Army Facilities Management - United States Army

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Army Regulation 420–1

Facilities Engineering

Army Facilities Management

Rapid Action Revision (RAR) Issue Date: 24 August 2012

Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 12 February 2008

UNCLASSIFIED

Chapter 24 Acquisition and Sale of Utilities Services 24–1. Introduction This chapter concerns policy and procedures for the acquisition and sale of utility services. 24–2. Policy AR 420–41 contains the policy information referred to in paragraph 24,–1 above. Subjects within that regulation include— a. Acquisition of utility services. b. Sales of utilities and related services.

Part Six Special Policies Chapter 25 Fire and Emergency Services Section I Introduction 25–1. Overview This chapter implements statutes and DODI 6055.06, Fire and Emergency Services (F&ES) Program, requirements. It prescribes Army policies and responsibilities covering all fire fighting (structural, aircraft, and wildland), emergency dispatching services, by civilians or military, fire prevention (technical services), hazardous materials (HAZMAT)/ Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High-yield Explosives (CBRNE) response, Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD), Global War on Terrorism (GWOT), emergency medical services (EMS), rescue services, disaster preparedness, and ancillary services. 25–2. Applicability This chapter applies to the active Army, Army National Guard, the Army National Guard of the United States, Army Reserve, and tenants, concessionaires and contractors on active Army installations, except as noted below. a. This regulation does not apply to— (1) Installations or parts thereof that have been licensed to the States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, District of Columbia, Territory of the Virgin Islands, and Guam for Army National Guard use. (2) Civil works functions of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, except when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is operating on or using APF of military installations and activities. (3) In cases where tenant Army activities where another military department or Government agency, such as the General Services Administration, is the host agency and maintains real property accountability and control, the host agency normally retains ultimate responsibility for fire and emergency services. However, in accordance with the host agencies laws and regulations, the host agency may require a tenant Army activity to cooperate with the host agency’s fire and emergency services requirements and provide action in accordance with the terms and conditions of a hosttenant agreement to protect Federal property and economic interests, (for example 36 CFR 251.56 or 43 CFR 2920.7). In such cases, the tenant Army activity may need to meet or implement specific requirements of this chapter. b. In areas outside the United States, Status of Forces Agreements (SOFA) or other country-to-country agreements may take precedence over this regulation. 25–3. Chapter exponent The exponent of this chapter is the ACSIM (DAIM–ISL). 25–4. Chapter responsibilities The responsibilities listed below are in addition to the general responsibilities identified in paragraph 1–4. a. Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations and Environment). The ASA (IE&E) provides policy and program direction for F&ES. b. Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management. ACSIM is the ARSTAF proponent for the promulgation and integration of F&ES policies to the planning, programming, execution, and operation of Army installation management. c. Army commands, Army service component commands, and direct reporting units. The ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs will— (1) Provide fire and emergency services per this regulation to installations under their command and control.

