.26. Civil Engineer Squadron Structure.

3.26.1. Civil Engineer Squadron (CE) Functions and Responsibilities. Establish, operate, sustain, and protect installations as power projection platforms that enable Air Force and other supported commander core capabilities through engineering and emergency response services across the full mission spectrum. 3.26.2. Engineering Flight (CEN). Responsible for portfolio optimization, community planning, environmental planning, program development, energy, design and construction management, Installation Geospatial Information and Service (IGIS) and Comprehensive Asset Management Plan (CAMP) integration. Provides project management to include design, contract execution, and Simplified Acquisition of Base Engineer Requirements (SABER). Also provides installation mapping, facility floor plan maintenance, and civil engineer record drawing management. 3.26.3. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Flight (CED). Provides oversight and management of the capabilities to safely respond, mitigate or defeat the hazards presented by enemy or friendly employment of Explosive Ordnance (EO) to include Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) or conventional explosive, nuclear, biological, chemical, radiological, or incendiary material on and off installations. 3.26.4. Fire Emergency Services Flight (CEF). Provides incident leadership and response capabilities for all multi-agency incidents, aircraft crash/rescue responses, structural fire responses, technical rescue services, hazardous material (HAZMAT) incident management/response, pre-hospital medical emergencies (non-transport), and fire prevention services in order to minimize negative consequences of emergency incidents. 3.26.5. Installation Management Flight (CEI). Provides oversight and management of financial management support, information technology management, and force support for the squadron. Provides oversight and management of real property, cultural and natural resources, environmental compliance, and hazardous waste (HAZWASTE) management. Also provides housing, dormitory, and furnishing management. 3.26.6. Operations Flight (CEO). Provides oversight and management of facility and infrastructure operations, maintenance and repair, material control, customer service, services

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contract management, and operations engineering functions. Responsible for transportation and utilities Activity Management Plan (AMP) management. 3.26.7. Readiness and Emergency Management Flight (CEX). Provides oversight and management of the installation emergency management program, and the civil engineer squadron expeditionary engineering program to include Prime Base Engineer Emergency Force (BEEF) operations. Trains installation populace on CBRN defense, Air Force incident management, and Emergency Response Operations. Serves as installation CBRN/HAZMAT emergency responders, emergency operations center manager and operates the installation mobile communications vehicle/mobile emergency operations center. 3.27. Communications Squadron. Figure 3.27. Communications Squadron Structure.

3.27.1. Communications Squadron (SC) Functions and Responsibilities. Wing focal point for all cyberspace operations and planning. Assures wartime readiness of cyberspace airmen. Interfaces directly with other cyberspace units to include those within Twenty-fourth Air Force, Defense Information Systems Agency, and other Air Force and joint organizations. 3.27.2. Policy and Evaluations (SCQ). Provides unit training program management, squadron standardization and evaluation/quality assurance, reporting and analysis, and policy guidance functions. 3.27.3. Operations Flight (SCO). Provides a network control center capability, including a client service center, network management, server administration and network cybersecurity services. Also, the flight enables knowledge management through such services as records management, forms, publications, content and collaboration management, workflow, and electronic communications management. The flight further performs Department of Defense Information Network (DoDIN) operations on unclassified and secure voice, data and radio frequency networks including associated infrastructure and assets for which the wing has

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 responsibility. Conducts DoDIN operations to enable wing mission and by direction from the owning MAJCOM Cyberspace Coordination Center and the 624th Operations Center. 3.27.4. Plans and Resources Flight (SCX). Manages activities related to base-level Command, Control, Communications and Computers (C4) systems planning: plans support, including mobility/deployment planning, spectrum management, strategic planning and requirements analysis; implementation, including architectures, integration, direction and standards; resources, including budgeting and billing; and human resources/functional management, including agreements and contract management. The flight is responsible for base-level cybersecurity programs (Communications Security, Computer Security, Emission Security, Spectrum Information Assurance). Conducts functional mission analysis to identify wing mission dependencies on cyberspace and provide mission assurance. In overseas locations, includes postal operations and management. 3.27.5. Special Mission Flight (SCP) (Optional). A communications squadron Special Mission Flight may be added to units having unique responsibilities, such as a teleport facility or Theater Deployable Communications equipment. MAJCOMs will submit requests to implement this variation to AF/A1M according to this Instruction.

3.28. Medical Group. Figure 3.28. Medical Group Structure.

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3.28.1. Medical Group Functions and Responsibilities. Provides healthcare services including preventive services as well as patient care and treatment for tactical units, the military community and other authorized personnel. 3.28.2. Medical Group Staff. The medical group staff may include a number of functional advisors: Administrator (SGA); Biomedical Sciences Corps Executive (SGB); Chief of Medical Staff (SGH); Chief Nurse (SGN); Chief of Dental Services (SGD); Chief of Aerospace Medicine (SGP); and Director of Medical Education (*at academic teaching facilities only). Individual groups may not have all functional advisors, depending on the mission and clinical capability of the medical treatment facility. Individuals serving as medical unit commanders or flight heads may also serve as functional advisors in some cases. For instance, in groups with dental squadrons, the squadron commander is the Chief of Dental Services. Functional advisors provide professional and specialized technical perspectives to the commander. They are full participants in executive level decision making, including strategic and operational planning, design of services, resource allocation, and organizational policies. Functional advisors actively support a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of health care and organizational management. 3.28.3. Organization Variations. 3.28.3.1. Variations are authorized for medical groups with two, three, five or six squadrons based on group size and mission. Medical groups typically have two or three squadrons, including Medical Operations and Medical Support Squadrons and, if required due to special mission requirements, one or more of the following squadrons: Aerospace Medicine, Dental, Inpatient Operations or Surgical Operations. Medical groups over 1,000 authorizations may also have a Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron, if required. 3.28.3.2. Figures 3.29-3.36 depict the authorized squadron and flight variations. MAJCOMs may approve changes to a medical group’s squadron or flight configuration that are IAW figures 3.29-3.36 and unit size guidance. To receive a DAF/A1M letter for such actions involving squadron activations, inactivations or redesignations, MAJCOMs submit them on the RCS: HAF-A8X(M) 9227 report IAW AFI 16-403, Updating the USAF Program Installations, Units, and Priorities and Movement of Air Force Units, at least two months before implementation; the appropriate rationale for the action should be annotated in the “Remarks” section. MAJCOMs submit requests for variances to these figures to AF/A1MO under this Instruction. 3.28.3.3. Medical Squadrons are authorized at small locations or when the medical unit is assigned to an air base group and may include but are not limited to the following functional flights: Medical Support; Medical Operations; Aerospace Medicine; and Dental. Limited-Scope Medical Treatment Facilities are authorized as medical functional flights or small medical squadrons assigned to an air base squadron, air base group or a support group and are organized with the above functions as functional flights, sections or elements, as appropriate. 3.28.4. The medical group structures do not apply to the Air Reserve Components. 3.28.5. Additional detail on the medical unit structures, including the most recent information, can be found in the Air Force Medical Service Flight Path for the USAF Combat Wing Organization-Medical Special Instruction located on the Air Force Medical

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website

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3.29. Medical Support Squadron. Figure 3.29. Medical Support Squadron Structure.

Note: Flights shown are options available. Composition of units depends on the mission and clinical capability of the medical treatment facility. Individual units do not have all flights. 3.29.1. Medical Support Squadron (SGS) Functions and Responsibilities. Provides medical logistics, medical information services, personnel and administration, TRICARE operations and patient administration, readiness, pharmacy, clinical laboratory, nutritional medicine, diagnostics and therapeutics, histopathology, and diagnostic imaging (without an assigned radiologist) in support of the medical group. 3.29.2. Clinical Laboratory Flight (SGSL). Collects, analyzes and prepares reports on biologic specimens. Manages the blood transfusion process. 3.29.3. Diagnostic Imaging Flight (SGSQ). Accomplishes, records, interprets and stores radiographic scans, fluoroscopy and ultrasounds. May perform angiograms, guided biopsies, myelograms and other procedures. 3.29.4. Histopathology Flight (SGSH). Provides analysis of biologic specimens from major and minor surgical procedures. Performs frozen section interpretation and autopsies. 3.29.5. Medical Information Services Flight (SGSI). information tools to meet the medical mission.

Plans, implements and manages

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3.29.6. Medical Logistics Flight (SGSM). Provides materiel, facilities, equipment, maintenance and services and manages war reserve materiel and transportation for the medical mission. Responsible for management of Defense or Air Force Working Capital Funds assets and programs for the medical mission. 3.29.7. Nutritional Medicine Flight (SGSN). Provides dietetic services for patients and staff, including food production and service activities, clinical nutrition management services, nutrition education, subsistence management and cost accounting. 3.29.8. Personnel and Administration Flight (SGSP). personnel and administrative needs for the medical group.

Provides and arranges for the

3.29.9. Pharmacy Flight (SGSD). Receives and fills prescriptions. Monitors patients for drug interactions and incompatibilities. Provides patient and provider education and performs drug use evaluations. 3.29.10. Readiness Flight (SGSX). Leads operational readiness training and exercise planning for all medical personnel. Ensures medical forces are organized, trained and equipped to meet in-garrison and deployed mission requirements. Conducts medical UDM functions and force readiness reporting. 3.29.11. Resource Management Flight (SGSR). Plans, programs, allocates and accounts for manpower and funds. Performs billing and collecting, data analysis, workload accounting and other related functions. 3.29.12. TRICARE Operations and Patient Administration (TOPA) Flight (SGST). Plans, develops and implements the local TRICARE health plan to include beneficiary and provider services, analysis and utilization management, and interacts with the regional TRICARE contractor. Oversees medical record management, admissions/dispositions, medical evaluation boards and other patient administrative activities. 3.29.13. Diagnostics and Therapeutic Services Flight (SGSA). This flight combines selected functions to provide diagnostic, preventive, therapeutic, education and food services for patients, providers and other customers. May include functions from the following flights: Clinical Laboratory; Histopathology; Nutritional Medicine; Pharmacy; and Diagnostic Imaging.

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3.30. Medical Operations Squadron. Figure 3.30. Medical Operations Squadron Structure.

Note: Flights shown are options available. Composition of units depends on the mission and clinical capability of the medical treatment facility. Individual units do not have all flights. 3.30.1. Medical Operations Squadron (SGO) Functions and Responsibilities. Plans, organizes, operates and evaluates a comprehensive system of health care, to include the development of processes to provide seamless and accessible beneficiary-focused, diagnostic, preventive, and treatment related services. Provides patient education and continuity of care for health maintenance, as well as for the acute and chronic management of disease and injuries. 3.30.2. Educational and Developmental Intervention Services (EDIS) Flight (SGOT). Helps children with special needs achieve their developmental and educational potential by providing quality family-centered support services in the home, school and community. Provides evaluations and educational services for children (0-21) with special needs in support of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Used at designated locations. At smaller installations, may fall under the Mental Health Flight. 3.30.3. Emergency Services Flight (SGOE). Provides medical care to patients with emergent and urgent problems and provides emergency medical response. 3.30.4. Family Health Flight (SGOF). Provides comprehensive examination, diagnosis and treatment of inpatients and outpatients. Clinical services include the monitoring and maintenance of patients’ state of health, counseling and guidance, health education,

