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BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE

AIR FORCE PAMPHLET 34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 Incorporating Change 1, 30 JANUARY 2015 Services GUIDE TO PROTOCOL

COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available for downloading or ordering on the ePublishing website at http://www.e-publishing.af.mil RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication OPR: AF/A1SA Supersedes:

AFPAM 34-1202, 4 October 2006

Certified by: AF/A1S (Brigadier General Eden J. Murrie) Pages: 124

This pamphlet is an informational “how to” publication that provides historical references and guidance on directives found in AFPD 34-12, Air Force Protocol, and AFI 34-1201, Protocol. This pamphlet applies to Regular Air Force, Air Force Reserve, and Air National Guard to the extent they are capable of providing the required services. In collaboration with the Chief of Air Force Reserve (AF/RE) and the Director of the Air National Guard (NGB/CF), the Deputy Chief of Staff for Manpower, Personnel, and Services (AF/A1) develops personnel policy for Protocol. This Air Force Pamphlet (AFPAM) may be supplemented at any level; all MAJCOM level supplements must be approved by the HSB prior to certification and approval. Refer recommended changes and questions about this publication to the Office of Primary Responsibility (OPR) using the AF Form 847, Recommendation for Change of Publication; route AF Form 847s from the field through the appropriate functional chain of command. Ensure that all records created as a result of processes prescribed in this publication are maintained in accordance with Air Force Manual (AFMAN) 33-363, Management of Records, and disposed of in accordance with the Air Force Records Disposition Schedule located in the Air Force Records Information Management System. The use of the name or mark of any specific manufacturer, commercial product, commodity, or service in this publication does not imply endorsement by the Air Force. SUMMARY OF CHANGES This interim change clarifies activities and sequences of events for various ceremonies. A margin bar (|) indicates newly revised material.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013

Chapter 1—AIR FORCE PROTOCOL PROGRAM

7

1.1.

Scope. .....................................................................................................................

7

1.2.

Overview ................................................................................................................

7

Chapter 2—FLAG BACKGROUND

8

2.1.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

8

2.2.

Reference. ..............................................................................................................

8

2.3.

Overview. ...............................................................................................................

8

2.4.

U. ...........................................................................................................................

8

2.5.

Flag Burning Service. ............................................................................................

9

2.6.

Flag Burning Ceremony. ........................................................................................

9

2.7.

Flag Ordering for Special Ceremonies. ..................................................................

9

2.8.

Display of Flags. ....................................................................................................

10

2.9.

The History of the Stars and Stripes. .....................................................................

10

2.10.

Origin of The Colors. .............................................................................................

11

2.11.

When to Use Flags. ................................................................................................

11

2.12.

Automobile Flags. ..................................................................................................

11

2.13.

Air Force Boat Flags and Plates. ............................................................................

11

2.14.

Air Force Automobile Plates. ................................................................................

11

2.15.

Air Force Aircraft Plates. .......................................................................................

11

2.16.

Automobile Flag, Plates, and Aircraft Plates for Other Than Air Force members.

11

Chapter 3—FUNDING

13

3.1.

Introduction. ...........................................................................................................

13

3.2.

Appropriated Funds (APF). ...................................................................................

13

3.3.

Nonappropriated Funds (NAFs) for Special Morale and Welfare (SM&W) Purposes. ................................................................................................................

13

3.4.

When Government Funds Are Not Authorized or Available. ................................

14

3.5.

Appropriated Funds for Postage. ...........................................................................

14

Chapter 4—MEMENTOS

16

4.1.

Introduction. ...........................................................................................................

16

4.2.

Stewardship. ...........................................................................................................

16

4.3.

Inventories. ............................................................................................................

16

4.4.

Sources of Mementos. ............................................................................................

16

4.5.

Stocking Mementos. ..............................................................................................

17

AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013

3

4.6.

Presentation. ...........................................................................................................

17

4.7.

Honoraria. ..............................................................................................................

17

4.8.

Accepting Gifts. .....................................................................................................

18

Chapter 5—TRANSPORTATION

19

5.1.

Introduction. ...........................................................................................................

19

5.2.

Authorized Use. .....................................................................................................

19

5.3.

Unauthorized Uses. ................................................................................................

19

5.4.

Using Good Judgment. ..........................................................................................

19

5.5.

Military Airlift. ......................................................................................................

20

5.6.

Spouse and Dependent Travel. ..............................................................................

20

Chapter 6—ADDRESSING ENVELOPES

22

6.1.

Introduction. ...........................................................................................................

22

6.2.

Reference. ..............................................................................................................

22

6.3.

Guidelines. .............................................................................................................

22

6.4.

Examples. ...............................................................................................................

23

Chapter 7—PRECEDENCE 7.1.

Introduction. ...........................................................................................................

Chapter 8—CUSTOMS AND COURTESIES

25 25 26

8.1.

Introduction. ...........................................................................................................

26

8.2.

Reference. ..............................................................................................................

26

8.3.

Overview. ...............................................................................................................

26

8.4.

Salutes. ...................................................................................................................

26

8.5.

Visiting Ships of the Navy. ....................................................................................

28

8.6.

Other Forms of Salutes. .........................................................................................

29

8.7.

Positions of Honor. ................................................................................................

29

8.8.

American Military Decorations. ............................................................................

30

8.9.

Other Official Customs of the Service. ..................................................................

31

8.10.

Service Semantics. .................................................................................................

31

Chapter 9—FORMS OF DRESS

33

9.1.

Introduction. ...........................................................................................................

33

9.2.

Formal Attire. .........................................................................................................

33

9.3.

Business Suit ..........................................................................................................

33

4

AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 9.4.

Business Casual. ....................................................................................................

33

9.5.

Casual Attire. .........................................................................................................

34

9.6.

Sports Attire. ..........................................................................................................

34

9.7.

Dress for Retired Members. ...................................................................................

34

9.8.

Dress for Protocol Officers and Staff .....................................................................

34

Chapter 10—ADMINISTRATION

35

10.1.

Types of Invitations. ..............................................................................................

35

10.2.

Elements of an Invitation (Figure 10. ....................................................................

35

Figure 10.1.

Invitation Example .................................................................................................

37

10.3.

Preparing Invitations. .............................................................................................

37

10.4.

Addressing Envelopes (see Chapter 6). .................................................................

38

10.5.

Mailing/Distributing Invitations. ...........................................................................

38

10.6.

R. ............................................................................................................................

38

10.7.

R. ............................................................................................................................

38

10.8.

Postponing and Recalling Invitations. ...................................................................

39

10.9.

Name Tags. ............................................................................................................

39

10.10. Table Seating and Arrangements. ..........................................................................

39

10.11. Place Cards. ...........................................................................................................

39

10.12. Seating Designators. ..............................................................................................

39

10.13. Table Settings. .......................................................................................................

40

10.14. Menu Cards. ...........................................................................................................

40

10.15. Food Cards. ............................................................................................................

41

Chapter 11—FLIGHT LINE 11.1.

Introduction. ...........................................................................................................

Chapter 12—DISTINGUISHED VISITORS (DVS)

42 42 43

12.1.

Introduction. ...........................................................................................................

43

12.2.

Initial Notification of a Visit. .................................................................................

43

12.3.

Planning. ................................................................................................................

43

12.4.

International Dignitaries. .......................................................................................

49

12.5.

Execution. ..............................................................................................................

52

12.6.

Post-Visit. ..............................................................................................................

54

Chapter 13—CONFERENCES

55

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5

13.1.

Introduction. ...........................................................................................................

55

13.2.

Planning Factors. ...................................................................................................

55

13.3.

Intermediate Stages (Two to Three Weeks Out). ...................................................

56

13.4.

Final Stages (One to Two Weeks Out). .................................................................

56

13.5.

Just Prior. ...............................................................................................................

56

13.6.

During Conference. ................................................................................................

57

13.7.

After Conference. ...................................................................................................

57

Chapter 14—MILITARY CEREMONIES

58

14.1.

Ceremony General Management. ..........................................................................

58

14.2.

Military Funerals. ...................................................................................................

60

14.3.

Individual Retirements. ..........................................................................................

61

14.4.

Promotion Ceremony. ............................................................................................

62

14.5.

Change of Command. ............................................................................................

64

14.6.

Activation, Inactivation and Redesignation Ceremonies. ......................................

66

14.7.

Re-enlistment Ceremony. ......................................................................................

68

14.8.

Award Ceremony. ..................................................................................................

68

14.9.

Decoration Ceremony. ...........................................................................................

69

14.10. Reveille and Retreat. ..............................................................................................

70

14.11. Building Dedication/Ribbon Cutting. ....................................................................

70

14.12. POW/MIA Ceremonies. .........................................................................................

71

14.13. Fallen Warrior Ceremony ......................................................................................

73

14.14. Memorial Service ...................................................................................................

74

14.15. Remembrance Service ...........................................................................................

75

Chapter 15—SOCIAL FUNCTIONS

77

15.1.

Seating Arrangements. ...........................................................................................

77

15.2.

The Receiving Line. ...............................................................................................

77

15.3.

Toasts. ....................................................................................................................

79

15.4.

Additional Factors. .................................................................................................

81

15.5.

Dinners. ..................................................................................................................

81

15.6.

Receptions. .............................................................................................................

82

Chapter 16—DININGS IN AND DININGS OUT 16.1.

Overview. ...............................................................................................................

83 83

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 16.2.

Background. ...........................................................................................................

83

16.3.

Purpose. ..................................................................................................................

84

16.4.

Dining in. ...............................................................................................................

85

16.5.

Dining out. .............................................................................................................

85

16.6.

Combat Dining in. ..................................................................................................

85

16.7.

Attendance. ............................................................................................................

85

16.8.

Guests of the Mess. ................................................................................................

85

16.9.

Dress. .....................................................................................................................

85

16.10. Key Players. ...........................................................................................................

85

16.11. Planning Considerations. .......................................................................................

88

16.12. Conducting the Dining in. ......................................................................................

91

16.13. Rules of the Mess. ..................................................................................................

95

16.14. A Final Word. ........................................................................................................

96

Attachment 1—GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION

97

Attachment 2—TABLE SEATING ARRANGEMENTS

100

Attachment 3—TITLES AND FORMS OF ADDRESS

106

Attachment 4—TABLE A4.1. SERVICE EQUIVALENT UNIFORMS

118

Attachment 5—ESCORT OFFICER GUIDE

120

AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013

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Chapter 1 AIR FORCE PROTOCOL PROGRAM 1.1. Scope. This pamphlet provides guidance and history for excellence in protocol, decorum, customs and courtesies during Air Force ceremonies, conferences, and social events, in hosting distinguished visitors and in honors afforded at military funerals. MAJCOM, DRU, and FOA commanders and the Chief, National Guard Bureau, may issue additional guides specific to their protocol operations so long as it further supports the goals of the United States Air Force and specific military missions. 1.2. Overview Refer to AFI 34-1201 for a full overview and a delineation of roles and responsibilities associated with Air Force protocol

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Chapter 2 FLAG BACKGROUND 2.1. Purpose. This chapter provides tools, background and historical information on the display, disposition, and use of flags. 2.2. Reference. Flags are an integral part of Air Force events. AFI 34-1201 provides directive guidance. The following information on flags is historical and informational in nature. 2.3. Overview. Flags play an important role in military ceremonies. There are very formal rules of etiquette with regard to their use and display. The national flag of the United States of America is the most important symbol of our nation's past and future. It is important to display it proudly and properly. This chapter consolidates information from many sources and serves as a reference. 2.4. U. S. and Foreign National Anthems. 2.4.1. The U. S. National Anthem. Francis Scott Key’s "The Star Spangled Banner" became the U.S. national anthem on 3 March 1931. “THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER” “O say! can you see, by the dawn's early light, What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming? Whose broad stripes and bright stars thro’ the perilous fight, O'er the ramparts we watched, were so gallantly streaming? And the rockets’ red glare, the bombs bursting in air, gave proof thro’ the night that our flag was still there. O say! does that Star-Spangled Banner yet wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? “On the shore, dimly seen thro’ the mist of the deep, Where the foe’s haughty host in dread silence reposes, What is that which the breeze, o’er the towering steep, As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses? Now it catches the gleam of the morning’s first beam, In full glory reflected now shines in the stream. ‘Tis the Star-Spangled Banner. 0 long may it wave O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave. “And where is that band who so vauntingly swore, That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion A home and a country should leave us no more? Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution. No refuge could save the hireling and slave From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave, And the Star-Spangled Banner in triumph doth wave 0’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013

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“O thus be it ever when freemen shall stand Between their lov’d home and war’s desolation, Blest with vict’ry and peace, may the Heav’n-rescued land Praise the pow’r that hath made and preserv’d us a nation. Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, And this be our motto, ‘In God is Our Trust.’ And the Star-Spangled Banner in triumph shall wave O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.” 2.4.2. Title 36 United States Code, Section 301 provides guidance on conduct during the playing of the national anthem. The national anthem, first verse, is the only song authorized for playing at Air Force ceremonies when colors are presented. “God Bless America” or other patriotic songs will not be substituted for the nation anthem. 2.4.2.1. “To The Color” is not the national anthem; it is a bugle call that is occasionally played instead of the national anthem, although, it is not recommended as a replacement to the national anthem. During “To The Color,” military members and civilians should render the same customs and courtesies as those given to the playing of the national anthem. 2.4.3. The national anthem may be played at the beginning, middle, or end of a program, the choice being made according to where it will be given the greatest dignity. The anthem is always played with dignity. There is never applause after its rendition. The anthem is never "jazzed up" to compete with modern music. The anthem is never played as part of a medley. 2.4.4. National anthems of foreign countries may be obtained from the Department of the Army: Anthems NCO, The United States Army Band Library, Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, VA 22211; Comm: (703) 696-3648; email: [email protected] Anthems of foreign nations are used when rendering honors on the occasion of official visits of foreign heads of state, members of a royal family, and other visiting foreign delegations. The performance of the national anthem of any foreign country will be followed, without pause, by playing the national anthem of the United States. When two or more foreign national anthems are played, the United States national anthem is performed last. 2.5. Flag Burning Service. Title 4 United States Code, Chapter 1, states: "The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem of display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning." 2.5.1. In many American communities, one or more organizations, such as the Boy Scouts of America, Veterans of Foreign Wars, or the American Legion, render an important community service by collecting and overseeing the proper disposal of old, worn, tattered, frayed, and/or faded U.S. flags. 2.6. Flag Burning Ceremony. A formal ceremony is not required. The American Flag Foundation (formerly The National Flag Foundation) provides a guide for conducting a patriotic flag burning ceremony at the following website: http://americanflagfoundation.org/. 2.7. Flag Ordering for Special Ceremonies. Flags for retiring military members may be purchased using unit O&M funds. Contact your local unit GPC approving authority. Flags may also be obtained at cost from the honoree’s U.S. Senator or U.S. Representative. Contact the

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013

appropriate congressional office for their ordering procedures. The websites listed below are current as of the publication of this document, but are subject to change. 2.7.1. Sources for flags can be found on the GSA http://www.gsaadvantage.gov/advgsa/advantage/main/start_page.do.

website:

2.7.2. Flags that have been flown over the Capitol can be ordered from the honoree’s U.S. Senator or U.S. Representative. Ordering procedures are outlined at the following website: http://www.capitolflags.gov/ordering/. 2.7.3. Instructions on ordering flags flown over the Pentagon are available throught the Pentagon Force Protection Agency at the website: http://www.pfpa.mil/services/flagpnt.html. 2.8. Display of Flags. Correct height, positioning, straightening of staffs, and the draping of flags all play an important role in achieving the correct display. AFI 34-1201 provides specific guidelines on the position and manner of display of the U.S. flag. Practical tips for arranging flags for both indoor and outdoor events are outlined below. 2.8.1. Use the same size and type of flagstaff and base within a presentation of flags, unless the U.S. flag is placed at the center of a line of flags; then it must be displayed at a higher level than other flags in the display. When the U.S. flag is displayed with flags of other nations, flags should be of equal size and height. 2.8.2. Use flags of the same material in a display—do not mix outdoor flags with indoor flags. 2.8.3. Use the same size flag, except for the smaller general officer flag. 2.8.4. Securely fasten to the flag staff to prevent sliding down the staff during the event. 2.8.5. Finals (metal nickel-plated spades) are parallel to the audience with flat side out. 2.8.6. Due to ceiling limitations in most rooms, flag staff height may be an issue. Avoid using 8-foot staffs because a full size flag will be too large and touch the floor. 2.8.7. Flags should be draped from left to right as you look at the flag. Drape all flags the same way so the bottom tips are all in the same location. 2.8.8. It is recommended that another person, knowledgeable of flag protocol, check a flag display to ensure accuracy. 2.9. The History of the Stars and Stripes. The story of the origin of our national flag parallels the story of the origin of our country. As our country received its birthright from the peoples of many lands, who were gathered on these shores to found a new nation, so did the patterns of the Stars and Stripes rise from several origins. The history of the U.S. flag and origin of The Colors is printed in Our Flag from the 109th Congress, 2nd session which is from the U.S. Senate concurrent resolution 108 (S. DOC.109-18) available at the following web address: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CDOC-109sdoc18/pdf/CDOC-109sdoc18.pdf. 2.9.1. The Meaning of Stars and Stripes. The flag of the United States of America has 13 horizontal stripes, 7 red and 6 white, representing the 13 original colonies. The union, which consists of white stars of 5 points on a blue field, is located in the upper quarter next to the

AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013

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staff and extending to the lower edge of the fourth red stripe from the top. The number of stars equals the number of States in the Union. 2.10. Origin of The Colors. From the times of the Roman legions, various standards were carried within the military units to identify them to the on-scene commander. Over the years, the unit standard became sacred, and it was a singular honor to carry it. The tradition held throughout the ages, and at the beginning of the seventeenth century when armies adopted the regimental system, someone decided to assign color (using the word in it conventional sense) to each regiment. After 1813, the colors were carried by the Color Sergeant, a rank specifically introduced into the British Army first, then the American, to bestow special recognition for the NCO honored to carry the unit's identifier. 2.11. When to Use Flags. Tradition calls for flags to be displayed at all indoor and outdoor military ceremonies. At indoor ceremonies, flags may be prepositioned or posted at the beginning of the ceremony. At outdoor ceremonies, flags may be prepositioned, posted, or “trooped” if military formations pass in review, as in the case of a parade. 2.11.1. Flags in Receiving Lines. At formal dinners or receptions, it is customary to display flags either behind the head table or behind the receiving line; both locations are not necessary. Refer to AFI 34-1201, Chapter 2, for specific guidance on flag precedence. 2.11.2. Table or Miniature Flags. Table flags must be arranged in accordance to the rules for flag precedence when using the using the U.S. flag with others in a display. 2.12. Automobile Flags. Tradition has called for automobile flags; however, they are not currently used within the Air Force. 2.13. Air Force Boat Flags and Plates. Tradition has called for boat flags and plates; however, they are not currently used in the Air Force. The following is provided as information for Protocol officers operating in a joint environment. 2.13.1. Boat flags are 2 feet 4 7/16 inches by 4 feet 6 inches, corresponding to the positional or individual flags of the senior government official, civilian or military, occupying the boat. 2.13.2. Boat plates are a facsimile, less fringe, of the positional or individual flag of the senior government official, civilian or military, occupying the boat. Two sizes are authorized, 6 inches by 9 inches and 11 inches by 14 inches. 2.14. Air Force Automobile Plates. Automobile plates are authorized for use on government owned and leased vehicles, not on privately owned vehicles. An automobile plate indicates the official status or rank of the senior individual occupying the vehicle. The plate will be removed or covered when the individual for whom the plate is issued is not in the vehicle. Automobile plates are locally fabricated. Refer to AFI 34-1201, Chapter 2, for additional details on automobile plates. 2.15. Air Force Aircraft Plates. Aircraft plates are authorized to represent the senior government official, civilian, or military occupying the Air Force aircraft. Aircraft plates are facsimiles, less fringe, of the positional or individual flag. Aircraft plates are 11 inches by 14 inches or smaller as required by individual aircraft. Brackets for aircraft plates are mounted according to existing technical orders. 2.16. Automobile Flag, Plates, and Aircraft Plates for Other Than Air Force members. Officials of other departments, comparable to Air Force officials authorized to

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013

display their flag or other appropriate device on other government automobiles and aircraft, are also authorized to display their flag or appropriate device on Air Force automobiles and aircraft. When two or more dignitaries (including Air Force members) are present, display the device representing the senior government official, civilian, or military. For additional information, refer to AFI 34-1201, Chapter 2.

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Chapter 3 FUNDING 3.1. Introduction. There are several sources of funds for protocol-related expenses. In addition to following published financial policy, perception must also be considered. What is technically authorized may be perceived as improper. This chapter provides an overview of various fund sources and references. Always refer to financial management policy when determining the proper fund source. When in doubt, consult with the staff judge advocate and financial manager. Remember to obtain required approval before obligating funds. 3.2. Appropriated Funds (APF). APFs are government funds from the public treasury, appropriated by an act of Congress to conduct the business of government agencies and activities. The appropriation for the Department of Defense (DoD), for example, provides the primary financial support for carrying out the defense and national security missions and activities assigned to the department and its component services. Under some circumstances, APFs may be used for discretionary expenditures related to the mission of a command. 3.2.1. Official Representation Funds (ORF). ORF are specifically appropriated through the Secretary of Defense (SecDef) to the Secretary of the Air Force (SecAF) and are intended to uphold the standing and prestige of the United States by extending courtesies to certain officials and dignitaries of the United States and foreign countries. The SecAF allocates ORF to the MAJCOM commanders, who further allocate a portion of these funds to Numbered Air Force Commanders and Wing Commanders based on annual requirements and availability. ORF are frequently referred to as contingency funds. 3.2.1.1. DoDI 7250.13, Use of Appropriated Funds for Official Representation Purposes outlines official DoD policy concerning ORF. 3.2.1.2. HAF Mission Directive (MD) 1-6, The Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Air Force, delineates policy for the Secretariat and the Air Force on contingency funds and assigns responsibility for overall management of contingency funds to the Administrative Assistant to the SecAF. 3.2.1.3. AFI 65-603, Official Representation Funds, implements AFPD 65-6, Budget Policy and DoDI 7250.13 governs use of ORF. The local protocol office is typically the point of contact for these funds. 3.2.2. Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Funds. O&M Funds may be used for many protocol-related expenses. Coordinate with your resource advisor before obligating O&M funds for your function. 3.3. Nonappropriated Funds (NAFs) for Special Morale and Welfare (SM&W) Purposes. Nonappropriated funds come primarily from the sale of goods and services to (DoD) military and civilian personnel and their families. AFI 34-201, Use of Nonappropriated Funds (NAFs), Chapter 12, defines Air Force policy concerning the request, approval, and use of NAFs for SM&W purposes. The table in that chapter outlines the proper fund source for several types of expenditures. MAJCOMs and installations may impose stricter requirements than those contained in the AFI. Fundamentally, SM&W expenditures must be conservative, be in the best interest of the Air Force, benefit the military community, and not be limited to specific grades or

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013

levels of personnel. The Force Support Squadron’s resource manager is the point of contact for these funds. MAJCOM commanders ensure the integrity of this program by personally monitoring base-level expenditures through required quarterly reports. 3.4. When Government Funds Are Not Authorized or Available. For many events, such as dinners and break refreshments at a conference, the proper source of funds is the individual. 3.4.1. For conferences, workshops, and seminars, estimate the total cost to provide refreshments and meals. Divide the total cost by the number of attendees and charge this amount (normally referred to as a hospitality fee) to any attendee taking part in the refreshments. Remember to clearly itemize the expenses that comprise the hospitality fee. Inform attendees of the amount owed upon arrival or during registration and ensure to obtain payment up front. 3.4.2. For dinners, factor in not only the cost of the meal, but the costs for such items as programs, honored guests’ meals, and decorations; prorate these additional costs over all the attendees as appropriate (consider a “sliding scale” to provide some relief for lower ranking attendees). Typically, these functions are held in an Air Force Club and you will charge pro rata costs to the attendees. When this is the case, work closely with the catering manager or club manager to ensure you understand the process and any benefits afforded to club members. It is important attendees are charged the proper amount and that they understand the true cost of the meal, including additional charges to cover other expenses. 3.4.3. There are other occasions when government funds are not authorized or available and the individual is not the proper source of funds. When this is the case, private organizations, community support groups, or off-base businesses may, under certain circumstances, offer support for base functions. However, you may not solicit this support. Consult with the local finance and staff judge advocate offices to determine the proper way to proceed. 3.5. Appropriated Funds for Postage. APFs may be used to pay the postage for official mail relating solely to the business of the United States Government (Reference: DoDM 4525.8_AFMAN 33-306, DoD Official Mail Manual). APFs may be used: 3.5.1. By the Army National Guard and Air National Guard only for mailings pertaining to Federal Government matters. 3.5.2. By an activity or activity commander for inviting non-DoD dignitaries to attend official social functions held in behalf of a DoD Component or sponsored in the name of a DoD Component. The official status of the function must be clearly stated or readily apparent in the invitation. For example, an installation commander is authorized to use APF postage to invite community officials to an installation open house. 3.5.3. By retired members of a DoD Component for merchandise return or business reply items furnished to them by a DoD activity. 3.5.4. For mailing change-of-address cards. (Only applies for changes-of-address resulting from carrying out written military orders. A copy of the orders must be presented with the cards.) 3.5.5. For mailing bulk shipments of daily, weekly, housing and similar bulletins. Mailings must be for supported installations and activities only. Less costly methods of shipment must be considered and used when feasible.

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3.5.6. For official announcements of official retirement, promotion, award, change-ofcommand, and ship commissioning/decommissioning ceremonies. The location and time of a directly related reception may be noted if it does not result in any increase in cost to the Government. Notation must not include advertisement for or endorsement of any enterprise.

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Chapter 4 MEMENTOS 4.1. Introduction. Presentation of mementos to official visitors and guests is a demonstration of appreciation and in accordance with official courtesies. Refer to the Joint Ethics Regulation, DoD 5500.7-R, AFI 34-201, AFI 65-601V1, Budget Guidance and Procedures, and AFI 65-603, Official Representation Funds Guidance and Procedures, for policy. Consult with local contracting, finance (APF), Force Support Squadron resource management (NAF) and staff judge advocate offices to ensure you follow all applicable rules. 4.2. Stewardship. AFI 65-603, identifies mementos as items of little intrinsic value, such as coins, paperweights, lapel pins, plaques, and welcome baskets/boxes. If government funds will be expended, determine what, if any, category of funds is authorized to support the event and what amount may be spent. 4.2.1. Official Representation Funds (ORF). Designated DoD officials and other officials delegated the authority to host ORF events may present mementos funded by ORF to certain high-level dignitaries. The aggregate cost of mementos presented by any one DoD official to any one authorized guest at a DoD sponsored event may not exceed the limits established by law, currently $350. This amount changes from year to year. DoD organizations may also give mementos, not to exceed $50, to authorized DoD officials. Refer to AFI 65-603 and DoDD 7250.13 for specifics. 4.2.2. Special Morale and Welfare (SM&W) Expenditures. When a memento is authorized as a NAF SM&W expenditure, the spending limit is $20. Refer to AFI 34-201 to determine whether funding is authorized for a specific purpose. In general, mementos are authorized for: 4.2.2.1. Retirees 4.2.2.2. Spouses of retirees, award winners, and promoted individuals 4.2.2.3. Under certain circumstances, government and non-government personnel for civic affairs/events, memorial observances, and hosting of visiting personnel 4.3. Inventories. Separate inventories and accounts must be kept for mementos purchased with APFs and NAFs. It is very important to keep accurate records. These records must be up to date and reflect both where the stocked items came from and where (to whom) they went. 4.4. Sources of Mementos. Most military organizations present mementos that either contain an organizational emblem or are representative of the local area. Two factors to consider when selecting a source are price and reliability. Low prices are attractive but ensure the chosen supplier(s) can deliver when required. Additionally, identify an engraver, either on or off base, who can support short notice requirements. 4.4.1. If available, the installation Arts and Crafts operation will likely have an assortment of items that best represent the installation and its mission. 4.4.2. Search local trophy shops for plaques and engraving. These items may be purchased in advance, but engraved plates should be added to the memento at the latest possible moment in case a visitor’s plans change and a memento is no longer needed.