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(2) Within their approval authority, ensure both Army and current fire protection consensus standards are applied for design, construction, location, and use of facilities. (3) Provide direction for the execution of technical investigation of major fires (over $250,000 in damage and/or loss of life), and forward a formal report of findings to the ACSIM. d. Fire and emergency services functional manager. The F&ES functional manager will— (1) Provide HQDA representation to the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) as required by the Office of the Secretary of the Army. (2) Establish goals and objectives; provide policies, procedures, and uniform operational guidelines to include input to the Army program objective memorandum (POM) and to planning, programming, budgeting and execution system (PPBES) procedures. (3) Provide oversight for implementation of these policies and procedures, attainment of goals, and objectives. (4) Advise IMCOM, ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs with installation responsibilities, other ARSTAF, and the Secretariat in matters pertaining to resourcing, operation, and management of the Army Fire and Emergency Services (F&ES) program. (5) Coordinate policies, standards (such as UFC and Army Standards/Standard Design), and reports with other DA, USACE, Federal, and civilian organizations through membership and participation in professional working groups, committees, boards, seminars, forums and fire protection organizations. (6) Interpret and prepare Army responses to Congressional inquiries as well as Government Accounting Office (GAO), DOD and DAIG, U.S. Army Audit Agency (USAAA) reviews, audits, and investigations pertaining to the Army’s Fire and Emergency Services Program. (7) Announce and promote interagency training opportunities and partner with Industry training programs (for example, International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC), National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), and International City/County Managers Association (ICMA)). (8) Serve as rotating Chairperson of DOD F&ES Working Group under the auspices of the Defense Environmental Security Council. (9) Review annual National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) and Army Occupational Safety and Health Annual 1500 reports. (10) Determine F&ES requirements during closing, laidaway, and caretaker operations. (11) Coordinate annual Worldwide Department of Defense (DOD)/International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) Training Conference, on a rotating basis with other services, and assist the IMCOM with Army Training sessions, workshops, and Awards Luncheon. (12) Ensure that Army F&ES wildland fire program complies with the Army Wildland Fire Policy Guidance located at (http://www.hqda.army.mil/acsimweb/fd/policy/fire/docs/Wildland02firePolicy.pdf). (13) Publish and promote the use of the F&ES Web site at (http://www.hqda.army.mil/acsimweb/fd/policy/fire/ firecur.htm). e. Director of Environmental Programs. The Director of Environmental Programs with the assistance from the U.S. Army Environmental Center will provide wildland fire support to the F&ES Functional Manager. f. Deputy Commanding General (DCG), Installation Management Command. IMCOM, is responsible for— (1) Formulating and integrating broad based plans to significantly improve the F&ES function within IMCOM. (2) Advising on requirements and recommending to ACSIM, changes to the Army F&ES program. (3) Ensuring regions and installations/garrisons implement F&ES regulatory requirements, as well as Army policies, regulations, and programs. (4) Implementing Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Position Classification Standard, Fire Protection and Prevention Series, GS–081. (5) Providing oversight and evaluation of the effectiveness of the F&ES ORI program within IMCOM. (6) Providing oversight and evaluation of the Installation Status Report (ISR) emergency services scores and ratings. (7) Preparing program status reports, conducting staff assistance visits, participating in DOD F&ES Working Group meetings, and supporting group initiatives, that is, Army Standards/Standard Designs. (8) Evaluating and recommending to ACSIM, actions relating to garrison F&ES waiver requests and assessment of the risk. (9) Reviewing and tracking the status of F&ES staffing within IMCOM. Action plans will be developed for any deviations noted. (10) Reviewing and tracking the status of fire apparatus/equipment acquisition and procurement within IMCOM. (11) Consolidating, reviewing, and submitting the annual Army Fire Loss Reports (exceeding $500 or more loss) required by the ACSIM. (12) Reviewing and coordinating the status of F&ES functions with , Army Service Component Commands, and Direct Reporting Units. (13) Reviewing and tracking fire/accident investigations, fire/accident data, and correction of findings.