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rehabilitation and prevention of disease, provision of clinical and consultation services and medical care evaluation. 3.30.5. Genetics Flight (SGOU). Provides care and counseling to patients with, and/or at risk for genetically based conditions. Advises and assists health care providers with the identification and management of patients or families with, or at risk for the same. Functions may include clinical and laboratory services. 3.30.6. Medically Related Services Flight (SGOV). Where required, provides medical services to children who are eligible to receive special education in the Department of Defense Dependent Schools (DoDDS) overseas under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Functions may include audiology, speech-language pathology services, occupational therapy, physical therapy, social work services, community health nurse services, child psychology services, child psychiatry services and developmental pediatric services. 3.30.7. Mental Health Flight (SGOW). May include psychiatry, clinical psychology, clinical social work, inpatient nursing units, substance abuse counseling, specialized treatment functions (alcohol and drug rehabilitation) and family advocacy. At smaller installations, may include EDIS function. 3.30.8. Obstetrical/Gynecological (OB/GYN) Services Flight (SGOG). Provides routine and specialized obstetrical and gynecological services in both the ambulatory and inpatient settings. 3.30.9. Pediatrics Flight (SGOC). Provides comprehensive and predominantly nonsurgical care to children and young adults under eighteen. 3.30.10. Physical and Occupational Therapy Flight (SGOY). Provides for the evaluation and management of acute and chronic conditions with the goal of alleviating pain and restoring functions. Depending on the mission and clinical capability of the facility, functions may include occupational therapy, physical therapy, orthotics and rehabilitation medicine. If occupational therapy is not available in the medical treatment facility, this flight becomes the “Physical Therapy Flight”. 3.30.11. Surgical Services Flight (SGOS). Provides comprehensive, specialized surgical care. 3.30.12. Aeromedical Staging Flight (SGOI). See Aerospace Medicine Squadron. 3.30.13. Aerospace and Operational Medicine Flight (SGOZ). This flight is used in two or three squadron medical groups that do not have an Aerospace Medicine or Dental Squadron. It performs the functional mission of an Aerospace Medicine Squadron. 3.30.14. Aerospace and Operational Physiology Flight (SGOR). See Aerospace Medicine Squadron. 3.30.15. Audiology Flight (SGOA). See Aerospace Medicine Squadron. 3.30.16. Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight (SGOJ). See Aerospace Medicine Squadron. 3.30.17. Dental Operations Flight (SGOD). See Aerospace Medicine Squadron. 3.30.18. Health Promotion Flight (SGOH). See Aerospace Medicine Squadron.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 3.30.19. Hyperbaric Medicine Flight (SGOQ). See Aerospace Medicine Squadron. 3.30.20. Occupational Medicine Flight (SGON). See Aerospace Medicine Squadron. 3.30.21. Optometry Flight (SGOO). See Aerospace Medicine Squadron. 3.30.22. Personnel Reliability Program Flight (SGOX). See Aerospace Medicine Squadron. 3.30.23. Public Health Flight (SGOL). See Aerospace Medicine Squadron. 3.30.24. Clinical Medicine Flight (SGOK). This flight is used in two or three squadron medical groups that want to combine all clinical functions into one flight. May include functions from the following flights: Family Health; Mental Health; Obstetrics/Gynecological Services; Pediatrics; and Primary Care. 3.30.25. Maternal/Child Care Flight (SGOB). Provides routine and specialized OB services in the inpatient settings. Depending on mission and clinical capability, elements may include Labor and Delivery, Postpartum, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Nursery. This flight combines the functions of the Obstetrics/Gynecological Services and Pediatrics flights. 3.30.26. Medical Services Flight (SGOM). This flight combines selected functions to provide comprehensive, but predominantly nonsurgical care to patients. May include functions from the following flights: Emergency Services, Family Health, Mental Health, OB/GYN Services, Pediatrics and Primary Care. 3.30.27. Primary Care Flight (SGOP). Provides for the delivery of comprehensive primary care services for all ages. Clinical services include the management of acute and chronic health problems, disease prevention activities, screening, counseling, patient education, health risk assessment, continuity and coordination of care. May include functions from the following flights: Family Health, Pediatrics, Mental Health and OB/GYN Services. 3.30.28. Organization Variations. If there is no Aerospace Medicine Squadron, the Aerospace Medicine Squadron functions (marked with * in the figure) fall under Medical Operations Squadron. These functions may transfer as one Aerospace and Operational Medicine Flight or as individual flights.

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3.31. Aerospace Medicine Squadron. Figure 3.31. Aerospace Medicine Squadron Structure.

Note: Flights shown are options available. Composition of units depends on the mission and clinical capability of the medical treatment facility. Individual units do not have all flights. 3.31.1. Aerospace Medicine Squadron (SGP) Functions and Responsibilities. Supports the operational Air Force by enhancing the health of its people: ensuring a fit force, preventing disease and injury, protecting the environment, and, anticipating and responding to medical contingencies in all environments and workplaces. Also provides and supports regulatory assessments, risk assessments, enhanced mission performance, planning, and public relations/risk communication service-lines. 3.31.2. Aeromedical Staging Flight (SGPW). Receives, shelters, processes, transports and provides medical and nursing care to patients who enter, travel in and/or exit the aeromedical evacuation system, including patients in “remain overnight” status. Coordinates patient movement requirements through the appropriate global, theater, or joint Patient Movement Requirements Centers (PMRCs); coordinates with base operations for mission ground support; coordinates with billeting and transportation to provide assistance to nonmedical/medical attendants while transiting and remaining overnight. 3.31.3. Aerospace and Operational Medicine Flight (SGPF). Provides primary care to flying and special operational duty personnel and their families, including all Space and Missile Operations Duty personnel and their families. Provides primary care and application of USAF medical Personnel Reliability Program (PRP) standards for all personnel assigned to PRP positions at bases that do not have PRP flight in the Aerospace Medicine Squadron. (Family members of PRP personnel who are not flyers are to obtain primary care from family medicine, primary care, medical services or pediatric flights.) Provides flying and occupational preventive health physicals. Determines fitness for flight and special

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 operational duties. Acts as the Human Systems Integration consultant to the wing and to air operations, space weapons, and warfare centers. 3.31.4. Aerospace and Operational Physiology Flight (SGPT). Supports local and regional DoD operational commanders by providing appropriate aerospace physiology and human performance enhancement training. Provides consultant services for flying and ground safety activities and physiological/human factor investigations and analysis of military aircraft mishaps. Provides High Altitude Reconnaissance and Air Drop Mission Support. In squadrons with hypobaric (altitude) chambers, provides overall management to include operations, training, and oversight. In squadrons with hyperbaric (dive) chambers, responsibilities reflect the availability of hyperbaric specialists but may include operations, training and oversight. 3.31.5. Audiology Flight (SGPQ). Provides clinical diagnostic and aerospace medicine flight operational support. Evaluates and treats hearing and balance disorders. Manages Hearing Conservation Program (HCP) and hearing loss prevention programs including education/training and shop visits 3.31.6. Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight (SGPB). Provides operational health risk assessment expertise to enhance commander decision making and health service support capabilities by identifying, evaluating, and recommending controls for chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and physical occupational and environmental health threats. 3.31.7. Health Promotion Flight (SGPZ). Provides programs that encourage healthy lifestyles, e.g., tobacco product non-use, exercise and fitness, nutrition, stress management, cardio-vascular disease prevention and substance abuse education. 3.31.8. Hyperbaric Medicine Flight (SGPH). Provides initial clinical care for decompression sickness, and carbon monoxide poisoning. Additionally provides coordinated care in chronic clinical cases such as gas gangrene and non-healing wounds. When dedicated hyperbaric personnel are not assigned, Aerospace and Operational Medicine Flight and Aerospace Physiology personnel provide initial response capability and serve as consultants to the medical group. 3.31.9. Occupational Medicine Flight (SGPO). Delivers comprehensive preventive care to the military and civilian work force. Provides initial management of occupational injuries and illnesses. Directs medical monitoring efforts for the work force. Instructs clinical specialists and other allied health professionals on the recognition of occupational illnesses and injuries. 3.31.10. Optometry Flight (SGPE). Examines, diagnoses, treats and manages diseases and disorders of the visual system as well as diagnosis-related systemic conditions with special emphasis on providing primary eye care and refractive services to flying and non-flying military personnel. Manages the spectacle/gas mask inserts, contact lens and warfighter aviation corneal refractive surgery programs. 3.31.11. Personnel Reliability Program Flight (SGPP). Responsible for application of USAF medical PRP standards for all military personnel assigned to PRP positions at bases with more than 400 personnel assigned to PRP.

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3.31.12. Public Health Flight (SGPM). Recommends and implements programs to prevent disease, disability, morbidity, and death through effective use of populationbased public health programs. Conducts epidemiological surveillance and analysis of communicable, environmental, and occupational morbidity and mortality to establish and prioritize strategies for prevention and intervention. 3.31.13. Dental Operations Flight (SGPD). This flight option is used when a medical group does not have a Dental Squadron. 3.31.14. Organization Variations. If there is no Aerospace Medicine Squadron, the Aerospace Medicine Squadron functions fall under Medical Operations Squadron. These functions may transfer as one Aerospace Medicine Flight or as individual flights. 3.32. Dental Squadron. Figure 3.32. Dental Squadron Structure.

Note: Flights shown are options available. Composition of units depends on the mission and clinical capability of the medical treatment facility. Individual units do not have all flights. 3.32.1. Dental Squadron (SGD) Functions and Responsibilities. Implements and maintains comprehensive programs for the prevention and treatment of dental disease to ensure maximum individual readiness and optimal oral health. Sustains maximum readiness utilizing the Air Force Dental Readiness Assurance Program and delivery of comprehensive dental services and programs. Provides a dental health care delivery system that integrates quality, cost effectiveness, and access and may include administration of a private sector care referral program. 3.32.2. Area Dental Laboratory Flight (SGDA). Supports Air Force and other federal dental and medical services by fabricating and repairing dental prostheses, orthodontic appliances and related materials. 3.32.3. Clinical Dentistry Flight (SGDD). Provides diagnostic and preventive services and delivers comprehensive dental treatment. 3.32.4. Dental Laboratory Flight (SGDL). Fabricates dental prostheses and other appliances to support local treatment. Refers workload to the area dental laboratory as required. 3.32.5. Dental Residency Flight (SGDR). Provides education, training and administrative support for selected dental officers.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 3.32.6. Dental Support Flight (SGDS). Supports the squadron in matters relating to personnel management, records, reports, publications, correspondence, training, resource management, logistics and general management of patient data.

3.33. Inpatient Operations Squadron. Figure 3.33. Inpatient Operations Squadron Structure.

Note: Flights shown are options available. Composition of units depends on the mission and clinical capability of the medical treatment facility. Individual units may not have all flights. 3.33.1. Inpatient Operations Squadron (SGI) Functions and Responsibilities. Provides or arranges for the full scope of inpatient clinical health care services for the defined population normally on a 24/7 basis. Assesses the health care needs and expectations of the population served; plans, organizes, operates, evaluates, and improves a comprehensive system of inpatient health care services from admission to discharge; develops processes to provide seamless, customer-focused access, assessment, diagnostic services, preventive and treatment services, education and continuity in all care settings for health maintenance as well as acute and chronic management of disease and injury; supports information requirements of beneficiaries, staff, and management; and, develops a program to continuously analyze and improve system performance, to include measures of customer satisfaction, clinical outcomes, costs, and effectiveness of all key processes. 3.33.2. Critical Care Flight (SGIC). Provides specially trained personnel and specialized monitoring and support equipment or treatment of patients whose conditions require intensified, comprehensive observation and care. Depending on mission and clinical capability of the facility, functions may include Surgical and Medical Intensive Care, Special Care Units and Cardiac Care Units. 3.33.3. Maternal/Child Care Flight (SGIB). See Medical Operations Squadron. 3.33.4. Medical Inpatient Flight (SGIM). Provides comprehensive, specialized, non-surgical care to medical patients in inpatient nursing units.

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3.33.5. Mental Health Inpatient Flight (SGIW). Provides comprehensive, specialized care to mental health inpatients. 3.33.6. Perioperative Flight (SGIP). Provides perioperative services to include operating room, anesthesia, same day surgery, post anesthesia care unit and sterile processing department. 3.33.7. Surgical Inpatient Flight (SGIS). Provides comprehensive, specialized, surgical care to inpatients. All inpatient surgical units, regardless of specialty, fall within the Surgical Inpatient Flight (excluding intensive care units). 3.33.8. Multiservice Inpatient Flight (SGIA). To be utilized for smaller flights. Combines functions of Medical Inpatient and Surgical Inpatient Flights. 3.34. Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron. Figure 3.34. Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron Structure.

Note: Flights shown are options available. Composition of units depends on the mission and clinical capability of the medical treatment facility. Individual units may not have all flights. 3.34.1. Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron (SGQ) Functions and Responsibilities. Responsible for diagnostic, preventive, therapeutic, education, nutrition and food services for patients, staff, and other customers. 3.34.2. Clinical Laboratory Flight (SGQC). See Medical Support Squadron. 3.34.3. Diagnostic Imaging Flight (SGQQ). See Medical Support Squadron. 3.34.4. Histopathology Flight (SGQH). See Medical Support Squadron. 3.34.5. Nutritional Medicine Flight (SGQD). See Medical Support Squadron. 3.34.6. Pharmacy Flight (SGQP). See Medical Support Squadron. 3.34.7. Organization Variations. The Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron is an optional squadron for medical groups with over 1,000 authorizations that have large capabilities in the affected areas. When this option is used, the Medical Support Squadron does not have the affected flights.