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4.4.3. Additional sources for mementos include local gift shops, artists and craftsmen, bookstores and factory outlet stores. The search for a memento should take place well before it is needed for an event. 4.5. Stocking Mementos. Keeping a conservative stock of mementos on hand will ensure maximum flexibility and avoid last-minute trips to the supplier. The size of stock will be determined by the frequency with which mementos are presented and budget. 4.6. Presentation. Advance coordination is crucial, especially for international visitors. It is important to inform the visitor (or representative) in advance in case the visitor wants to make a reciprocal presentation. If a visitor is not prepared to reciprocate, determine if this will result in any embarrassment to the visitor. If so, cancel the presentation. The reverse of this situation is also true. If a visitor plans to make a presentation to your principal, ask if there should also be a reciprocal presentation. 4.6.1. For large groups, if all members are of the same relative rank, it is appropriate to present each with a similar memento. If one or two members are clearly of a higher rank than the rest of the group, it is appropriate to present them with a "higher order" memento. In either case, obtain leadership approval in advance. 4.6.2. There are no strict guidelines for the actual presentation of mementos, but consider making the presentation when it will have the greatest impact. Some suggestions include: 4.6.3.1. Following lunch or dinner with the most senior staff member the individual or group will meet. Small mementos can be pre-positioned at the table. 4.6.3.2. At the conclusion of a briefing or presentation attended by a senior staff member. 4.6.3.3. Following an office call with the commander or his/her representative. 4.6.3.4. At the conclusion of a speech at a dinner or dining in or dining out, presented by the host or president of the mess. 4.6.4. Wrapping mementos is an important but often overlooked process. Attractive wrapping paper, ribbons and bows, as appropriate, can make as positive an impact as the memento itself. The opposite also holds true. If the memento is presented in an unattractive package (shipping container, etc.), it may send a negative message. Do not wrap mementos in such a manner that they will be difficult to open. Excessive ribbon or tape can create a time consuming struggle that detracts from the presentation. If a visitor will be departing shortly after the presentation, be prepared to pack the memento for travel. Do not try to shortcut this process by filling the box with excessive packing material prior to the presentation. Include a short note or card suggesting you will mail the memento for the recipient if he or she desires as an alternative. 4.6.5. Presentation/breakaway boxes make excellent wrapping. In this manner, the memento is secured in a box, and the lid and the box are wrapped or taped with ribbon separately. This permits the honoree simply to remove the lid to get to the memento. This is especially advantageous if the honoree must open the memento in front of a large crowd. 4.7. Honoraria. Fees for guest speakers, lecturers and panelists, when they are authorized, are paid using APFs. Like mementos, policy exists to limit excessive fees paid to these individuals.

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Refer to AFI 65-601V1, for specifics. Consult the local finance office and staff judge advocate to identify proper procedures and limitations. 4.8. Accepting Gifts. You may encounter situations where mementos or gifts are offered to your commander, host, or even to you as a protocol official. Generally, gifts offered due to a person’s official position cannot be accepted. Consult your local staff judge advocate in these situations to avoid possible legal repercussions for you or your commander. The Joint Ethics Regulation (JER), DoD Directive 5500.7, Standards of Conduct, contains specific guidelines that must be followed concerning gifts, gratuities, and honoraria from outside sources. AFI 51-601, Gifts to the Department of the Air Force, outlines restrictions governing who within the Air Force may accept or reject gifts offered to the Department of the Air Force.

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Chapter 5 TRANSPORTATION 5.1. Introduction. The two applicable sources of Air Force policy regarding transportation are AFI 24-101, Passenger Movement, and AFI 24-301. The chapter provides a general outline for transporting individuals for official purposes. Refer to above instructions for definitive policy. Attachment 8, General Official Use Rules, and Attachment 9, GMV Official Use Rules for Transportation Terminals of AFI 24-301 provide tables with specific examples of instances in which transportation requests are both authorized and unauthorized. 5.2. Authorized Use. Government vehicle use is limited to official purposes that would further the mission of the Air Force, not for personal reasons, personal business, personal convenience or pleasure. The following is a partial list of authorized transportation uses. Refer to AFI 24301 for complete guidance. 5.2.1. Temporary duty, under certain circumstances. 5.2.2. Personnel officially taking part in public ceremonies, etc. 5.2.3. To transport civilian organizations to military installations to take part in base activities when officially invited. 5.2.4. Active duty personnel to or from Air Force scheduled appointments. 5.2.5. Personnel conducting official off-base business may take government vehicles to offbase eating establishments, in the vicinity of the work site, when returning to base is not cost effective. 5.2.6. Government Motor Vehicle (GMV) travel is authorized to transport immediate family members of the sponsor in situations involving a sponsor’s combat related death. 5.3. Unauthorized Uses. The following is a partial list of unauthorized uses of GMVs in accordance with AFI 24-301, Chapter 3, Attachment 8, and Attachment 9. 5.3.1. Transportation to on-base dining facilities. 5.3.2. For personal social engagements or personal business. 5.3.3. Vehicle support to spouses at additional expense to the government when accompanying the member on official business. 5.3.4. Personal or government-directed household goods moves. 5.3.5. Event Support (icebreakers, picnics, fundraisers, etc). authorized for official functions.)

(GMV support is only

5.3.6. Transportation to adult oriented establishments, establishments for eating that do not have the primary purpose of food service (i.e. establishments with “Bar” in the name), or offbase entertainment or recreational facilities. 5.4. Using Good Judgment. When the above guidance does not specifically fit a request for transportation support, use Attachments 8 (General Official Use Rules) and 9 (GMV Official Rules for Transportation Terminals) of AFI 24-301 as guidance. When guidance does not

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specifically fit a situation, commanders must document answers to the following questions prior to approving the use of a government motor vehicle: 5.4.1. Is the purpose of the trip official? 5.4.2. Does the request have the potential to create an unfavorable perception or cause public criticism? 5.4.3. Will the request impact mission requirements? 5.4.4. Is commercial or DoD-scheduled transportation available? The Air Force does not provide transportation that competes with commercial services. 5.5. Military Airlift. Military airlift (Mil Air) is one mode of DV transportation. Each Air Force command has a validator that processes Mil Air requests. Requests for military transportation are submitted via DD Form 2768, Military Air Passenger/Cargo Request. 5.6. Spouse and Dependent Travel. This includes spouse travel on military aircraft as well as in staff cars or military buses. The sources for Air Force policy are AFI 24-101 and AFI 24-301. Please refer to these documents for complete details. 5.6.1. For spouses traveling as an adjunct to the sponsor on either DoD or commercial aircraft, travel must satisfy two criteria: 1) the travel must be an official requirement and 2) the spouse must actually participate in the event requiring the travel. 5.6.1.1. DoD personnel in DV Code 2 (the Secretary of Defense, Service Secretaries, Principal Under Secretaries, and appropriate four-star general officers) may approve travel of their spouses, based on meeting the above criteria. The Air Force Senior Executive Management Office publishes a relative rank list with DV codes for active duty general officers and civilian senior executives. AF Portal link: http://www.my.af.mil/gcss-af/USAF/site/HAF/AF_A1/DPS). 5.6.1.2. Incumbent approval for spouse travel is also authorized for certain three-star general officers serving in designated overseas billets. 5.6.1.3. All other spouse travel must be approved on a case-by-case basis by the appropriate authority based on unit of assignment. Refer to AFI 24-101 for details. 5.6.1.4. Both commercial and Mil Air authorization/approval must be supported with Invitational Travel Orders (ITOs). ITOs ordinarily authorize reimbursement of transportation costs only. 5.6.2. Spouse Travel in Staff Cars. Spouses are not considered representatives of the United States, DoD or Air Force, except when traveling on an approved Invitational Travel Authorization (ITA). 5.6.2.1. The laws that govern travel on government aircraft also apply to government vehicles. When spouse travel by air is appropriate, staff car support is equally valid. Ground transportation must be in direct support of the invitation (i.e. travel to/from transportation terminal, lodging, and event site.) 5.6.2.2. A spouse officially invited to attend a function or ceremony with the military member is authorized travel by government vehicle. When separation of the spouse and member occurs during official functions, the spouse is afforded transportation.

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5.6.3. Spouses authorized to travel in their own right. Sometimes spouses travel in their own right, as unpaid volunteers or members of boards and committees. 5.6.3.1. In this case, ITOs are used; these can be funded (as authorized by the Joint Federal Travel Regulation (JFTR) or unfunded, as appropriate. 5.6.3.2. Most TDY travel is accomplished by commercial air. The sponsoring base organization is responsible for the travel budget, including per diem. Funded orders are required for all commercial travel. 5.6.3.3. If military aircraft is desired, an exception to policy approved by the Assistant Vice Chief of Staff is required.

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Chapter 6 ADDRESSING ENVELOPES 6.1. Introduction. This chapter provides a guide to addressing envelopes. Additional specific examples are included in Attachment 3. 6.2. Reference. A valuable reference for properly addressing envelopes for government officials is Protocol, The Complete Handbook of Diplomatic, Official and Social Usage by McCaffree, Innis, and Sand. 6.3. Guidelines. The following guidelines will help ensure envelopes are properly addressed. It is acceptable to use labels with a font that matches the print on the invitation; place the labels neatly on the envelope. If possible, print directly onto the envelope using a printer with an envelope feeder. 6.3.1. Address and mail invitations to business addresses, unless the only address available is residential. 6.3.2. The words “OFFICIAL BUSINESS” must follow the organizational return address. 6.3.2.1. Invitations for changes of command and retirement ceremonies can be mailed at government expense. 6.3.2.2. Invitations strictly for social events, e.g., retirement dinners, must be mailed at retiree’s expense. 6.3.3. Do not use abbreviations in the address except for Dr., Mr., Mrs., and Ms. 6.3.4. Use the formal rank for each individual and do not abbreviate. 6.3.5. Do not use promotion selections, e.g., Brigadier General (Sel). 6.3.6. For official correspondence to retired members (or the retired member and spouse), use “Rank Full Name, USAF, Retired” For social correspondence to the retired member or the retired member and spouse, use “Rank Full Name;” the word “Retired” is not required. 6.3.7. Use the individual’s full name, e.g., Major Thomas L. Radisson. 6.3.8. If the spouse is invited, include “and Mrs.” on the label. Accepted etiquette indicates an envelope addressed “Major Thomas L. Radisson” would mean the invitation is intended for him only. If the spouse is invited, the envelope should read "Major and Mrs. Thomas L. Radisson." 6.3.9. List the “primary” invitee first on the envelope. 6.3.9.1. The primary is the individual who merits the invitation because of their position or relationship to the honoree or event. 6.3.9.2. List the primary first regardless of the spouse’s rank or gender. 6.3.9.3. Examples of addressing couples. 6.3.9.3.1. Military married to military. Master Sergeant Ted E. Phillips and Technical Sergeant Rose M. Phillips (male as the primary)

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Technical Sergeant Rose M. Phillips and Master Sergeant Ted E. Phillips (female as the primary) 6.3.9.3.2. Different last names. Colonel Ralph S. Larson and his wife whose name is Carla A. Rogers, should be addressed as “Colonel Ralph S. Larson and Ms. Carla A. Rogers” (male as primary), or “Ms. Carla A. Rogers and Colonel Ralph S. Larson” (female as primary) 6.3.9.3.3. Exceptions. If an individual has a known preference on how to be addressed, accommodate if possible. 6.4. Examples. 6.4.1. Standard. Mr. and Mrs. John Jones Street Address City, State (abbreviated) Zip 6.4.2. When addressee’s duty title is included. Brigadier General John D. Jones, Commander, 432d Airlift Wing and Mrs. Jones Street Address City, State (abbreviated) Zip 6.4.3. Couples (if the spouse is senior, you still list the invitee as the primary). Colonel John Jones and Captain Patricia Jones (male as primary), or Captain Patricia Jones and Colonel John Jones (female as primary) 6.4.4. Distinguished officials such as senators, mayors, etc. The Honorable John Jones and Mrs. Jones 6.4.5. Retired general with spouse: 6.4.5.1. Official. Major General and Mrs. John Jones, USAF, Retired and Mrs. Jones 6.4.5.2. Social. Major General and Mrs. John Jones 6.4.6. Retired general (when spouse is not included in the invitation). Major General John Jones, USAF, Retired 6.4.7. When title and name are too long to fit on one line, indent second line two spaces. The Honorable Sebastian Michael Stephenson and Mrs. Stephenson 6.4.8. Doctors and those with other professional titles. Dr. and Mrs. John Smith (not Dr. John Smith and Mrs. Smith), or Dr. John Smith and Dr. Sarah Smith (if both are doctors or have titles) 6.4.9. When female has retained her maiden name. Mr. Donald Johnson and Ms. Sally Jones Major Sally Jones and Lieutenant John Smith (female as primary) 6.4.10. When husband is civilian. Major Beth Johnson and Mr. Johnson

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 6.4.11. Couple residing together, but unmarried. Mr. Donald Johnson Ms. Sally Jones Street City, State (abbreviated) Zip 6.4.12. Retired Reserve member before entry into retired pay status. Colonel John D. Sanders, USAFR, Retired. 6.4.13. Retired Reserve upon entry into retired pay status (age 60). Colonel John D. Sanders, USAF, Retired.

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Chapter 7 PRECEDENCE 7.1. Introduction. Precedence is the right to higher honor or priority of importance at a ceremonial or formal occasion. Determining order of precedence is the starting point for all aspects of an official function. Refer to AFI 34-1201, Chapter 7, for guidance on precedence.

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Chapter 8 CUSTOMS AND COURTESIES 8.1. Introduction. This chapter provides a guide to the history of military customs and courtesies, especially the roots and traditions of the Air Force. Policy concerning proper customs and courtesies is addressed is AFI 34-1201. 8.2. Reference. The information contained in this chapter was taken from a variety of sources including Military Customs and Traditions by Major Mark M. Boatner III, Naval Ceremonies, Customs and Traditions by VADM William P. Mack and LCDR Royal W. Connell, USAFA Cadet Decorum Handbook--Contrails, United States Air Force Academy and The Air Force Basic Military Training Study Guide. 8.3. Overview. The Air Force, being the newest of the Armed Forces, draws many of its customs, courtesies and tradition from its parent service, the U.S. Army. Since inception on 18 September 1947, the Air Force has developed customs and traditions of its own. This chapter provides a brief outline of the customs, courtesies and traditions of the Air Force and sister Services. 8.4. Salutes. Nothing is more embedded in the military culture than saluting. All Services teach this in their basic officer and enlisted training programs and it is reinforced throughout the service member's career. 8.4.1. Origins. The exact origin of the hand salute is unknown; many references point to the knight's symbolic gesture of raising his visor to reveal his identity as a courtesy on the approach of a superior as its origin. Another possible early origin was the common practice of raising the right (weapon) hand as a greeting of friendship. Major Mark M. Boatner III, author of Military Customs and Traditions, believes the origin of the hand salute derives from the long established custom for juniors to remove their headgear in the presence of superiors. In the British Army as late as the American Revolution, a soldier saluted by removing his hat. As the British soldier's hat became more cumbersome, the act of removing the hat degenerated into a gesture of grasping the visor. The following entry in the "Order Book of the Coldstream Guards," dated 3 September 1745, supports this view: "The men ordered not to pull off their hats when they pass an officer, or to speak to them, but only to clap up their hands to their hats and bow as they pass." Over the years, the practice may have evolved into the modern hand salute. 8.4.2. Meaning. The hand salute today, while it varies across the globe, says in effect, "I greet you." Returning the salute says in turn, "I return your greeting." It is rendered with pride as a sign of recognition and respect between comrades in the honorable profession of arms. 8.4.3. Saluting on the Flight Line. Requirements for saluting on the flight line differ from base to base due to command and operational activity. However, members of a formal greeting party always salute the arrival and departure of an aircraft carrying a distinguished visitor (DV) and displaying the appropriate general officer or positional flag/plate. Other guidelines include:

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8.4.3.1. Saluting is normally required around the base operations building, the passenger terminal, and similar locations. 8.4.3.2. Saluting is not normally required in aircraft parking areas, around aircraft static displays, in areas designed for aircraft maintenance, or in aircraft alert hanger areas. 8.4.3.3. Regardless of location on a flight line, if a situation appears appropriate for saluting, salute. It is an expected courtesy. “When in doubt, salute.” 8.4.4. Saluting When with an Officer and Second Officer Approaches. 8.4.4.1. When in the company of a senior officer and a more senior officer approaches, tactfully ensure the first officer is aware of the senior’s approach. When the first officer salutes, salute at the same time. 8.4.4.2. If in the company of a senior officer and a junior officer approaches, salute at the same time as the senior. If you outrank the approaching officer, hold your salute until the senior officer drops his or her salute. If the approaching officer is of higher rank than you are, drop your salute after the approaching officer drops his or her salute. 8.4.4.3. If in the company of a senior officer who is unaware of a junior’s salute, do not interrupt by rendering a salute to the junior. 8.4.5. When Passing a Senior Officer from Behind. If overtaking a senior officer, slow to a normal pace and over take the officer on his/her left. Approach within three paces, extend a verbal greeting and resume pace. 8.4.6. Exceptions to Saluting. 8.4.6.1. Rendering a salute is not required when arms are encumbered. However, one should always extend a verbal greeting or respond to one in such a circumstance. (Note: You should always salute a senior officer if he/she is encumbered and you are not, even though the salute cannot be returned.) 8.4.6.2. In the Air Force and Army, do not salute indoors except during a formal report. If a senior enters an office or workspace, stand to show respect for the senior. 8.4.6.3. If saluting will interfere with official duties or is obviously impractical. 8.4.6.4. When in the ranks of formation. If at ease in a formation, come to attention when addressed by a senior officer. 8.4.6.5. When working as a member of a detail or engaged in sports or social functions. 8.4.6.6. When one is a spectator at a sports event. If addressed by a senior, come to attention. 8.4.6.7. When driving a vehicle. However, when practical, return the salutes of others. (This most frequently occurs when an officer driving a vehicle returns the Security Forces member’s salute at the entry gate of an Air Force base.) 8.4.6.8. When outdoors in Mess Dress, Semi-Formal, or PT gear, saluting is not required. However, if outside at retreat in PT gear, render appropriate salute. 8.4.7. The National Defense Authorization Act of 2008 contained an amendment to allow un-uniformed service members, military retirees, and veterans to render a hand salute during

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 the hoisting, lowering, or passing of the U.S. flag. The amendment does not address saluting the flag during the playing of the national anthem, pledge of allegiance, honors (i.e. Taps), or any other saluting situations. The National Defense Authorization Act of 2009 added the following: Authorizing hand-salutes during the national anthem by military retirees, veterans and out-of-uniform military personnel.

8.5. Visiting Ships of the Navy. Customs and courtesies while visiting Marine and Naval land installations are similar to those of the Air Force and Army. However, this changes when visiting ships of the Navy. 8.5.1. The ceremony of boarding a naval vessel, regardless of size, is an old and highly respected tradition. The custom of salutes while boarding a naval vessel is adhered to rigidly regardless of the high rank of the visitor. 8.5.2. On larger naval vessels (aircraft carrier or amphibious ship), the vessel’s top side is attended by side boys when visiting officers of the armed forces come onboard for or depart from official visits in uniform. Smaller naval vessels do not routinely provide side boys for official visits unless it is a formal ceremony like a change of command. Officers of the rank of second lieutenant to major are given two side boys and a lieutenant colonel and colonel four side boys. Brigadier general and major general warrant six side boys and lieutenant general and general warrant eight side boys. Full guard and band are also given to general officers. The senior officer always boards the ship first and departs last. 8.5.3. If the visiting general's approach to the ship is by boat, the boatswain pipes when the boat comes alongside. He pipes again and the side boys salute when the visiting officer's head reaches the level of the deck. 8.5.4. When a ship has gangways rigged on both sides, the starboard (right) gangway is reserved for officers and the port (left) gangway for enlisted, unless otherwise directed. 8.5.5. Regardless of the size of the ship's complement, when reaching the deck, face the Colors, or aft if no Colors are hoisted, and salute. Immediately thereafter, salute the Officer of the Deck (OOD) regardless of rank, and say "Request permission to come aboard, sir." The OOD returns the salute. Normally, in the case of a visiting general officer, the captain of the ship and any officers of flag rank aboard will be standing near the OOD to welcome the visitor the moment the above ceremony has been completed. If civilian dignitaries are visiting a naval vessel, they should uncover when paying respect to the flag by removing headgear as soon as they clear the ladder or gangway and stand at attention for a brief moment and bow towards the Colors. 8.5.6. The bridge is the "command post" of the ship when underway (unless in a combat environment), as is the quarterdeck while the ship is at anchor. It is likely the ship's captain will escort the general and aide immediately to the quarterdeck. When pacing the deck with another officer, the place of honor is outboard; and when reversing direction, each turns toward the other. Everyone salutes the quarterdeck when entering. The starboard side of the quarterdeck is reserved for the ship's captain (and admiral, if a flagship). The port side of the quarterdeck is reserved for commissioned officers, and the crew has all the other weather decks of the ship.

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8.5.7. Naval customs such as those relating to messes, calls on the captain, and permission to visit the bridge, are normally not applicable to a general officer. The following outlines a few points concerning "covered" vs. "uncovered" and other rules while aboard a Navy vessel: 8.5.7.1. Warrants and junior officers remove caps in wardroom country. 8.5.7.2. All officers uncover when passing through captain's or admiral's country except when in full dress or wearing a sword. 8.5.7.3. All remove caps when passing through crew's quarters at meal times. 8.5.7.4. All remove caps when entering sickbay. 8.5.7.5. Officers do not uncover in the open except for divine worship, funerals, and other religious ceremonies. 8.5.7.6. When an officer reports on board ship, he or she should call on the commander within 48 hours. A junior never presents his or her "compliments" to a senior; instead, he or she "pays his or her respects." It is courteous, but not required, to leave a calling card. 8.5.8. On leaving the ship, the inverse order of embarking is observed. With junior officers first, salute the OOD and request permission to leave the ship (if a boat is used, the OOD will indicate when the boat is ready). Then face the Colors (or the quarterdeck), salute, and disembark. 8.5.9. In the Army and Air Force, salutes are always rendered with the right hand. (Note: In the Air Force, left hand execution will be authorized in rare cases where a member is unable to use their right hand due to injury.) The Navy may use the left hand if the right is encumbered. Army and Air Force personnel may salute when seated or uncovered; Navy personnel do not. 8.6. Other Forms of Salutes. The idea of holding a weapon in a harmless position is a universally accepted custom for showing respect. 8.6.1. Present Arms. The movement of "Present arms" with the rifle is a token of submitting a weapon to the person being honored. 8.6.2. Sword Salute. The first movement of the sword salute, bringing the hilt up opposite the chin, point of the sword in the air, and the second motion, lowering the point to the ground, symbolizes the trust of "putting down your guard." 8.6.3. Gun Salutes. High-ranking military and civil officials may be honored by a prescribed number of gun blasts. In the Air Force, gun salutes are not fired during any parade, reveille or retreat ceremony. 8.7. Positions of Honor. The principle that the right side of a person or thing is the position of honor is a time honor tradition. The "right of the line" was the critical side in ancient battle formations and is the place of honor in ceremonies today. 8.7.1. The right is also the point of honor in heraldry. The field of blue on the American flag is the point of honor, so the U.S. flag is always displayed with the field of stars to the flag's right. The one exception is a flag placed over a casket; the point of honor is to the left of the body, where it is more fitting the field is over the heart.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 8.7.2. The first place of honor is always on the right. One should always afford seniors this position when walking, riding, or sitting with them. When joining up with a senior, always assume a position to his or her left. 8.7.3. The second place of honor is that of being in front or "going first." As a junior, allow a senior to precede you through a doorway. If boarding an aircraft in a group, the senior member will enter first to select a seat, and so on. On departing the aircraft, the same rule applies; the most senior officer departs first. 8.7.4. In the combination of a junior woman and a senior man, the senior man should precede the junior woman through the door. Unofficially, or in a "social" situation, the man may extend traditional courtesies and allow the woman the position of honor. 8.7.5. Three exceptions to these rules of courtesy and conduct include: 8.7.5.1. When an aircraft has been assigned a senior officer, all junior-ranking personnel board first and take their seats before the senior arrives at the aircraft. Normally, either the crew or the senior officer’s executive officer/aide will ensure the proper seat is reserved for the senior officer. All should remain in their seats until the senior officer leaves the aircraft at its destination. 8.7.5.2. When entering an auto or a small boat, the senior officer is the last to enter and the first to leave. The position of honor in an automobile is in the rear seat to the right of the driver. If the driver cannot open or close the door, the junior passenger should do so. See AFI 34-1201, Chapter 11, for suggestions on seating passengers by precedence in automobiles.

8.8. American Military Decorations. The first American decoration was developed by George Washington in 1782 when he had the "purple heart" created. It was to be awarded for "singularly meritorious action" and consisted of a small purple cloth heart to be worn over the left breast. Three were awarded in 1783, but records show no others since then. 8.8.1. Medal of Honor. In December of 1861, Senator James W. Grimes of Iowa introduced a bill that resulted in the establishment of a Medal of Honor for Navy enlisted men. This is the first decoration formally authorized by the American government to be worn as a badge of honor. The Army followed suit in 1862, and officers were declared eligible for the medal in 1863. The following guidelines on saluting and arrangement of recipients are presented from the Congressional Medal of Honor Society’s “Medal of Honor Recipients General Protocol and Information” document. 8.8.1.1. Salute. There is no law or military regulation requiring personnel of any rank to salute a Medal of Honor recipient. However, it is permissible to salute a recipient as a display of respect or honor, whether he or she is civilian or retired military, when he or she is physically wearing the medal. 8.8.1.2. Arrangement of Recipients. When more than one Medal of Honor recipient is to be present at an event, the Congressional Medal of Honor Society and the recipients themselves request they not be arranged by rank. Recommended options of order are alphabetically, by war, by action date, by birthplace, by state, by age, or by height if in a parade or on a raised platform.

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8.8.2. Additional Medal of Honor facts and information about recipients are available at the Congressional Medal of Honor Society’s web page at: http://www.cmohs.org/. 8.9. Other Official Customs of the Service. 8.9.1. RHIP (Rank Hath Its Privileges). RHIP refers specifically to those special courtesies that persons of junior rank or status extend to their "seniors." Extending a verbal courtesy (such as "sir") or physical courtesy (such as a salute) to a senior acknowledges a privilege the senior has earned and expects. It is also an acknowledgment of authority and respect. Rank also has its obligations, which includes ensuring subordinates' rights are respected. 8.9.2. Calling a Room to Attention. By enlisted custom, the first person to see an officer entering the room calls the room to attention. If an officer of equal or higher rank is already in the room, the room is not called to attention. When the officer departs, the room is called to attention again. 8.9.2.1. It is not traditional for officers to follow this practice. When junior officers are gathered in a room awaiting the arrival of a senior officer, post an individual to watch for his or her arrival. As the senior officer approaches, the watcher may sound off, “stand by” or “at ease,” as a warning. When the senior enters the room, one officer will announce, “Ladies and gentlemen, the commander,” or “Ladies and Gentlemen, General Jones.” All officers stand at attention until told to be seated. It is a common courtesy for all individuals in a room or area to stand when a senior civilian enters. 8.9.2.2. Brining a room to attention should be avoided if doing so will create a safety hazard or negatively affect the mission. 8.9.3. By Direction of the President. Only "by direction of the President" can an officer be required to serve as a subordinate to one whom he or she ranks. Orders assigning any officer to a position of command over an officer senior to him/her will include the phrase "by direction of the President." 8.9.4. Addressing Junior Officers. In the Army and Air Force, only academy cadets and warrant officers are addressed as "Mister/Miss/Ms."; all other officers are addressed by their rank. The Navy follows old traditions and avoids addressing officers below the rank of Commander by title. When speaking to naval officers below the rank of Commander, enlisted use "Mister/Miss." 8.9.5. Courtesy Visits/Calls. When visiting any military organization or Navy ship, it is customary to pay a courtesy call to the commanding officer. On an Army installation, the first call should be to the commanding officer, even if the visitor ranks him or her. When reporting in on a Navy vessel, report to the ship's captain within 48 hours of arriving. 8.9.5.1. When making new contacts in either an official or a social capacity, it may be appropriate to offer business cards, if available. Present the card face up while making good eye contact. When receiving a card, give the presenter of the card the courtesy of reading it before putting it away. 8.10. Service Semantics. When scheduled to visit a Navy ship or Army post take the time to learn Service specific semantics. 8.10.1. Flags are only flown at "half-mast" on board ships or on naval installations. In the Army and Air Force, flags are flown at ''half-staff."