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(14) Implementing and executing the Army F&ES annual awards program. (15) Participating in the annual DOD World Wide F&ES Training Forum, and conducting Army training sessions, workshops, and Awards Luncheon. (16) Advising and providing F&ES technical advice to HQ IMCOM Staff, Regions, and Garrisons. (17) Participating in the coordination of F&ES policies, standards, and reports with other DA, USACE, Federal, and civilian organizations through membership in professional working groups, committees, boards, seminars, forums and fire protection organizations. (18) Providing qualified fire protection specialists at the headquarters and regions. (19) Providing direction for the execution of technical investigations of major fires (over $250,000 in damage and/or loss of life), and forwarding a formal report of findings to the ACSIM. (20) Promoting regional fire academies (satellite DOD Fire Academy training centers) meeting firefighter certification standards, and cooperative Mutual/Reciprocal Aid agreements with civil sector fire departments. (21) Conducting F&ES ORIs triennially (once every three years) within IMCOM and Child Development Center inspections as necessary. (22) Performing fire investigations in coordination with CID, FBI, and installation/garrison fire departments. (23) Monitoring and overseeing implementation of installation/garrison F&ES plans, programs, budgets, and operations, to ensure compliance with DOD and DA regulations. (24) Ensuring DOD, Army, and current fire protection national consensus standards are applied for design, construction, location, and use of facilities. (25) Reviewing, validating, prioritizing, consolidating, and forwarding as appropriate installation/garrison reports. (26) Ensuring a Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Management Information System (MIS), as a management tool for data maintenance and record keeping, is implemented at IMCOM garrisons. g. Senior Commander. The Senior Commander of an installation, is responsible for executive level oversight of installation support services. The Senior Commander will be a general officer appointed on orders by HQDA. The SC need not reside or work on the installation. The Army Reserve Senior Commander is the CAR for Army Reservefunded installations and Army Reserve BASOPS command and control headquarters. The Army National Guard Senior Commander is the Director, Army National Guard (DARNG), for National Guard-funded installations. h. Directors of Installation Management Command Regions. IMCOM Region Directors will— (1) Implement IMCOM programs, policies, and management practices as outlined in paragraph 25–4f. (2) Facilitate communications and coordination between the headquarters, IMCOM proponent for fire and emergency response services and the garrison Directorate of Emergency Services staff. (3) Provide a qualified fire protection specialist per DOD 6055.06–M. (4) Monitor and oversee implementation of installation/garrison F&S plans, programs, budgets, and operations to ensure compliance with DOD and DA regulations. (5) Ensure DOD, Army, and current fire protection national consensus standards are applied for design, construction, location, and use of facilities. (6) Review, validate, prioritize, consolidate, and forward as appropriate installation/garrison reports. (7) Ensure a commercial off–the–shelf management information system is implemented at their installations/garrisons. (8) Provide direction for the execution of technical investigation of major fires (over $250,000 in damage and/or loss of life), and forward a formal report of findings to the ACSIM. (9) Promote regional fire academies (satellite DOD Fire Academy training centers), meeting firefighter certification standards per DOD 6055.06–M and cooperative Mutual/Reciprocal Aid agreements with civil sector fire departments. (10) Conduct F&ES operational readiness inspections triennially (once every 3 years) and Child Development Center inspections. (11) Perform fire investigations in coordination with the Criminal Investigation Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation, and installation/garrison fire departments. i. Garrison Commanders. (1) Ensure that the Directorate of Emergency Services (DES) is the garrison entity that provides for the protection, welfare and safety of the garrison community. This includes first responders to emergencies, as well as those functions that plan responses, educate the community and disseminate public safety-related information. (2) Execute, maintain, and enforce an effective F&ES program. (3) Ensure that recruitment and promotion of F&ES personnel meets the certification requirements of DOD 6055. 06–M. (4) Implement a Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Management Information System (MIS) for the use as a management tool for F&ES data maintenance and record keeping. In addition, the Emergency Management Information System (EMIS) or its replacement is permitted at chemical surety installations to track and manage chemical emergencies.