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3.35. Surgical Operations Squadron. Figure 3.35. Surgical Operations Squadron Structure.

Note: Flights shown are options available. Composition of units depends on the mission and clinical capability of the medical treatment facility. Individual units may not have all flights. 3.35.1. Surgical Operations Squadron (SGC) Functions and Responsibilities. Provides episodic care to the patient population. Provides specialized treatment to patients that is generally a singular occurrence. 3.35.2. Anesthesia Flight (SGCJ). Provides pre-operative services, recovery room/postanesthesia care units and pain management clinics. 3.35.3. Diagnostic Imaging Flight (SGCR). See Medical Support Squadron. 3.35.4. General Surgery Flight (SGCQ). Examines, diagnoses and treats diseases, injuries and disorders by surgical means and provides related inpatient nursing units. 3.35.5. OB/GYN Services Flight (SGCG). See Medical Operations Squadron. 3.35.6. Operating Room Flight (SGCS). May include the Operating Room, Post Anesthesia Care Unit, Commander Support Section, Anesthesia and Same Day Surgery functions. 3.35.7. Orthopedics Flight (SGCO). Provides outpatient clinics, brace shops, and podiatry services. 3.35.8. Surgical Services Flight (SGCU). Provides treatment of patients who, because of a major surgical procedure or post- or pre-operating conditions, require intensified, comprehensive observation and care. Also provides services such as ambulatory surgery clinics, operating rooms, anesthesia, post-anesthesia care units and sterile processing department.

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3.35.9. Surgical Specialties Flight (SGCX). Provides ophthalmology, orthopedics, neurosurgery, thoracic surgery, cardiac surgery, urology, vascular surgery, and plastic surgery. 3.35.10. Critical Care Flight (SGCC). See Inpatient Operations Squadron. 3.35.11. Maternal/Child Care Flight (SGCB). Medical Operations Squadron.

See Inpatient Operations Squadron and

3.35.12. Medical Inpatient Flight (SGCN). See Inpatient Operations Squadron. 3.35.13. Mental Health Inpatient Flight (SGCW). See Inpatient Operations Squadron. 3.35.14. Multiservice Inpatient Flight (SGCM). See Inpatient Operations Squadron. 3.35.15. Perioperative Flight (SGCP). See Inpatient Operations Squadron. 3.35.16. Surgical Inpatient Flight (SGCI). See Inpatient Operations Squadron. 3.35.17. Organization Variations. 3.35.17.1. In facilities too small to have Inpatient Operations Squadrons, Inpatient Operations flights (marked with * in the figure) can be established under the Surgical Operations Squadron if those services are present in the facility. 3.35.17.2. When this option is used, the Medical Operations Squadron does not have the OB/GYN Services and Surgical Services Flights.

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Chapter 4 TERMINOLOGY AND PROCEDURES FOR ORGANIZATION ACTIONS 4.1. Organization Actions. Use the terminology and related procedures outlined in this chapter to make an organization change. Implementation of actions is to be in accordance with applicable provisions of AFI 10-503, Strategic Basing. Procedures and responsibilities shown below apply to MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs. SAF/AAR may perform these functions for their supported organizations. 4.2. Organization Terminology: 4.2.1. Constitute. Provide the legal authority for a new unit by designating it in a Department of the Air Force (DAF/A1M) letter. 4.2.2. Disband. Withdraw the legal authority for a unit. The designation of the unit is retired and preserved in historical records. 4.2.3. Reconstitute. Renew legal authorization of a disbanded unit. 4.2.4. Activate. Bring into existence a constituted unit, a detachment of a unit, or a provisional unit. An active unit can legally function as specified by directives. 4.2.5. Inactivate. End the existence of a unit, detachment of a unit, or provisional unit. An inactive unit retains its lineage, history and honors and is available for activation when needed again. Units should be inactivated when their mission ceases to exist and all resources are withdrawn. 4.2.6. Designate. Give an official name (or a number and name). 4.2.7. Redesignate. Change the name or number. 4.2.8. Consolidate. To permanently combine two or more organizations by merging their lineage into a single line to form a single organization. Consolidation usually applies to organizations that were active at different times but have the same numerical designations or similar functions. Units that have been active concurrently cannot be consolidated. A consolidated unit cannot subsequently be separated. 4.2.9. Assign. Place a unit with an existing military organization. 4.2.10. Attach. Place a unit, or part of a unit, with a military organization other than its parent organization, without making it a part of that organization. A unit, or part of a unit, may be attached for operational control, administrative control and logistic support. 4.2.10.1. Operational Control. The authority of a commander at any echelon at or below the level of CCMD to perform those function of command over subordinate forces involving organizing and employing commands and forces, assigning tasks, designating objectives and giving direction necessary to accomplish the mission. 4.2.10.2. Administrative Control. Direction or exercise of authority over subordinate or other organizations in respect to administration and support. Examples of administrative control are UCMJ authority, personnel classification, effectiveness reports, granting leaves and so on.

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4.2.10.3. Logistic Support. The support provided by one organization to another, enabling that organization to carry out operations. Examples include supply, maintenance, logistics planning, transportation and contracting. An order that states a unit is attached for logistic support only clearly means operational control and administrative control are not responsibilities of the commander to which the unit is attached. The order itself does not detail the extent and kind of logistic support, as this support is clarified through separate documents, such as host tenant support agreements. 4.2.11. Allot. Authorize a unit to be part of the Air National Guard. DAF/A1M memos allot units to the National Guard Bureau which in turn allots them to the appropriate state, territory or the District of Columbia. 4.2.12. Status Change. Change the organizational status of a MAJCOM, FOA or DRU. A status change is accomplished by a DAF/A1M memo. Status changes are often accompanied by a redesignation. For example, the status change of the Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Agency from a FOA to a subordinate organization of Air Combat Command (ACC) was accompanied by its redesignation to Twenty-Fifth Air Force. 4.3. Organization Procedures. The following procedures apply to organization entities within the Air Force. 4.3.1. Establishments: 4.3.1.1. An establishment is automatically created when its headquarters unit is activated. 4.3.1.2. An establishment is controlled through its headquarters. However, subordinate units are assigned to the establishment, not to the headquarters unit. This enables each unit within an establishment to have a separate identity. The fact that the headquarters unit controls the establishment places the other units subordinate to it. Personnel are assigned to a unit, not to an establishment. 4.3.1.3. The assignment of any establishment assigns all its components at the same time, unless otherwise specified. For example, when a wing is assigned to an NAF, the assignment of the wing's groups and squadrons also is to the NAF. The separation of units by location does not affect their assignment to the establishment. 4.3.1.4. Inactivation of a headquarters unit automatically inactivates the establishment. Units assigned to the establishment automatically revert, unless otherwise directed, to the next higher level. 4.3.2. Units: 4.3.2.1. HQ USAF issues a DAF/A1M letter to constitute and activate MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs. For a unit subordinate to a MAJCOM, FOA or DRU, HQ USAF constitutes the unit and assigns it to the MAJCOM, FOA or DRU for activation. The MAJCOM, FOA or DRU will activate and assign the unit by issuing a G-Series Order citing the DAF/A1M letter as authority. (T-1). A DAF/A1M letter also can authorize a MAJCOM, FOA or DRU to redesignate or inactivate a unit. An inactivated unit reverts to the control of HQ USAF. DAF/A1M letters and G-Series Orders follow the formats prescribed in Chapter 7.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 4.3.2.2. A MAJCOM, FOA or DRU may reassign a unit internally unless the unit's assignment is specified in a DAF/A1M letter or by a standard structure prescribed in this Instruction. 4.3.2.3. A unit may be reassigned from one MAJCOM, FOA or DRU to another. In this case, the losing MAJCOM, FOA or DRU (after coordinating with the gaining MAJCOM, FOA or DRU) requests AF/A1M approve the reassignment on a date agreed to by both commands (if agreed to by both parties, the gaining command may make the request or the commands may make a joint request). If only unit reassignments are involved, the DAF/A1M letter directs the reassignment of such units and copies are sent to both commands. If reassignment and movement occur at the same time, the movement directive issued per AFI 16-403 can also serve as the reassignment directive. 4.3.2.4. The effective date of an organization action (for example, activation, inactivation, or redesignation) is either published in the DAF/A1M letter or in orders issued by the MAJCOM, FOA or DRU. When a DAF/A1M letter allows the effective date to be on or about a certain date, the organization action must occur no more than 30 calendar days before or after that date. (T-1). 4.3.2.5. Numbered flights are units and require the same organization procedures as other units. Alpha and functional flights, however, are not units and are not subject to this chapter's procedures. 4.3.3. Nonunits: MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs have the approval authority to activate, inactivate, and redesignate detachments and operating locations (OL) (see below for specifics such as how to designate them and restrictions on redesignations). MAJCOM Manpower and Organization focal points should conduct an annual detachment/OL review to validate the continuing requirement for the activity. MAJCOM, FOA and DRU Manpower and Organization focal points and SAF/AARM (for serviced organizations) may approve variances to paragraphs 4.3.3.1.2. and 4.3.3.2.6 below regarding sequencing of detachment and OL designations if warranted due to factors such as operational needs, to maintain continuity, or to identify with a particular related organization or location (such as joint bases); detachments remain numeric and OLs remain alphabetical. 4.3.3.1. Detachments: 4.3.3.1.1. A MAJCOM, FOA or DRU may activate a detachment for a function that is geographically separated from its parent unit. A detachment is activated to fill a need for command or supervision, or for other reasons, such as to facilitate unit movement. If there is a need for command authority, the senior officer on duty with a detachment is appointed on orders as detachment commander. Note: Normally, a geographically separated organization is designated an operating location unless onsite command authority is required. Then, it is designated a detachment. 4.3.3.1.2. Detachments are numbered in sequence, beginning with 1. 4.3.3.1.3. A detachment can be redesignated to another number within the same unit. The new number cannot duplicate a currently active detachment number within that unit. 4.3.3.1.4. The following redesignations cannot be made:

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4.3.3.1.4.1. A detachment of one parent unit to a detachment of another parent unit. 4.3.3.1.4.2. A detachment to a unit. 4.3.3.1.4.3. A unit to a detachment. 4.3.3.1.4.4. A detachment to an operating location. 4.3.3.1.4.5. An operating location to a detachment. 4.3.3.1.5. The inactivation of a parent unit automatically inactivates its detachments. 4.3.3.1.6. Detachments are designated as part of a unit, not an establishment, e.g., Detachment 1, 1st Fighter Squadron or Detachment 4, HQ 1st Operations Group. 4.3.3.1.7. If a gap in sequential numbering occurs due to actions such as inactivation of a detachment, it is not necessary to take actions to change the numbers of the other detachments in the unit to fill in the gap. 4.3.3.2. Operating Location (OL): 4.3.3.2.1. An OL may be activated by a MAJCOM, FOA or DRU. 4.3.3.2.2. An OL is a geographically separated location where persons are required to perform permanent duty and the command supervision or other features provided by a detachment are not needed. 4.3.3.2.3. An OL is not a location separated from an installation to which persons are transported to work. 4.3.3.2.4. Guidelines in Paragraphs 4.3.3.1.3. to 4.3.3.1.7. above regarding detachments also apply to operating location actions (with the understanding that OLs are designated alphabetically instead of numerically). 4.3.3.2.5. Manpower authorizations for an OL are reported with the location where duty is being performed. 4.3.3.2.6. OLs are designated in alphabetical sequence, beginning with A. 4.3.3.3. Coding Personnel Accounting Symbol (PAS) Data 4.3.3.3.1. The PAS code contains data fields for designating detachments, OLs and staff elements. The following coding rules apply: 4.3.3.3.2. OLs are designated with a maximum of three alphabetic characters in a four-character field. The first character of the OL field is zero. The first two characters of the OL field are always zero for OLs designated with two letters. The first three characters of the OL field are always zero for OL designations with a single letter (e.g., OL code “000A” for OL-A, OL code “00ZZ” for OL-ZZ, OL code “0ABC” for OL-ABC). 4.3.3.3.3. If the OL is not subordinate to the detachment, the detachment code is designated with zeroes (e.g., detachment code “0000” and OL code “000A” means OL A and parent is not a detachment).