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 8.10.2. In the Army, only women and midshipmen wear "pants." Men wear trousers. 8.10.3. Navy and Marine Corps Terminology for Navigating Aboard Ship. "Decks" are floors, "ladders" are stairways, "starboard" is right, "port" is left, "aft" is rear, "below" is downstairs, "forward" is towards the front, and "head" is the bathroom.

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Chapter 9 FORMS OF DRESS 9.1. Introduction. One of the duties of a protocol officer it to recommend to the host or hostess the appropriate attire for events. Sensitivity to surroundings applies to dress as well as behavior. Dressing appropriately for the culture or occasion is crucial in ensuring a successful event; attire worn demonstrates respect and appreciation for others. When considering the attire for an event, terms like “casual” and “informal” have become ambiguous over the years. To ensure event participants and guests are appropriately dressed, clearly define dress requirements in advance. Avoid the use of terms such as “smart casual” or “black tie optional” when identifying dress requirements because they are confusing to a guest as to what the host/hostess expects. Attachment 4 includes a Table of Service Equivalent uniforms and civilian attire. 9.2. Formal Attire. 9.2.1. Historically, “Formal” refers to “White Tie” and “Semiformal” refers to “Black Tie”. White Tie is the most formal style of dress and suggests “tails”- a long black tailcoat with matching trousers, white wing-collared shirt, white bow tie, and white pique waistcoat. For the ladies, appropriate dress would be a full-skirted grand ball gown and long white gloves. “Black Tie” includes a tuxedo for men and a long evening dress (or equivalent dress pants suit) or formal cocktail dress for women. 9.2.2. In the Air Force, this is the Mess Dress/Semi-Formal Uniform and is appropriate attire for functions such as dinings in, dinings out, formal receptions, military weddings (if a participant), and civilian or corporate "black tie" events. For certain official formal evening functions and state occasions, identified as “white tie affairs,” Air Force officers wear the Mess Dress with a white bow tie. 9.3. Business Suit A business suit is typically cut from the same fabric cloth for both the pants and jacket or skirt and jacket; for men, a tie is worn with it. The material and color is dependent on the time of year, weather, and type of event. The military counterpart to "business suit" is Service Dress for Air Force and its equivalent for the other services. The Service Dress uniform is appropriate for events, which include ceremonies, parades, reviews, official visits of civilian dignitaries, changes of command, and receptions. 9.4. Business Casual. Business Casual dress implies comfortably unrestricted attire while still appropriate for business and offers broad possibilities for dress. Invitations for the military equivalent to business casual dress will state the uniform, which in most cases will be the "uniform of the day (UOD)." If uniformity of dress is not important, specifying UOD for Air Force functions is acceptable. For example, UOD is appropriate for members attending a function such as a commander's call (principals or personnel receiving recognition may wear Service Dress). If it is important that everyone be in the same uniform, be specific, e.g. "Longsleeve blue shirt w/tie." 9.4.1. For civilian guests equivalent appropriate attire includes coat and tie (not a suit), slacks and sport coat, open collar for men and dress/skirt/slacks and blouse or sweater for women. Expect most community dignitaries and civilian guests to arrive in sports coat and tie or business suit unless advised otherwise. To avoid confusion and ensure guests arrive in the same type of attire, the level of dress should be specified in the invitation, for example

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 “Coat and Tie, or Sports Coat w/Open Collar etc.” Civilian Business Casual standards will vary depending on geographic location. For example, Business Casual in Washington D.C. (coat and tie or sport coat with or without tie) will be different from Honolulu, HI (Aloha shirt and slacks) or Fort Walton Beach, FL (slacks and golf shirt). If unsure of what to wear, it is always best to ask.

9.5. Casual Attire. It is important to note that Business Casual is different from casual attire. Casual attire is typically worn for more relaxed or outdoor events and is not as ‘dressy’ as Business Casual. Dress for men may include jeans with a short or long-sleeved open-neck shirt, a sweater or sports coat, but no tie. Dress for women may include skirts, pants with blouse, sweater or casual dress. While termed “casual,” it is important to keep in mind that the form of dress must be appropriate for duty related events. 9.6. Sports Attire. Many business functions revolve around a sporting event. Wear the appropriate sports attire given the event, weather and time of year. Avoid attire that shows too much skin (for either males or females) as well as clothing and shoes with offensive logos or pictures. 9.7. Dress for Retired Members. 9.7.1. Retired members may wear the appropriate uniform to social and official events as prescribed in AFI 36-2903, Dress and Personal Appearance of Air Force Personnel. 9.7.2. Wearing of authorized miniature medals on civilian business suit/formal wear is authorized as prescribed in AFI 36-2903. 9.8. Dress for Protocol Officers and Staff 9.8.1. When working an event, protocol officers or staff typically dress in accordance with the level of dress specified by host/hostess in the invitation. 9.8.2. On occasion, protocol officers or staff my need to wear appropriate clothing for setup of an event and tear down at the conclusion. Use good judgment as a representative of the host/hostess.

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Chapter 10 ADMINISTRATION 10.1. Types of Invitations. There are different types of invitations, from a formal engraved invitation to an informal phone call. 10.1.1. Formal invitations can be printed or handwritten. Printed invitations are the most common and can be used for ceremonies, dinners, etc. They can be printed on card stock or letterhead. 10.1.2. Handwritten invitations are written in black or blue ink on card stock or notepaper with organizational emblem or the commander’s flag. The semi-printed invitation should not have the required information typed in; it should be handwritten. 10.1.3. Letter invitations are effective when there is more than one function included, e.g., an icebreaker the first night, a reception and dinner the next night, and a ceremony the third day. 10.1.4. Options for e-mail invitations include cutting and pasting the actual invitation onto the e-mail or providing the event information in the body of the e-mail. E-invitations can also be created through the Air Force Institute of Technology’s (AFIT) E-Invitations website at http://einvitations.afit.edu/generator/index.cfm. 10.1.5. Telephone invitations are acceptable, but should be followed up with a "To remind" written invitation. When issuing a telephone invitation, do not put the invitee on the spot with a question like "Is Colonel Jones free Thursday night?" Instead, begin with "General Command is having a dinner Thursday night at his quarters. Is Colonel Jones available?" Telephone invitations are useful in "blocking" schedules for planning purposes well in advance of functions for officials with busy schedules. 10.2. Elements of an Invitation (Figure 10 1). 10.2.1. Command emblem or commander’s flag. An invitation will normally have the host’s organizational emblem, star flag, or other symbol at the top. The emblem should be centered; if there are two hosts, the senior host’s emblem should be on the left. The emblem can be printed along with the invitation or preprinted on the stationary. 10.2.2. Host. The invitation always begins with the host's title or full name or both. With more than one host, include all of the names. If the function is located at one of the host's quarters, that name should go first, or if it is at the club or a restaurant, the name of the senior host goes first. If side-by-side, the senior host's name goes to the left. 10.2.3. Event. Phrasing of the invitation and event. Generic events (such as the words lunch, dinner, reception) are not capitalized within the invitation. Special events such as Change of Command or Air Force Ball should be capitalized. Several ways to phrase the invitation include: 10.2.3.1. …request(s) the pleasure of your company 10.2.3.2. …request(s) the honor of your presence 10.2.3.3. …cordially invite(s) you to

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 10.2.4. Date and Time. The date must be spelled out as follows: “on Thursday, the thirtyfirst of January.” The time may be spelled out in several ways: “at half past seven o’clock,” “at seven thirty o’clock,” or “from seven thirty to nine o’clock” (if the event warrants an end time). If there is a question as to whether the function is in the morning or evening, consider stating "half past seven o'clock in the evening." 10.2.5. Location. Provide specific location such as room, building, and base or city. 10.2.6. R.s.v.p. Place R.s.v.p. date and information in the bottom left-hand corner. Response may include the following: phone number, e-mail address, web site, or R.s.v.p. mail back card/sheet. When using a phone number and invitations are going off base to other military installations or civilian locations, use both the commercial and DSN numbers. Phrases such as "Regrets Only" or "Acceptances Only" can be confusing and are not recommended. 10.2.7. Dress. Be specific with uniform and civilian dress requirements (see Chapter 9). 10.2.8. Other. Additional information can be included below the dress information, e.g., “Cost per person: $15.00”; “No-host cocktails”; “Pay-as-you-go bar”. Information such as "Reception follows immediately after the ceremony” (state if in another location) is normally centered at the bottom of the invitation.

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Figure 10.1. Invitation Example

10.3. Preparing Invitations. 10.3.1. First, meet with the commander or a knowledgeable representative to obtain necessary details for a proposed invitation list: what type of function, when, where, who is to be invited, what is the preferred dress. A sample invitation and proposed guest list is recommended. 10.3.2. In coordination with the appropriate offices, develop a guest list suitable to the event. Consider inviting local city, county, and state officials; chamber of commerce officials and members of organizations that are supportive to the military. If there are other military organizations in the local area, consider including their commanders and key people. Be aware that some guest lists may have to meet specific ratios of DOD to non-DOD (see Chapter 3, and AFI 65-603, Chapter 3). 10.3.3. Depending on the type of function, decide what inserts to include. 10.3.3.1. R.s.v.p. return card/sheet

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 10.3.3.2. Self-addressed envelope 10.3.3.3. Menu selection card 10.3.3.4. DV pass (allowing civilians access to the base or building) 10.3.3.5. DV parking pass (can be the same as the DV pass if you choose) 10.3.3.6. Map (either on back of DV pass or on separate sheet) 10.3.3.7. Reception invitation card 10.3.3.8. Pre-ceremony reception invitation card 10.3.3.9. Special instructions card (bus boarding instructions, inclement weather plan) 10.3.3.10. Seating card 10.3.4. If required, submit everything (invitations, all inserts, and proposed invitation list) in a package to the host for approval. 10.3.5. If it is a short-notice invitation with only a few invited (i.e. a dinner at the commander's quarters), begin by calling all of the invitees to check availability. This provides an opportunity to pencil the function in on a calendar and avoids sending an unnecessary invitation if an invitee is not available. Follow up the phone call with a "To remind" invitation.

10.4. Addressing Envelopes (see Chapter 6). 10.5. Mailing/Distributing Invitations. 10.5.1. Send invitations out three to four weeks in advance for official functions, ceremonies, large dinners, etc. 10.5.2. "Hold the date" or "mark your calendar" cards can be used for functions with an identified date, but for which additional details are pending. These can be sent out as much as six months in advance so invitees can block their calendars and make tentative travel/hotel arrangements. 10.6. R. s.v.p. Worksheet. 10.6.1. Have the R.s.v.p. worksheet ready as soon as invitations are mailed in case one receives an R.s.v.p. the same day. 10.6.2. The R.s.v.p. worksheet should be in alphabetical order with columns for all necessary information; yes, no, how many, menu selection, method of payment, telephone number, special seating requirements, name of caller, social first names for name tags (clarify spelling of the first name of the guest/spouse), etc. 10.7. R. s.v.p. Responses. 10.7.1. If an invitee does not respond by the R.s.v.p. date, follow-up with a phone call or email their office for a response. 10.7.2. If attendance numbers are significantly different than originally planned, notify the club, caterer, or restaurant with an update. Each caterer will have a different attendance guarantee date.

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10.8. Postponing and Recalling Invitations. If possible, send out a written explanation of postponement/cancellation of a function. If time does not permit, notify invitees by telephone. 10.9. Name Tags. Tailor name tags to the event; they can include rank, go-by name, first name, last name, and duty title. Ensure the nametag is easily readable from a distance. The name is the most important feature of a nametag. Do not let logos and emblems dominate the tag. Nametags can be helpful in accounting for attendance if special funding has been authorized for an event. Arrange nametags alphabetically on tables close to the entrance. Protocol staff members should be at tables to assist guests with nametags. Nametags should be worn on the right side of the body to facilitate line of sight while shaking hands with other guests. 10.10. Table Seating and Arrangements. Seating is an important aspect in the success of an event (see Chapter 15). 10.11. Place Cards. Place cards are useful at formal and informal occasions to facilitate seating. As a rule, cards are made from white or cream-colored card stock and are approximately 1½ by 3 inches (cards either are folded and free standing or placed in a holder). Traditionally, the flag of a general or admiral or the unit crest is embossed or printed on the card. Names are either printed or written on the cards in black or dark blue ink. Cards are addressed with title or rank and last name only. 10.11.1. "Brigadier General John D. Doe" is written as "General Doe" 10.11.2. "Lieutenant Colonel Susan R. Smith" is written as "Colonel Smith" 10.11.3. "Mrs. Gloria C. Smith" is written "Mrs. Smith" 10.11.4. “TSgt Robert Jones” is written “Sergeant Jones” 10.11.5. “CMSgt Mary Smith” is written “Chief Smith” 10.11.6. "Rear Admiral Harry M. Jones" is written as "Rear Admiral Jones" 10.11.7. Note that the Navy does not truncate the rank. 10.11.8. If more than one person with the same rank and last name is present, add their first initial to avoid any confusion. 10.11.9. Which card to use is determined by who is hosting the event or personal preference. If a flag officer (general or admiral) is hosting, use a card that corresponds to their rank (1, 2, 3, or 4 stars) regardless of whether a more senior officer is attending. If the host is not a general officer, use a card with the unit crest. When the spouse of a general/flag officer hosts a function where the military member is not present, do not use "star" place cards. It may be the host’s preference to place go-by names on the reverse side of place cards. Placement of the cards will vary depending upon the table setting but are typically centered above the plate. 10.12. Seating Designators. To expedite the seating of guests at a large function, it is helpful to number the tables and create a “you-are-seated-at” (YASA) board, YASA cards, or seating chart. Prominently display table numbers on all tables. Keep the table numbers in place until all guests are seated (staff may then remove them). To facilitate seating, two lists are recommended at the check in table, one alphabetical and one by table.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 10.12.1. You-Are-Seated-At (YASA) Cards. At a large dinner when there is assigned seating, present guests with YASA cards as they arrive. A seating chart may also be displayed showing the location of the tables. When labeling YASA cards, use the “conversational” rank versus the formal rank, i.e., “Lieutenant General Hamilton,” would be displayed as “General Hamilton” on the YASA card (with the exception of USN attendees, whose rank is always spelled out, i.e., Vice Admiral Smith versus Admiral Smith). 10.12.2. YASA Boards. 10.12.2.1. Display the YASA board(s) in a central location or multiple locations around the room but consider the impact of congestion as people crowd around the board to identify seats. 10.12.2.2. One type of YASA board has an alphabetical list of all guests with table number beside their name and a diagram of the table layout to provide an orientation to the room. The YASA board or boards should be large enough to display the names of all guests with corresponding table number. 10.12.3. Seating Charts. For smaller events, utilize a seating chart with table diagram and names of guests at each table; it may be displayed outside the dining room.

10.13. Table Settings. Table settings are usually the concern of the establishment (the club or restaurant) where a luncheon or dinner is to be held. There are occasions when protocol staff may need to provide assistance in this area. Consult etiquette reference texts for a detailed explanation of the appropriate table setting to use for various types of functions. The following general information should cover most situations: 10.13.1. Avoid overcrowding. 10.13.2. Place silverware on the table in the order of its use, starting from the outside and working toward the plate. 10.13.3. The silverware, napkin, and plate are lined-up approximately one inch from the edge of the table. 10.13.4. Place forks at the left of the plate. 10.13.5. Place knives and spoons at the right of the plate with the blade of the knife facing toward the plate. 10.13.6. An iced beverage spoon may be placed on the table to the right of the soup spoon or may be laid above the plate with handle to the right. 10.13.7. The individual butter knife is usually placed across the top of the butter plate parallel with the edge of the table. 10.13.8. Place a water glass (if utilized) slightly above the tip of the knife nearest the plate and in front of the wine glasses. Fill it two-thirds full before guests are seated. 10.13.9. Pour wine at the appropriate time during the meal (if toasts are to be proposed right after the invocation, ensure wine glasses are "charged" before guests take their seats). 10.14. Menu Cards. Menu cards are occasionally used at formal events. As a rule, cards are made from white or cream-colored heavy card stock and are printed with black ink with the flag of a general or admiral, an organizational crest, or other graphic printed at the top of the card or

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on the cover. Menu cards can stand above the plate or be laid elsewhere at the setting. Menu cards serve multiple purposes; they may be used to describe the menu available for the event, they can discriminate between multiple menu options or they may be used to pay tribute to a guest of honor. Cards may be written in calligraphy, handwritten, printed, or produced on a computer. List only the main courses and wines being served, not the rolls and butter, celery tray, chocolates, ice water, salt and pepper, etc. 10.15. Food Cards. Food cards can be used at a buffet to describe the item and helpful for guests with food allergies or dietary restrictions.

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Chapter 11 FLIGHT LINE 11.1. Introduction. Flight line protocol is an issue of compliance; all policy is covered in AFI 34-1201, Chapter 11.

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Chapter 12 DISTINGUISHED VISITORS (DVS) 12.1. Introduction. Compliance associated with distinguished visitors (DVs) is addressed in AFI 34-1201, Chapter 12. This chapter provides a guide to preparing for, executing and documenting DV visits. 12.2. Initial Notification of a Visit. Notification of a DV visit can take several forms and be either formal or informal in nature. Frequently, it will be in the form of a telephone call or written correspondence. The key to obtaining accurate information consistently, regardless of the form of notification, is to have a list of questions readily available. Examples of DV visit notifications include: visitor's office contacts Protocol, commander receives a note or telephone call, directorate receives a note or telephone call, lodging requests from individuals or higher headquarters message. The next several paragraphs provide suggestions as a template for a successful DV visit. 12.2.1. A successful visit requires the following information: arrival and departure times, purpose of visit, number in party, communications requirements, lodging arrangements, transportation requirements, office calls, briefings (classified or unclassified), social functions, entertainment, tours, meals (including dietary or customs restrictions), honor cordon or guard, mementos, photography, publicity or security level, and biographies. 12.2.2. If the DVs are international dignitaries, other considerations include interpreters, greeting, visiting, eating, and gestures. Obtain as much information as feasible upon initial notification. After obtaining initial information, notify all agencies involved in the visit. Communication is paramount to the success of any DV visit, and continues throughout the visit process. 12.3. Planning. 12.3.1. Develop a detailed protocol working plan containing information needed to execute the visit to include a contingency plan. This is not the itinerary provided to a DV, but rather a worksheet with notes and points of contact for reference. 12.3.2. Establish a checklist for planning the DV visit. Although no two visits are exactly alike, many of the steps in the planning process remain basically the same for each visit. 12.3.3. The planning task requires an understanding of the major steps in the process as well as the details. The following is one approach to breaking down the planning phase into its major steps, and accomplish details. 12.3.4. Identify "long-lead" items and actions. Upon notification of the visit, confirm the availability of the commander or host; conflicts may require suggested alternative dates for the visit. Tentatively reserve quarters, club or dining facilities, transportation, honor guard, and entertainment; cancel or reschedule later as needed. Determine the purpose of the visit in order to identify appropriate site visits and briefings. Specific actions to consider: 12.3.4.1. Prepare a checklist when planning all visits. 12.3.4.2. Arrange lodging accommodations.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 12.3.4.3. Contact the DV's office to determine purpose of the visit and DV's expectations. (This is an opportune time to get other details, like numbers and names of those accompanying the DV and dietary restrictions, etc.) 12.3.4.4. Obtain commander’s/host's approval for the visit. 12.3.5. Determine Roles and Responsibilities for the Visit. The protocol officer, in most cases, will advise on and/or oversee the visit. For larger functions or visits, the commander may appoint a directorate or unit as the overall office of primary responsibility (OPR) for the function, with the protocol officer providing support to project and escort officers. Communication between all involved and a clear delineation of responsibilities are both keys to a successful visit. 12.3.6. Develop a "Strawman" Itinerary. Work with the action officer to outline specific briefings and tours required for a productive visit. Seek early input from the commander or host for the visit. Sequence the events in a logical manner--begin with command and specialized briefings before site visits for a better understanding. Block out rough times to include questions and answers during briefings and transportation between activities. Consider comfort breaks. Include time for meals, and at the end of the day, adequate time for rest and relaxation or exercise before beginning evening functions. Factor in the DV's "body clock" and amount of traveling already done. Itineraries take many forms. The key to making a useful document is in answering the basic questions of who, what, where, when, how and the proper dress code for each event. Place oneself in the DV's shoes and review the itinerary from that perspective. The use of notes placed in appropriate locations within the itinerary will help to reduce questions asked throughout the visit. At a minimum, the itinerary format identifies the date, time, activity, and location, as well as those DVs participating and what to wear. The itinerary should flow logically from one event or date to the next. Too much detail in the itinerary may result in the DV watching the clock rather than enjoying the events they are participating in. Consider the physical size and print of the itinerary. If the DV’s activities require a significant amount of movement or being, consider making the itinerary pocket size. If the DV is elderly, consider larger type or bolder font. Consider the following when presenting the strawman itinerary to the commander or host: 12.3.6.1. Notifying organizations in the command responsible for operations of particular interest to the DV. 12.3.6.2. Identifying specific technical discussions and/or briefings the DV will receive, and block times (OPR). 12.3.6.3. Making preliminary arrangements for meals. 12.3.6.4. Blocking times for each activity. Providing sufficient time not only for meetings, office calls, meals, etc., but also for changes of clothes, coffee or tea breaks, occasional rest periods, and transportation. 12.3.6.5. Will spouse accompany? If requested, plan a separate itinerary. The same planning factors apply. 12.3.6.6. Planning an evening meal (or formal luncheon if required). If not already accomplished, tentatively reserve the facility and any entertainment. Identify invitation requirements and develop a suggested invitation list.

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12.3.6.7. Determine who pays for various functions and how payment will be made. DVs in per diem status normally pay for all their expenses; the accompanying aide or escort will pay the DV's bill. However, there are situations where some expenses may be paid from official sources. 12.3.6.8. Getting the commander or host's approval for the strawman itinerary. 12.3.7. Flesh out the Itinerary. Once your strawman itinerary is approved, begin adding detail. Start with the DV's arrival (how will the DV arrive, who is greeting, where is the first stop, how will the DV get there, who is accompanying, who takes care of luggage, who greets at the next stop). Continue through to the completion of the visit (departure time, departure point, transportation, who will accompany the DV, farewell attendance, and luggage transportation) and everything in between. The following planning factors address generic events; modify to fit specific needs: 12.3.7.1. Briefings. Schedule the briefing or conference room as appropriate, determine attendees (key staff, host, visitors, knowledgeable staff officers, etc.), line up briefers and conduct dry run briefings (preferably with the commander or host present) and develop seating charts and table tents/cards. Determine audio-visual requirements as soon as possible and plan for writing materials at the table. Consider refreshments; plan on water at the table as a minimum. 12.3.7.2. Office Calls. As a minimum, schedule an office call immediately upon visit notification (15-20 minutes usually suffices) with the commander as a courtesy. Be prepared to provide the commander information on the DV, purpose of the visit, and other relevant data. Consider others as appropriate (major directorates, etc. (Note: Traditionally, with an office call, the visitor is senior to the host. In a courtesy call, the visitor is of lower rank than the person he or she is visiting). 12.3.7.3. Tour/Site Visits. There are the "showplaces" that reflect an organization and the pride of the unit. They may be mission or support agency related (the new Child Development Center or Airmen's dormitory). When setting up tours, consider the following: arranging for the commander or representative to greet and escort the DV through the facility; meeting necessary security requirements; making sure the facility and its surroundings are clean and presentable; and most importantly, dry-run the tour. Most problems with site visits occur because of poor time management. Allow time for visits to work centers and small talk with personnel at those centers. Personnel will be tempted to "overdo" it. Be ready for events to last longer than programmed and plan accordingly—the protocol officer should keep the visit on schedule. 12.3.7.4. Meals (Breakfast and Lunch). Some DVs do not eat breakfast, but will expect pastries or coffee in their quarters while others will want a full breakfast to start the day. If appropriate, plan a breakfast (or lunch) with a group (i.e. junior officers or airmen). The officers' and enlisted clubs and Airmen dining facility are recommended settings. In a time-constrained itinerary, if traveling from one facility or site to another, consider stopping for lunch on the way to the next visit. A “working lunch" is practical during briefings or discussions (especially if pressed for time); arrange for prepared sandwiches or have lunch catered. As appropriate, consider a more formal setting at the club, with the host and others attending.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 12.3.7.5. Dinner Plans. Allow enough time between the end of the business day and the start of dinner for the DV to relax, unpack, exercise, shower, etc. Normally, plan for an hour and a half; never less than 45 minutes unless pre-coordinated with the DV. Consider the DV's desires (food preference, purpose of visit, level of formality, etc.). He or she may prefer a quiet evening at leisure. In such cases, arrange transportation and provide a list of local restaurants; offer to make reservations. The purpose or type of visit may dictate more involved arrangements, ranging from setting up an informal dinner at the club or local restaurant, to a formal reception and dinner with local dignitaries and senior officers attending. 12.3.8. Other Miscellaneous Tasks. 12.3.8.1. Arrange honors and ceremonies. 12.3.8.2. Ensure all arrangements, including reservations for hotels and restaurants, transportation, luggage detail, photographic support, conference room support, etc., are in writing. 12.3.8.3. Ensure that dignitaries will be met and bid farewell by officers of commensurate rank, whenever possible. As a rule, a general or flag officer should be present at the arrival and departure of a general or flag officer on an official visit, unless there are no general or flag officers assigned to the installation. In this case, the installation commander or vice commander should be present. 12.3.8.4. Coordinate Customs, Immigration, and Agriculture arrangements when DVs are flying in directly from an overseas location. 12.3.8.5. Arrange public affairs support, if required (press conference, photo opportunities). 12.3.8.6. Maintain a contact list of organizations and personnel that need to be notified (and update, as required) of itinerary changes. 12.3.8.7. Confirm security clearances are on file with offices to be visited. Confirm access to controlled/restricted areas before the DV's arrival (OPR). DV may require storage of classified material. 12.3.8.8. Establish uniform/dress requirements for all events and document in the itinerary. 12.3.8.9. Keep the DV's office/escort officer apprised of any changes to the itinerary. Notify the DV's office/escort officer beforehand of any toasts to be offered at social functions (and his or her appropriate response) proposed speaking opportunities or press coverage, etc. 12.3.8.10. The final action is to obtain the commander or host's approval of the completed itinerary. Once the final itinerary is approved, minimize changes. 12.3.9. Coordinating the Details. Once the itinerary is approved, follow up on the details for successful execution. First, confirm the transportation, club, lodging, and security arrangements made initially. Provide all agencies involved with copies of the itinerary and understand the role they play in the visit. Briefed all escort offices on their responsibilities.