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(5) Approve garrison F&ES assessments of the risks, and submit waiver requests, if applicable. (6) Ensure serviced tenant activities reimburse installations for F&ES as defined by Memorandum of Agreements (MOAs) and Interservice Support Agreements (ISSAs). (7) Designate an installation Wildland Fire Program Manager in either F&ES or natural resources organization, and approve the Installation Wildland Fire Management Plan when applicable. (8) Establish a method for commercial procurement of meals and supplies in emergency situations. (9) Army National Guard State Installation Commanders of Federally-owned Training Sites and Commanders of Army Reserve Regional Readiness Commands may delegate within their staffs the same responsibilities as listed for the Garrison Commanders elsewhere within this regulation. j. Chief, Fire and Emergency Services. The F&ES chiefs will ensure all fire department members meet training and certification requirements outlined in DOD 6055.06–M and are properly drug tested per Executive Order 12564. Emergency communications center and emergency medical services personnel assigned to F&ES departments are included. The F&ES chiefs will develop a Strategic Plan (STRAP) that is consonant with the DOD F&ES STRAP and the following: (1) Manage and direct F&ES programs. (2) Provide emergency dispatch services. (3) Provide emergency response services for structure fires. (4) Provide emergency response services for aircraft rescue fire fighting (ARFF) if required. (5) Provide fire prevention services. (6) Provide emergency response services for hazardous materials (HAZMAT) and weapons of mass destruction (WMD) incidents. (7) Provide emergency response services for wildland fires if required. (8) Provide emergency medical response services (EMS) if required. (9) Conduct rescue operations. (10) Provide specialized training, if resources permit. k. Senior Army Commander in a Theater of Operations. When fire fighting teams are deployed OCONUS, senior Army commander in the theater will have the same responsibilities as those listed for ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs in c, above. l. Commandant, United States Army Engineer School. The Commandant, United States Army Engineer School is responsible for developing procedures for the Army’s military firefighters (MOS 21M and also Officers or Warrant Officers serving in Fire Marshal positions) to include developing doctrine, training, leader development, organization, materials, and operational concepts. m. Firefighting detachment commanders and/or non-commissioned officers in charge. Firefighting detachment commanders and/or non-commissioned officer in charge will— (1) All MOS 21M personnel are trained and certified in accordance with paragraph 25–61, Certification Requirements. (2) Orders are issued to qualified firefighters assigned to authorized positions. (3) Firefighting operations are conducted safely and according to this regulation and FM 5-415. (4) Orders authorizing, changing, or terminating fire fighting status and DA Form 4730 (Certificate for Performance of Hazardous Duty) are forwarded to the servicing Finance Office/Defense Accounting Office in a transmittal letter no later than the day after receipt or preparation in accordance with AR 37–104–4 . (5) All MTOE assigned equipment and fire truck apparatus maintenance is performed in accordance with paragraph 25–7, Fire and Emergency Services Apparatus and Equipment, and any applicable regulatory guidance. (6) Management standards/guidelines are met in accordance with paragraph 25–9, Management. (7) Firefighting training program is followed in accordance with paragraph 25–10, Fire and Emergency Services Training. (8) Firefighting detachments provide emergency response services for structure fires as outlined in section IV, Provide Emergency Response Services for Structure Fires. (9) Firefighting detachments conduct ARFF operations according to section V, Provide Emergency Response Services for ARFF. (10) Fire prevention services in theatre of operations are established and provided, to include prevention and inspection, and that a standard operating procedure/guideline for the theatre area of operations is written. (11) Guidelines for fire extinguishers are followed according to paragraph 25–33, Fire Extinguishers. (12) Firefighting detachments provide initial emergency response to emergencies involving Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) and Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and Chemical Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and High Explosives (CBRNE) while in theatre, according to guidelines outlined in section IX of this chapter. (13) Firefighting detachments provide emergency response and rescue services for wildland fires according to guidelines outlined in section X of this chapter, Provide Emergency Response Services for Wildland Fires.