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 4.3.3.3.4. If the OL is subordinate to the detachment, both fields are designated independently (e.g., detachment code “0001” and OL code “000A” equals OL A of detachment 1). 4.3.3.3.5. Detachment and OL data fields (four characters each) are combined in the personnel system. Therefore, total non-zero characters cannot exceed four characters. 4.3.3.3.5.1. An OL can be up to three characters if the detachment number designation is one digit (1-9). 4.3.3.3.5.2. An OL can be one or two characters if the detachment number designation is two digits (10 through 99). 4.3.3.3.5.3. An OL can be only one character if the detachment number designation is three digits (100 through 999). 4.3.3.3.5.4. An OL cannot be assigned to a detachment numbered greater than 999. If it should become necessary to establish an OL, the detachment is redesignated using not more than three digits for identification. 4.3.3.3.5.5. The first character of an OL or staff element data field is alphabetic if used for anything other than an OL (e.g., when establishing a separate PAS for a senior rater). 4.3.3.3.5.6. General guidance on the PAS system is in AFCSM 36-699, Volume 4, Personnel Accounting Symbol System Users Manual. 4.3.3.4. Squadron Sections. A commander of a large unit (235 or more military authorized), squadron or above, may delegate administrative control of all assigned members by appointing a section commander on special orders IAW guidance in AFI 51604. 4.3.3.4.1. If a full-time section commander is not authorized under a manpower standard, unit commanders may appoint a section commander who performs these functions as an additional duty. Commanders should exercise discretion to ensure this is done only when warranted by span of control factors. 4.3.3.4.2. See AFI 51-604 for legal guidance on appointment of section commanders. See AFI 36-2101, Classifying Military Personnel (Officer and Enlisted), for guidance on AFSC/duty title matters. 4.3.3.5. Air Force Elements: 4.3.3.5.1. An Air Force Element may be designated to function as a unit by a designating officer (described below). The designating officer attaches the Air Force members on duty with an organization outside the Air Force to the Air Force Element. (Refer to AFI 51-604 for the determination of an Air Force Element commander and/or the appointment of Air Force Element section commanders.) The following officers have authority to designate an Air Force Element to function as a unit: 4.3.3.5.1.1. The Senior Air Force Officer (SAFO) in a defense agency, defense field activity, unified or specified combatant command, joint task force, combined task force, coalition force, or activity outside the Air Force that exercises

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operational control over the Air Force Element. 4.3.3.5.1.2. The commander of the Air Force MAJCOM for active duty members within that command detailed to a unit of the Air National Guard not in federal service; detailed to an organization outside the Air Force for which the Secretary of the Air Force serves as the Executive Agent pursuant to Department of Defense Directives; or similar circumstances. 4.3.3.5.1.3. The Commander, Air Force District of Washington for Air Force Elements not within such commands, agencies or activities. 4.3.3.5.2. In appropriate circumstances (such as a geographically dispersed Air Force Element), an Air Force Element may be divided into sections and an Air Force Element section commander appointed to each section. In these cases, the Air Force Element commander designates which members are attached to each section. 4.4. Office Symbol Codes. Office Symbol Codes (OSCs) identify the organization structure and functional responsibilities within a unit. For instance, “HO” is the OSC for the History Office in the wing headquarters. The following specifically addresses OSCs as used in MPES and related manpower documentation. (Note: Office Symbol Codes were formerly called Organization Structure Codes.) 4.4.1. General Characteristics of OSCs. 4.4.1.1. Major functions have two-letter symbols, e.g., surgeon--SG. Since basic functions report to major functions, basic functions have three-letter (or more) symbols, e.g., dental--SGD. A basic function’s office symbol starts with the same letters as the parent function’s office symbol, and adds one more letter. 4.4.1.2. Each major function within the Air Force is assigned a two-letter office symbol; wing staff, group, and squadrons within the operations group and mission support group have two-letter office symbols. Basic functions are assigned three-letter (or more) office symbols. Some major functions include basic functions that are similar in title and function to another major function (e.g., the major function of manpower, personnel and services, A1, may have a basic function of plans). Since all office symbols within a function start with the same two letters, the personnel plans function should use the office symbol A1X rather than XP so the basic function is not confused with a major function. 4.4.1.3. The OSC CC may be used for organizational commanders instead of the functional OSC. MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs should be consistent among their likeorganizations in use of CC or the functional OSC in MPES. 4.4.1.4. To the extent possible, OSCs use the same letters and titles at HQ USAF, MAJCOM, and base-level. 4.4.1.5. Types of OSCs. There are two types of OSCs: 4.4.1.5.1. Air Force Standard OSCs are available for use by more than one command. These types of OSCs are established for standard organization structures such as those in Chapter 3 of this AFI or a functional AFI and to promote standardization and ease of communication. These OSCs are identified by a command code of “HQ” in the MPES OSC Reference Table.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 4.4.1.5.2. Command-unique OSCs are used by a single command, as identified in the MPES OSC Reference Table. Command-unique OSCs cannot duplicate or conflict with standard OSCs. Do not create a command-unique OSC if an Air Force standard OSC exists for an organization; e.g., if a Civil Engineer Squadron has an Operations Flight, it uses an OSC of CEO as reflected in Chapter 3. 4.4.2. Procedures for MPES OSCs: 4.4.2.1. MPES OSCs are limited to 7 alphanumeric characters. Though special characters such as dashes or slashes may be acceptable when OSCs are used for communication or identification purposes, they cannot be included in OSCs as reflected in MPES because they create problems in some data systems that interface with MPES. 4.4.2.2. MPES OSC titles are limited to 40 characters for Air Force systems and a 100 character title for interface with DoD systems. To facilitate interface with the DoD systems, the 100 character title should be spelled out as much as possible, avoiding acronyms and other abbreviations. Special characters cannot be used in MPES OSC titles because they create problems in some data systems that interface with MPES. 4.4.2.3. Organizational level should not normally be included in the OSC title; i.e., do not include words like Division, Directorate, Squadron, Flight, Section, etc., in the title. This allows the same OSC to be used at different organizational levels. 4.4.2.4. Using organizations should request deletion of OSCs that are no longer required. The deletions cannot occur until there are no longer any manpower authorizations using the OSC. 4.4.2.5. Existing OSCs should be used when possible. 4.4.2.6. HQ USAF functional managers should maintain standard OSCs/structures down to the division or equivalent level (i.e., offices with three-digit OSCs) for MAJCOM and NAF headquarters to facilitate communications and minimize personnel transition time. The HQ USAF functional manager must approve all deviations to these established threeletter office symbols (see Paragraph 6.1.3). 4.4.2.7. Do not use proposed OSCs until approved. 4.4.3. A-Staff OSCs. A-staff OSCs are used to identify certain major staff elements in HQ USAF, MAJCOM headquarters and C-NAF headquarters. These OSCs are patterned on the J-staff structure used in joint organizations and are designed to improve communication within the Air Force and with other DoD organizations. Base-level organizations do not use A-Staff OSCs. Functions not covered by the standardized A-staff structure maintain their current office symbols (e.g., FM, JA, SG, PA, etc.). Standard 2-letter A-staff OSCs are shown in Figure 4.1. MAJCOMs may request to link A-staff 2-digit functions (e.g., A3 and A5 as A3/5) in their MAJCOM headquarters using the organization change request procedures in Chapter 6. MAJCOMs are authorized to approve linking A-staff 2-digit functions in their C-NAFs if they follow the guidance in Figure 3.2. MAJCOMs may return to the standard A-staff structure in Figure 4.1. without using the organization change request procedures in Chapter 6 but they must notify AF/A1M of the return to the standard structure.

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Figure 4.1. Standard 2-Letter A-Staff OSCs. A1 – Manpower, Personnel and Services A2 – Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance A3 – Operations A4 – Logistics, Engineering and Force Protection A5 – Plans and Requirements A6 – Communications A8 – Strategic Plans and Programs A9 – Studies, Analyses, Assessments and Lessons Learned A10 – Strategic Deterrence and Nuclear Integration (Limited to HQ USAF and approved MAJCOM headquarters) 4.4.4. Requests for MPES OSC Actions: 4.4.4.1. If an OSC change is needed because of an Organization Change Request (OCR), requesters include the associated OSC actions in question 5 of the OCR per the procedures in Chapter 6 of this AFI. 4.4.4.2. MAJCOMs, FOAs, DRUs and SAF/AAR send other OSC requests for MPES actions via e-mail to the AF/A1MO Workflow mailbox. The e-mail should have a distinct subject reflecting the request and requester; e.g., subject: OSC Request - ACC OS Add; OSC Request - AFMC PK Actions. The e-mail should include: the specific OSC, OSC titles, action (add, delete, change), a short rationale for the request, and whether requesting a standard or command-unique OSC (identify command code, as appropriate). A spreadsheet request template is available from AF/A1MO, their Air Force Portal site or SharePoint site. AF/A1MO obtains functional coordination within HQ USAF, as required, and forwards approved requests to be loaded into MPES. Note: OSC requests for organizations outside the Air Force (e.g., Air Force Elements) should be sent to AF/A1MP instead of AF/A1MO.

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Chapter 5 PROCEDURES FOR NAMING AND NUMBERING UNITS 5.1. Nomenclature. Standardize organization titles, when possible. When activating a unit, designate it using the procedures in this Instruction and guidance in AFPD 38-1. 5.2. General Guidelines. Apply the following guidelines when naming a unit: 5.2.1. Generally, units require a specific organization title or designation made up of a number or name, a "kind" (nomenclature) and a "type" (organizational level) indicator. Examples of a numbered and named unit designations are in Figure 5.1. Figure 5.1. Unit Designation Examples. Numbered Unit Designation Example: Title: 2d Bomb Wing Number: 2 Unit Kind: Bomb Unit Type: Wing ------------------------------------------Named Unit Designation Example: Title: Ogden Air Logistics Center Unit Kind: Ogden Air Logistics Unit Type: Center 5.3. Unit Number: 5.3.1. A numbered unit is assigned a number of no more than three numerals (for example, 305th Air Mobility Wing). 5.3.2. USAF designates Numbered Air Forces in a single series beginning with "First." Do not use Arabic or Roman numerals in designating Numbered Air Forces. C-NAFs have a parenthetical designation indicating their component role consisting of "(Air Forces XXXXX)" where "XXXXX" is the functional or geographic designation of the associated Unified Combatant Command; e.g., Eighteenth Air Force (Air Forces Transportation) or Seventh Air Force (Air Forces Korea). NAFs that are not C-NAFs cannot have a parenthetical designation; e.g., Second Air Force. 5.3.3. Use unit numbers as low in sequence as possible. 5.3.4. Reserve numbers 101 through 299 for Air National Guard units. 5.3.5. Do not duplicate wing and independent group numerical designations. In other words, there is only one 388th wing (presently a fighter wing) or one 720th group (presently a special tactics group). Since these numbers are taken, no other 388th or 720th wing or group is authorized. AF/A1M manages active wing designations. 5.3.6. Give groups and support squadrons the same number as their parent organizations, when possible. If you cannot give groups their parent organization's number (e.g., due to duplication) do not use a number already assigned to another wing. Assign to these groups or

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squadrons a number that bears a logical relationship to the parent. When feasible, number duplicate units 7XX or 8XX (where XX is the wing number). For example, duplicate squadrons under the 96th Civil Engineer Group would be the 96th Civil Engineer Squadron and 796th Civil Engineer Squadron. 5.3.7. Do not normally give mission squadrons assigned to groups or wings the same number as their parent organizations. When otherwise convenient, use sequential numbers for mission squadrons within the same wing. Examples of mission squadrons include operational squadrons in a flying wing, training squadrons in a training wing, and software maintenance squadrons in a maintenance wing. 5.3.8. You may not normally redesignate a unit numerically. For example, if the host wing at a base changes, the support units are not redesignated from the old host wing number to the new host wing number. Instead, the support units under the old host wing are inactivated and support units with the new host wing number are activated. This ensures that the previous host wing has like-numbered support units available for activation if needed. 5.3.9. Normally number units subordinate to a NAF 6XX (where XX is the NAF number). Do not use 6XX numbers for units not assigned to XX NAF (where XX is the NAF number). 5.3.10. Use the heritage priorities in AFPD 38-1 to assign unit numerical designations for wings, independent groups and operational squadrons. 5.4. Unit Kind: 5.4.1. Assign a unit nomenclature that describes its assigned mission. Do not construct unit titles that restrict another unit with a like mission from using that nomenclature. 5.4.2. Do not designate composite wings or composite independent groups by "kind" designation (for example, 3d Wing). 5.4.3. Keep unit "kinds" (nomenclature) and type attributes short and simple. Use more specific nomenclature at lower organizational levels, but keep the number of different titles to a minimum. 5.4.4. Use current, approved nomenclature for units. For available unit "kinds" (nomenclatures) see the Organization Kind Code Reference Table in MPES. Units must have approval from AF/A1M for any deviations to approved nomenclature. (T-1). 5.5. Unit Type: Use Chapter 2 of this Instruction to determine appropriate unit types. 5.6. New Nomenclature. If an unusual factor such as a special mission suggests a deviation from the standard organization nomenclature, a MAJCOM may request new nomenclature from AF/A1M. Include in these requests the proposed nomenclature (unit kind), type (level), command to which restricted (if any) and a short definition of the mission implied by the nomenclature. Also include the justification or rationale for the proposed nomenclature. Include this information in question 5a of an Organization Change Request IAW the procedures in Chapter 6 of this Instruction. For example: Proposed Unit Kind: Fighter Training Proposed Unit Type: Squadron Command Restriction: None. Definition: Provides flying training in fighter type aircraft.