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If needed, prepare invitations, place cards, nametags, placards, etc. before the visit starts. Consider what might go wrong and plan for it. Other details include: 12.3.9.1. Ensure all drivers of the official party are briefed in regards to schedules, routes and uniform requirements, and are given explicit directions. Drivers should be able to operate independently if separated from the other vehicles in the official party. 12.3.9.2. Prepare a package that contains at least a map of the area, the local itinerary and lists of room assignments and telephone numbers for presentation to each member of the visiting party. 12.3.9.3. Secure information booklets and other printed information. 12.3.9.4. Reconfirm with the club or restaurant on the composition of the visiting party, accommodations, time and date of arrival, and method of payment. 12.3.9.5. Continue to provide changes and updates to the DV's office or escort. 12.3.9.6. Determine any special requirements upon the DV's departure from the installation (i.e., flight lunches, notifications passed to next stop, etc.) 12.3.9.7. Conduct a final dry-run of the visit from beginning to end where practicable. As a minimum, run through checklists to ensure transportation, lodging, entertainment, etc., are addressed. If time permits, conduct dry-run briefings and tours again, especially if there were concerns during the first dry-run. This walkthrough will identify where the weak points are and can be critical to the success of the visit. 12.3.9.8. Make any last-minute minor changes to the itinerary. Include a list of all visitors, with full names, nicknames, duty titles, grades, clearances, and organizations. 12.3.9.9. Check the quarters in advance of the DV's arrival to allow housekeeping time to correct any deficiencies. 12.3.9.10. Brief the commander or host on any last-minute changes. Make sure he or she does not have any questions and is comfortable with all arrangements. 12.3.9.11. If the visit involves additional escort officers, brief them on base facilities, uniform requirements, start time of events, greeting and transporting their assigned DV. Provide all escort officers with a copy of the itinerary and protocol plan for after action feedback and addressing any problems or comments received from the DV. 12.3.10. Planning Considerations. 12.3.10.1. Accommodations. Refer to AFI 34-246, Air Force Lodging Program, Table 2.1, for information on DV priority. Obtain the following (as appropriate) prior to making a reservation: the DV's last name, first name, middle initial, and nickname, rank or grade, branch of service, social security number, duty title, home address, purpose of visit, installation or city, state or country, date of arrival and departure, total number of nights, retirement date and last position held on active duty (if DV is retired), point of contact and telephone number. 12.3.10.1.1. Contact the lodging office and relay the information to the reservation clerk. The reservation clerk inputs the information into the lodging computer. Confirm DV suites are available. The reservation clerk will assign the DV a room

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 number and a reservation number. Notify the DV’s point of contact with lodging facility, room number, telephone number, and building number. 12.3.10.1.2. Check the DV suite before arrival for cleanliness and amenities and contact the lodging office if the DV suite does not meet protocol standards. If the DV requests particular items that are not in the suite, contact the lodging office to see if the items are available. For difficult to fill requests, work with the commander or host; consider unrealistic or unfair demands on the staff and their personal finances. In addition, consider any negative impact on the mission. 12.3.10.1.3. Contract Quarters Hotels. In situations where DV suites are fully occupied, a DV may have to be lodged at a local hotel. Check with the lodging office before selecting a hotel. The lodging office maintains a contract quarter facilities listing and will assist in making the reservation. When the DV occupies contract quarters, the lodging office will issue the DV a contract quarters statement. The statement will include the DV's name, number of nights, name of the hotel, and price per night of the quarters. The DV is responsible for paying all room and incidental charges when checking out. The hotel keeps a copy of the contract quarters statement and will provide a copy to the DV upon checking out. (For additional guidance regarding contract quarters, refer to AFI 34-246). 12.3.10.1.4. Non-availability. In situations when all installation lodging facilities and contract quarters are occupied, ask the lodging office to issue a statement of nonavailability for government quarters. 12.3.10.2. Welcome Package. A welcome package may be simple or elaborate, depending on the DV and purpose of the visit. A welcome basket may be provided for certain international DVs, where appropriated funds can be utilized. As a professional courtesy, included a welcome note in or placed next to a DV's welcome package. The note may be handwritten (preferred) or a preprinted note signed by the commander sponsoring the DV's visit. Place the welcome package in a professionally prepared folder. Contents will vary, but include at a minimum the following items: 12.3.10.2.1. An itinerary including biographies of commanders that the DV will meet or commanders of installations the DV will visit. 12.3.10.2.2. Fact sheets on the installations or systems the DV will see. 12.3.10.2.3. A map of the installation where the DV is staying to include the fitness facility. 12.3.10.2.4. A map of the city where the DV is staying. 12.3.10.2.5. A dining guide for the installation and the nearest city. 12.3.10.2.6. Pamphlets on historical places of significance nearby (or in areas that the DV is interested). 12.3.10.2.7. Points of contact for the DV's visit to include home, office and fax numbers. 12.3.10.2.8. Place the welcome package in the DV's room before arrival. If the nature of the visit does not include an overnight stay, then include necessary information for

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the visit on the itinerary. Established a standard for welcome packages and then adjust based on the circumstances of each visit. 12.3.10.3. Physical Security Considerations. 12.3.10.3.1. Notify Security Forces (SF) or the Office of Special Investigations (OSI), in advance and in writing, when a DV visits an installation. Whether SF or OSI or both are notified of a DV's visit, depends primarily on the rank of the DV and/or the force protection level (FPCON) which exists at the installation during the visit. In some cases, a DV visit may be postponed or canceled based on FPCON. In the notification, include all pertinent facts concerning the DV and the places he or she plans to visit. Include SF and/or OSI should be on the list of personnel/organizations to be notified for last minute changes. 12.3.10.3.2. For DV visits which include international dignitaries, high ranking officials from a foreign government, or high ranking U.S. government officials, protocol staff may require coordination with both personal security agents as well as local agencies. These individuals may insist on keeping weapons on their person, even in restricted or controlled areas. Pre-coordination with the installation commander, security officials, and custodians of restricted areas being visited is critical. With an agenda that includes public appearances, be aware of the type of facility being utilized and whether or not it will be acceptable from a security standpoint. Seating arrangements may not follow accepted protocol guidance, but rather designed for physical safety of the DV in relation to the layout of the facility. 12.3.10.4. Classification and Clearance Requirements. If the DV will receive classified briefings or tours, be aware of established procedures for ensuring the DV has the appropriate clearance to receive the briefings. The DV’s Special Security Officer (SSO) or security manager and the installation counterpart should coordinate. For standard classified briefings, obtain the DV's clearance information from the OPR and hand carry it during those briefings. 12.3.10.5. Publicity. If military or civilian press coverage for a DV visit is appropriate, contact the Public Affairs office and/or photographic laboratory. In cases where a senior DV travels with his or her own Public Affairs representative, that individual will handle all publicity arrangements through the local Public Affairs Office. If press coverage is anticipated during a visit, check with the DV beforehand to determine his or her desires regarding publicity. It is important to specify the type of media to be used. Request photographic coverage of a DV visit by submitting AF Form 833, Multimedia Work Order, to the installation photographic laboratory in advance of the visit dates. 12.3.10.6. Transportation. Planning DV transportation from point A to point B may require several vehicles, drivers and escort officers or the requirement may be as simple as escorting one DV visitor from his or her room, to a meeting location, and then to a point of departure. In either case, develop a transportation plan. The plan should answer the who, what, when, where and how (and sometimes why) questions. 12.4. International Dignitaries. All international visits to the United States require advance coordination and approval. These visits are usually sponsored by the service chiefs or the Joint Chiefs of Staff with an executive agent assigned to coordinate local support and itineraries from

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facilities or installations being visited. The Secretary of the Air Force International Affairs Office (SAF/IA) is the only approval authority for international visits to Air Force installations per AFPD 16-1, International Affairs. Approval for both the visit and level of disclosure of classified information must come in writing through official international channels. For selfinvited visitors, the international visitor requesting the visit initiates the request through his or her respective embassy's air attaché office. The embassy forwards an official request to SAF/IA. Details will include the level of classification, action officer, requested briefings, and protocol involvement. The SecAF makes the final determination for approval of the visit. 12.4.1. The courtesy extended these DVs, whether military or civilian, is based on relative rank. When planning an international DV’s itinerary utilize distinctive local resources to vary the guests' exposure to American forms of entertainment. Local Air Force Association and civic organizations are often willing to help entertain visiting dignitaries. 12.4.2. International DVs are usually accompanied by one or more aides of their own armed service who are destined for future positions of authority in their own country. They often form lasting impressions about the United States based on the treatment accorded them as members of a visiting party. Provide special attention to their transportation, dining, and recreational arrangements. When possible, provide lodging for the visiting international DV's U.S. escort officer in the same building as the foreign dignitary and include the officer in the events scheduled for the dignitary. If limited space precludes the escort's inclusion in certain social events, make other provisions for the escort's meals. 12.4.3. Consider the cultural background of visiting international DVs and accommodate, whenever possible, individual religious preferences and food or beverage restrictions. At a minimum, living accommodations should be single rooms in hotels and in lodging; make room assignments based on their status as members of a dignitary's party rather than individual rank. 12.4.4. When possible, provide an escort for an international spouse, taking into consideration any language barrier that may exist, his/her age, and position. Utilize officers or service wives as escorts whose language capabilities, travel, or position make them valuable to the guest. For officially sponsored visits, interpreters for both the DV and spouse will be part of the official party. 12.4.5. While it is preferable to invite persons of comparable stature or rank to a dinner or small party, some variety may improve a larger function such as a reception. Try to include visitors of the same national origin as the guest of honor as well as a representative selection of junior officers. 12.4.6. Notification to Installations of International Distinguished Visitors. HQ USAF usually notifies installations scheduled for foreign dignitary visits at least two weeks prior. The notification, tour letter or message, is for planning purposes and usually includes the name, rank, and position of the visitors. Other details may include English language proficiency; clearance instructions; specific equipment in the hands of foreign government; and any particular fields of interest to the visitor. Biographical sketches are furnished, when available, in addition to a complete itinerary for the entire tour.

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12.4.7. Itineraries for International Distinguished Visitors. The itinerary is usually based upon the suggestions of the USAF representative in the country concerned and is compiled in a manner to serve USAF interests at home and abroad. 12.4.8. HQ USAF Escort Officer. International dignitaries visiting Air Force installations under the auspices of the USAF are usually accompanied by an Air Force escort officer. Whenever possible, the escort officer is chosen from those officers currently in training for assignment to the attaché or mission system in the country concerned. Solicit the advice of the escort officer on any phase of the local itinerary that needs clarification. He or she is usually the "paying agent" for the visit and will reimburse authorized expenses. 12.4.9. Entertainment of International Distinguished Visitors. Tour funding for international dignitaries is usually the responsibility of the sponsoring agency. The funds provided correspond with the rank of the visitor and objective of the tour. 12.4.9.1. Historically, visitors prefer small dinner parties to cocktail parties as a means of entertainment. 12.4.9.2. International visitors prefer small, intimate gatherings rather than large groups composed of members of the staff and subordinate organizations. 12.4.9.3. International visitors are often interested in the home life of American people and may appreciate an invitation into the commander’s home for entertainment. 12.4.9.4. International visitors enjoy joining base functions that have not been planned particularly for them, e.g., picnics and barbecues where sport clothing may be worn. 12.4.9.5. Provide international visitors time for shopping and an opportunity to visit local points of economic, historical, and scenic interest such as ranches, farms, museums, and parks. Anticipate a visit to the installation's exchange. Coordinate beforehand with the exchange manager as part of the contingency planning. 12.4.9.6. The local escort officer must ensure all entertainment expenses remain within the limit established in the tour letter. The cost of quarters and rations are not included in these funds and are paid separately by the sponsoring agency escort officer. Provide the escort officer a complete itemized bill in sufficient time to enable him/her to pay prior to departure and guest lists for each function arranged for the visitor. 12.4.10. Project Officers for International Distinguished Visitors. Like domestic visits, a local project officer or escort officer is appointed to accompany the sponsoring agency escort officer and the international visitors during the tour of the installation. The local project officer is available for necessary liaison between the sponsoring agency escort officer and the installation authorities. 12.4.11. Briefings for International Distinguished Visitors. Coordinate with the local Foreign Disclosure office in advance to determine the level of classification that may be briefed to the international DVs. Provide hard copies to the Foreign Disclosure office to assist in determining this level of classification. Many international visitors visiting Air Force installations understand English only when it is spoken slowly and simply. Their English language proficiency and other pertinent data are available in the biographical sketch provided by the agency issuing the basic invitation. Unless the international visitor is fluent in the English language, briefing personnel should refrain from using complex words or

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 sentences. Avoid the use of acronyms or abbreviations. Use simplified organization charts and avoid complex visual aids. Briefings should focus primarily on the mission and operations. 12.4.12. Accommodations for International Distinguished Visitors. Provide international dignitaries with suitable distinguished visitor accommodations on the installation and needed transportation. If a visit extends over a weekend, consider accommodations in the nearest city to provide a feel for the American way or life. In most cases, the letter from the sponsoring agency will indicate the type of accommodations provided to international dignitaries. 12.4.13. Press and Photographic Coverage for International Distinguished Visitors. Contact the local Public Affairs office for guidance. The initial release is made by sponsoring agency and followed with whatever coverage the local information services officer considers appropriate. Careful consideration should be given to the wishes of the visiting international dignitary. If photographic support is required for an international DV visit, submit AF Form 833 to the installation's photographic laboratory in advance. Pay close attention to “who, when, what, and where” concerning the photographs taken in order to identify persons and activities when the photographs are developed.

12.5. Execution. Execution is the most crucial aspect of a DV visit. Protocol office staff ensures the DV stays on schedule in accordance with the published itinerary. Verbally “dry run” the itinerary with a co-worker concentrating on what could go wrong and how to address the situation. The following outlines additional factors to consider for a successful visit. 12.5.1. Communications Support. 12.5.1.1. Double and triple check to ensure all supporting agencies received any last minute changes. It is important to communicate with follow-on locations in the itinerary when there is an unexpected delay that will affect the schedule. Carry a phone at all times during a DV visit. The host or commander relies on protocol staff to update the arrival or departure time of the DV for greeting and farewell purposes. 12.5.1.2. Ensure all personnel or organizations participating in the DV visit have the most current copy of the itinerary once the visit begins, to include the DV’s driver. Providing biographical sketches of the DV, proper uniform for the DV's visit and purpose of the DV's visit are often the most requested pieces of information by general and flag officers responsible for greeting, hosting, or a farewell. 12.5.1.3. Leave a copy of the itinerary back at the office while the DV visit is in progress, so that official personnel can make contact in the event of an emergency or answer questions regarding the current status of the visit. 12.5.2. Contingencies. The itinerary is a living document, and even after publication and distribution, often changes; be prepared for contingencies. Suggested items to carry while on a DV visit include: extra copies of the itinerary, extra copies of seating charts, extra 1, 2, 3, and 4 star table name cards and a calligraphy pen, listing of all phone numbers used on a daily basis, small generic memento(s) that can be presented on the spur of the moment, lint brush, chewing gum/breath mints, aspirin/antacid tablets, tissues, note paper, envelopes, stamps, extra pens, command letterhead, envelopes and an extra phone battery. Contingency

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examples include transportation problems, early or late arrival/departure, medical emergency, dental emergency, etc. 12.5.3. Greet and Farewell. 12.5.3.1. Failure to properly greet or farewell a DV can set the wrong tone for the rest of a visit or ruin what was an excellent visit. Usually a general officer, flag officer, or civilian equivalent is greeted and sent-off by a general officer, flag officer, or civilian equivalent that is commensurate in rank to the visitor. At installations with no general or flag officers assigned, the commander or vice commander greets distinguished visitors. When the DV arrives or departs with a spouse, it is appropriate for the greeting/farewell party to include a spouse. Protocol is responsible to make sure the greeting/farewell party is in the correct location, at the correct time, in the appropriate dress, and provided the DV's biographical sketch and itinerary in advance. Be prepared to introduce the parties, know first names or nicknames of individuals concerned, and/or know customs particular to the visitor’s country. 12.5.3.2. Be informed of possible differences in policy between a greet and farewell at a military installation versus a commercial terminal, the difference between the DV being on official business versus leave, or the difference between the DV being retired or on active duty. The installation commander will normally make those decisions. 12.5.4. Honor Guard or Cordon. In general, honors and ceremonies are reserved for the President, Vice President, statutory appointees, general or flag officers of the U.S. military, international dignitaries occupying positions comparable to these U.S. officials, regardless of rank, and for occasions that such ceremonies promote international goodwill. 12.5.4.1. Distinguished persons, who are entitled to honors, are listed in AFI 34-1201, Attachment 2. This table includes those honors prescribed for statutory civilian and military officials of the Department of Defense and does not apply to Civil Service Employees. The intent of honors is to extend a mark of courtesy to a distinguished person (honors will be accorded only to the distinguished person him or herself and not to his or her personal representatives). Honors are accorded to an individual rather than a group. A committee or delegation is honored in the person of the senior or ranking member. 12.5.4.2. Unless otherwise directed, full honors must be accorded the President of the United States when he arrives at or departs from any Air Force installation, regardless of the day or hour. Except for the President, honors are not accorded between retreat and reveille, on Sundays, or on national holidays (except Armed Forces and Independence Day), unless the officer directing the honors believes the occasion requires an exception. A distinguished person arriving at an Air Force installation at a time honors are not accorded may be honored at a later time if he or she desires it. When two or more persons entitled to honors arrive or depart from an installation at the same time, only the senior receives honors. If they arrive or depart successively, honors are paid to each in turn, except that a senior visitor must be notified before the installation accords honors to a junior visitor. Any official or officer holding two or more positions (civilian or military), any one of which entitles him or her to honors, receives only the honors due the highest grade; he or she is not honored in more than one capacity.

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12.6. Post-Visit. 12.6.1. Reporting Requirements. Once the DV's aircraft departs, provide the DV's office with departure time and expected arrival time at the next destination. Update the Protocol offices’ visitor database (if utilized) with the following topics: title of visit; visitor's full name and nickname, visitor's rank/grade or equivalency, branch of service of visitor, visitor's organization; title of visitor; country; military or civilian status; date of visit; number of days; number in party; command or organization visited; general or flag officers called on; meals served; command or organization that hosted visitor; mementos received from visitor (by whom and on behalf of, reported as required); mementos presented to visitor (by whom and on behalf of); accommodation location; welcome note provided and any significant comments or lessons learned. This information will provide a synopsis of the DV's last visit and reference should another visit occur in the future. 12.6.2. Letters of Appreciation. An important aspect of a DV visit is to recognize the effort and achievement of personnel who worked hard to make the DV's visit successful. The Protocol office should provide recognition in writing as appropriate (i.e. a letter of appreciation signed by the installation commander).

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Chapter 13 CONFERENCES 13.1. Introduction. This chapter provides a guide to preparing for, executing and documenting conferences. 13.2. Planning Factors. 13.2.1. Select a date for the conference early, based on the host's availability (and the availability of high-level guests or participants) and the availability of conference facilities. De-conflict with other major activities in the community that might make it difficult to obtain quarters during the conference. 13.2.2. The commander should appoint an OPR for the conference. If a professional society or organization is co-hosting the event, clear lines of authority and responsibility are critical planning factors. Assign responsibility for tasks to specific individuals and develop milestones for accomplishing these tasks. The staff judge advocate’s office should review plans to provide government resources in support of conferences that include professional societies or non-government organizations. 13.2.3. Determine the agenda and major social events (dinners, formal luncheons, entertainment, guest speakers, locations, meal and other costs, etc.) and reserve additional facilities as needed. Determine uniform and dress requirements. Identify and determine communication requirements (i.e., on call person to provide laptop support, secure phone support in lodging, internet access, etc.). Determine the total cost to charge each attendee (factor in all conference materials, speaker fees, refreshments, and meals.). Determine types of funding authorized and prepare funds requests in advance as required. Hotel/accommodation charges are normally the responsibility of the attendee for Air Force sponsored conferences. 13.2.4. Determine spouse attendance early on and include the results of this in any initial information papers alerting the command to the conference. For questions regarding spouse travel, contact the MAJCOM transportation office. 13.2.5. Publicize early. Distribute registration information at least eight weeks prior to the event. If available, utilize a web page or SharePoint site with conference information that includes a registration process that posts data to a conference database. As appropriate, distribute a brochure or email with the agenda and proposed guest speakers (After confirming tentative speaker availability). 13.2.6. Professional society or organizational conferences may have a mixture of contractors and military attendees. Conference planners need to determine security clearance requirements and methods for passing clearances; include these with the registration instructions. 13.2.7. If POV parking is limited at the conference site, plan for transportation of conference attendees from hotels to the conference location if POV; reserve resources as required. 13.2.8. Coordinate escort officers for participating DVs. As appropriate, develop separate DV itineraries for visits to the installation or courtesy calls with the commander.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 13.2.9. Arrange for and train escort officers on their duties and responsibilities. We suggest assigning each escort officer a single DV, and task them to work with the DV's office on travel and other arrangements.

13.3. Intermediate Stages (Two to Three Weeks Out). 13.3.1. Train selected escort officers if DVs will attend or participate. Refer to Attachment 5 for an escort officer guide. 13.3.2. Confirm social arrangements Protocol is responsible for to include facility reservations, menus (and prices) and entertainment. Develop inclement weather plans as backup for outside activities that are canceled due to bad weather (i.e., afternoon golf matches rained or snowed out). 13.3.3. Confirm the list of invitees and required administrative support for the conference (nametags, conference material, etc.) 13.4. Final Stages (One to Two Weeks Out). Begin confirming all earlier coordination. 13.4.1. Confirm DV participation, itineraries (to include any inclement weather plans), and escort officer responsibilities (office calls, briefings, etc.). 13.4.2. Confirm lodging, transportation, meal, and entertainment arrangements. 13.4.3. Draft seating plans as needed. (Table seating arrangements are addressed in Attachment 2). To facilitate making last minute changes without affecting the entire seating plan, consider arranging seating by position rather than rank. 13.4.4. Complete all administrative or computer-generated support items (nametags, name cards, programs, seating diagrams, table plans, parking signs, etc.). Consider space allocation for a protocol command post and a separate work area for visiting support staff. 13.4.5. Confirm who will greet/host/farewell all attending DVs and provide this information to escort officers. 13.4.6. Verify all arrangements for mementos, plaques, flag set-up for speakers or honored guests, master of ceremonies, biographies, and introductions. 13.4.7. Confirm all security arrangements to include parking and nametags or passes needed for any restricted area. Verify who will handle classified material and where it will be stored. Finally, confirm arrangements for secure telephone or systems support required specifically for the conference. 13.4.8. Confirm all other audiovisual support (presentation rooms, TV/DVD players, computers, etc.). The OPR/host will set and announce any format requirements for presentation products. 13.4.9. Confirm planned light refreshments for breaks and/or working sessions. 13.5. Just Prior. 13.5.1. Plan for last minute attendee changes or cancellations. Develop a contingency plan for changes to travel plans, MILAIR cancellations, changes to commercial air arrivals and changes to ground transportation.

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13.5.2. The OPR/host should make any required weather decisions early on. Do not cancel any inclement weather arrangements until sure they will not be needed. 13.5.3. Determine greeter schedule to match DV arrivals. Remind greeters to plan accordingly for early or late MILAIR arrival and brief them on aircraft parking procedures. Remind greeters of any ground transportation plans and location of the nearest telephone or restroom. 13.5.4. Verify vehicles are clean, inspected, and ready to go with drivers who are familiar with the sequence of events. Ensure drivers are familiar with their vehicle (trunk release, door locks, safety items, etc). Provide DV vehicles with a star plate as appropriate. Confirm conference-specific parking signs are in place. Allow extra time for travel by bus, if used, and discuss any routing or parking arrangements of concern with the driver. 13.5.5. Confirm all accommodations are checked and ready (welcome notes/packets, telephones, mementos or welcome baskets (if appropriate), building maps to locate other attendees. etc.). 13.5.6. Determine classified storage availability with the OPR. 13.5.7. Verify all administrative support items are complete and ready for issue. 13.5.8. Triple check escort officers. If possible, have a spare escort and vehicle available to assist with unexpected DV arrivals. 13.6. During Conference. 13.6.1. Assist the OPR/host as required. Be available to assist DVs a needed. 13.6.2. Replenish refreshments as necessary. 13.6.3. Be flexible and handle changes in a calm professional manner. 13.7. After Conference. 13.7.1. Capture lessons learned and any historical data of importance to the Protocol office within 72 hours (list of actual attendees, mementos presented, survey responses, receipts for official expenditures, etc.). 13.7.2. Distribute letters of appreciation and “thank-you” notes as appropriate.

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Chapter 14 MILITARY CEREMONIES 14.1. Ceremony General Management. 14.1.1. Uniforms. The event project officer should determine the uniform combination as far in advance as possible. 14.1.2. Event Location. The project officer will confirm reservation of facilities or location by the funding unit. Location should be chosen with careful consideration for parking accessibility, seating capacity, and military appropriateness. 14.1.2.1. Ramp Freeze/Quiet Hours. If appropriate to the ceremony, coordinate a request with Airfield management for a ramp freeze or quiet hours. 14.1.3. Officiating Official. The officiating official of a retirement, promotion, or award ceremony should be the first appropriate individual in the honoree’s chain of command, officer or senior civilian. The officiating official should be higher in grade to the honoree. It is not appropriate for enlisted members to officiate a ceremony. If the honoree desires someone other than the first appropriate individual in the chain, the honoree should discuss this with his or her supervisor. An SES or GS may officiate at all ceremonies with the exception of enlistment/reenlistment and initial commission ceremonies for officers. These ceremonies require an active, reserve, guard or retired officer to officiate. As an officiating official, an SES or GS may administer the oath of office when it is purely ceremonial in nature. Ensure General Officers or SESs with a participating role in the ceremony, which are neither the hosts nor just guests (i.e. making remarks, presenting a medal, etc.), are included in the official party. Personal or positional colors should be posted and musical honors played for the highest rank of the person in the official party, even if not the host. 14.1.4. Invitations. When required, the event project officer should send out invitations to allow sufficient time for attendees to R.s.v.p. for the event. 14.1.5. Programs. As appropriate, the event project officer should have programs produced for the ceremony in accordance with funding guidelines. 14.1.6. Briefings. The event project officer should conduct a briefing with the presiding official and honoree to review all aspects of the ceremony prior to the ceremony. It is recommended that the briefings take place approximately thirty days prior to the ceremony. 14.1.7. Flags may be pre-posted for most events if resources or stage space is limited. 14.1.8. Music is not a requirement for a ceremony, but if appropriate and available, may be used to add decorum to the ceremony 14.1.8.1. “Arrival Fanfare” is played while the official party is in motion; musical honors for general officers and above (“Ruffles and Flourishes”, etc.) are rendered once the official party is in position in front of their chairs. “Ruffles and Flourishes” is not played while the party is in motion; however, it may be done so for the President. 14.1.8.2. When the presiding official of a ceremony is a retired general officer, musical honors are played only if the presiding officer is in uniform.

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14.1.8.3. When the presiding official of a ceremony is an SES, musical honors are not played. 14.1.8.4. During musical honors, while customary for those in attendance to face the general officer, it is not necessary for persons standing immediately beside the general officer to face in his or her direction. 14.1.8.5. During outdoor ceremonies, and when musical honors are rendered, military members in uniform face and salute the person being honored. The person for whom the honors are rendered also salutes (as a symbolic gesture of “returning” the salute). 14.1.9. Any official or unofficial gathering of military and civilians that includes a meal as part of the activity (awards ceremony, dining in or out, farewell/retirement dinners, etc), may include Comrades at Arms and/or POW/MIA tables/ceremonies. While there is the option for POW/MIA and Comrades At Arms tables/ceremonies, there can be either, both, or neither based on the desires/concurrence of the local and/or hosting commander. 14.1.9.1. The POW/MIA table/ and Comrades At Arms tables are separate entities; do not combine them. 14.1.9.2. If a POW/MIA table is incorporated into an event, the official script must be used. 14.1.9.3. A Comrades at Arms table will include a written tribute to remind the audience of the courage, sacrifice and service of men and women currently serving in harm's way, both at home and abroad, and in troubled areas of the world. A “Comrades at Arms” script should be generic in nature, not referring to any one person or group on a personal level. 14.1.10. Floral presentations may be made on behalf of all the men and women of the Air Force or by the honoree during ceremonies. Typically, the honoree or the office of the honoree pays for flowers. 14.1.11. Receiving Lines. A receiving line usually includes the U.S. Flag, USAF Flag, and general officer’s personal colors or a Senior Executive Service member’s individual flag. The honoree stands in front of the flags and receives guests first, followed by the spouse. Additional family members are not recommended in receiving lines in order to prevent line stagnation. 14.1.12. Ceremony Pre-brief. Prior to any ceremony, provide the official party and spouses with a summary of the sequence of events. Detail their movements to familiarize them with the entire event. 14.1.13. While General Officers and SES are entitled to personal/positional colors (PCs) and musical honors (for civilian positions listed in attachment 2 of AFI 34-1201) for any event they participating in, its Air Force tradition the PCs and musical honors are not posted or played at breakfasts, luncheons, and dinners. PCs are posted and musical honors are played only at ceremonies. However, if the event is a combination of both (i.e. Dining-In/Out and Graduation Dinner), then PCs are posted and musical honors played. 14.1.14. The Sequences of Events listed in the following ceremonies are approved by the Air Force.