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(14) Firefighting detachments provide emergency medical response services according to guidelines outlined in section XI of this chapter, Provide Emergency Medical Response Services. (15) Firefighting detachments conduct technical rescue operations according to guidelines outlined in section XII of this chapter, Conduct Technical Rescue Operations. 25–5. Statutory and other authority Title 29, Section 651, United States Code (29 USC 651, et seq. ); 10 USC 2465; Section 29, Part 1910, Code of Federal Regulations (29 CFR 1910 ), 29 CFR 1960 (and other CFR provisions applicable to fire and emergency services (F&ES)); and issuances from the Office of Management and Budget and the General Services Administration provide authority for this regulation. 25–6. Fire and emergency services management a. Surety operational fire and emergency services requirements. Those installations/garrisons with surety requirements, to include those associated with nuclear, chemical, and biological activities, will ensure that necessary and appropriate F&ES planning, programming, training, preparation, and execution capabilities, are in place to support those requirements. This includes the expectation of periodic F&ES rehearsals and exercises to ensure proficiency in the execution of response plans. During emergencies involving chemical surety material, the Incident Commander (IC) will operate as part of the Initial Response Force (IRF) in a position subordinate to the chemical surety on scene coordinator. b. Fire and emergency services operational readiness inspections. (1) Responsibility for conducting F&ES operational readiness inspections rests with the, Army Service Component Commands, and Direct Reporting Units and/or IMCOM, whichever holds responsibility for command and control and funding for the installation. Operational readiness inspections of F&ES departments will be conducted at least triennially (every 3 years) by a higher headquarters level using the current DA operational readiness inspections checklist. (2) The fire chief will make annual self-inspections using the current DA operational readiness inspections checklist. (3) The most recent annual self-inspection or triennial operational readiness inspections will be used to support ratings used in the annual Installation Status Report. c. Fire and emergency services operations. The fire chief or the designated senior fire officer shall be the Incident Commander (IC) for all F&ES operations. 25–7. Fire and emergency services apparatus and equipment a. Personal protective equipment. As a minimum, installations/garrisons will provide personal protective equipment (PPE) that meet the following requirements: (1) Per DODI 6055.06 (2) Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA), per NFPA 1404 and 29 CFR 1910.134. (3) Station wear is considered personal protective equipment and shall comply with NFPA 1975, Station/Work Uniforms for Fire and Emergency Services. (4) Predominantly natural fiber physical fitness clothing to support participation in the DOD mandated Fitness/ Wellness Program. (5) Personal Alert Safety Systems (PASS) for all firefighters per NFPA 1982. (6) Personal protective equipment per 29 CFR 1910.132, general requirements; 1910.133, eye and face protection; 1910.135, head protection; 1910.136, foot protection; 1910.138, hand protection. (7) Mission requirements may require supplemental PPE be provided. PPE will meet the applicable standard for the type of clothing issued (NFPA, OSHA, and National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG) standards). (8) If a conflict exists between DOD, NFPA, CFR or OSHA standards, the more stringent standard would apply. b. Procurement of fire apparatus. The procurement of fire fighting apparatus (FFA) is contained within the Nontactical Vehicle (NTV) acquisition program. This program is centrally managed and is Other Procurement Army (OPA) funded. c. Fire department equipment. (1) Vehicle mounted and personnel equipment will conform to applicable National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), and common table of allowances (CTA) directives. (2) Fire departments may use decals and safety striping on all administrative, command, and support vehicles. (3) All fire apparatus will have on-board intercom communications system with radio interface to enhance command and control and also provide superior hearing protection. (4) NFPA 1932, Use, Maintenance, and Service Testing of In-Service Fire Department Ground Ladders for ladder maintenance shall be followed. (5) Provide portable radios for supervisors, lead firefighters, fire inspectors and other fire protection personnel as justified by a standard operational procedure (SOP) / standard operational guideline (SOG) for non-tactical radios.