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Justification: Provide rationale for new nomenclature. 5.7. Procedures for Unit Designation: Units are regularly activated, inactivated, or redesignated as a result of force structure and organizational changes. Designation actions will conform to policy criteria in AFPD 38-1 and procedural criteria documented in this Instruction. (T-1). 5.7.1. Do not designate or redesignate a unit with the exact number, name and type of another active or inactive unit. 5.7.2. When a new unit is needed, you may re-activate an inactive unit of the same number or name and similar function. It may be redesignated before activation to reflect current nomenclature when needed. The unit that is activated again keeps its lineage, honors, history and emblem. When proposing a unit activation, MAJCOMs should contact the Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) as early in the process as possible for identification of appropriate inactive units that are available. “Similar function” for inactive flying units means re-activation as a unit whose members operate aircraft, spacecraft or other flying equipment operating in the air or space environments. Other types of mission units and support units do not use the heritage of former flying units. 5.7.3. A unit retains its lineage, honors and history through all activations, inactivations and redesignations. AFI 84-101, Historical Products, Services, and Requirements, describes the effect an organizational action has on inheriting the lineage, honors and history of a unit. Upon request, the Air Force Historical Research Agency provides MAJCOMs with a list of qualified inactive units for possible activation. 5.7.4. MAJCOMs will use approved nomenclature and heritage lists to propose unit designations. Submit these proposals to AF/A1M for evaluation and certification of compliance with guidance in AFPD 38-1 and this Instruction according to procedures in Chapter 6. If MAJCOMs wish to deviate from the guidance, they must provide explicit justification in a request for approval of an organizational variance. AF/A1M sends proposals to the Chief of Staff for approval. 5.7.5. Requests to memorialize a named unit or named activity are to follow the guidelines in AFI 36-3108, Memorialization Program and Ceremonies. MAJCOMs submit these requests according to the procedures in Chapter 6 of AFI 38-101 and include a biography of the individual, explanation of why the MAJCOM wishes to memorialize the organization for this individual, and certification that appropriate quality force reviews or background checks have been conducted.

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Chapter 6 ORGANIZATION CHANGES 6.1. Actions Requiring AF/A1M Approval. MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs and their subordinate units (through their Manpower, Organization and Resources office) must have AF/A1M approval to: 6.1.1. Activate, inactivate, or redesignate a unit or to vary from any policy, guidance, procedure, or standard organization depicted in this Instruction or AFPD 38-1. A variation includes any addition, deletion, or merger of functions shown in a standard organization. (T1). AF/A1M staffs these requests to appropriate approval authorities within HQ USAF as shown in Table 6.1. Table 6.1. OCR Approval Levels for Actions Submitted to AF/A1M.

ACTION

APPROVAL LEVEL

MAJCOM Activations, redesignations, inactivations NAF Activations, redesignations, inactivations HQ USAF FOA or DRU activations, redesignations and inactivations MAJCOM FOA or MAJCOM DRU Activations MAJCOM FOA Redesignations, inactivations Wing Activations, redesignations, inactivations Independent Groups Activations, redesignations, inactivations Dependent Groups Activations, redesignations, inactivations, variations Dependent Groups Nonstandard Nomenclature Operational Squadrons/Numbered Flights Activations, redesignations, inactivations Support Squadrons/Numbered Flights Activations, redesignations, inactivations, variances Named Units (Centers) Activations, redesignations, inactivations Named Units (Other than Centers) Change to standard internal Squadron functional structure or name of internal Squadron functional flights

SECAF SECAF SECAF SECAF AF/CC or AF/CV AF/CC or AF/CV AF/CC or AF/CV AF/A1 AF/CC or AF/CV AF/A1 AF/A1MO or AF/A1M & Functional Manager AF/CC or AF/CV AF/A1 AF/A1M & Functional Manager

6.1.2. Change major staff elements (directorate or equivalent level; i.e., offices with twodigit office symbols) in a MAJCOM headquarters.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 6.1.3. Also, HQ USAF functional managers must approve changes to MAJCOM headquarters at the division or equivalent level (i.e., offices with three-digit office symbols). MAJCOMs submit these requests to the appropriate HQ USAF functional manager with an information copy to AF/A1MO or to AF/A1M via the procedures in this chapter.

6.2. Organization Change Request (OCR). A request for organization action such as unit activation, inactivation, redesignation, or variation to a standard structure should include answers to the following questions, as they apply. Answer “Not Applicable” when appropriate. AF/A1M reviews organization change requests and, upon approval, direct MAJCOMs, FOAs, DRUs or SAF/AAR to reflect the action in the RCS: HAF-A8X(M)9227 Report, Programming Actions Involving Units, Installations, and Unit Equipment per AFI 16-403. Also, MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs are required by AFI 84-105, Organizational Lineage, Honors, and Heraldry, to submit to the Air Force Historical Research Agency a monthly report of any changes in organizations using RCS: HAF-HO(M)7401, Air Force Organization Status Change Report. Implementation of actions should be in accordance with applicable provisions of AFI 10-503. 6.2.1. Organization Change Request Questions. (MAJCOMs should edit submissions from their base-level organizations before forwarding requests to HQ USAF to ensure questions are answered completely and that information extraneous to HQ USAF review is deleted.) 6.2.1.1. Question 1: What is the proposed action (list specific actions, such as activation, inactivation, nomenclature change, reorganization, or variation request)? 6.2.1.2. Question 2: Why is the action needed? What are the expected benefits? (Identify factors driving the need for the action, e.g., changes to Instructions, missions or concepts of operations; attach any substantiating Air Force directives. In describing expected benefits, identify improvements, examples of increased mission capability and so on. Generalized statements such as increases mission capability or reduces span of control are not adequate as justifications.) 6.2.1.3. Question 3: What is the structure of the new organization (include current and proposed organization and function charts showing authorized and proposed manpower by officer, enlisted and civilian. Also include Average Daily Student Load, where applicable. Explain manpower changes. To assist in identification of potential Congressional or community concerns, identify the number of manpower authorization changes for each affected installation in your response; use a table if needed.)? 6.2.1.4. Question 4: Explain how the proposed structure compares with standard structure, nomenclature and size guidance and provide rationale for any requested deviations. Using the guidance in Chapter 2, include computation of adjusted populations for wings, groups or squadrons with manpower authorizations under the unit size thresholds. 6.2.1.5. Question 5: As a result of this request, are any changes needed to add or delete Organization Nomenclature Codes or Office Symbol Codes (OSCs) or to change the title for an OSC; if so, provide the following information. Strive to use existing codes rather than creating new ones. Avoid special characters due to data system interface problems. (See Chapter 4 for additional information on OSCs.) 6.2.1.5.1. Question 5.a. Organization Nomenclature Code Change:

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Action: [Add or Delete; titles cannot be changed] Title:

6.2.1.5.2. Question 5.b. OSC Change:

6.2.1.6. Question 6: For unit activations or redesignations, explain why the proposed unit designation was chosen. Identify any inactive historical units you’re proposing to use and explain why you want to use these units. (Coordinate proposals with the appropriate history office.) 6.2.1.7. Question 7: What is the cost of the request in terms of dollars and resources? (Document cost in terms of dollars and manpower. Include administrative costs such as flags and signs, as well as manpower increases or monetary costs directly driven by the requested reorganization action. Do not include costs that may be a result of related force structure, for example, runway construction costs for bedding down programmed aircraft would not be included in the OCR to activate an associated flying squadron. If the action cannot be implemented from within currently programmed MAJCOM, FOA or DRU resources, see paragraph immediately below.) 6.2.1.7.1. MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs normally implement actions approved under the OCR process using currently programmed manpower and budgetary resources. In the rare cases when this is not possible, they submit an initiative for the resources needed to the Air Force Corporate Structure during a budget exercise, following guidance in AFI 16-501, Control and Documentation of Air Force Programs, and any related instructions. This is done prior to or concurrent with the OCR submission. AF/A1M will hold the OCR without action until the resources are approved. AF/A1M will return the OCR with-out action if the resource approval does not occur within 30 calendar days of receipt of the OCR. For reconsideration, the MAJCOM, FOA or DRU resubmits the OCR following approval of the resources. 6.2.1.8. Question 8: Provide a mission directive, statement or description for organizations being activated, inactivated, redesignated or reorganized. 6.2.1.9. MAJCOM, FOA, and DRU A1Ms and SAF/AARM (for serviced organizations) submit OCRs requiring AF/A1M action per Paragraphs 6.1.1-2 using a request memo

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 from the A1M or SAF/AARM to AF/A1MO. These submissions reflect their commands’ position and are to have been staffed with appropriate offices internal to the command (including affected command functional points of contact) prior to submission to HQ USAF. AF/A1MO coordinates the OCRs with appropriate HQ USAF offices and staffs the OCR to the approval authorities reflected in Table 6.1 for a decision on approval or disapproval. 6.2.1.9.1. If approval authority is the VCSAF, CSAF or SECAF, the submitting MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU includes documentation reflecting approval to release the OCR by their commander, director, vice commander or equivalent. A copy of the command staff summary sheet for the action is the preferred documentation and is included as an attachment to the OCR submission memo. 6.2.1.9.2. OCRs for AFRC and ANG units include coordination by the Gaining Commands for the affected units. HQ AFRC/A1M and NGB/A1M obtain the coordination from the Gaining Command A1Ms who staff the requests within their command, including appropriate functional coordination. The Gaining Command A1Ms obtain coordination from their commander or vice commander if the approval authority for the action per Table 6.1 is the VCSAF, CSAF or SECAF. The MAJCOM commander or vice commander may delegate the coordination of these OCRs to the command A1M; the command A1M provides a copy of the delegation to AF/A1MO, HQAFRC/A1M and NGB/A1M and updates the delegation at least every five years. (Note: See AFPD 10-3, Air Reserve Component Forces; AFI 10-301, Responsibilities of Air Reserve Component (ARC) Forces; and AFI 90-1001, Responsibilities for Total Force Integration, for further discussion of Gaining Commands. This term is under review for AFRC units. If guidance is subsequently modified to change the Gaining Command term for AFRC units, the same responsibilities will apply to organizations with the revised term; however, if AFI 10301 guidance directing Gaining Command review of organizational structure is eliminated as it applies to AFRC, the corresponding requirement for Gaining Command coordination of AFRC OCRs in this paragraph of AFI 38-101 will no longer be required.) 6.2.1.9.3. MAJCOMs, FOAs, DRUs and SAF/AARM are encouraged to use supplements to this AFI or similar documents to provide guidance to their organizations on OCRs that do not require HQ USAF approval, as well as commandunique organization structures, terms and processes. 6.2.1.9.4. Figure 6.1 is a checklist of tips for preparing an OCR. This is not allinclusive and supplements the questions in Paragraphs 6.9.1.1-8 above. Following these tips helps reduce staffing delays that occur when additional information or corrections need to be requested.