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14.2. Military Funerals. 14.2.1. General. The USAF Honor Guard or the Base Honor Guard under the provisions of AFI 34-242, Mortuary Affairs Program, typically conducts military funerals. 14.2.2. Dress. Military attendees of a military funeral must wear service dress uniforms with flight or service cap. All attendees should be prepared to wear appropriate inclement weather apparel during poor weather (i.e. overcoat, raincoat, black gloves, scarf, etc.). Funeral attire for civilians should be subdued in color and for females, a limited amount of bare skin displayed. 14.2.3. Flyovers are conducted under the provisions of AFI 34-242. 14.2.4. Universally accepted etiquette at a cemetery includes speaking quietly, refraining from stepping on graves and not intruding on mourners. Uniformed personnel must, and veterans not in uniform may if they desire, salute whenever the casket or urn is moved - from the hearse, from the house of worship, and at the interment site. A salute is also rendered during military funeral honors. 14.2.5. Funeral Service. Upon the request of the next of kin, a service may be held before the military funeral followed by a procession to the funeral gravesite. Unit or family representatives are responsible for conducting these services. High-ranking military and government officials may be invited, but it is important to remember that this is a time focused on family and friends. The wishes of the next-of-kin are paramount. 14.2.5.1. At the request of the family, a family representative may work closely with the Chaplain and Honor Guard to ensure a smooth flow of events and guidance to guests. The family representative or ushers may ensure that a sufficient number of seats on the right front of the chapel/house of worship are reserved for the immediate family, who are seated before the casket or urn is taken in. The front pew(s) on the left are typically reserved for honorary pallbearers if needed. If pallbearers are used to carry the casket or urn into position inside the chapel/house of worship, seats are typically reserved for them at the rear. 14.2.5.2. High ranking military or government officials are greeted as guests and shown or directed to a seat along with other guests. It is not typical to reserve seating at a service for attendees other than for family and honorary pallbearers. 14.2.5.3. If a procession to the gravesite will follow the service, a family representative may help direct guests to follow the hearse and family member vehicles. At the graveside, if there are seats for family, the family representative may help guide family members to them and invite other guests to gather around the family. 14.2.6. Remains Arrival. When remains of the deceased arrive and pass before military personnel those in uniform salute, unless walking, until the remains are stationary. Civilians should place their right hand over their heart during the movement of remains, unless walking. 14.2.7. Funeral Military Honors. The three volleys fired by the firing party and Taps played by the bugler are considered military honors. Both military and civilians attending the funeral service will rise for military honors and be seated at the conclusion of military honors. Military members will render the hand salute from the beginning of the firing

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sequence until the conclusion of Taps. Civilians place their right hand over their heart during military honors. 14.2.7.1. Personal Colors. For funerals honoring general officers, their personal colors are present. During the ceremony, the honor guard will furl and case the personal colors. This is the only instance when personal colors are furled and cased. 14.3. Individual Retirements. 14.3.1. General. Recognition upon retirement is a long-standing tradition of military service. Commanders ensure members leave with a tangible expression of appreciation for their contributions to the Air Force and its mission, and with the assurance they will continue to be a part of the Air Force family in retirement. Since retirement ceremonies are ceremonial in nature, SES/GS individuals may act as the presiding official. Enlisted members may not officiate a retirement ceremony. Consult AFI 36-3203, Service Retirements, for retirement planning details. 14.3.2. Sequence of Events. The following is the approved sequence of events for indoor retirement ceremonies. The order of the remarks by the speakers may be adjusted as desired by the host of the ceremony. Bolded items are general officer specific; italicized items are optional. Outdoor retirement ceremonies are occasionally conducted in conjunction with parades. See Air Force Manual 36-2203, Drill and Ceremonies, for further guidance on outdoor retirements. If more than one individual is retiring in the same ceremony, retirement order is by rank, highest to lowest. However, if awards are being presented, retirements are conducted in order of awards being presented IAW this instruction, paragraph 14.9.3, rule for ease of ceremony movement. (For example, a Master Sergeant receiving a higher award than a Major is retired first.) SEQUENCE OF EVENTS: OPENING NARRATION ARRIVAL FANFARE MUSICAL HONORS COLORS NATIONAL ANTHEM INVOCATION REMARKS BY PRESIDING OFFICIAL MEDAL PRESENTATION READING OF RETIREMENT ORDER RETIREMENT CERTIFICATE PRESENTATION UNITED STATES FLAG PRESENTATION AIR FORCE RETIRED LAPEL BUTTON LETTERS PRESENTATION SPOUSE CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION PRESENTATION FLOWER PRESENTATION REMARKS BY HONOREE CLOSING NARRATION AIR FORCE SONG DEPARTURE

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 SEQUENCE OF EVENTS FOR RETIREMENT AND CHANGE OF COMMAND: OPENING NARRATION ARRIVAL FANFARE MUSICAL HONORS COLORS NATIONAL ANTHEM INVOCATION REMARKS BY PRESIDING OFFICIAL REMARKS BY OUTGOING COMMANDER FORMATION RENDERS LAST SALUTE CHANGE OF COMMAND REMARKS BY INCOMING COMMANDER FORMATION RENDERS FIRST SALUTE MEDAL PRESENTATION READING OF RETIREMENT ORDER RETIREMENT CERTIFICATE PRESENTATION UNITED STATES FLAG PRESENTATION AIR FORCE RETIRED LAPEL BUTTON LETTERS PRESENTATION SPOUSE CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION PRESENTATION FLOWER PRESENTATION REMARKS BY HONOREE CLOSING NARRATION AIR FORCE SONG DEPARTURE 14.3.3. Flag Furling and Casing. The furling and casing of personal colors is not authorized at retirement ceremonies. The personal colors of general officers remain active after retirement and displayed at the appropriate times (See AFI 34-1201, Chapter 2). Furling and casing of a general officer‘s or SES member‘s personal flag is not appropriate during a retirement ceremony as it is symbolic of the death of the individual. For general officers, furling and casing of the personal colors is performed at the conclusion of the funeral. 14.3.4. A retirement ceremony is a military ceremony; other types of tributes such as videos, dramatic flag folding or passing (other than the AF-approved standard, defined in AFI 341201, Attachment 4), gift presentations from various groups or individuals should be conducted during informal activities surrounding a retirement ceremony (i.e. reception, dinner, or luncheon) instead of the official ceremony.

14.4. Promotion Ceremony. 14.4.1. General. Promotions are significant events in the lives of military people. Commanders and supervisors are responsible for ensuring their people receive proper recognition. Since promotion ceremonies are ceremonial in nature, SES/GS individuals may act as the presiding official, to include administering the oath of office, except for initial commissioning ceremonies. Enlisted members may not officiate a promotion ceremony.

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14.4.2. Sequence of Events. The following is an approved sequence of events for an indoor promotion ceremony. The order of the remarks by the speakers may be adjusted as desired by the host of the ceremony. Bolded items are general officer specific; italicized items are optional. Promotion ceremonies are typically held indoors. SEQUENCE OF EVENTS: OPENING NARRATION ARRIVAL FANFARE MUSICAL HONORS COLORS NATIONAL ANTHEM INVOCATION REMARKS BY PRESIDING OFFICIAL PROMOTION ORDER PINNING OF INSIGNIA OATH OF OFFICE UNFURLING OF PERSONAL FLAG REMARKS BY HONOREE CLOSING NARRATION AIR FORCE SONG DEPARTURE RECEPTION 14.4.3. Group Promotions. descending rank order.

Multiple promotion ceremonies should be sequenced in

14.4.4. Personal Colors. At the discretion of the host or honoree, there are three options for presenting the new personal colors. 14.4.4.1. Option 1. During a general officer’s promotion, their personal colors are present. During the ceremony for promotion to Major General and above, the honor guard will retrieve the previous rank personal colors and discreetly exit the room, additional honor guard members then uncase and unfurl the new rank personal colors. 14.4.4.2. Option 2. In this sequence, the new personal colors (the new rank personal colors) and the previous personal colors (the old rank personal colors) are both used. Two personal colors bearers march in side by side (space permitting). The new personal colors bearer halts two paces to the right side and slightly in front of the official party. The previous personal colors bearer continues marching to retrieve the previous personal colors from its posted position with the displayed flags, then returns to a position to the left of the honoree facing the new personal colors bearer. Upon halting, the personal colors bearers drop both personal colors simultaneously to a position parallel to the ground with the previous personal colors nearest the official party. As the previous personal colors are furled and cased, the new personal colors are unfurled simultaneously. A third person may be used to uncase the new personal colors. Both personal colors bearers then bring them back to the vertical position, the previous personal colors bearer exits the room and the new personal colors bearer posts the new personal colors next to the displayed flags.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 14.4.4.3. Option 3. In this sequence, the new personal colors are furled, cased, and preposted. The honor guard marches in side by side (space permitting). One honor guard member posts forward of the official party while the second member retrieves the new personal colors then moves forward to the first member. The new personal colors are lowered, uncased, and unfurled. The new personal colors are then raised. The honor guard member with the flag marches into place behind and between the official party as the other member departs. The honor guard member presents the new personal colors to the officiating officer who then presents to the honoree. The honoree passes the personal colors back to the honor guard member who then re-posts the personal colors next to the displayed flags and departs. 14.4.5. Oath of Office (from AFI 36-2501, Officer Promotions and Selective Continuation).

“I, (NAME), having been appointed a (grade in which appointed), United States Air Force, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter, so help me God.” 14.5. Change of Command. 14.5.1. General. The primary purpose of a change of command ceremony is to allow subordinates to witness the formality of command change from one officer to another. The ceremony should be official, formal, brief and conducted with great dignity. 14.5.2. For SES/GS individuals participating in these ceremonies, substitute the word “Leadership” for “Command” on all items (i.e. invitations, script). SES/GS cannot command and do not salute. Statements such as “Sir /Ma’am, I relinquish leadership.” should be substituted in the script. 14.5.3. Sequence of Events. This is an approved sequence of events for indoor change of command ceremonies. The order of the remarks by the speakers may be adjusted as desired by the host of the ceremony. Bolded items are general officer specific; italicized items are optional. SEQUENCE OF EVENTS: OPENING NARRATION ARRIVAL FANFARE MUSICAL HONORS COLORS NATIONAL ANTHEM INVOCATION REMARKS BY PRESIDING OFFICER AWARD PRESENTATION REMARKS BY OUTGOING COMMANDER FORMATION RENDERS LAST SALUTE CHANGE OF COMMAND REMARKS BY INCOMING COMMANDER FORMATION RENDERS FIRST SALUTE

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CLOSING NARRATION AIR FORCE SONG DEPARTURE RECEPTION 14.5.4. Flag/Guidon Exchange. The flag/guidon is exchanged during the change of command as a symbolic gesture providing a tangible view of the command authority being transferred from one commander to the next. The sequence for the exchange begins with three participants standing abreast, from left to right as viewed from the audience, presiding officer, outgoing commander, and incoming commander. A fourth participant, the flag/guidon bearer, takes a position behind and between the presiding officer and outgoing commander. The flag/guidon bearer gives a subdued command, (Officers, Center); the presiding officer executes a left face while the two commanders execute a right face. The outgoing commander salutes the presiding officer, while stating, “Sir/Ma’am, I relinquish command.” The presiding officer returns salute. The outgoing commander takes the flag/guidon from the flag/guidon bearer, holding the flag and angling the top of flag towards the head of the flag/guidon bearer, and presents it to the presiding officer with presiding officer hands on top. The outgoing commander takes one step to the right, two steps back and one step to the left; simultaneously, the incoming commander takes two steps forward, taking the outgoing commander’s place. The presiding officer presents the flag/guidon to the incoming commander who firmly receives the flag/guidon and passes it to the flag/guidon bearer. The incoming commander salutes the presiding officer, while stating, “Sir/Ma’am, I assume command.” The presiding officer returns the salute. The flag/guidon bearer gives a subdued command, (Officers, Post). All three officers face forward. 14.5.5. Assumption of Command. Assumption of command ceremonies occur when there is a time lapse between the departure of a commander and the arrival of a new commander. An assumption of command sequence is identical to a change of command sequence, with the obvious omission of the award presentation and outgoing commander’s remarks. The flag/guidon exchange sequence varies from a change of command. The presiding officer and incoming commander face the audience. The flag/guidon bearer takes a position behind and between the presiding officer and the commander. The flag/guidon bearer gives a subdued command, (Officers, Center); the presiding officer executes a left face while the incoming commander executes a right face. The incoming commander salutes the presiding officer and states, “Sir/Ma’am, I assume command.” The presiding officer returns salute. The presiding officer takes the flag/guidon from the flag/guidon bearer and, holding the flag and angling top of the flag towards the head of flag/guidon bearer, presents it to the incoming commander who firmly receives it and passes it to the flag/guidon bearer. The flag/guidon bearer gives a subdued command, (Officers, Post). Both officers face forward. 14.5.6. Appointment to Command. Appointment to command ceremonies are executed the same as assumption of command ceremonies. Appointment to command differs from assumption of command only from a succession of command perspective. See AFI 51-604, Appointment to and Assumption of Command, for details. 14.5.7. Relinquishment of Command. There is no approved ceremony in the Air Force called a “Relinquishment of Command”, nor is there funding for such a ceremony. AFI 51604 and AFMAN 36-2203 make no reference to relinquishment of command. A ceremony

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 called or based on relinquishment of command (example “Celebration of Command”) will not be executed by Air Force personnel. 14.5.8. First Salute/Last Salute. The rendering of First Salute/Last Salute is quickly becoming an Air Force tradition and is appropriate during a Change of Command Ceremony. The First Salute/Last Salute is in keeping with the dignity and formality of the event and is more fitting for events where space is more limited. During the ceremony, Airmen in formation, given the appropriate command by the formation commander, will render a salute in place to show respect and appreciation to the outgoing commander through the commander’s last salute from the unit. At the appropriate time after the passing of the guidon or the assumption of command, Airmen in formation, given the appropriate command by the formation commander, will render a salute in place to show respect and recognition of their new commander through the commander’s first salute from the unit. The First Salute/Last Salute should be performed in lieu of the Inspection of Troops and Pass in Review for any Change of Command below Wing level and can be substituted for the Inspection of Troops and Pass in Review at any level at the discretion of the incoming and outgoing commanders.

14.6. Activation, Inactivation and Redesignation Ceremonies. 14.6.1. Activation (Reactivation)/Inactivation sequence of events. This is an approved sequence of events for activation/inactivation ceremonies. Bolded items are general officer specific; italicized items are optional. March On, Presentation of Command and Advancement of the Colors are outdoor ceremony specific. A reactivation ceremony is identical to an activation ceremony with only obvious changes to narration. SEQUENCE OF EVENTS: OPENING NARRATION MARCH ON DRESSING SEQUENCE PRESENTATION OF COMMAND ARRIVAL FANFARE MUSICAL HONORS ADVANCEMENT OF THE COLORS/NATIONAL ANTHEM INVOCATION REMARKS BY PRESIDING OFFICER AWARD PRESENTATION ACTIVATION/INACTIVATION ORGANIZATIONAL FLAG UNFURLING/FURLING POSTING OF THE COLORS REMARKS BY UNIT COMMANDER CLOSING NARRATION AIR FORCE SONG DEPARTURE RECEPTION 14.6.2. Flag/Guidon Exchange, Activation (Reactivation). The flag/guidon exchange sequence for an activation/reactivation ceremony begins immediately following the new flag unfurling, with the host and incoming commander facing the audience. The flag/guidon

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bearer takes a position behind and between presiding officer and commander. The flag/guidon bearer gives a subdued command, (Officers, Center); the presiding officer executes a left face while the incoming commander executes a right face. The incoming commander then salutes the presiding officer and states, “Sir/Ma’am, I assume command”. The presiding officer takes the flag/guidon from the flag/guidon bearer, holding the flag angled towards the flag/guidon bearer, and presents it to the incoming commander who firmly receives it and passes it to the flag/guidon bearer. The flag/guidon bearer gives a subdued command, (Officers, Post). Both officers face forward. 14.6.3. Flag/Guidon Exchange, Inactivation. The flag/guidon exchange sequence for an inactivation ceremony begins immediately before the flag furling with the presiding officer and commander facing the audience. The flag/guidon bearer takes a position behind and between the presiding officer and the commander. The flag/guidon bearer gives a subdued command, (Officers, Center); the presiding officer executes a left face while the outgoing commander executes a right face. The outgoing commander salutes the presiding officer while stating, “Sir/Ma’am, I relinquish command.”; the presiding officer returns salute. The outgoing commander takes the flag/guidon from the flag/guidon bearer, holding the flag angled towards the flag/guidon bearer, and presents it to presiding officer with presiding officer hands on top. The presiding officer gives the flag/guidon to the flag/guidon bearer, who prepares for the flag furling sequence. 14.6.4. Redesignation sequence of events. This is a traditional sequence of events for redesignation ceremonies. Bolded items are general officer specific; italicized items are optional. March On, Presentation of Command, and Advancement of the Colors are outdoor ceremony specific. OPENING REMARKS MARCH ON DRESSING SEQUENCE PRESENTATION OF COMMAND ARRIVAL FANFARE MUSICAL HONORS ADVANCEMENT OF THE COLORS/NATIONAL ANTHEM INVOCATION REMARKS BY PRESIDING OFFICER AWARD PRESENTATION REDESIGNATION ORGANIZATIONAL FLAG UNFURLING/FURLING POSTING OF THE COLORS REMARKS BY COMMANDER CLOSING REMARKS AIR FORCE SONG DEPARTURE RECEPTION 14.6.5. Flag furling/unfurling. At the discretion of the presiding officer, a flag furling (or unfurling) may be performed instead of simply removing and posting the flag/guidons. It is most appropriate to perform this sequence immediately after the redesignation is read. Two flag/guidon bearers march in side by side (space permitting), the new flag/guidon bearer halts

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 two paces to the side and slightly in front of the official party. The previous flag/guidon bearer continues marching to retrieve the previous flag/guidon from its posted position with the displayed flags, then returns to a position next to the new flag/guidon bearer. Upon halting, the flag/guidon bearers drop both flag/guidons simultaneously to a position parallel to the ground. As the previous flag/guidon is furled, the new flag/guidon is unfurled. A third person may be used to uncase the new guidon, then case the previous flag/guidon. Both flag/guidon bearers then bring the flag/guidons back to the vertical position, the previous flag/guidon bearer exits the room and the new flag/guidon bearer posts the new flag/guidon next to the displayed flags.

14.7. Re-enlistment Ceremony. 14.7.1. General. Unit commanders will honor all reenlistees through a dignified reenlistment ceremony. The airman may request any commissioned officer to perform the ceremony and may invite guests. The member's immediate family should be invited. This reinforces the fact that when a member makes a commitment to the Air Force, the family is also making a commitment. Any active duty, reserve, guard, or retired commissioned officer of the U.S. Armed Forces may perform the ceremony, which may be conducted in any place that lends dignity to the event. The U.S. flag must form a backdrop for the participants. Reenlistees and reenlisting officers must wear an authorized uniform for the ceremony. (EXCEPTION: The uniform requirement is optional for retired officers.) 14.7.2. Procedures. The core of the ceremony is the oath of enlistment. The oath is recited by the officer and repeated by the re-enlistee. The re-enlistee and the officer administering the oath must be physically collocated during the ceremony. Once completed, the officer congratulates the re-enlistee and invites the other attendees to do the same. Refreshments may be served. 14.7.3. Enlisted Oath. “I, (NAME), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, and that I will obey the orders of President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the uniform code of military justice—so help me God.” 14.8. Award Ceremony. 14.8.1. General. An award ceremony affords an opportunity to recognize a member's accomplishments. The commander or other official determines whether to present an award at a formal ceremony or to present it informally. Many units present awards during commander's call. Commanders and supervisors must ensure the presentation method reflects the significance of the award. 14.8.2. Sequence. This sequence can be used when an award presentation is made separately from a commander’s call. Bolded items are general officer specific; italicized items are optional. Due to the brevity of this variety of ceremony, all musical elements are optional and colors can be pre-posted. SEQUENCE OF EVENTS: OPENING NARRATION ARRIVAL FANFARE MUSICAL HONORS

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COLORS NATIONAL ANTHEM INVOCATION REMARKS BY PRESIDING OFFICIAL PRESENTATION OF AWARD REMARKS BY HONOREE (AT THE PRESIDING OFFICIAL’S DISCRETION) CLOSING NARRATION AIR FORCE SONG DEPARTURE RECEPTION 14.9. Decoration Ceremony. 14.9.1. General. Decoration ceremonies formally recognize service members for meritorious service, outstanding achievement, or heroism. A formal and dignified ceremony is necessary to preserve the integrity and value of decorations. When possible, the commander should personally present the decoration. Regardless of location, the ceremony should be conducted at the earliest possible date after approval of the decoration. All military participants and attendees wear the uniform specified by the host. If in doubt, the blue uniform rather than the airman battle uniform (ABU) is recommended. It is also proper for participating retired members to wear a uniform. At the commander's discretion, a photographer may take pictures during the ceremony. 14.9.2. Procedures. Although decoration ceremonies may differ slightly from one unit to another, they normally begin by announcing "ATTENTION TO ORDERS." All members in attendance stand at attention and face the commander and the recipient. The commander's assistant reads the citation while the commander and recipient stand at attention. After the reading of the citation, the commander and recipient face each other and the commander affixes the medal on the individual's uniform. The commander then extends personal congratulations and a handshake while presenting the decoration certificate. The recipient salutes the commander and the commander returns the salute to conclude the formal part of the ceremony. Attendees are then invited to personally congratulate the recipient and enjoy any refreshments provided. 14.9.3. Sequence. Bolded items are general officer specific; italicized items are optional. Due to the brevity of this variety of ceremony, all musical elements are optional and colors may be pre-posted. If multiple awards are being presented, ceremony order is by award from highest to lowest, not by rank of individual. If the same award is being presented, it should be completed by sequential number of the award (i.e. second oak leaf cluster is award before first oak leaf cluster). If everything is equal, then award by rank, highest rank first. SEQUENCE OF EVENTS: OPENING NARRATION ARRIVAL FANFARE MUSICAL HONORS ADVANCEMENT OF THE COLORS/NATIONAL ANTHEM INVOCATION REMARKS BY PRESIDING OFFICIAL PRESENTATION OF DECORATION

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 REMARKS BY HONOREE (AT THE PRESIDING OFFICIALS’S DISCRETION) CLOSING NARRATION AIR FORCE SONG DEPARTURE RECEPTION

14.10. Reveille and Retreat. 14.10.1. General. The U.S. Flag is flown daily from reveille until retreat. Reveille, the raising of the colors for the day’s activities, is a ceremony in which the unit honors the U.S. flag when it is raised in the morning. Retreat, the retirement of the colors from the day's activities, is a ceremony in which the unit honors the U.S. flag when it is lowered in the evening. 14.10.2. Dress. Military attendees of reveille and retreat should wear uniform of the day unless ordered otherwise by the installation commander. Military members conducting the ceremony should wear their service dress uniform with flight or service cap. All attendees should be prepared to wear appropriate inclement weather apparel during poor weather (i.e. overcoat, raincoat, black gloves, scarf, etc.). 14.10.3. Timing. The sounding, for both reveille and retreat, is decided by the installation commander. Reveille shall be played for 20 seconds. During this time, the flag is raised quickly to the top of the flagpole. During retreat, the flag is lowered slowly and ceremoniously. The two bugle calls sounded at retreat are “Retreat” and “To The Color.” Uniformed personnel in formation during the playing of “Retreat,” should be at the position of parade rest, then assume the position of attention. Uniformed personnel not in formation during the playing of “Retreat,” should be at the position of attention. The flag should reach the bottom at the last note of "To The Color." “The Star Spangled Banner” may be played instead of "To The Color" during a retreat ceremony. 14.10.4. Formation. During Reveille and Retreat ceremonies, when in a formation or a group, the senior military member present will call the group to “Attention” and then “Parade, Rest” at the first note of Reveille or Retreat. That member will then call the group to “Attention” and “Present, Arms” at the first note of “To The Color” or the “The Star Spangled Banner” and then “Order, Arms” at the conclusion. 14.10.5. Civilian and Motorist Honors. In 1812, Reveille was a drum call, but as time passed it came to mark when the flag was raised in the morning and honors paid to it. Since it is no longer only a call for soldiers to rise in the morning, it is proper for all military and civilian personnel to afford honors to the flag during these ceremonies when the flag is being raised or lowered. When Reveille or Retreat is played simply as a bugle call to signal the beginning or end of the duty day, no courtesies are required. If Reveille or Retreat is played as a prelude to the national anthem or “To The Color,” members of the Armed Forces and veterans who are present, but not in uniform, may render the military salute when outdoors. All other individuals stand at attention and place their right hand (with a hat if wearing one) over their heart. Vehicles in motion should stop. 14.11. Building Dedication/Ribbon Cutting. 14.11.1. General. A building dedication/ribbon cutting ceremony is the opportunity to formally recognize the completion/opening of a new building or facility.

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14.11.2. Sequence. This is the traditional, authorized sequence of events for a building dedication or ribbon cutting ceremony. Bolded items are general officer specific; italicized items are optional. SEQUENCE OF EVENTS: OPENING NARRATION ARRIVAL FANFARE MUSICAL HONORS COLORS/NATIONAL ANTHEM INVOCATION REMARKS BY PRESIDING OFFICIAL DEDICATION/RIBBON CUTTING REMARKS BY UNIT COMMANDER CLOSING NARRATION AIR FORCE SONG DEPARTURE RECEPTION 14.12. POW/MIA Ceremonies. 14.12.1. (Number of) Personnel Involved. 14.12.1.1. (1) NCOIC 14.12.1.2. (5) Hat Bearers 14.12.2. Equipment. 14.12.2.1. Ceremonial Army, Marine, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, and civilian cap (1 of each). 14.12.3. Support Material. 14.12.3.1. A round table, a white table cloth, six chairs, book of faith (optional), red rose displayed in vase, red ribbon, slice of lemon on a bread plate with a pinch of salt, place setting at an open table, and (6) wine glasses. (NOTE: All support material should be supplied by the host). 14.12.4. Preparation. 14.12.4.1. NCOIC meets with host upon arrival at ceremony site to review specifics: entrance cue; entrance and departure area; ensure there is enough room around the table for all team members to walk; proper set-up of table (red ribbon tied around vase and placed in the middle of the table; book of faith (optional) placed next to the vase; bread plate with slice of lemon and pinch of salt on it placed next to the book of faith and the vase; one place setting with plate, silverware, and wineglass; the other five wineglasses placed evenly around the table in empty place settings). The table should occupy a prominent position in the layout of the room. 14.12.5. Sequence of Events. 14.12.5.1. Fifteen minutes prior to the ceremony, the team lines up outside of the entrance: holding hats in correct Joint Service order (Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard and civilian), at waist level, and with the bill of the hat pointing out.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 14.12.5.2. Once the narrator starts reading the POW/MIA Hat Table script, the team is queued and enters the room headed toward the table. 14.12.5.3. Upon reaching the table, the team circles it once. The NCOIC calls “HALT” when the Air Force hat is in front of the full place setting for the second time. 14.12.5.4. NCOIC calls “Ready, Face” and the team faces the table. 14.12.5.5. The NCOIC starts the movement and, at the same time, all bearers move their right hands slowly around the front of the bill to the left side of the hat, touching their left hand. Then letting go with the left hand and keeping it in position, turning the hat around 180 degrees. Bearers then bend over and place hat in the place setting. 14.12.5.6. The bearers let go of the hat, stand up at attention, reach out with their right hand, and cup the wineglasses. All wine glasses will be lifted out in front of the bearers meeting in the center of the table. Glasses are turned upside down and then lowered back down to the table. 14.12.5.7. When the glasses are securely on the table, the bearers come back to the position of attention. 14.12.5.8. NCOIC calls “Present, Arms.” The bearers perform a three-second present and a three-second order. 14.12.5.9. Once back at the position of attention, the NCOIC calls “Ready, Face.” All bearers perform a right face, wait one count, and then step off with no arm swing toward the predetermined departure area (Note: If the host wishes, after the dinner is over, the team may go back in and retrieve the hats; this is performed in the exact opposite order. All commands are subdued and called only loud enough for the team members to hear). 14.12.5.10. The playing of Taps is not part of the POW/MIA ceremony. The playing of Taps is symbolic of the death of a service member; it is not appropriate for POW/MIAs who have not been declared as deceased. 14.12.6. Script. The following is the recommended script according to the POW/MIA league of families and endorsed by the Department of Defense: MISSING MAN TABLE & HONORS CEREMONY COURTESY OF NATIONAL LEAGUE OF FAMILIES OF AMERICAN PRISONERS AND MISSING IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

NARRATOR: “As you entered the dining area, you may have noticed a table at the front, raised to call your attention to its purpose – it is reserved to honor our missing loved ones (or missing comrades in arms, for veterans). Set for six, the empty places represent Americans (our men and women) still missing from each of the five services – Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard – and civilians. This honors ceremony symbolizes that they are with us, here in spirit. Some (here) in this room were very young when they went into combat; however, all Americans should never forget the brave men and women who answered our nation‘s call (to serve) and served the cause of freedom in a special way.