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(6) As a minimum, one thermal imager will be provided for each assigned fire company. (7) Life expectancies of various primary fire fighting apparatus are as follows: (a) HAZMAT and rescue vehicles 12 years. (b) Engines and ARFF vehicles 15 years. (c) Aerial ladder trucks 20 years. d. Vehicle inspection, maintenance, testing, and recordkeeping. Garrisons must comply with DODI 6055.06, NFPA standards, and the following: (1) General vehicle care. Care of vehicles at the fire department includes— (a) Organizational maintenance. (b) Preventive maintenance. (c) Intermediate maintenance. (d) Capability testing. (e) Vehicle status recordkeeping. (2) Technician certification. NFPA 1071, Standard for Emergency Vehicle Technician Professional Qualifications, requires that an emergency vehicle technician must be qualified to work on emergency response vehicles. Emergency Vehicle Technician (EVT) Certification Commission exams are listed in appendix A of NFPA 1071 as a means for the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) to determine a technician’s qualifications. e. Fire and emergency services personnel will— (1) Ensure requisitions for fire fighting equipment parts have the appropriate issue priority designator (IPD). This IPD will equal the highest force activity designator (FAD) unit supported by the fire department. For example, spare parts requirements for fire fighting equipment that supports an installation FAD III unit will equal the IPD authorized for the FAD III unit (see AR 725–50; chap 2, for further guidance on FADs and IPDs). (2) Perform operator’s preventive maintenance checks and services (PMCS) to keep the apparatus in reliable working order. The applicable technical manual outlines PMCS procedures. Annotate discrepancies on an apparatus maintenance checklist reflecting manufacturer’s maintenance requirements and NFPA 1901, Automotive Fire Apparatus; and report them to unit maintenance for correction. (3) Take immediate action to return to service any fire fighting or rescue vehicle that is out of service. Maintain a separate logbook or automated equivalent to record vehicle-out-of-commission time based on a 24 hour per day requirement. (4) Ensure proper completion and continual update of RCS 1577 (using DA Form 3665) report. (5) Conduct vehicle service tests per NFPA 1911 and other applicable standards. Record tests on DA Form 5380 (Fire Apparatus Test Record). (6) Aerial ladder tests, will be conducted per NFPA 1914, Testing Fire Department Aerial Devices, for the annual testing by a certified organization and maintain testing records for the life of the vehicle. Section II Manage and Direct Fire and Emergency Services Programs 25–8. Program objective Manage and direct core F&ES programs and program development to meet installation mission. 25–9. Management a. Management of resources. (1) Ensure the following standards/requirements are met: (a) DODI 6055.06 and Manpower Staffing Standards System (MS–3) Final Report (FIN–REP)/Application Fire Protection (Army Common) CONUS or submit a waiver request through the appropriate chain of command to HQDA, ACSIM. (b) Establish and maintain an occupational safety and health program in accordance with NFPA standard 1500 and compile data for the Army Occupational Safety and Health 1500 Annual reports (http://www.hqda.army.mil/acsimweb/ fd/virlibrary/virtualLibrary/pages/mem_dir-f.htm). (c) 29 CFR 1910.1200. (d) 29 CFR 1910.146. (e) 32 CFR 626. (f) Army wildland fire policy guidance (http://www.hqda.army.mil/acsimweb/fd/virlibrary/virtualLibrary/pages/mem_dir-f.htm). (g) DODI 2000.18. (h) NFPA 1582: Standard on Comprehensive Occupational Medical Program for Fire Departments and NFPA 1583: Standard on Health-Related Fitness Programs for firefighters. (i) DODI 6055.06, paragraph 6.7, Fitness and Wellness. 278