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Figure 6.1. OCR Preparation Tips (use with questions in paragraphs 6.9.1.1-8).

6.2.2. A request for organization action is not required in the following instances: 6.2.2.1. For units inactivating as a result of an approved force structure action. Actions subject to legislative action or related studies are not considered approved until satisfactory completion of the legislative requirements. If actions are not in accordance with heritage priority guidance in AFPD 38-1, an OCR is required. 6.2.2.2. When organizational impacts have been addressed as part of actions approved under AFI 38-203, Commercial Activities Program (see that publication for specific guidance on required information). 6.2.2.3. When specific unit actions are directed in a Program Action Directive, Program Guidance Letter, Program Change Request, or similar directive issued by HQ USAF. 6.2.3. A MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU, after notifying AF/A1M, may return a changed organization to a prescribed configuration.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 6.2.4. Additional requirements may need to be met for establishment of a new FOA, DRU, MAJCOM FOA, or MAJCOM DRU. The annual Defense Appropriations Act usually contains a provision prohibiting expenditure of funds for establishment of such organizations. The provision permits the Secretary of the Air Force (SECAF) to grant a waiver if SECAF certifies to Congress that the establishment results in personnel or financial savings to the Department of the Air Force. Existing FOAs, DRUs, MAJCOM FOAs and MAJCOM DRUs will not be redesignated or re-missioned to an unrelated mission area to circumvent this legal direction. (T-1). Contact AF/A1MO for the current guidance when considering establishment of one of these organizations. 6.2.5. Units will not take actions such as scheduling ceremonies, inviting dignitaries, or making public announcements prior to appropriate HQ USAF approval of organization changes. (T-1). 6.2.6. MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs ensure all notification requirements are followed for organization actions. Consult current guidance including CJCSI 2300.02H, Coordination of Overseas Force Structure Changes (OFSC) and Host-Nation Notification; AFI 10-503, Strategic Basing; AFI 10-504, OFSC and Host Nation Notification; AFI 16-601, Implementation of, and Compliance with, International Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agreements; and current Congressional notification/public announcement requirements (as applicable). Take these requirements into account when planning implementation timing. For instance, the Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE) treaty requires the U.S. make notifications on affected organization changes 42 days in advance of the implementation date and additional time needs to be allowed for processing the notification through EUCOM, the Joint Staff, and the State Department after OCR approval. (Note: MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs work CFE notifications with HQ USAFE per guidance in AFI 16-601.) 6.2.7. MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs also use the Organization Change Request procedures for reassignment of units or named activities to another MAJCOM, FOA or DRU. The losing command normally prepares the OCR. If agreed to by both parties, the gaining command may prepare the OCR or the commands may submit a joint OCR. In all cases, the submitting command must coordinate the OCR with the other command prior to submission and include this coordination with their OCR submittal to AF/A1M. (T-1).

6.3. Testing New Organizations. MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs may develop and test new organizations. The purpose of an organization test is to evaluate the new organization's effectiveness under actual working conditions and resolve most common problems before committing affected functions to change. A test involving an organization structure found in this Instruction requires AF/A1M approval. Submit test plans for approval at least 120 calendar days before the proposed start of the test. The test plan should include: 6.3.1. Answers to the questions in Paragraph 6.2.1., as they apply. 6.3.2. Dates of the test period (not to exceed 1 year). 6.3.3. Objective measures to assist in evaluation of the test. 6.3.4. After completing the test period, the MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU sends results and recommendations to AF/A1M. A waiver request is included if a permanent organization change is desired.

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Chapter 7 ORGANIZATION DOCUMENTATION 7.1. Implementation Authority. HQ USAF, MAJCOM, FOA and DRU manpower and organization functions are responsible for publishing the legal and authoritative documents needed to implement organization actions. 7.1.1. Department of the Air Force (DAF/A1M) Letters. DAF/A1M letters constitute, reconstitute, disband, consolidate, activate, inactivate, redesignate, assign and reassign (between MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs) Air Force units. In addition, DAF/A1M letters designate, redesignate, inactivate, assign and reassign (between MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs) named activities. DAF/A1M letters serve as authority for MAJCOM, FOA and DRU unit and named activity organization actions. DAF/A1M letters follow the formats outlined in Figure 7.1. through Figure 7.5. 7.1.1.1. Effective Date. The effective date of an organization action is either published in the DAF/A1M letter or in the order issued by a MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU. When a DAF/A1M letter allows the effective date to be on or about a certain date, the organization action must occur no more than 30 calendar days before or after that date. (T-1). 7.1.1.1.1. MAJCOMs, FOAs, DRUs and SAF/AARM notify HQ USAF/A1MO of their desired effective dates by providing HQ USAF/A1MO a courtesy copy of their RCS: HAF-A8X(M)9227 Reports submitted in accordance with AFI 16-403. The desired effective dates should be projected a minimum of two months in advance but no less than one day in advance. 7.1.1.1.2. An on or about date in a DAF/A1M letter is at least 30 calendar days from the date of the letter. This provides the maximum flexibility for commands submitting their desired effective dates with less than a month’s notice while preventing the final effective dates from being earlier than the date the DAF/A1M letter is issued. 7.1.1.1.3. If a MAJCOM, FOA, DRU or SAF/AARM needs to change an effective date outside the dates allowed by a DAF/A1M letter on or about date, it submits the new desired date and reason for the change in an amendment to its RCS: HAFA8X(M)9227 Report using the instructions in AFI 16-403. This amendment should be submitted before the last day within the on or about period for DAF/A1M letters with on or about dates or before the effective date if the original DAF/A1M letter did not have an on or about date. 7.1.1.1.4. If a DAF/A1M letter allows an effective date to be on or about a certain date and the MAJCOM, FOA, DRU or SAF/AARM fails to issue a special order providing the final date within the on or about period, then the on or about date in the DAF/A1M letter becomes the final effective date. 7.1.1.1.5. DAF/A1M letters activating, inactivating, redesignating or changing the status of MAJCOMs, FOAs and DRUs provide a specific effective date and do not

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 have on or about dates. This is because these types of organizations are directly subordinate to HQ USAF, which is the issuing authority for DAF/A1M letters. 7.1.2. G-Series Orders. These orders are published to activate, inactivate, redesignate, assign and reassign units, detachments and named activities subordinate to a HQ USAF, MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU; and to attach one organization to another. A MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU manpower and organization function may authenticate and publish G-Series Orders using the formats in Figure 7.6 through Figure 7.12. SAF/AAR may perform these functions for their supported organizations. In addition, AFI 33-328, Administrative Orders, provides general guidelines about orders preparation. ANG units follow additional guidance in ANG Supplement to AFI 33-328. (Note: Unit moves and movement orders are covered by AFI 16-403.) 7.1.2.1. Guidelines for G-Series Orders: 7.1.2.1.1. Numbering G-Series Orders. Orders are numbered in sequence starting with number one (for example, GS-1, GS-2 and so on). Begin a new sequence each fiscal year. 7.1.2.1.2. Effective Date. The effective date of the action described in the order is the date of the order, unless a different effective date is specified. 7.1.2.1.3. Distribution. Send all organizations impacted by the order a copy. Use of standard distribution lists is encouraged. Orders involving medical units include the Air Force Medical Support Agency on distribution. All orders (and DAF letters) are sent to AFHRA (address AFHRA/RSO, 600 Chennault Circle, Maxwell AFB, AL 36112-6424 or e-mail: [email protected]). 7.1.2.2. G-Series Order Organization Actions: 7.1.2.2.1. Activation and Assignment. Include the title of organization, station, unit or establishment of assignment, effective date and authority (Figures 7.6. and 7.9.). 7.1.2.2.2. Redesignation. Include the old and new unit or detachment designation; the station, unit and establishment of assignment, as applicable; the effective date; and the authority (Figures 7.7. and 7.9.). (See Paragraph 4.3.3.1.4. for additional guidance regarding redesignation of detachments.) 7.1.2.2.3. Inactivation. Include the designation of organization being inactivated, the station, the effective date, the disposition of personnel and equipment, statement that funds are to be disposed of according to Air Force directives and the authority (Figures 7.8. and 7.9.). 7.1.2.2.4. Reassignment. Include the designation of the establishment from which the unit is relieved, the establishment to which the unit is assigned, the effective date of transfer and the authority (Figures 7.9. through 7.11.). 7.1.2.2.5. Attachment of One Unit to Another. Include the unit and MAJCOM to which attached, the effective date of attachment, the purpose of attachment and the authority (See sample orders in Chapter 8). 7.1.2.2.6. Detachments and Operating Locations. (See Figure 7.12.) Detachments and operating locations are designated as part of a unit, not an establishment, e.g.,

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Detachment 1, 1st Fighter Squadron or Operating Location A, HQ 1st Operations Group. This is because detachments and operating locations are parts of a unit, not separate units. Special orders are not required for Operating Location actions because there is no associated UCMJ authority; however, MAJCOMs may publish orders for announcement or accountability purposes. 7.2. Distribution Requirements . Each MAJCOM manpower and organization function ensures HQ USAF/A1MO is on distribution to receive special orders, MAJCOM organization charts, mission directives and Instructions relating to organizations within their command. 7.3. Headquarters Department of the Air Force Organization Chart. This publication prescribes AFVA 38-104, HQ USAF Organization Chart. AFVA 38-104 shows HQ USAF offices under the Secretariat and the Air Staff down to the 3-letter level, along with their respective Field Operating Agencies (FOAs). SAF/AAR prepares this AFVA semiannually or as needed.

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Figure 7.1. Sample DAF/A1M Letter--Constitute and Assign for Activation.

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 Figure 7.2. Sample DAF/A1M Letter--Reconstitute and Assign for Activation.

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90 Figure 7.3. Sample DAF/A1M Letter--Redesignation.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 Figure 7.4. Sample DAF/A1M Letter--Inactivation.

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Figure 7.5. Sample DAF/A1M Letter—Reassignment Between Commands.

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 Figure 7.6. Sample Special Order--Activate.

Figure 7.7. Sample Special Order--Redesignate.

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94 Figure 7.8. Sample Special Order--Inactivate.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 Figure 7.9. Sample Special Order—Multiple Unit Actions.

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Figure 7.10. Sample Special Order—Reassign Within a MAJCOM, FOA or DRU.

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 Figure 7.11. Sample Special Orders—Reassign Between MAJCOMs, FOAs or DRUs.

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Figure 7.12. Sample Special Order—Activate/Inactivate Detachment/Operating Location.