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I would like to ask you to stand, and remain standing for a moment of silent prayer, as the Honor Guard places the five service covers and a civilian cap on each empty plate.” In silence or with dignified, quiet music as background, the Honor Guard moves into position around the table and simultaneously place covers of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, Coast Guard and civilian hat, on the dinner plate at each table setting. The Honor Guard departs. NARRATOR: “Please be seated (pause). I would like to explain the meaning of the items on this special table. The table is round – to show our everlasting concern for our missing men (and women). The tablecloth is white – symbolizing the purity of their motives when answering the call to duty. The single red rose, displayed in a vase, reminds us of the life of each of the missing, and the loved ones and friends of these Americans who keep the faith, awaiting answers. The vase is tied with a red ribbon, symbol of our continued determination to account for our missing. A slice of lemon on the bread plate is to remind us of the bitter fate of those captured and missing in a foreign land. A pinch of salt symbolized the tears endured by those missing and their families who seek answers. (Optional) The bound text is a book of faith to represent the strength gained through devotion to sustain those lost from our country. This glass is inverted – to symbolize their inability to share this evening‘s (morning’s/day’s) toast. The chairs are empty – they are missing. Let us now raise our water glasses in toast to honor America‘s POW/MIAs and to the success of our efforts to account for them.” NOTE: The number of personnel can be varied from one to six. The ceremony can be altered as to the number of hats and personnel. You can also place the hats as the latter part of the script is read and invert the glasses as the script mentions it. 14.13. Fallen Warrior Ceremony 14.13.1. (Number of) Personnel Involved 14.13.1.1. (1) Narrator 14.13.2. Equipment 14.13.2.1. Empty chair at the end of the head table (no place setting). 14.13.3. Support Material 14.13.3.1. None 14.13.4. Preparation

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 14.13.4.1. None 14.13.5. Sequence of Events 14.13.5.1. An empty chair is placed at the end left or right position of the head table prior to guests entering the event. If round tables are used then place the empty chair at any position at the head table. 14.13.6. Script

Narrator: “Ladies and Gentlemen, as we enjoy this evening of fellowship, we are reminded that not everyone is so privileged. At our head table this evening, we have an empty chair. This chair is empty by design. We placed it there for distinguished guests who cannot be with us today. This place is reserved to honor our fallen warriors. Today’s military member is well equipped and skilled in military combat and warfare for peaceful purposes and preserves the rights of men and women everywhere to be free of tyranny and terrorism. They are dedicated to the cause of peaceful coexistence on a global level. They go on duty each day knowing it might be the day they are asked to make the ultimate sacrifice. They are not the “summer soldier or sunshine patriot”. Our military service men and women are adept in many disciplines and each warrior has unique skills they contribute, not only to their military service, but also to their personal lives and their communities. Society recognizes our American military servicemen and women as an elite group. As we reflect upon this empty chair, we come face to face with the stark reality that some of our warriors and personal heroes have indeed been called upon to make that ultimate sacrifice. They are our brothers and sisters, our friends; and, our comrades-in-arms. Their absence is symbolized by this simple empty chair. Their sacrifice was not simple, nevertheless, as warriors, they would not want great ceremony or fanfare made of their heroic action. Their death leaves a wake of sorrow for us, their friends and families. But, it also leaves a legacy of pride in the time honored tradition of selflessness and dedicated service to country. A grateful nation mourns its loss. And, today we honor them. They are national treasures and inspire people everywhere seeking freedom from oppression and the right to live with dignity. So with this empty chair and with a moment of silence, we few, we band of brothers and sisters remember our fallen. In our hearts, we wish them peace and eternal rest from their toil. We will not forget them. And, we continue to honor them for their selfless sacrifice on behalf of the United States of America.” Note: Taps may or not may not be played at this time. After a moment of silence and playing of Taps (if played), the narrator continues with the program. Do not over use the playing of Taps; reserve only for the most formal of ceremonies (i.e., Air Force birthday celebrations, balls, etc.) 14.14. Memorial Service 14.14.1. General. Unit Memorial Services are not required but often conducted to facilitate the grieving and healing process of the family and unit members and friends. They are normally

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held within days of a person's death. These services are very personal in nature and the structure is typically facilitated by base Chaplains, the unit Commander, and the Mortuary Officer, with input from the family. The deceased and/or their family may, or may not, be present at the unit Memorial Service. The unit Memorial Service is not part of the mortuary entitlement the family receives upon death of a loved one; as such, it is not Air Force funded. Care must be taken not to confuse this unit service with the funeral/memorial service where the loved one will receive appropriate military funeral honors and entitlements. AFI 34-242, paragraph 8.2, provides that “The Air Force will provide funeral honors and a flyover (if the member is eligible) at the place of final disposition, or at a memorial service. Funeral honors will not be provided more than once”. However, in some situations, the family may choose to identify the unit Memorial Service as the location to receive their mortuary entitlements; careful coordination with the base Mortuary Officer is critical. 14.14.2. The Honor Guard may, or may not, be involved in a unit Memorial Service. Military funeral honors, if authorized, will only be provided at the direction of the person authorized to direct disposition. Any request for honors performed by the Honor Guard should be coordinated closely with the base Mortuary Officer. If the final place of interment is Arlington National Cemetery, funeral honors must be provided at Arlington National Cemetery by the Air Force Honor Guard and Band. In this situation, honors will not be provided at a unit Memorial Service. 14.14.3. Sample Sequence of Events. This is one example of a Memorial Service. SEQUENCE OF EVENTS: PRELUDE OR PROCESSIONAL HYMN OPENING STATEMENT OR PRAYER OR INVOCATION SCRIPTURE READING HYMN OR SPECIAL MUSIC EULOGY FINAL PRAYER OR BENEDICTION RECESSIONAL HYMN OR POSTLUDE 14.15. Remembrance Service 14.15.1. General. The Remembrance Service differs from and should not be confused with a Memorial Service. A Remembrance Service is held to both remember and honor individuals or groups of fallen warriors associated with a particular date, location, battle or war, who at the time of their death were serving in an active duty capacity or as a Federal Government civilian. There is no set or specific sequence of events for a Remembrance Service. The Remembrance Service is usually convened by the installation commander, unit commander, chaplain staff, and in some cases, fraternal groups such as the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), American Legion, Air Force Association (AFA) or Air Force Sergeant's Association (AFSA). There is an assumption that each individual or group of individuals had honors provided at the time of their death, do not perform funeral honors (rifle salute or presentation of the United States Flag) at a Remembrance Service. However, Taps may be played at the conclusion of the ceremony to signal, "take your rest." Funding may, or may not, be available and should be coordinated with the base Comptroller. 14.15.2. Sample Sequence of Events. This is one example of Remembrance Service.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 SEQUENCE OF EVENTS: OPENING NARRATION PRESENTATION OF THE COLORS/ NATIONAL ANTHEM INVOCATION WELCOMING REMARKS HOMILY AIR FORCE HYMN or BATTLE HYMN OF THE REPUBLIC READING OF HONOR ROLL (Fallen Members) BENEDICTION MEMORIAL PLAQUE UNVIELING or WREATH LAYING (with Muffled Ruffles and Taps) CLOSING NARRATION

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Chapter 15 SOCIAL FUNCTIONS 15.1. Seating Arrangements. Seating can be the key to the success ofan event. Rank precedence forms the basis for making most seat assignments. However, common sense and the comfort of guests must be considered. Be able to provide a clear rationale for seating arrangements and ensure the host or hostess understands and approves the seat assignments and in advance. See Attachment 2 for specific seating examples. 15.1.1. The position of honor is always to the right of the hostess (or host at a stag event). This position is usually given to the most senior guest or the guest of honor. At large events, designate hosts at each table and spread out the senior attendees. 15.1.2. When possible, seat men and women alternately. Avoid seating a civilian woman at the end or outer edge of a table; it may be necessary to seat two women next to each other. At some gatherings, it is acceptable to seat husbands and wives together, but at formal events seat them opposite each other. 15.1.3. Round tables are preferable to rectangular tables since they offer more potential positions of honor and facilitate conversation. 15.1.4. Seat speakers or anyone making introductions (including the Chaplain if an invocation is offered) as close to the podium as possible. 15.1.5. Consider the placement of the host and distinguished guest(s) to ensure they can see and be seen by the audience. 15.1.6. Strategically place interpreters when seating guests not fluent in English. Be sensitive to international customs and other unusual circumstances (e.g. personal security). 15.2. The Receiving Line. The word reception means the act of receiving or greeting. A receiving line is a practical and efficient way to accomplish this greeting. In the Air Force, receiving lines are frequently used to greet a new commander and spouse or to introduce a guest of honor. Consider the following for a successful receiving line: 15.2.1. The length of time for a receiving line is dependent on the desires of the host or guest of honor and the number of guests in the line. 15.2.2. Station individuals in the receiving line single file according to the rules of precedence. The host (usually the commander) and his/her spouse are number one and number two. The guest of honor is next, if there is one, followed by his/her spouse, followed by the next honored guest in order of rank. Limit the receiving line to no more than five people. When a Chief of State is the guest of honor, the host and hostess relinquish their positions and the line forms with the Chief of State, his/her spouse, and followed by the host and hostess. 15.2.3. Role of Announcer. If an announcer is used, the commander's aide or protocol officer acts to introduce guests. The announcer stands just to the side of the host and introduces the next guests in line. The announcer is not part of the receiving line and should

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 not shake hands with guests. The announcer's grasp of names should be quick and accurate, and pronunciation of names to the commander audible and distinct. 15.2.4. "The Puller." Position a person just off the end of the receiving line to direct or “pull” guests to refreshments or the lounge. This role is typically filled by a protocol staff member and plays a valuable part in preventing congestion at the end of the receiving line. 15.2.5. Staffing the Receiving Line. Form the receiving line just before the appointed hour. Locate the line a sufficient distance from the entrance to facilitate easy movement of guests. Try to limit guests wait time to no more than12-15 minutes in line. If necessary, direct some guests to the refreshments and ask them to check the line later when it has thinned out. If guests insist on remaining in the receiving line, let them remain. 15.2.6. Role of "Gatekeeper." Station a protocol person, familiar with the invited guests, at the entrance to the reception lounge, next to a table positioned for guests to place their drinks and food. Known as the "gatekeeper," this individual controls the flow of the receiving line. The gatekeeper ensures an orderly flow of guests by holding the line at the entrance until space clears for them to proceed. The gatekeeper also advises guests to place any drinks and food on the table provided before proceeding. Do not receive guests or go through a receiving line holding a drink or plate of food. 15.2.7. Procedures for Guests Going Through the Receiving Line. 15.2.7.1. Air Force. The invited individual should precede their spouse or guest through the line. 15.2.7.2. Army. Ladies first at all functions except at the White House. 15.2.7.3. Navy. Ladies first at all functions except at the White House. 15.2.7.4. Place drinks and food on the table provided before entering the reception area. 15.2.7.5. When going through the line, do not shake hands with the announcer. Provide your rank and last name (Major and Mrs. Smith), official title (Mayor and Mrs. Tom Jones) or name (Mr. and Mrs. Brown). Even if acquainted, guests should provide their name to the announcer/host. 15.2.7.6. The announcer presents the guest to the host, who in turn presents him or her to the guest of honor. The guest, proceeding down the line, shakes hands and greets each person. Never engage in extended conversation in a receiving line. The purpose of a receiving line is for the host and guest of honor to receive their guests. The time for conversation is in the reception or event after the receiving line. Guests may repeat their names to members while proceeding down the receiving line. 15.2.8. Physical Arrangements for Receiving Line. Consider the following guidelines for setting up a receiving line. 15.2.8.1. Pick a location that allows easy movement of guests without crowding. 15.2.8.2. The location should facilitate formation of guest line outside of receiving line room. 15.2.8.3. Entry into the reception area where refreshments are located should be accessible from the end of the receiving line and from an area adjacent to the beginning

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of the guest line (where the gatekeeper is positioned), without disturbing the natural flow of the guests. 15.2.8.4. Make space available at the entrance to the receiving line room for a gatekeeper and table and guest book (optional). 15.2.8.5. Position the receiving line so that direct sunlight does not distract either the guests or members of the receiving line. 15.2.8.6. Place a table behind the receiving line. Consider pre-positioning a pitcher of ice water and glasses (or other refreshments) for members of the receiving line. 15.2.8.7. Arrange flags behind the receiving line in accordance with flag etiquette. See AFI 34-1201, Chapter 2, for detailed information on flags. 15.3. Toasts. A toast is a gesture of honor rendered by the host to the guest of honor. The toast usually begins with a welcome to the guest of honor; when accompanied by his/her spouse, both may be referred to in the toast. Traditionally, only people are toasted, but it has become acceptable to toast organizations or groups. Champagne is a favorite beverage for toasting, but any wine is appropriate. Toasts are not offered with a mixed drink or after dinner liqueur. Toasting with water is acceptable. Ensure glasses are charged with the appropriate beverage prior to proposing a toast. 15.3.1. Formal Toasts. Formal toasts are made: to the colors, to the heads of state of all countries represented (determined by seniority of international officers present), to the President of the United States, and to the Chief of Staff of the Air Force and/or sister services. After the formal toasts, the host may ask everyone to sit and then toast the guests, if desired. 15.3.1.1. At a formal occasion, the host initiates the toasting (Mr./Madam Vice at a dining in/out). Any guest may initiate the toasting when the occasion is informal. The subject of the toast is always based upon the type of occasion. Those offering a toast, man or woman, should stand and raise the glass to shoulder level in a salute while making the toast, then raise the glass above eye-level prior to drinking. 15.3.1.2. The person being honored by the toast does not drink while he/she is being toasted. The honoree usually remains seated. After everyone sits down, the guest may rise and thank the host, offering a toast in return. 15.3.1.3. All military members and civilian males should stand unless they are the recipients of the toast. They should hold glasses at shoulder level while the toast is being given, raise glasses above eye level when responding to the toast and then partake of the beverage. 15.3.1.4. Nonmilitary females in attendance are not required to stand for a toast unless it is to the President of the United States, the U.S. flag, or if the wife of the host rises. Women may remain seated for any further informal toasts. 15.3.2. Standard Toasts. Standard toasts are made "To your health," or "To success and happiness," while special occasions such as weddings or birthdays require toasts more specific in nature such as "To Mary and John for a lifetime of happiness and love" or "May your next 25 years be as happy and as successful as your first 25 years."

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 15.3.3. Ceremonial Toasts. When observing the formality of ceremonial toasts on formal occasions, arrange the order and subject of all toasts in advance. It is the responsibility of the host to inform the guest of honor which toasts will be offered and when; the host proposes all toasts and the guest answers in kind. The experienced guest is careful to leave enough beverage in his or her glass at the end of the meal to be able to join in several toasts. 15.3.3.1. Always stand while drinking a toast to a Chief of State. The toast to the ruler of a country or the international guest of honor is always the first toast proposed on a formal occasion. A few minutes after the guests have seated themselves again, the senior representative of the country honored rises and proposes a toast to the rule of the host's country. All guests rise again to drink this toast. 15.3.3.2. Initial toasts may be followed by others to the countries or the services represented by the guests, and/or to the guest of honor and the host. There may be brief speeches that fit the occasion. Other toasts may follow. 15.3.3.3. Governments and titles change, verify accuracy in advance. 15.3.3.4. The position is toasted, do not mention the individual's name. 15.3.4. Toasts to International guests. When toasting international guests, the remarks may include the accomplishments of the guest of honor, ties between his/her country and the United States, and the hope and prospects for continued relationships. Often the historical background of the visitor's country is touched upon, especially with reference to former relationships with the United States. At the end of the remarks, the official giving the toasts will ask, "Will you stand and join me in a toast to “His Excellency (name), President of (country)," or "His Excellency the President of (country)," or "The President of (country)." Substitute title of the guest of honor, with the correct usage, as given in the examples at the end of this section. 15.3.5. Responses. Responses to toasts may range from a simple, "Hear, hear!" to a more complicated phrase. Please refer to the following partial listing of toasts for other examples. Toast: "To the Flag of the United States of America!" Response: "To the Colors!" Note: When used, this toast is always proposed first. Toast: "To Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second!" Response: "To Her Majesty!" Toast: "To Her Majesty Queen of Canada!" Response: "To Her Majesty!" Toast: "To His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Japan!" Response: "To the Emperor!" Toast: "To the President of the Republic of Korea!" Response: "To the President!" Toast: "To the President of the United States!" Response: "To the President!" Note: This toast applies only when more than one nation is represented. Toast: "To the Commander in Chief, The President of the United States!" Response: "To the President!"

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Note: This toast applies when only the United States is represented. If no allied officers are present, the host proposes this toast. 15.3.6. When proposing a toast to sister services, and only if members of those services are present, start with the most senior service as follows: Toast: "To the Chief of Staff of the United States Army!" Response: "To the Chief!" Toast: "To the Commandant of the Marine Corps!" Response: "To the Commandant" Toast: "To the Chief of Naval Operations!" Response: "To the Chief!" The most senior sister service representative present will then propose the toast to the Air Force Chief of Staff. Toast: "To the Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force!" Response: "To the Chief!" 15.3.7. Toast to Persons KIA, MIA or POW (always with water). Toast: "We toast our hearty comrades who have fallen from the skies, And were gently caught by God's own hands to be with him on high, To dwell among the soaring clouds they have known so well before, From victory roll to tail chase, at heaven's very door. And as we fly among them, we're sure to hear their plea, Take care, my friend, watch your six, and do one more roll for me. To our comrades killed in action, missing in action, or prisoners of war!" Response: Raise glass and partake of the beverage in silence. 15.4. Additional Factors. 15.4.1. Hosting International Guests. Protocol is critically important when hosting, entertaining or interacting with international guests. Be knowledgeable about guests’ particular customs and traditions, to include dietary restrictions and hand or facial gestures. 15.4.2. Smoking. In someone’s home, never smoke without asking permission. In a club/restaurant, smoke only in a designated smoking section. Do not smoke at the table without the approval of the entire party. 15.4.3. Entertainment at Social Events. Many events can be enhanced with the addition of live music. This can include background music during cocktails or dinner, or a performance after dinner. Generally, a performance after dinner should be no more than 30 minutes. USAF Bands provide a wide range of entertainment options. 15.5. Dinners. 15.5.1. Dinner parties can be held in the host's home, a club, or a restaurant. Factors affecting the success of a dinner party include congenial guests, well-planned menu, attractive table, well-prepared food, gracious host and hostess, and competent and pleasant service personnel. 15.5.2. At formal dinner parties, guests are greeted at the entrance by aides or protocol personnel. The host or hostess may stand near the door to the room to greet and welcome guests or circulate within the room, greeting new arrivals as he or she can.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 15.5.3. The host leads the way in to dinner with the female guest of honor. If place cards are used, the hostess is usually the last to enter the dining room, along with the guest of honor. An exception to the host leading the way is a large dinner where the host and hostess and guests of honor (and sometimes everyone at the head table) are last to enter. In this situation, they are asked to wait in a side room and are brought in and announced/introduced by the master of ceremonies. 15.5.4. When planning a dinner for guests from other parts of the country/world, consider going to restaurants with themes or menus unique to the local geographic area, taking any dietary restrictions into account. Conduct a site visit to the restaurant prior to organizing an event. Consider force protection concerns when coordinating with off-base venues.

15.6. Receptions. Receptions are usually formal affairs, a public or semi-public gathering in honor of a prominent person or an important event. The most common type of official reception is associated with a change of command, a promotion or a retirement. 15.6.1. A receiving line is appropriate at most receptions. 15.6.2. Arrange for some tables and chairs spread around the room to accommodate guests that cannot stand for long periods. 15.6.3. If nametags are used, position the nametag table away from the receiving line to avoid congestion. 15.6.4. Icebreakers. Icebreakers are traditionally held the first night of a meeting or conference. Keep the atmosphere informal; nametags are highly recommended.

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Chapter 16 DININGS IN AND DININGS OUT 16.1. Overview. Formal military dinners are a tradition in all branches of the United States Armed services. In the Air Force and Navy, it is the dining in; in the Army, the regimental dinner; in the Marine Corps and Coast Guard, mess night. The dining in and dining out represent the most formal aspects of Air Force social life. Most of the information also applies to a "combat" dining in and dining out. The dining in is a formal dinner for the members of a wing, unit, or other organization. The "Combat dining in" is less formal due to the dress requirements and informal atmosphere; however, the basic rules and format of the dining in apply. Dining in ceremonies should be conducted in a tasteful, dignified manner. A dining in should have a theme around which the decorations and ceremony are built. The dining out includes spouses and guests. 16.2. Background. 16.2.1. Many of our customs, traditions, and procedures are traceable to the earliest warriors. The dining in is one such military tradition that has its roots in the shadows of antiquity. The pre-Christian Roman Legions probably began the dining in tradition. Roman military commanders frequently held great banquets to honor individuals and military units. These gatherings were victory celebrations where past feats were remembered and booty of recent conquests paraded. The second century Viking war lords stylized the format of the victory feast. With the exception of the lookout, or watch, the entire clan attended these celebrations. Feats of strength and skill were performed to entertain members and guests. The leader took his place at the head of the table, with all others to his right and left in descending order of rank. 16.2.2. The dining in custom was transplanted to ancient England by Roman and Viking warriors. King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table practiced a form of dining in during the sixth century. The tradition eventually spread to non-military groups, such as the Saxon nobles of the tenth century and the medieval monasteries. The monks, who followed a more rigid regimen, had their form of dining in as an integral part of monastic life. The clergy spread the custom to the academies and universities. The British officer corps, with many graduates of these centers of learning, carried the tradition back to military units. The dining in became increasingly formalized after the first officers' mess was established. It is said that in early 1800s, when England was the reigning power in India, it was an English army post where the dining in received renewed impetus. 16.2.3. The commander of this Indian outpost had officers under his command who lived on the post and had their own mess hall, but were never around for dinner. Since the local area was more interesting than the post officers' mess, the post commander found himself eating alone many nights. To bring the officers back to the mess and to create camaraderie, the post commander instituted a program whereby all officers would not only dine at least once a month in the mess, but they would dine in full military ceremony. 16.2.4. Many early American customs and traditions were British in origin and the military was no exception. British Army and Navy units deployed to the wilderness of America brought with them the social customs and traditions of their service to include the formal

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 military dinner referred to as guest night. This pleasant custom provided an opportunity for officers to gather for an evening of good food, drinking, and fellowship. 16.2.5. British naval, land, and air units are still active enthusiasts of the dining in. Many units reportedly hold at least one such function monthly. Some British messes still call the occasion guest night, while others refer to it as dining in night or band night. 16.2.6. In establishing an independent nation, America's founders borrowed much of the military structure of their adversary, including social customs. The United States’ dining in tradition was borrowed from the English by George Washington's Continentals. Despite the colonists' aversion to anything suggesting the Redcoat, Continental naval and army officers must have fully realized the value of these occasions in the promotion of pride of service, high morale, and loyalty. 16.2.7. In the pioneer era of military aviation, the late General H. H. "Hap" Arnold is reported to have held famous parties called Wing-Dings at March Field in 1933, inaugurating the first of these occasions. 16.2.8. The long association of U.S. Army Air Force officers with the British during World War II surely stimulated increased American interest in the dining in custom. At Royal Air Force stations throughout Great Britain during World War II, the officers' mess was as popular with Army Air Force officers as it had been with the British for nearly a century and a half. As a place to seek leisure in off-duty hours, the officers' mess facilitated high spirits and practical joking. Through close association with British officers, the dining in increased in popularity among Army Air Force officers. 16.2.9. While the association of British and American officers during World War II brought the format and protocol of the Army Air Force dining in custom more in line with the English tradition, the war years also proved to be the high point of dining in popularity. After the war, Air Force dinings in steadily declined in frequency until the late 1950s. The decline may have been caused by postwar demobilization, transition of the Army Air Force to the U.S. Air Force, the occupation and reconstruction of Germany and Japan, the Korean War, the deep economic recession following Korea, and other factors diverting attention from military social functions. Then, beginning in 1958, there was a conscious effort to rejuvenate the USAF dining in tradition. 16.2.10. Despite the obstacles of the twentieth century, the tradition of dining in continues. The Navy and Air Force call this social affair the dining in. The Marine Corps and the Coast Guard refer to it as mess night; the Army refers to it as the regimental dinner. Veterans remember and revive the tradition at every opportunity. They recognize the important role these occasions play in preserving the traditions of the services.

16.3. Purpose. The dining in is occasion for officers to meet socially at a formal military function. It enhances the esprit of units, lightens the load of demanding day-to-day work, gives the commander an opportunity to meet socially with subordinates, and enables military members of all ranks to create bonds of friendship and better working relations through an atmosphere of fellowship. The dining in also provides a means of saying farewell to departing members, welcoming newly arrived members and forum to recognize individual and unit achievements.