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Chapter 8 ORGANIZING PROVISIONAL UNITS 8.1. Provisional Unit. A provisional unit is temporary in nature and created when a specific organization is required for a temporary mission and no organization exists to attach forces (including personnel). All personnel are attached to the provisional unit and remain assigned to their permanent unit. 8.1.1. References to assigned and attached units in this chapter refer to the organizational structure of the provisional organization which establishes the Air Force chain of command. Assigned and attached units should not be confused with assigned and attached forces. 8.1.2. Provisional units are organized in the same manner as permanent units. Establish provisional organizations at the organization level required to meet mission requirements (i.e., NAF, wing, group, squadron, flight, detachment, operating location). Organize provisional operations, maintenance, mission support, medical groups, and subordinate squadrons under a provisional wing, as needed. Related functions may be consolidated into a single unit if more efficient due to size, oversight, or other factors; e.g., all maintenance functions can be combined into a maintenance squadron when the size of the functions do not warrant separate maintenance, aircraft maintenance and maintenance operations squadrons. If only a portion of a squadron is required, those functions may be added to an existing provisional squadron or to the next higher provisional unit. For example, if an entire expeditionary force support squadron is not required, manpower, personnel, and services functions could be assigned into an expeditionary mission support group. 8.1.3. A provisional unit is attached rather than assigned to a permanent unit. Conversely, a permanent unit cannot be assigned to a provisional unit, but it may be attached to a provisional unit. A subordinate provisional unit is assigned to a higher provisional unit. 8.2. Types of provisional units. There are two types of provisional units (traditional and expeditionary). 8.2.1. Traditional. When there is a need for a temporary organization not associated with a contingency type situation. An organization change request (OCR) to HQ USAF or Department of the Air Force (DAF) letter is not required for this type of provisional unit. For example, 8.2.1.1. When two or more organizations merge and the need exists to create a temporary organization pending final disposition of resources from the merging organizations. 8.2.1.2. When an organization is needed for short-term requirement such as a temporary headquarters until a location is selected for the permanent headquarters. (Note: A provisional unit should not be established to pre-suppose approval of a permanent basing decision.) 8.2.2. Expeditionary. Provisional organizations established in support of a contingency or exercise operation. There are two types of expeditionary units (major force provider and rainbow). (Note: Additional guidance for use of provisional units during contingency

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 operations is provided in AFI 38-205, Expeditionary Manpower Management, and AFI 10401, Air Force Operations Planning and Execution.) 8.2.2.1. Major Force Provider. An expeditionary unit that draws the preponderance of its forces or command element from a single active unit. This wartime or contingency organization uses the unit designation of the unit providing the preponderance of forces (major force provider) or the command element. (Discussed further in 8.7.3.1.) 8.2.2.2. Rainbow. An expeditionary unit formed from multiple force providers. This wartime or contingency organization does not have an identifiable major force provider. These organizations are inactive historical units converted to provisional status and assigned to, and activated by MAJCOMs as expeditionary organizations. (Discussed further in 8.7.3.2.) 8.2.2.3. MAJCOM A1Ms will establish procedures for requesting the establishment of expeditionary units assigned or attached to subordinate AETFs. 8.2.3. MAJCOMs, FOAs, and DRUs will forward copies of G-series orders to AF/A1MO, AFHRA (address AFHRA/RSO, 600 Chennault Circle, Maxwell AFB, AL 36112-6424 or email: [email protected]), all units mentioned in the order, and other offices and units as needed. (Discussed further in 8.11.) (T-1).

8.3. PAS Codes . Provisional units have the same command relationship characteristics and PAS code requirements as permanent units. MAJCOMs request provisional PAS codes per current instructions. PAS codes are assigned and registered in the PAS system. The PAS code for provisional units is represented by an "H" in the fifth digit of the eight digit PAS instead of an "F" (i.e., "EP2CHR9C" vs. "EP2CFR9C"). The use of "H" serves two primary purposes: provides distinction between provisional units and regular units; and keeps the provisional PAS code compatible with the joint reporting systems. 8.4. History . 8.4.1. Traditional provisional organizations as described in 8.2.1. are temporary and once inactivated, their lineage ceases and may not be revived. Any provisional unit of this type using the same nomenclature as a previous provisional or permanent unit may not claim the lineage, history, or honors of that unit. 8.4.2. Major force provider expeditionary organizations as described in Paragraph 8.2.2.1. are temporary and once inactivated, their lineage ceases and may not be revived; however, any honors earned by this type of expeditionary provisional organization are conferred upon its single major force provider of the same organizational level (squadron to squadron; group to group, etc.) in accordance with AFI 84-105, Organizational Lineage, Honors, and Heraldry. For this purpose, wings are considered on the same organizational level as groups and squadrons on the same organizational level as numbered flights. 8.4.3. Rainbow expeditionary organizations temporarily converted from permanent to provisional organizations as described in 8.2.2.2. retain all lineage, history, and honors of the permanent unit and, when returned to permanent status, retain all lineage, history, and honors earned while in provisional status. Honors earned by a rainbow unit are retained by the rainbow unit and are not shared with units that provided personnel for the expeditionary organization.

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8.4.4. For specifics on lineage, honors, and heraldry refer to AFI 84-105, Organizational Lineage, Honors, and Heraldry. 8.5. Designations. MAJCOMs will title provisional units to reflect their functional mission. To the maximum extent possible, use existing nomenclature. Traditional provisional units include the term provisional in the unit designation to indicate the unit is provisional, for example, Headquarters 849th Mission Support Group (Provisional) or HQ 849 MSG (P). MAJCOMs must submit an organization change request to AF/A1M IAW Chapter 5 of this AFI for approval to create new unit nomenclatures (organization kind). 8.5.1. For traditional provisional units, MAJCOMs should select a unit designation that cannot be confused with another unit and does not have the same designation as an active unit. 8.5.2. Designate expeditionary units as directed in Paragraph 8.7. and Figure 8-1. 8.6. Air Expeditionary Task Force (AETF). An AETF may be established as an Air Force service component to a joint task force (JTF), or as a subordinate task force within a larger Air Force service component to address specific internal tasks. If an AETF is formed as the former, the AETF commander is also a commander, Air Force forces (COMAFFOR). Otherwise, the AETF commander is not a COMAFFOR, but reports to a COMAFFOR. An AETF has a commander, a staff, appropriate command and control mechanisms, and tailored and fully supported forces to meet specific mission requirements. The AETF is organized into a numbered expeditionary air force (NEAF), air expeditionary wings (AEW), air expeditionary groups (AEG), and air expeditionary squadrons (AES), or other organizations, as necessary to provide reasonable spans of control. When directly supporting a unified combatant command, the AETF is attached to the Air Force component. When an AETF is established to support a joint task force subordinate to a unified combatant command, the AETF may be attached for administrative control directly to the Air Force component to the unified combatant command, or it may be assigned to an AETF established at the unified combatant command level. 8.6.1. An AETF is named based on the unit providing the senior command headquarters, its size (NEAF, AEW, AEG), and the operation name. 8.6.1.1. For a NEAF level AETF, use the numerical designation of the engaged NAF, followed by Expeditionary Air Force (EAF), then the name of the operation. For example, a NEAF-sized AETF established under 12AF (AFSOUTH) would be designated as 12 EAF-OPERATION NAME. 8.6.1.2. In rare circumstances, a provisional command headquarters may be needed between a NEAF and its assigned and attached forces. These headquarters are designated as a numbered Air Expeditionary Task Force followed by an operation or location identifier, for example, 9th Air Expeditionary Task Force–Iraq (9 AETF-I). The 9 AETF-I would be assigned to the 9th Expeditionary Air Force (9 EAF). 8.6.1.3. For wing- or group-sized AETFs, use the numerical designation of the engaged wing or group, followed by Air Expeditionary Wing (AEW) or Air Expeditionary Group (AEG), then the name of the operation. For example, a wing or group-sized AETF established under 12AF (AFSOUTH) would be designated the 345 AEW-OPERATION NAME or the 345 AEG-OPERATION NAME.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 8.6.1.4. While not normally established, a squadron sized AETF would use the designation of the engaged expeditionary squadron followed by the operation name. 8.6.2. Refer to appropriate Air Force and Joint doctrine for additional guidance on organization and command relationships.

8.7. Air Expeditionary Force (AEF) Organization: 8.7.1. Expeditionary units are established to operate with an AETF. In the following paragraphs, the term “supported command” refers to the Air Force MAJCOM the AF component command is administratively assigned to and which is receiving support (i.e., forces) from other MAJCOMs. “Supporting command” refers to the Air Force MAJCOM, FOA or DRU providing forces to the supported command. 8.7.2. Permanent units supporting or participating in an AETF from their permanent locations are not redesignated as expeditionary units nor are major force provider expeditionary units established at the same location as the corresponding permanent unit. Inplace permanent units supporting or participating in an AETF can be attached to the expeditionary unit they are supporting. 8.7.3. Expeditionary units are numbered as follows. guidelines on AEF unit naming and numbering.

See also Figure 8-1 for detailed

8.7.3.1. With the exception of support units, the numerical designation for expeditionary units that have a major force provider reflects the designation of the unit that provides the preponderance of forces or the command element to the expeditionary organization. For example, if the 4th Fighter Wing is the major force provider of an Air Expeditionary Wing, then the nomenclature would be 4th Expeditionary Fighter Wing (EFW). If there is a mix of forces (e.g., fighter, mobility) then the nomenclature would be the 4 AEW. The organizational level of the expeditionary unit is the same as the unit providing the preponderance of forces, except for the situations in Paragraphs 8.7.3.1.1.and 8.7.3.1.2. 8.7.3.1.1. If size and scope of an operation do not warrant establishment of a wing, a group nomenclature may be used. For example, if the 4th Fighter Wing is the major force provider of an Air Expeditionary activity that does not have the appropriate scope or size to be designated a wing, a major force provider unit designated the 4th Expeditionary Fighter Group or 4th Air Expeditionary Group could be established. 8.7.3.1.2. If the size and scope of an operation do not warrant establishment of a squadron, a numbered flight nomenclature may be used. For example, if the 4th Civil Engineer Squadron is the major force provider for an expeditionary mission, but size does not warrant a squadron designation, a major force provider unit designated 4th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Flight could be established. 8.7.3.2. The numerical designation for expeditionary units that do not have a major force provider reflects the designation of an historic unit activated to form a rainbow unit. In cases where multiple MAJCOMs deploy forces to the same location, but a single major force provider cannot be identified, the supported MAJCOM will create expeditionary units using historical “rainbow” units allocated for their use by AF/A1MO. The numerical designation for expeditionary rainbow units retains the numerical designation of the historic unit converted from permanent to provisional status. MAJCOMs must

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work with their historians and the Air Force Historical Research Agency to identify inactivated units to fill rainbow expeditionary unit requirements to meet highest projected demand and provide those units to AF/A1MO. AF/A1MO will issue a Department of the Air Force (DAF) numbered letter converting the inactive historic units to provisional units and assigning them to the MAJCOM to activate or inactivate in provisional unit status as needed (Figure 8-2). 8.7.3.3. All subordinate dependent groups and support units carry the same numerical designation as the parent expeditionary organization. For example, support units under the 4th Expeditionary Fighter Wing would be designated the 4th Expeditionary Operations Group, 4th Expeditionary Maintenance Group, 4th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron, 4th Expeditionary Mission Support Group, 4th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron, 4th Expeditionary Medical Group. 8.7.3.4. If portions of an organization are deployed to different locations, MAJCOMs are authorized to include the name of the operation and location in the unit designation (e.g., 71st Expeditionary Fighter Squadron – Noble Anvil, Location Name). Figure 8.1. Expeditionary Unit Naming & Numbering Guidelines. Title xx Air Expeditionary Task Force (AETF). Can be a NEAF, wing, group or squadron level.

Purpose The generic name of an Air Force Service component presented to a joint task force commander. An AETF should be presented within the framework described in Air Force doctrine.

xx AETF- Operation Name or Location Identifier.

Provisional command headquarters between a NEAF and its assigned and attached forces.

xx Air Expeditionary Wing (AEW) or Expeditionary [mission-kind] Wing, e.g. Expeditionary Fighter Wing (EFW).

Temporary wing assigned to an AETF.

Comments & Examples Use the numerical designation of the tasked NAF, wing, group or squadron followed by the operation name (e.g., 12 EAF-OPERATION NAME, 4 AEW-OPERATION NAME, 4 AEGOPERATION NAME, 336 EAS-OPERATION NAME). An in-place NAF retains its NAF designation (e.g., 7 AF (AFKOR)). Use the numerical designation of the parent NEAF followed by the operation name or location (e.g. 9 AETF-Iraq). Use the numerical designation of the major force provider unit or an authorized rainbow unit, as appropriate (e.g., 345 AEW, 4 EFW)

104 xx Air Expeditionary Group (AEG)

xx Expeditionary [functional-kind] Group

xx Expeditionary [mission-kind] Squadron

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 Temporary independent group assigned to an AETF. An independent group has the same functions and responsibilities as a like-type wing, but its scope and size do not warrant wing-level designation. Temporary group assigned to an AETF.

Use the numerical designation of the major force provider unit or an authorized rainbow unit, as appropriate (e.g., 4 AEG)

A dependent group is a mission, maintenance, mission support, medical or large functional unit (e.g. communications) that provides the specified capability to a parent wing.

A dependent group uses the numerical designation of its parent expeditionary wing (e.g., 4th Expeditionary Operations Group, 4th Expeditionary Mission Support Group)

An independent functional group is a large functional unit that does not report to a wing; e.g., the 1st Civil Engineer Group under the 9th Air and Space Expeditionary Task Force. Temporary mission squadron assigned to an AETF.

An independent functional group uses the numerical designation of the major force provider unit or an authorized rainbow unit, as appropriate. Use the numerical designation of the major force provider unit or an authorized rainbow unit, as appropriate (e.g., 366th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron or 344th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron) Use the numerical designation of the major force provider unit or an authorized rainbow unit, as appropriate (e.g., 819th Expeditionary RED HORSE Squadron or 5th Expeditionary Combat Communications Squadron) Use the numerical designation of its parent expeditionary wing or group (e.g., 4th Expeditionary

xx Expeditionary [direct combat support-kind] Squadron

Temporary direct combat support squadron assigned to an AETF.

xx Expeditionary [support-kind] Squadron

Temporary support squadron assigned to an AETF.

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017

Detachment x, xx Expeditionary [functional-kind] [unit type]

Temporary dependent detachment of an expeditionary unit.

Operating Location (OL) x, xx Expeditionary [functional-kind] [unit type]

Temporary dependent OL of an expeditionary unit

105 Logistics Readiness Squadron) Number in sequence starting with 1. Use the unit designation of its parent unit (e.g., Detachment 1, 16th Expeditionary Special Operations Squadron) Alphabetized in sequence starting with A. Use the unit designation of its parent unit (e.g., OL-A, 24th Expeditionary Special Tactics Squadron)

8.8. Attaching/Assigning Provisional Units. Provisional units are assigned to a higher echelon provisional unit or attached to a higher or same echelon permanent unit. All expeditionary units are assigned to an AETF or attached under a component NAF and under the administrative control (ADCON) of the Air Force Service component for the geographic region in which forces are based. If a deployed expeditionary unit is not assigned or attached to the regional COMAFFOR (i.e., the forces are not formally transferred by Secretary of Defense order and the owning unified combatant command retains control) then a host-tenant support agreement is required to define support requirements. 8.9. Administrative Control (ADCON) . The ADCON responsibilities of the gaining commander can vary by scenario and should be specified in G-Series orders. The supporting and supported MAJCOMs must work together to ensure the degree of ADCON responsibilities is clearly understood. Specified ADCON responsibilities are included in AFDD Volume 1, Basic Doctrine. 8.10. UCMJ authority resides concurrently with the commanders in the assigned and attached units, and does not need to be explicitly stated in G-series orders. See 51-series AFIs for specific information on disciplinary and UCMJ matters. 8.11. G-Series Orders. AFI 33-328, Administrative Orders, provides guidance on the preparation of administrative orders. MAJCOMs, FOAs, and DRUs must publish G-series orders to activate, inactivate, redesignate, assign or attach provisional (including expeditionary) units. (T-1). The G-Series order provides the legal authority for provisional units. Examples of G-Series orders for provisional and expeditionary units are shown at Figures 8.3. – 8.7. MAJCOMs, FOAs, and DRUs forward copies of unclassified and classified orders to HQ USAF/A1MO, the Air Force Historical Research Agency (HQ AFHRA/RSO, 600 Chennault Circle, Maxwell, AFB AL 36112-6424), and all units mentioned in the order. MAJCOMs, FOAs, and DRUs use the Air Force Organization Status Change Report (RCS: HAF-HO (M) 7401) to document the organizational changes to provisional units IAW AFI 84-105, Organization, Lineage, Honors, and Heraldry. 8.11.1. G-series orders for expeditionary units are prepared by the supported MAJCOM (reference Paragraph 8.7.1.) or in cases where forces are not attached, by the MAJCOM retaining operational control. The supporting and supported MAJCOMs must work closely

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 together on drafting the G-series orders to ensure ADCON responsibilities are spelled out and the AETF commander’s concept for organization and unity of command are understood. 8.11.2. Command Relationships. The ground rules for command relationships are outlined in Joint Publication 1 and AFDD Volume 1. The supported and supporting command must work closely together to develop the best organization structure to support mission requirements and build a clear chain of command. 8.11.3. Activation and inactivation dates may be specified in the same G-series order. 8.11.4. MAJCOMs may add the name of the operation and location to any unit in the Gseries orders. 8.11.5. G-Series orders should be classified and declassified according to the security classification guidance published for the exercise or operation. Classified orders have appropriate paragraph marking, classified by, and declassification guidance. Every effort should be made to declassify the orders as soon as permissible or use a specific event (i.e. activation date) as the declassification date. 8.11.6. G-series orders for recurring and major exercise (when required) units follow the same basic conventions as those used for expeditionary units. 8.11.7. A G-series order is not required to establish a provisional or permanent MAJCOM headquarters. A DAF A1M letter is the authority and establishes the specific MAJCOM headquarters activation date.

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 Figure 8.2. Example of a DAF Letter Assigning Rainbow Units to a MAJCOM.

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AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017

Figure 8.3. Example of G-Series Order for Traditional Provisional Unit.

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 Figure 8.4. Example of G-Series Order for Exercise, Major Force Provider Unit.

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Figure 8.5. Example of G-Series Order for Major Force Provider Expeditionary Unit.

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 Figure 8.6. Example of G-Series Order for Major Force Provider Expeditionary Unit.

111

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Figure 8.7. Example of G-Series Order for Rainbow Unite (Requires DAF/A1M Numbered Letter).

GABRIEL O. CAMARILLO Assistant Secretary of the Air Force (Manpower and Reserve Affairs)

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017

113 Attachment 1

GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION References AFDD Volume 1, Basic Doctrine, 27 February 2015 AF Doctrine Volume 3, Command, 5 June 2013 AFI 10-207, Command Posts, 11 June 2014 AFPD 10-3, Air Reserve Component Forces, 17 May 2006 AFI 10-301, Responsibilities of Air Reserve Component (ARC) Forces, 16 August 2006 AFI 10-401, Air Force Operations Planning and Execution, 7 December 2006 AFI 10-503, Strategic Basing, 27 September 2010 AFI 10-504, Overseas Force Structure Changes and Host Nation Notification, 21 October 2011 AFI 11-202 Volume II, Aircrew Standardization/Evaluation Program, 13 September 2010 AFI 16-402, Aerospace Vehicle Programming, Assignment, Distribution, Accounting and Termination, 30 May 2013 AFI 16-403, Updating the USAF Program Installations, Units, and Priorities and Movement of Air Force Units, 25 January 2011 AFI 16-501, Control and Documentation of Air Force Programs, 15 August 2006 AFI 16-601, Implementation of, and Compliance with, International Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agreements, 18 February 2011 AFMD 1, Headquarters Air Force, 8 April 2011 AFI 33-328, Administrative Orders, 16 January 2007 AFI 33-328, Administrative Orders, ANG Supplement, 7 August 2015 AFI 33-360, Publications and Forms Management, 1 December 2015 AFMAN 33-363, Management of Records, 1 March 2008 AFCSM 36-699, Volume 4, Personnel Accounting Symbol System Users Manual, 3 August 2005 AFI 36-2101, Classifying Military Personnel (Officer and Enlisted), 25 June 2013 AFI 36-3108, Memorialization Program and Ceremonies, 31 August 2011 AFPD 38-1, Organization and Unit Designations, 24 August 2011 AFI 38-201, Management of Manpower Requirements and Authorizations, 30 January 2014 AFI 38-202, Air Force Management Headquarters and Headquarters Support Activities, 1 March 1995 AFI 38-203, Commercial Activities Program, 20 June 2008 AFI 38-204, Programming USAF Manpower, 21 April 2015

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AFI 38-205, Expeditionary Manpower Management, 24 May 2012 AFI 38-601, Format and Content of Mission Directives, 7 January 2015 AFI 48-149, Flight and Operational Medicine Program (FOMP), 1 November 2014 AFI 51-202, Nonjudicial Punishment, 31 March 2015 AFI 51-604, Appointment to and Assumption of Command, 11 February 2016 AFI 84-105, Organizational Lineage, Honors, and Heraldry, 19 March 2013 AFI 90-1001, Responsibilities for Total Force Integration, 29 May 2007 AFI 90-201, The Air Force Inspection System, 21 April 2015 AFI 90-301, Inspector General Complaints Resolution, 27 August 2015 CJCSI 2300.02H, Coordination of Overseas Force Structure Changes and Host-Nation Notification, 17 April 2015 Federal Acquisition Regulation, 16 May 2016 Defense Acquisition Regulation Supplement, 10 May 2016 Joint Publication 1, Doctrine for the Armed Forces of the United States, 25 March 2013 Adopted Forms AF Form 847, Recommendation for Change of Publication Abbreviations and Acronyms ACC—Air Combat Command ADSL—Average Daily Student Load ADR—Alternate Dispute Resolution AE—Aeromedical Evacuation AEF—Air Expeditionary Force AETC—Air Education and Training Command AETF—Air Expeditionary Task Force AFE—Aircrew Flight Equipment AFFOR—Air Force Forces AFHRA—Air Force Historical Research Agency AFMC—Air Force Materiel Command AFMS—Air Force Manpower Standard AFRC—Air Force Reserve Command AFSPC—Air Force Space Command AGE—Aerospace Ground Equipment

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 AMC—Air Mobility Command AMU—Aircraft Maintenance Unit ANG—Air National Guard AOC—Air Operations Center ARC—Air Reserve Component BEEF—Base Engineer Emergency Force C4—Command, Control, Communications and Computers CAF—Combat Air Forces CALCM—Conventional Air-Launched Cruise Missile CBRN—Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear CCDR—Combatant Commander CCIP—Commander’s Inspection Program CME—Contract Manyear Equivalent CMT—Combat Munitions Training C-MAJCOM—Component Major Command C-NAF—Component Numbered/Named Air Force COMAFFOR—Commander of Air Force Forces DAF—Department of the Air Force DDC—Deployment Control Center DFAS—Defense Finance and Accounting Service DoD—Department of Defense DoDDS—Department of Defense Dependent Schools DRU—Direct Reporting Unit EDIS—Educational and Developmental Intervention Services EO—Explosive Ordnance FOA—Field Operating Agency FPI—Force Protection Intelligence FWA—Fraud, Waste and Abuse HAZMAT—Hazardous Material HAZWASTE—Hazardous Waste HCA—Head of Contracting Activity HCP—Hearing Conservation Program

115

116 HQ—Headquarters HQ USAF—Headquarters US Air Force ICBM—Intercontinental Ballistic Missile IDO—Installation Deployment Officer IDRC—Installation Deployment Readiness Cell IED—Improvised Explosive Devise IGEMS—Inspector General Evaluation Management System ISR—Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance JFACC—Joint Force Air Component Commander LSC—Loading Standardization Crew LD-HD—Low Density-High Demand MAF—Mobility Air Forces MAJCOM—Major Command MAJCOM FOA—Major Command Field Operating Agency MAJCOM DRU—Major Command Direct Reporting Unit MDS—Mission Design Series MDSA—Maintenance Data System Analysis MICT—Management Internal Control Toolset MMHE—Munitions Materiel Handling Equipment MOC—Maintenance Operations Center MRI—Magnetic Resonance Imaging MTI—Military Training Instructor MTL—Military Training Leader MWR— Morale, Welfare and Recreation MPES—Manpower Programming and Execution System MSL—Maintenance Supply Liaison NAF—Numbered/Named Air Force OCR—Organization Change Request OL—Operating Location OSC—Office Symbol Code PACAF—Pacific Air Forces PAS—Personnel Accounting Symbol

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017

AFI38-101 31 JANUARY 2017 PME—Professional Military Education PMRC—Patient Movement Requirements Center PRP—Personnel Reliability Program PS&D—Plans, Scheduling and Documentation PSU—Primary Subordinate Unit RCC—Reception Control Center RNI— Repair Network Integration SABER—Simplified Acquisition of Base Engineering Requirements SAFO—Senior Air Force Officer SECAF—Secretary of the Air Force SERE—Survival, Escape, Resistance and Evasion SFMIS—Security Forces Management Information System SOC—Schedule of Changes SORTS—Status of Resources and Training TMDE—Test Measurement Diagnostics Equipment TOPA—TRICARE Operations and Patient Administration UCC—Unified Combatant Command UCMJ—Uniform Code of Military Justice UDM—Unit Deployment Manager USAF—United States Air Force USAFE—United States Air Forces in Europe USPACOM—United States Pacific Command UTC—Unit Type Code VI—Visual Information WIT—Wing Inspection Team WRM—War Reserve Materiel

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