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16.4. Dining in. The dining in is a formal dinner for the members of a wing, unit, or organization. Although a dining in is traditionally a unit function, attendance by other smaller units may be appropriate. 16.5. Dining out. The dining out is a relatively new custom that includes spouses and guests. It is similar in all other respects to a dining in. 16.6. Combat Dining in. The combat dining in, the newest of the dining in traditions, is popular in operational units. The format and sequence of events is built around the traditional dining in. The atmosphere and dress requirements are far less formal (flight-suits, ABUs, etc.). 16.7. Attendance. Traditionally, attendance at a dining in was mandatory and many commanders still consider this function a mandatory requirement, similar to a Commander's Call. The decision whether a dining in is voluntary or mandatory rests with the commander. 16.8. Guests of the Mess. There are two types of guests, official guests and personal guests. Official guests are honored guests of the mess. The guest speaker is an official guest. All official guests are seated at the head table and their expenses are shared by the members of the mess. Due to costs and space at the head table, limit the number of official guests. 16.8.1. Personal guests may be either military members or civilians (for dinings out). They are not seated at the head table, and their expenses are paid by the sponsoring member. 16.8.2. To enhance relationships, consider senior officers from other units and organizations and civic leaders from the local community when inviting guests. 16.8.3. Mess members should arrive at least ten minutes before the hour of invitation in order to meet and talk with the guests of honor and get acquainted with others. Members do not leave until the guests depart unless excused in advance. 16.9. Dress. Officers wear the mess dress uniform. Male civilians should wear appropriate black tie dinner dress or a dark suit. Clearly identify the proper dress for civilians in the invitation. Retired officers may wear the mess dress or civilian attire. For enlisted members, mess dress or the semi-formal dress uniform is worn. Refer to AFI 36-2903, for guidance on wear. 16.9.1. Long dinner dresses or evening clothes for female guests are appropriate when attending a dining out. 16.9.2. Pregnant military women should wear appropriate military attire. 16.10. Key Players. 16.10.1. President. This officer is the center figure of the dining in. Normally the commander of the organization hosting the dining in, the president is charged with the overall responsibility of the dining in. Specific duties of the president are as follows: 16.10.1.1. Oversee entire organization and operation of the dining in. 16.10.1.2. Appoint any or all of the following project officers: 16.10.1.2.1. Vice President 16.10.1.2.2. Arrangements Officer 16.10.1.2.3. Mess Officer

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 16.10.1.2.4. Escort Officers 16.10.1.3. Secure an appropriate speaker, set the date, and determine location. 16.10.1.4. Arrange for a chaplain to give the invocation. 16.10.1.5. Greet all guests before dinner is served. 16.10.1.6. Opening and closing of the mess. 16.10.1.7. Many of the duties of the president are delegated to the arrangements officer who works closely with the president to ensure the success of the dining in. 16.10.2. Vice President. The vice president serves as the president's principal assistant. The vice president is traditionally the junior officer of the mess; however, the president may select another member to serve in this demanding position. The success of the evening hinges largely on the imagination and humor of this individual who stimulates table conversation and keeps the program moving. The vice president also notes and makes special mention of the violations of the rules of the mess and breaches of protocol and etiquette. Traditionally, the vice president sits alone at the back of the dining room facing the president in order to observe the proceedings and monitor the flow of the program; the vice president is never seated near or at the head table. It is essential that mister/madam vice be very familiar with the customs and traditions of the mess. Duties of the vice president include: 16.10.2.1. Open the lounge at the appointed time. 16.10.2.2. Sound the dinner chimes at the appropriate time. 16.10.2.3. Prepare appropriate toasts as directed by the president. Composition of appropriate poems or witticisms (in good taste) relating to personalities and (or) organizations present is encouraged. 16.10.2.4. Keep the party moving and is the last person to leave. 16.10.3. Arrangements Officer. The arrangements officer is directly responsible to the commander for the comprehensive planning of the dining in and for attending to the numerous details required for a successful event. The person selected for this task should be a top planner and supervisor. In small units, a junior officer may be capable of filling this role, but in large units, an officer with more seniority and experience may be a better choice. The arrangements officer works closely with the president to determine the date and location, and to identify and invite the guest speaker. He or she is also responsible for the menu, seating, decorations, music and entertainment, lodging and reservations, invitations, and the agenda. The arrangements officer consults with the president before making any final decisions on key aspects of the event. Other duties of the arrangements officer include: 16.10.3.1. Establish the correct table and seating arrangement and arrange the necessary name and organization card; consider seating by organization, or by grade. 16.10.3.2. Putting flags and any awards in place before the opening of the lounge, unless posting of the colors is part of the planned ceremony. 16.10.3.3. Arrange for a suitable public address system (usually furnished by the club).

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16.10.3.4. Providing a lighted lectern with microphone for the guest speaker and chaplain. 16.10.3.5. Place dinner chimes at mister or madam vice's location. 16.10.3.6. Ensure all awards being presented available. 16.10.3.7. Arrange for a photographer if photographs are desired. Usually this function is delegated to the public affairs office. 16.10.3.8. Publish a detailed agenda and prepare a recommended guest list. Distribution and content are determined by the president. 16.10.3.9. Brief the senior Allied military member scheduled to attend on the proper toast to be made to the President of the United States. 16.10.3.10. Reproduce biographical sketches of guests as required. 16.10.3.11. Ensure a hat/coat checker is available. 16.10.3.12. After the dining in, prepare letters of appreciation to the guest of honor and others who rendered service for the president's signature. 16.10.4. Mess Officer. The mess officer is an optional player in the dining in/dining out. Once the preliminary decision about event facility is made, the arrangements officer can delegate some or all of the responsibilities associated with the dining facility to the mess officer. 16.10.5. Protocol Officer. 16.10.5.1. Send formal invitations to all guests at least four weeks prior to the event. 16.10.5.2. Establish procedures for taking R.s.v.p.’s 16.10.5.3. Make necessary lodging arrangements. 16.10.5.4. Make necessary transportation arrangements. 16.10.5.5. Assist with seating arrangements for the head table. 16.10.5.6. Brief the escort officers on specific protocol requirements relating to the guests. 16.10.5.7. Prior to the event, distribute biographical sketches of guests to the president, mister/madam vice, and other interested parties. 16.10.5.8. Establish a parking plan. 16.10.5.9. Assist escort officers as required. 16.10.5.10. Advise and assist on flag arrangements. 16.10.6. Escort Officers. Appoint one escort officer for each official and personal guest. Duties of the escort officer include: 16.10.6.1. Contact the guest in advance to discuss dress, location, meeting point, and composition of the audience.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 16.10.6.2. If the guests are from out of town, meet them at their initial arrival point and arrange for transportation and accommodations during their stay. 16.10.6.3. Meet and escort the guest into the lounge. 16.10.6.4. Brief the guest on the customs, courtesies, and procedures of the dining in. 16.10.6.5. Make sure that the guest is properly introduced to the president of the mess, other guests, the guest speaker, and members of the mess. 16.10.6.6. Ensure the guest is always in the company of several members of the mess; ensure no individual or group monopolizes the guest. 16.10.6.7. Upon departure, escort the guest to point of departure and bid farewell on behalf of all members of the mess. 16.10.7. Guest Speaker. The guest speaker's presentation is the traditional highlight of the evening. By custom, the speaker should be distinguished as either a military officer or official of the government. Contact the speaker well in advance and advised of the nature of the evening. When introducing the guest speaker to the mess, leave no doubt in the guests' minds whether they are to acknowledge the introduction to preclude possible embarrassment. Keep the introduction of the guest speaker simple; the speaker's ability will be evident.

16.11. Planning Considerations. Start early, three to four months in advance, set a firm date, location, and general action plan. Appoint a planning committee chaired by the arrangements officer. 16.11.1. Committee Membership. The size of the committee depends on the magnitude of the function. Committee members must be motivated and action oriented. Select committee members with expertise in their area of responsibility. Potential committee members include: 16.11.1.1. Recorder. 16.11.1.2. Finance. 16.11.1.3. Invitations and Reservations. 16.11.1.4. Food and Beverage. 16.11.1.5. Decorations. 16.11.1.6. Publicity. 16.11.2. Date and Location. Selecting a date and location for the dining in is step 1. First, set a tentative date. If the committee has a guest speaker in mind, informally check the individual's availability. Make sure the date does not conflict with other military commitments, such as deployments, inspections or major base social function. Once a tentative date is set, choose a tentative location. Location is usually the officers' club for a dining in and dining out. Depending on circumstance, another location may be suitable, such as an aircraft hanger for a combat dining in. If the preferred location is available, book it immediately. If considering off-base sites, ensure the prospective caterer is willing and able to meet requirements. Have a thorough understanding of all provisions of any contract before signing it. Pay particular attention to the cancellation clauses and cost factors (i.e. whether or not quoted prices include tax and gratuity).

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16.11.3. Choosing a Guest Speaker. Carefully choose the guest speaker. Traditionally, the speaker is a high-ranking military officer or government official. The arrangements officer usually prepares the letter of invitation for the president's signature; include the date, location, describe the audience and other pertinent facts about the occasion. It is appropriate to suggest suitable topics and desired length for the speech. Identify a potential alternate speaker in case the speaker of choice cancels. 16.11.4. Invitations to Senior Officials. Coordinate with the appropriate level commander before sending invitations to senior officials, such as the SecDef and Principal Deputies, Service Secretaries, and Service Chiefs, including the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and other high ranking military and government civilian DVs. 16.11.5. Other Invitations. Send formal invitations to all guests, official and personal, extended in the name of the president. Invitations are not usually sent to members of the mess. 16.11.6. Place Cards and "YASA" Cards. Place cards are required only at the head table; organization identification cards are appropriate at other tables. Use one card for each table (uniform in size, color, and lettering). With assigned seating, utilize "YASA" cards with accompanying seating arrangement board to help members find their seat. Remove table numbers after the mess is assembled and first dinner course is served. 16.11.7. Music. Schedule the band (consider a military band or ensemble) through the installation public affairs office. If a suitable band is unavailable, consider either a taped program or no music at all. 16.11.8. Menu. The traditional menu consisted of four or five courses, with roast prime rib of beef and Yorkshire pudding. In recent years, the standard dinner at a dining in includes salad, entree, and dessert. While appetizers and soups may be easily added, a larger menu means increased costs; portions of large meals often go uneaten. 16.11.9. Wine. Wine is an integral part of the dining in both for adding to the meal and for toasting. The wine is served in carafes by wait staff or simply placed on the table and passed around, from left to right (counterclockwise). Provide an alternative non-alcoholic beverage for those not wishing to drink wine, with refills readily available. 16.11.10. Seating. Table arrangements for a dining in include straight banquet style, “T”, “U”, or modified “E” formations; consider ease of passage and space between place settings when choosing the best arrangement; avoid crowding tables. To allow the president and mister/madam vice to face each other when speaking, place mister/madam vice’s table at the opposite end of the banquet hall directly facing the president. Seat the head table according to protocol, with the senior honored guest to the right of the president, the next senior person to the left of the president, etc. The senior honored guest is usually the guest speaker. If this is not the case, it is customary to informally ask the senior honored guest if he or she will cede that position to the guest speaker. Do not seat guests at the ends of a table. Table seating for a dining out requires a man woman-alternating pattern within protocol restraints. Seat spouses in precedence determined by their military member's grade; spouses are not seated together. Refrain from seating two women next to each other except to avoid seating a civilian woman at the end of the table. If seated at the head table, the chaplain often sits on the far left of the president. At a dining out, the guest of honor's wife is seated to the right of

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 the president with the second-ranking woman to his left. The president's wife is seated to the right of the guest of honor. Seat other guests throughout the mess and seat members of the mess according to seniority. Seat organizations at tables arranged in accordance with local protocol or custom; consider the ability of the head table to clearly see all members of the mess. Do not just consider the mess member's ability to see the head table. Refer to Attachment 2 for depictions of seating arrangements. 16.11.11. Decorations. Decorations fall into two categories, tables and the dining room/lounge. Limit table decorations to floral centerpieces and silver candelabra; formal organizational decorations may also be appropriate. The silver is provided by the caterer (club) while the centerpieces must be ordered from a florist. Order flowers at least one week in advance. Identify a budget and allow the florist to work around that amount. Dining room and lounge decorations include seals, emblems, flags, and colors tastefully displayed. When in doubt, keep the theme of the decorations patriotic. 16.11.12. Program. A printed program booklet is not required, but may provide the dining in with a touch of class. The printed program is usually 5¼ by 8½ inches in size. Consider dressing up the booklet with quality paper stock, graphic art and variations in typeface. The president of the mess should approve a sample prior to printing. One booklet is usually positioned at each place setting. Contents of the program may include: 16.11.12.1. Welcome letter from the commander. 16.11.12.2. History of the dining in. 16.11.12.3. Background, tradition, or explanation of locally originated ceremonies held as part of the dining in. 16.11.12.4. Agenda. 16.11.12.5. Schedule of, and proper responses to, toasts. 16.11.12.6. Biography and photograph of the guest speaker. 16.11.12.7. Biography and photograph of the commander. 16.11.12.8. History of the sponsoring organization. 16.11.12.9. Menu. 16.11.12.10. "Rules of the Mess." 16.11.12.11. Words to the Air Force Hymn or Air Force Song. 16.11.12.12. Brief description of awards and recipients. 16.11.13. Financial Planning. Estimating all costs and determining the pro-rata cost charged to each member of the mess is critical for a successful event. Consider the following: 16.11.13.1. Unit military personnel customarily pay their own way and share the expense of all formally invited guests. Clearly designate the funding status of personnel outside the sponsoring organization in the invitation. Wording such as "come join us" followed with an estimate of the cost connotes a paying member. Use of the word "guest" in the invitation indicates a formal guest of the sponsoring unit without a requirement to pay. As a formal guest, the guest speaker does not pay. To defray the cost for junior enlisted

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personnel, consider donations from private organizations or a multi-tiered price structure applied according to grade. Consult the legal office before accepting funds from private organizations. 16.11.13.2. A dining in at reasonable cost to each member is usually more enjoyable than an expensive extravaganza. 16.11.13.3. Once tentative costs are determined, develop an operating budget. 16.11.13.4. Establish a procedure for collecting and depositing money such as a separate bank account specifically for the function. For a large function, identify POCs in elements of the unit to take reservations and collect money or club card numbers from their assigned unit. 16.11.14. Bartenders. During the cocktail hour, ensure a sufficient number of bartenders are available. To eliminate a long bar line, consider starting the evening with extra bartenders at each bar, but be aware that this may increase the cost. Discuss options with club management or the caterer. Suggested number of bars required: 16.11.14.1. 1-50 people: 1 bar 16.11.14.2. 51-100 people: 2 bars 16.11.14.3. 100-500 people: 3 or more bars 16.11.14.4. Non-alcoholic beverages should available at each bar. 16.11.15. Chaplain. Invite a chaplain to give the invocation. If a chaplain is not available, a member of the mess may give the invocation. 16.11.16. Photography. Brief the photographer on the agenda of events in advance. Identify the specific photographs desired and clarify any requirements. The photographer should not detract from ceremonies or activities. If necessary, stage photos before or after the event. If desired, arrange a private professional photographer for personal photographs of the members of the mess. 16.11.17. Memento for the Speaker. The memento for the guest speaker, if provided, should be of nominal value. A plaque commemorating the occasion or the gavel used by the president of the mess is acceptable. 16.11.18. Site Inspection. Check the site thoroughly on the day of the event with assistance from committee members and make adjustments or corrections as appropriate. 16.12. Conducting the Dining in. 16.12.1. Conduct and Courtesies. Urge members to meet as many guests as time permits without monopolizing the time of any one guest. The following is a step-by-step sequence of the dining in, from arrival to adjournment. 16.12.2. Cocktails. Member of the mess should arrive in the lounge within 10 minutes of opening time and prior to the senior honored guest. The cocktail period usually lasts between 30 and 60 minutes. This time is intended for members to assemble before dinner and meet the guests. Escort officers should remain with guests while members rotate between guests. Light snacks such as nuts, chips, and pretzels may be strategically located throughout the lounge. Soft, classical or semi-classical background music is appropriate (recorded or live).

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 16.12.3. Assembling for Dinner. At the end of the cocktail period, mister/madam vice sounds the dinner chime and directs the mess to proceed to the dining room. Members and guests assigned to the head table remain in the lounge or assemble in an anteroom. All others proceed in an orderly fashion to assigned seats and stand quietly behind their chairs. By tradition, drinks are never taken into the dining room. There are several entry options for members of the head table. 16.12.3.1. The president and guest of honor enter first with the president on the left and the honored guest on his/her right. Continue with the next ranking individual on the left and next ranking official guest on his/her right-hand and so forth. 16.12.3.2. Table members file in to the dining area in the order they will be seated at the table, far end of the platform from entrance steps first, with those seated closest to the platform steps last. This order of entry works well when the platform the head table is placed on is narrow and does not allow members room to pass behind one another. 16.12.3.3. The president and guest of honor enter the mess last after everyone is assembled. 16.12.3.4. Once the head table is in place, "Ruffles and Flourishes" and the "General's March" are played as appropriate if the senior member is a general officer. All members of the mess stand at attention during the playing of “Ruffles and Flourishes.” 16.12.4. Calling the Mess to Order. Immediately following the sounding of "Ruffles and Flourishes," the president raps the gavel once to call the mess to order. The president then directs the color guard to post the colors. The color guard marches into the dining room and posts the colors. The national anthem is then played or sung. If the colors are in place, or there is no color guard, the national anthem is played or sung immediately following the president's call to order. A bugler may sound "To The Color" instead of the national anthem. Following the national anthem, the color guard departs the room. Since protocol does not require that the colors, once posted, must be retired, some commanders elect to dismiss the color guard at this time. After the color guard departs, the president asks the chaplain or an appointed member of the mess to deliver the invocation. After the invocation, the members of the mess and guests remain standing for the toasting. 16.12.5. Wine Pouring Ceremony. Usually, wineglasses are already filled; but if a wine pouring ceremony is observed, members of the mess and guests will be seated immediately following the invocation. The president removes the stopper from the decanter placed before him/her; the senior officer at each table does likewise following the president's lead. Decanters are passed from hand to hand to the right, with each member filling his or her glass. Decanters never touch the table until all glasses are filled and the president replaces the stopper and places the decanter on the table. Club service personnel should be ready to replace decanters as they are emptied, and to fill wine goblets with a non-alcoholic beverage as appropriate. According to tradition, port wine is used for toasting while another wine is used for dinner. The choice of wines is a commander's prerogative. When all glasses are charged, and the president has replaced the decanter on the table, all members of the mess and guests rise for the toasts.

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16.12.6. Other Ceremonies. Other ceremonies may be used instead of, or in conjunction with, the opening ceremony (i.e. a sword ceremony). Keep ceremonies simple, well rehearsed and limit to no more than one or two, to keep the evening's events on schedule. 16.12.7. Toasting. In addition to general rules covered in Chapter 15 of this publication, the following apply specifically to a dining in or dining out. 16.12.7.1. Informal toasts are an important part of the occasion. They should be humorous, but in good taste. Utilize "plants" to make some impromptu toasts to set the tone of the evening. 16.12.7.2. After the welcoming remarks, the president introduces the head table, and mister/madam vice proposes a toast, "To our honored guests." The guests respond, "Here, Here." 16.12.7.3. Normally, toasts are planned and approved in advance by the president. To avoid confusion, print the toasts and responses in the dining in program booklets placed at the tables. However, at any time after the toast to the Chief of Staff, a member may ask to be recognized by saying, "mister/madam vice, I have a point of order." Mister/madam vice recognizes the member by saying, "Sir/Madam, state your point of order." The member will, in a polite and forthright manner, advise the president that the toast required by courtesy or protocol has not been proposed. The president then requests the member who has the floor to propose the toast or asks mister/madam vice to propose the appropriate toast. (This is an opportune time for the president of the mess to explain the POW/MIA table and propose his last toast ("One more roll") before his/her opening remarks.) 16.12.8. President's Opening Remarks. The president's remarks provide the opportunity to officially welcome guests and set the tone for the evening. After the head table is introduced, the president either personally introduces the remaining guests or polls the escort officers. Once all guests are recognized, mister/madam vice proposes a toast to the guests. Members of the mess stand, guests remain seated. The response to this and all future toasts is, "Hear, Hear!" The president then seats the mess and invites the members to eat. Courses are served to the head table first. At other tables, the highest-ranking individuals are served first. Mister/madam vice is served immediately after the head table. Before serving the entree, the president may wish to add some humor to the meal by asking mister/madam vice to sample the meal. The vice president may choose to compose an ode or poem to the meal. 16.12.9. Recess. At the scheduled time, the president raps the gavel three times to gain attention. When the mess is silent, the president raps twice and announces a short recess allowing dishes to be cleared and dessert served. Members stand by their places until the head table departs. Everyone then proceeds to the cocktail lounge where the bars have reopened. 16.12.10. Reconvening the Mess. At the end of the recess, mister/madam vice sounds the dinner chimes and directs everyone to proceed to the dining room. Traditionally, drinks are not brought into the dining room following the recess. When members reach their places, they stand directly behind their chairs. The president leads the head table party into the dining room. The president then seats the mess with one rap of the gavel. Coffee and tea are served and dessert is eaten.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 16.12.11. Awards. If individual or unit achievements are recognized, an appropriate ceremony is arranged. The ceremony takes place during the formal portion, often immediately preceding the guest of honor's speech. A toast to those recognized is appropriate. It is inappropriate to plan a ceremony directly after the guest speaker's speech. 16.12.12. Guest Speaker's Address. After recognition and awards, and any scheduled entertainment, the president introduces the guest speaker. The speaker's address (usually patriotic or entertaining in nature) typically lasts 15 to 20 minutes. After thanking the speaker, the president presents a memento to the speaker. The president then asks the vice president to propose an appropriate toast to the guest speaker. Mister/madam vice proposes a toast, "To our guest of honor." 16.12.13. Closing the Mess. After the toast to the guest speaker, the president recognizes those who organized the dining in and thanks mister/madam vice. If desired, the colors are retired by the color guard. The president encourages everyone to stay and enjoy him or herself, if post-dinner entertainment is planned, and then adjourns the mess with two raps of the gavel. After the mess is adjourned, members remain at the dining in until the guest of honor and the president depart. If there is a delay in departure, the president may allow members to leave at their discretion. Traditionally, mister/madam vice is the last member to leave the dining in. 16.12.14. Post Dinner Entertainment. Post dinner entertainment depends upon the imagination of the sponsoring unit, the arrangements officer and the vice president, within the guidelines set by the president. At the close of a dining out, an orchestra, band, or DJ for dancing may be appropriate entertainment. 16.12.15. The Grog Bowl. 16.12.15.1. The grog bowl is an "accessory" traditional to a dining in, although not required. If a grog bowl is not utilized, consider some other means of punishment for infractions. 16.12.15.2. The planning committee determines the contents of the grog bowl. It is permissible to have two grog bowls, one alcoholic and one non-alcoholic. 16.12.15.3. Consider a grog mixing ceremony where the contents of the grog are combined along with a humorous narrative by mister/madam vice. 16.12.15.4. Certain members of the mess seem to be frequent violators, such as mister/madam vice. It is not uncommon for the president and the guest speaker to be charged with at least one violation. If the president leaves his/her position at the head table, he/she must appoint another individual to assume his/her position. 16.12.15.5. The arrangement officer or mister/madam vice, should brief the president on the rules beforehand (refresh his/her memory) and determine the "rules of engagement" to keep this portion of the program from getting out of hand. 16.12.15.6. Infractions warranting a trip to the grog bowl are noted at any time by the president, vice president, or any member of the mess. Members bring infractions to the attention of the president by raising a point of order. If the validity of the charge is questioned, members vote by tapping their spoons on the table.

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16.12.15.7. When the president directs a violator to the grog bowl, the individual proceeds to the bowl promptly. The bowl is usually located on mister/madam vice's table. Upon arriving at the grog bowl, the violator does the following: 16.12.15.7.1. Does an about face and salutes the president. 16.12.15.7.2. Turns to the bowl and fills the cup. 16.12.15.7.3. Does another about face and toasts the mess. 16.12.15.7.4. Drains the contents of the cup without removing it from the lips, then places it inverted on his/her head signifying it is empty. 16.12.15.7.5. Replaces the cup, again salutes the president, and returns to his/her seat. With the exception of the toast, "To the Mess," the violator is not permitted to speak during this process. 16.12.15.8. At various points during the evening, a member may be sent to the grog bowl as punishment for violating the “rules of the mess” (outlined in paragraph 16.13). The following provides additional examples of common violations of protocol warranting a trip to the grog bowl include: 16.12.15.9. Common Violations of Protocol Warranting a Trip to the Grog Bowl. 16.12.15.9.1. Wearing an ill-fitting or discolored mess jacket. 16.12.15.9.2. Wearing non-issue suspenders. 16.12.15.9.3. Starting a course before the president. 16.12.15.9.4. Applauding a particularly witty, sarcastic, or succinct toast (unless following the example of the president). 16.12.15.9.5. Loud and obtrusive remarks 16.12.15.9.6. Discussing business, referred to as "opening the hangar doors." 16.12.15.9.7. Leaving the dining area without permission from the president. 16.12.15.9.8. Talking while another person has the floor. 16.12.15.9.9. Quibbling. 16.12.15.9.10. Haggling over date of rank. 16.13. Rules of the Mess. The following outlines rules under which the mess is conducted. They are designed to conform to tradition and promote levity. Violators of these rules are subject to the wrath and mischievousness of mister/madam vice. All assigned penalties are carried out before the membership. 16.13.1. Thou shalt arrive within 10 minutes of the appointed hour. 16.13.2. Thou shalt make every effort to meet all guests. 16.13.3. Thou shalt move to the mess when thee hears the chimes and remain standing until seated by the president. 16.13.4. Thou shalt not bring cocktails or lighted smoking material into the mess.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 16.13.5. Thou shalt not leave the mess whilst convened. Military protocol overrides all calls of nature. 16.13.6. Thou shalt participate in all toasts unless thyself or thy group is honored with a toast. 16.13.7. Thou shalt ensure that thy glass is always charged when toasting. 16.13.8. Thou shalt keep toasts and comments within the limits of good taste and mutual respect. Degrading or insulting remarks will be frowned upon by the membership. However, good natured needling is encouraged. 16.13.9. Thou shalt not murder the Queen's English. 16.13.10. Thou shalt not open the hangar doors. 16.13.11. Thou shalt always use the proper toasting procedure. 16.13.12. Thou shalt fall into disrepute with thy peers if the pleats of thy cummerbund are not properly faced. 16.13.13. Thou shalt also be painfully regarded if thy clip-on bow tie rides at an obvious list. Thou shalt be forgiven; however, it thee also ride at a comparable list. 16.13.14. Thou shalt consume thy meal in a manner becoming gentlepersons. 16.13.15. Thou shalt not laugh at ridiculously funny comments unless the president first shows approval by laughing. 16.13.16. Thou shalt express thy approval by tapping thy spoon on the table. Clapping of thy hands will not be tolerated. 16.13.17. Thou shalt not question the decisions of the president. 16.13.18. When the mess adjourns, thou shalt rise and wait for the president and head table guests to leave. 16.13.19. Thou shalt enjoy thyself to thy fullest.

16.14. A Final Word. Various forms of skits or entertainment may also be included to add to the evening. The decorations, ceremony, humor, and wit contribute to the memory of the evening. A memorable event does not need to be excessively costly or lengthy, prepare an agenda and stick to the schedule. A formal program that lasts between 2 and 2 1/2 hours is ideal, allowing sufficient time for informal entertainment.

DARRELL D. JONES Lieutenant General, USAF DCS, Manpower, Personnel, and Services

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GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION References Title 4 United States Code, Chapter 1, The Flag and Seal, Seat of Government and the States AR 220-90, Army Bands, 14 December 2007 AFPD 16-1, International Affairs, 2 November 2009 AFPD 34-12, Air Force Protocol, 28 Oct 2011 AFI 13-202, Overdue Aircraft, 11 March 2010 AFI 13-213, Airfield Driving, 1 June 2011 AFI 24-101, Passenger Movement, 27 October 2004 AFI 24-301, Vehicle Operations, 1 November 2008 AFI 34-201, Use of Nonappropriated Funds (NAFs), 17 June 2002 AFI 34-242, Mortuary Affairs Program, 2 April 2008 AFI 34-1201, Protocol, 4 October 2006 AFI 36-2201, Air Force Training Program, 15 September 2010 AFI 36-2803, The Air Force Awards and Decorations Program, 15 June 2001 AFI 36-3203, Service Retirements, 8 September 2006 AFI 51-601, Gifts to the Department of the Air Force, 26 November 2003 AFI 51-604, Appointment To and Assumption of Command, 4 April 2006 AFI 65-601V1, Budget Guidance and Procedures, 3 March 2005 AFI 65-603, Official Representation Funds, 24 August 2011 AFI 84-105, Organizational Lineage, Honors, and Heraldry, 1 February 2006 AFMAN 23-110, USAF Supply Manual, 1 April 2009 AFMAN 33-363, Management of Records, 1 March 2008 AFMAN 36-2203, Drill and Ceremonies, 3 June 1996 AFOSH STD 91-100, Aircraft Flight Line - Ground Operations and Activities, 1 May 1998 HAF MD 1-6, The Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Air Force, 22 December 2008 DoDI 1005.06, Display of National Flag at Half-Staff, 27 March 2008 DoDI 7250.13, Use of Appropriated Funds for Official Representation Purposes, 30 June 2009 DoDD 4525.8-M_AFMAN 33-306, DoD Official Mail Manual, 12 October 2006 DoD 5500.7-R, Joint Ethics Regulation OPNAV Instruction 1710.7A, Department of the Navy Social Usage and Protocol Handbook

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Service Etiquette by Oretha D. Swartz Mark M. Boatner III, Military Customs and Traditions, Geenwood Press, 1976 William P. Mack & Royal W. Connell, Naval Ceremonies, Customs and Traditions, Naval Institute Press, 2004 USAFAI 36-3537, Cadet Social Decorum, 25 April 2012 Contrails 1993-1994, United States Air Force Academy Note: For additional information and tools (checklists, guides, templates, etc.) refer to the Protocol Manager’s pages of the Air Force Services Portal at http://www.usafservices.com/Managers/Protocol.aspx. Adopted Forms DD Form 2768, Military Air Passenger/Cargo Request AF Form 833, Multimedia Work Order AF Form 847, Recommendation for Change of Publication Abbreviations and Acronyms ABU—Airman Battle Uniform AFPC—Air Force Personnel Center ATOC—Air Transportation Operations Center DRU—Direct Reporting Unit DSN—Defense Switch Network DV—Distinguished Visitor ECP—Entry Control Point FOA—Field Operating Agency FOD—Foreign Object Damage GMV—Government Motor Vehicle ITA—Invitational Travel Authorization ITO—Invitational Travel Order MAJCOM—Major Command NAF—Nonappropriated Fund(s) or Numbered Air Force O&M—Operations and Maintenance OOD—Officer of the Deck ORF—Official Representation Funds OSI—Office of Special Investigations PAX—Passenger

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RHIP—Rank Hath/Has Its Privileges SecAF—Secretary of the Air Force SecDef——Secretary of Defense SM&W—Special Morale and Welfare STU—Secure Telephone Unit TA—Transient Alert YASA—You Are Seated At Terms Official Function—Any ceremony or event where senior members are operating in an official capacity with members under their command or as a host to outside members. This includes, but is not limited to, official meetings and conferences, official promotions, reenlistment and retirement ceremonies, changes of command and reorganization events, and funerals. Not all official functions are mandatory nor are they all authorized official funding. Consult the appropriate funding AFIs to determine if funding is authorized for a specific event. Official Social Function—An event where senior Air Force members or senior civilian personnel are operating in an official capacity commensurate with their position to build or reinforce relationships with counterparts, government and civic officials, international visitors, or unit members. Not all social functions are mandatory nor are they all authorized official funding. Consult the appropriate funding AFIs to determine if funding is authorized for a specific event.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 Attachment 2 TABLE SEATING ARRANGEMENTS

Note: For additional seating arrangement examples, refer to the Protocol Manager’s pages of the Air Force Services Portal at: http://www.usafservices.com/Managers/Protocol.aspx A2.1. Seating can be the key to the success of an event or conference. After the guest list is compiled, it is then used for seating arrangements. Figure A2.1. Mixed Circular Table for Ten – Equal Male and Female

Figure A2.2. Mixed Circular Table for Eight – Equal Male and Female

Note: The 1st Lady is seated to the left of the host, rather than the traditional seat of honor at the host’s right. Seating in this fashion will ensure guests are seated next to the hostess, and prevent side-by-side seating of husbands and wives. Apply this arrangement when table seating is in multiples of four (e.g. 4, 8, 12, 16, etc. places). With the table seating for any number of other than a multiple of four guests, traditional methods apply.

AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 Figure A2.3. Circular Tables for Eight – Host and Hostess at Separate Tables

Figure A2.4. Circular Table for Ten – Four Ladies, Six Gentlemen

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Figure A2.5. Head Banquet Table for Eight – Four Ladies, Four Gentlemen

Note: This example violates traditional seating convention in order to prevent a lady from being seated at the end of the table. Figure A2.6. U-Shaped Table – Mixed Seating

Note: This example violates traditional seating convention in order to prevent a lady from being seated at the end of the table. Avoid seating guests on the inside of the table.

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Figure A2.7. U-Shaped Table – Unaccompanied Seating

Note: This arrangement is useful for “stag” events. Figure A2.8. Mixed Seating – Multiples of Four Guests Including an Unmarried Couple

Note: Seat the unmarried couple side-by-side, with the lady to the gentleman’s right.

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Figure A2.9. Traditional Conference/Board Room. Ranking position (position #1) is traditionally that of the host. If there is no obvious host, the senior person sits at position #1. (See note following Figures A2.9 and A2.10) Podium

4 Double Front-View O/H Projection

14

12

8

2

6

10 1

15

1 3

11

5

9

3

7

Figure A2.10. U-Shaped Table. Ranking position (position #1) is traditionally that of the host. If there is no obvious host, the senior person sits at position #1. (See note following Figures A2.9 and A2.10) Podiu m

14

12

10

8

6

Double Front-View O/H Projection 4

2 1 3 1 3

11

9

5 7

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Note: (Figures A2.9 and A2.10): Military adage of “placing rank to the right” is applied differently in seating. The ranking position in seating is that of the host. Guidelines: Host is seated at position number 1. The position of honor is to the right of the host, so the next ranking individual or guest of honor will be seated in position #2. If the event is a briefing to senior leaders with no obvious host, then the senior person sits at position #1 and the next ranking person sits in position #2. The rest of the attendees are seated in rank or precedence orders back and forth down the table. If the host wants to give his/her seat to a ranking person or guest of honor out of courtesy, the host will then sit in position #2.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 Attachment 3 TITLES AND FORMS OF ADDRESS

Table A3.1. Titles and Forms of Address The Secretary of Defense Envelope: official

The Honorable Alexander Ryan Smith Secretary of Defense

Envelope: social

The Honorable The Secretary of Defense (and Mrs. Smith)

Secretary’s Wife

Mrs. Alexander Ryan Smith

Salutation

Dear Mr. Secretary (and Mrs. Smith)

Complimentary Close

Respectfully, or Sincerely,

Invitation Place Card

The Secretary of Defense (and Mrs. Smith) The Secretary of Defense

Introductions

Conversation

Mrs. Smith The Secretary of Defense, Mr. Smith (and Mrs. Smith) or The Honorable Alexander Ryan Smith, Secretary of Defense (and Mrs. Smith) or Secretary Smith (and Mrs. Smith) Mr. Secretary or, Mr. Smith, or, Sir Mrs. Smith

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Table A3.2. TITLES AND FORMS OF ADDRESS Service Secretaries* Envelope: official

The Honorable Alexander Ryan Smith Secretary of the Air Force (or Army or Navy)

Envelope: social

The Honorable The Secretary of the Air Force (and Mrs. Smith)

Secretary’s Wife

Mrs. Alexander Ryan Smith

Salutation

Dear Mr. Secretary (and Mrs. Smith)

Complimentary Close

Sincerely, The Secretary of the Air Force (and Mrs. Smith) The Secretary of the Air Force Mrs. Smith The Secretary of the Air Force, Mr. Smith (and Mrs. Smith) or The Honorable Alexander Ryan Smith, Secretary of the Air Force (and Mrs. Smith) or Secretary Smith (and Mrs. Smith)

Invitation Place Card Introductions

Conversation Mr. Secretary or, Mr. Smith Note: *Although the Secretaries of the Armed Services are not members of the Cabinet, they are by custom addressed in the same manner as Cabinet officers.

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Table A3.3. Titles and Forms of Address (General Officers) General, Lieutenant General, Major General, Brigadier General (Air Force, Army, Marine Corps) Envelope: official General* Scott Allen Doe, USAF (position title) Envelope: social Salutation

Complimentary Close Invitation

General* (and Mrs.) Scott Allen Doe Dear General** (and Mrs.) Doe: or for a woman officer Dear General** Doe (and Mr. Doe):

Sincerely, General** (and Mrs.) Doe or for a woman officer General Doe (and Mr. Doe) Place Card General**Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe Introductions: formal (full rank) (full name) (title position) or Introductions: social General*** Doe (and Mrs. (Mr.) Doe) Conversation General*** Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe * or Lieutenant General or Major General or Brigadier General, as appropriate ** For the Army and Air Force: Except for formal invitations, when written, the base rank is used, e.g., General Doe, not Major General Doe. The specific rank of Marine officers is customarily used on invitations and place cards as well as salutations. *** With the exception of formal introductions, use base rank in conversation, e.g., General Doe, not Major General Doe.

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Table A3.4. Titles and Forms of Address; (Captain – Colonel) Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel, Major, Captain (Air Force, Army, Marine Corps) Envelope: official Colonel* Scott Allen Doe, USAF Envelope: social Salutation

Complimentary Close Invitation

Colonel* (and Mrs.) Scott Allen Doe Dear Colonel** (and Mrs.) Doe: or for a woman officer Dear Colonel** Doe (and Mr. Doe):

Sincerely, Colonel** (and Mrs.) Doe or for a woman officer Colonel Doe (and Mr. Doe) Place Card Colonel**Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe Introductions: formal (full rank) (full name) (title position) or Introductions: social Colonel*** Doe (and Mrs. (Mr.) Doe) Conversation Colonel*** Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe * or Lieutenant Colonel or Major or Captain, as appropriate ** For the Army and Air Force: Except for formal invitations, when written, the base rank is used, e.g., Colonel Doe, not Lieutenant Colonel Doe. The specific rank of Marine officers is customarily used on invitations and place cards as well as salutations. *** With the exception of formal introductions, use base rank in conversation, e.g., Colonel Doe, not Lieutenant Colonel Doe.

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Table A3.5. Titles and Forms of Address (Lieutenants) First Lieutenant, Second Lieutenant (Air Force, Army, Marine Corps) Envelope: official First Lieutenant* Scott Doe, USAF Envelope: social Salutation

First Lieutenant* (and Mrs.) Scott Doe Dear Lieutenant** (and Mrs.) Doe: or for a woman officer Dear Lieutenant** Doe (and Mr. Doe):

Complimentary Close

Sincerely,

Invitation Place Card

Lieutenant** (and Mrs.) Doe Lieutenant**Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe (full rank) (full name) (title position) or Lieutenant*** Doe (and Mrs. (Mr.) Doe) Lieutenant*** Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe

Introductions: formal Introductions: social Conversation

* or Second Lieutenant as appropriate ** For the Army and Air Force: Except for formal invitations, when written, the base rank is used, e.g., Lieutenant Doe, not First Lieutenant Doe. The specific rank of Marine officers is customarily used on invitations and place cards as well as salutations. *** With the exception of formal introductions, use base rank in conversation, e.g., Lieutenant Doe, not First Lieutenant Doe.

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Table A3.6. Titles and Forms of Address (NCOs) Noncommissioned Officers (Air Force, Army, Marine Corps) Envelope: official Full rank Scott A. Doe, USAF*

Envelop: social

Full rank* (and Mrs.) Scott A. Doe

Salutation

Dear Sergeant** (and Mrs.) Doe: or for a woman NCO Dear Sergeant** Doe (and Mr. Doe):

Complimentary Close

Sincerely,

Invitation Place Card

Full rank** (and Mrs.) Doe Sergeant**Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe (Full rank) Doe and (Mrs. (Mr.) Doe)

Introductions Conversation

Base Rank*** Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe

* Use the full rank in the address element ** For the Army and Air Force: In salutations and place cards, the base rank is used, e.g., Sergeant Doe, not Staff Sergeant Doe. The specific rank of Marine Noncommissioned officers is customarily used on invitations and place cards as well as salutations. *** In conversation, use Chief as appropriate.

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Table A3.7. Titles and Forms of Address (Airmen) Senior Airman, Airman First Class, Airman, Airman Basic (USAF) Envelope: official Senior Airman* Scott A. Doe Envelope: social Salutation

Senior Airman* (and Mrs.) Scott Allen Doe Dear Airman** (and Mrs.) Doe:

Complimentary Close

Sincerely,

Invitation Place Card

Senior Airman** (and Mrs.) Doe Airman**Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe (full rank) Doe (and Mrs. (Mr.) Doe)

Introductions: formal Introductions: social Conversation

Airman Doe (and Mrs. (Mr.) Doe) Airman Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe * or Airman First Class or Airman or Airman Basic, as appropriate ** In salutations and place cards, the base rank is used, e.g., Airman Doe, not Senior Airman Doe *** With the exception of formal introductions, use base rank in conversation, e.g., Airman Doe, not Airman First Class Doe.

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Table A3.8. Titles and Forms of Address (Retired Officers) Retired Officer (Air Force, Army, Marine Corps) Envelope: official (full rank) Scott A. Doe, USAF, Retired* (and Mrs. Doe) Envelope: social Salutation

(full rank) (and Mrs.) Scott A. Doe Dear Base Rank** (and Mrs.) Doe: or for a woman officer Dear Base Rank** Doe (and Mr. Doe):

Complimentary Close

Sincerely,

Invitation Place Card

General** (and Mrs.) Doe General**Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe (full rank) (full name) (title position) or General*** Doe (and Mrs. (Mr.) Doe) General*** Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe

Introductions: formal Introductions: social Conversation

* or USA or USMC as appropriate. ** For the Army and Air Force: In salutations and place cards, the base rank is used, e.g., General Doe, not Major General Doe. The specific rank of Marine officers is customarily used on invitations and place cards as well as salutations. *** With the exception of formal introductions, use base rank in conversation, e.g., General Doe, not Major General Doe.

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Table A3.9. Titles and Forms of Address (Admirals) Admiral, Vice Admiral, Rear Admiral* (Navy, Coast Guard) Envelope: official Admiral* Scott Allen Doe, USN (position title) Envelope: social

Admiral* (and Mrs.) Scott Allen Doe

Salutation

Dear Admiral* (and Mrs.) Doe: or for a woman officer Dear Admiral** Doe (and Mr. Doe):

Complimentary Close

Sincerely,

Invitation Place Card

Admiral* (and Mrs.) Doe Admiral* Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe Introductions: formal (full rank) (full name) (title position) or Introductions: social Admiral* Doe (and Mrs. (Mr.) Doe) Conversation Admiral** Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe * or Vice Admiral or Rear Admiral, as appropriate. The specific rank of naval officers is customarily used on invitations and place cards as well as on envelopes ** With the exception of formal introductions, use base rank in conversation, e.g., Admiral Doe, not Vice Admiral Doe.

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Table A3.10. Titles and Forms of Address ( Captain, Commander (Navy, Coast Guard) Envelope: official

Captain* Scott Allen Doe, USN

Envelope: social Salutation

Captain* (and Mrs.) Scott Allen Doe Dear Captain* (and Mrs.) Doe: or for a woman officer Dear Captain* Doe (and Mr. Doe):

Complimentary Close Invitation

Sincerely, Captain* (and Mrs.) Doe or for a woman officer Captain* Doe (and Mr. Doe) Captain* Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe

Place Card Introductions Conversation * or Commander

Captain* Doe (and Mrs. (Mr.) Doe) Captain* Doe or Captain Mrs. (Mr.) Doe

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Table A3.11. TITLES AND FORMS OF ADDRESS Lieutenant Commander; Lieutenant; Lieutenant, junior grade; Ensign (Navy, Coast Guard) Envelope: official Lieutenant Commander* Scott A. Doe, USN (position title) Envelope: social Salutation

Complimentary Close Invitation Place Card

Lieutenant Commander* (and Mrs.) Scott A. Doe Dear Lieutenant Commander* (and Mrs.) Doe: or for a woman officer Dear Lieutenant Commander* Doe (and Mr. Doe): Sincerely,

Lieutenant Commander* (and Mrs.) Doe Lieutenant Commander*Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe Introductions: formal Lieutenant Commander Doe (and Mrs. (Mr. Doe) Introductions: social or for Ensigns Mr. (Mrs., Miss, Ms.) Doe (and Mrs. (Mr.) Doe) Conversation Lieutenant Commander* Doe or Lieutenant Commander or Mr., Mrs., Miss Doe *or Lieutenant or Lieutenant, junior grade or Ensign, as appropriate. The specific rank of naval officers is customarily used on invitations and place cards as well as on envelopes.

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Table A3.12. TITLES AND FORMS OF ADDRESS Retired Officer (Navy and Coast Guard) Envelope: official

(full rank) Scott A. Doe, USN*

Envelope: social Salutation

(full rank)* (and Mrs.) Scott A. Doe Dear Rank** (and Mrs.) Doe: or for a woman officer Dear Base Rank** Doe (and Mr. Doe):

Complimentary Close

Sincerely,

Invitation Place Card

(Rank) (and Mrs.) Doe Admiral**Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe (full rank) (full name) United States Navy, *Retired

Introductions: formal

Introductions: social Conversation

Admiral*** Doe (and Mrs. (Mr.) Doe) Admiral*** Doe Mrs. (Mr.) Doe

* or USCG ** as appropriate. The specific rank of naval officers is customarily used on invitations and place cards as well as on envelopes. *** With the exception of formal introductions, use base rank in conversation, e.g., Admiral Doe, not Rear Admiral Doe.

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 Attachment 4 TABLE A4.1 SERVICE EQUIVALENT UNIFORMS

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Notes: *If host indicates a certain dress, follow the host’s intent. **Determined by host, current fashion, local customs, time and type of event. 1. This matrix is intended to serve as a guideline for appropriate attire. Each service uniform regulation has specific guidelines for wear. Some uniforms are optional, seasonal or required for specific pay grades only. Army White Mess and Air Force Formal Dress are not pictured. Army – AR 670-1 Marine Corps – MCO P1020.34G Navy – United States Navy Uniform Regulation NAVPERS 15665I Air Force – AFI 36-2903 Coast Guard – COMDTINST M1026.6F 2. Uniforms may deviate from above matrix depending on event and/or directed by host or command. Adapted from the OCJCS Protocol Table of Service Equivalent Uniforms

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AFPAM34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 Attachment 5 ESCORT OFFICER GUIDE

A5.1. Distinguished Visitors (DV). This guide outlines primary responsibilities for escort officers and represents the "norm" in terms of usual procedures. Occasionally, a DV visit will involve unusual circumstances requiring both flexibility and adaptability. Design a plan based on known information and the advice of the project officer. A5.2. Making Contact. A5.2.1. The protocol officer in charge of the event will provide escorts with the DV's name, grade, organization, position, office telephone number and biography on the DV. Arrival/departure, lodging, and transportation information may also be provided. Exchange contact information with both the protocol and project officers. A5.2.2. Call the DV's office. The escort should introduce him or herself to the DV's secretary, executive officer and/or Aide-de-camp. A5.2.3. The escort officer should indicate who is calling why he or she is calling ("I have been appointed as the escort officer for Gen XXX for X event, and wanted to introduce myself, as well as talk about the DV's plans and requirements"). A5.2.4. Leave full name, rank, and telephone number(s) with the DV's office A5.2.5. Obtain the correct phonetic pronunciation and spelling of the DV's name. A5.2.6. Double check flight numbers, arrival and departure times, and transportation requirements (MilAir, Commercial Air, Rental Car, etc.); protocol handles lodging reservations, but confirm if the information is available. Do not assume the DV's office will provide an update when there is a change. Contact his/her office again 2-3 days prior to the event (MilAir requests are confirmed during this period and transportation adjustments may be required). A5.3. Transportation. Whether the DV is arriving at the airport or base operations, check with protocol to confirm transportation was arranged with base transportation. If the DV arrives via MilAir at base operations, either the escort officer or a transportation driver will be responsible for picking the DV up. In either case, the escort officer will greet the DV upon arrival. If escorting a general officer, make sure the appropriate star plate is on the car (the star(s) should point up). If alone in the car, before driving, remove the plate. Replace it before the DV gets in the vehicle. A5.4. Lodging Check-In. Before departing for the airport or base operations, pre-register the DV at the lodging office, pick up the room key, locate the room, and inspect it. During the inspection, ensure the following items/actions are accounted for/executed. A5.4.1. DV's key opens the door A.5.4.2. Room is clean and furniture is in good repair A5.4.3. Fresh linen is on the bed A5.4.4. Toilet paper is available/toilet flushes properly A5.4.5. Plenty of towels and washcloths are clean and available

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A5.4.6. TV, remote control, DVD player and lights are operational A5.4.7. Refrigerator is on, works properly, and is stocked sufficiently A5.4.8. Check expiration dates on amenity items (candy bars, milk, juices, etc.); remove expired items and report or return them to the lodging front desk A5.4.9. Ample hangers are in the closet, iron, ironing board, and starch A5.4.10. Check alarm clocks to ensure clocks are set to correct time A5.4.11. Phone works (unsecured/secure); directions & directory are located near the phone A5.4.12. Nothing remains in the room from the previous occupant A5.4.13. Room temperature is comfortable A5.4.14. Welcome notes or other welcome items are visible and displayed attractively A5.5. Pick-Up. Stay apprised of the DV's schedule. Be familiar with and utilize the following two checklists, one for commercial air arrivals/departures and one for MilAir arrivals/departures. Commercial reservations often change to MilAir arrangements 1-3 days prior to the visit. A5.6. Commercial Air. A5.6.1. Check with protocol to confirm transportation was arranged with base transportation. After pre-registering the DV at the lodging office and inspecting quarters, drive to the airport and park as conveniently as possible. A5.6.2. Enter the airport and reconfirm arrival time of aircraft on visual displays. A5.6.3. Locate DV's gate/disembarkation area and wait for him/her there. Upon arrival, greet the DV, introduce yourself, and escort the DV to the baggage claim area. A5.6.4. Assist the DV them with luggage and put the luggage in the trunk (identify the trunk release mechanism in advance). A5.6.5. Open the car door for the DV. DVs are normally seated in the right rear seat, however, he or she may want to ride in front; be flexible. A5.6.6. Drive to DV lodging or wherever the DV needs to go from the airport. A5.6.7. If DV lodging is the destination, the vehicle should pull up to the entrance of the building where the DV's room is located. Assist the DV with the car door and luggage, and show the DV to his or her room. Before departing, discuss any requirements with the DV, identify the location of the staff car/keys (if one is available) and agree on the next meeting point (if possible). Provide the DV an escort/business card with phone numbers. A5.6.8. Some DVs require minimal assistance from escort officers and may dismiss the escort officer after the initial greeting. This is appropriate provided the DV knows how to contact the escort officer if assistance is needed during the visit. A5.6.9. Commercial Departure. Arrange or confirm transportation with protocol again. Pick up DV at previously agreed upon time and place. Assist with luggage, transport DV to the airport, assist with luggage and escort him or her to the gate. Confirm aircraft departure time has not changed. A5.7. Military Air (MILAIR).

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A5.7.1. Coordinate with the protocol officer to obtain instructions on requirements and reporting location for MILAIR arrivals. After contacting base transportation to confirm vehicle support, pre-registering the DV at the lodging office, and inspecting quarters, drive to base operations (if necessary). Park in the front parking lot if utilizing a POV and walk through the building to the back counter. If in a staff car, pull around onto the flight line and park the car in the circular drive directly in front of the building. Note: This is all accomplished in coordination with the protocol officer and dependent upon local installation procedures. A5.7.2. If requested, assist or check with base operations on the following: A5.7.2.1. Check to ensure a welcome message is on the appropriate base marquee(s) A5.7.2.2. Arrival time of the aircraft (provide the call sign and the DV's name). A5.7.2.3. Ask the controllers to identify exactly where the aircraft will park on the flight line (confirm visually). Transient alert crew will set up equipment near the intended aircraft parking spot. A5.7.3. If a local DV is also assigned to greet the incoming DV, locate the individual, carry out introductions and brief him or her as necessary. If the local DV's rank is below the incoming DV's, then the local DV should also salute the aircraft. The local DV should stand to the escort officer’s right on the flight line. He or she should lead "present arms" and "order arms" for both, unless this individual is a civilian. In this case, only the military escort officer will salute. A5.7.4. As the aircraft lands, the escort officer positions him or herself on the center edge of the painted red carpet. Although a guideline, the escort officer should ensure he or she stays out of the way of danger. A5.7.5. As the aircraft comes to a stop, military should salute; once the engines are off, move toward the aircraft door. A5.7.6. The transportation driver should pull staff car up to the aircraft. If the escort officer is driving, pull the car close to the aircraft while the local DV greets and leave it running while assisting with luggage. If both the greeter and the driver, the escort officer will have to be flexible. (Hint: Position the car close to the yellow line, leave it running as the aircraft taxis toward its parking spot, jump out of the vehicle, and quickly take position to salute and greet.) A5.7.7. Greet the DV, accomplish introductions and assist with all bags. A5.7.8. Open the car door for the DV, ensure bags are in the trunk. A5.7.9. Salute the car as it drives away (if a transportation driver is present or the DV chooses to drive the staff car); or, get in the car and drive the DV to the DV quarters/destination. A5.7.10. If DV lodging is the destination, pull the staff car up to the entrance of the building where the DV's room is located. Assist the DV with the car door and luggage, and show the DV to his or her room. Before departing, discuss any requirements with the DV and agree on the next meeting point (if possible). Provide the DV an escort/business card with phone numbers. If the staff car does not remain at the DVQ for the DV's use, return the vehicle to

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transportation. If the car stays with the DV (usually the case), leave the car and arrange personal transportation. A5.7.11. Some DVs require minimal assistance from escort officers and may dismiss the escort officer after the initial greeting. This is appropriate provided the DV knows how to contact the escort officer if assistance is needed during the visit. A5.7.12. MILAIR Departure. Call base operations in advance to confirm departure time or to inform them (and the aircrew) that the DV desires to depart earlier or later. Pick up the DV at agreed upon time and location and transport to base operations or meet him/her at base operations. The aircrew should be ready to receive. Assist with bags and salute the aircraft as soon as it begins to move out (if military), and then move back toward base operations. Remain at base operations until the aircraft takes off. A5.8. Reminders. A5.8.1. In the days prior to the DV's arrival, protocol will obtain updates on the DV's travel plans. Stay in contact with the protocol project officer to avoid miss any changes. A5.8.2. Uniform for escort duty is Service Dress unless instructed otherwise. A5.8.3. Be able to properly pronounce the DV's name and obtain a biography in order to become familiar with the DV's background and appearance (for recognition purposes at the airport). A5.8.4. Use common sense and remain flexible. A5.8.5. Consider uniform condition and personal appearance A5.8.6. Study directions to and from the airport prior to the DV's arrival and dry run the route if necessary. A5.8.7. Keep a list of relevant POC telephone numbers (i.e. transportation, protocol, and lodging) available at all times; protocol will provide this list. A5.8.8. Have a copy and be familiar with the itinerary of the event the DV is attending. A5.8.9. If questions or concerns arise, contact protocol. If asked a question to which the answer is unknown, do not make any assumptions, contact protocol for guidance. A5.8.10. Arrive at base operations or the airport at least 30 minutes prior to scheduled arrival time. A5.8.11. Be prepared for inclement weather (umbrella). A5.8.12. Be familiar with the events the DV is attending (i.e., if attending a conference, obtain a copy of the conference itinerary and briefing agenda from the project officer). A5.8.13. Know locations of restrooms, telephones, etc. A5.8.14. Know dress requirements for every event (for the DV and the spouse). A5.8.15. Carry a notepad.

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Figure A5.1. QUICK REFERENCE ESCORT CHECKLIST 1. Escorts are notified by unit executive officer of escort duty. 2. Contact protocol and obtain information pertinent to the DV visit. 3. Call the DV’s office to speak with the DV’s secretary, exec and/or aide; provide contact numbers and inquire about the DV’s itinerary. 4. Monitor the DV’s arrival time-it usually changes! Do this through protocol instead of calling the DV’s office too frequently. If contacted by the DV’s office with an update, back-brief protocol. It may affect a local DV greeter's schedule. 5. Once arrival/departure times, lodging, and transportation are confirmed, mentally walk through the plan to ensure every detail is covered. 6. Pre-register the DV at the DV quarters before his/her arrival. Pick up the key, locate the room and inspect it if it is ready. 7. Arrive at the designated arrival point (base ops/airport) at least 30 minutes ahead of time. If there are any changes, communicate them to the local DV greeter so he/she does not waste time by arriving too early or late. 8. Double check that transportation is available with the correct rank displayed (if appropriate). Brief the local DV greeter upon arrival and get into position soon after the ten mile out call-do not forget earplugs! 9. Greet the DV upon arrival, collect any bags, and transport the DV to the appropriate destination. 10. Agree on departure plans with the DV, as well as any other important issues, before departing. Ensure the DV has all necessary contact info in case needed. 11. See the DV off-assist with any extras and everything required. Call protocol for assistance.

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BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE AIR - AF.mil

BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE AIR FORCE PAMPHLET 34-1202 10 JANUARY 2013 Incorporating Change 1, 30 JANUARY 2015 Services GUIDE TO PROTO...

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