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(j) SB 700–20, Reportable Items Selected for Authorization (This item is included on EM 0007), CTA 50–909, and CTA 50–970. (k) FM 5–415 (deploying and using engineer fire fighting teams). (l) Hazard communication program, OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120. (2) Cross staffing of F&ES apparatus is authorized, except as specifically prohibited in this regulation. (3) Firefighters will not perform duties or details that interfere with F&ES unless authorized by the Fire Chief. (4) Garrisons will integrate MTOE 21M deployable firefighters with TDA fire departments to maintain MOS proficiencies, but these MTOE firefighters will not offset TDA requirements. b. Chief, Fire and Emergency Services. (1) Manages the F&ES organization and may be assigned additional duties as the Base/Installation Emergency/ Disaster Preparedness Officer with duties per DODI 6055.06. (2) The fire chief or designated senior fire officer (SFO) at the emergency incident is the incident commander and is responsible for the conduct of all F&ES operations according to the National Incident Management System. However, for responses to releases of special nuclear materials or chemical agent materials (as defined in AR 50–5, AR 50–6, and AR 50–7), the Commander may appoint another appropriately trained and qualified individual to serve as incident commander. (3) F&ES personnel are authorized to obtain meals from appropriated fund dining facilities per AR 30–22. When meals are required during F&ES operations, the installation fire chief may purchase meals using a Government purchase card from local sources. (4) Develop Standard Operating Guides and/or Standard Operating Procedures in accordance with Appendix R. c. Contracted fire and emergency services. Contracting for F&ES requires performance oriented statements of work (SOWs) (see DODI 4100.33). SOW will be reviewed by Fire Protection Specialist for technical accuracy and compliance. Installations shall not obligate or expend funds for entering into a contract for fire fighting functions at any military installation or facility per 10 USC 2465 except for the following contracts: (1) Except as provided in subparagraph (2) below, funds appropriated to the DOD may not be obligated or expended for the purpose of entering into a contract for the performance of fire fighting or security-guard functions at any military installation or facility. (2) The prohibition in subparagraph (1), above does not apply to the following contracts: (a) A contract to be carried out at a location outside the United States (including its commonwealths, territories, and possessions) at which member of the armed forces would have to be used for the performance of a function described in subsection (1) at the expense of unit readiness. (b) A contract to be carried out on a Government-owned but privately operated installation. (c) A contract (or the renewal of a contract) for the performance of a function under contract on 24 September 1983. (d) A contract for the performance of fire fighting functions if the contract is— 1. For a period of one year or less; and 2. Covers only the performance of fire fighting functions that, in the absence of the contract, would have to be performed by members of the armed forces who are not readily available to perform such functions by reason of a deployment. d. No cost fire and emergency services from public agencies. Whenever possible, installations and Army Reserve Centers located within the limit of a municipality, fire protection district, or other government subdivision will rely on that public agency for cost free protection, when that F&ES protection meets or exceed the requirements as specified in this document and DODI 6055.06. e. Mutual and automatic aid agreements. (1) Mutual and automatic aid agreements will be formally documented. Sample mutual aid agreements are shown at figure S–1 (United States/CONUS) and figure S–2 (Foreign/OCONUS). (2) Only the garrison commander acting on behalf of the Secretary of the Army and an authorized representative of the fire organization may execute the agreement. Garrisons will review and update all mutual aid agreements biennially (every other year). The fire chief will maintain copies of all agreements. f. Technical standards, public law, and deviations. (1) Commanders of garrisons must request any waiver in writing through their respective chain of command to HQDA (ACSIM) for appropriate action. This waiver authority does not apply to Public Laws. (2) Statutory and other authority is contained in 29 USC 651, et. seq.; 29 CFR sections 1910, 1960 (and other CFR provisions applicable to Fire and Emergency Services); Homeland Security Presidential Directive/HSPD–5, Subject: Management of Domestic Incidents; and OMB and GSA issuances. (3) Facilities subject to the requirements of the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) per 42 USC 4151–4156 and 29 USC 794 will meet the ADAAG whenever ADAAG provides equal or greater accessibility than UFAS. (4) The U.S. Army has adopted the most current National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) codes and standards. As each NFPA Standard is revised, the ACSIM and IMCOM F&ES staff will review the standard and issue Technical

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Implementation Guidance as necessary for the new standard. Title 15 USC 272 requires all Federal agencies and departments use technical standards that are developed or adopted by voluntary consensus bodies, such as the NFPA. If DOD elects not to use these consensus standards, the DOD must give the Office of Management and Budget an explanation why it elected to use different standards. (5) Design, construction, and maintenance and repair of projects for Army Reserve facilities (including tri-Service Armed Forces Reserve Centers) will comply with AR 140–483. (6) Garrisons will subscribe to the NFPA National Fire Code renewal service (or equivalent electronic media service) whereby NFPA sends changes to subscribers. This Army regulation takes precedence over all technical and field manuals. The publications listed in appendix A give more guidance on various aspects of fire and emergency services. (Also, appendix A tells how to order these publications.) g. Fire and emergency services distinctive identification. Garrisons will issue badges, collar brass, patches, baseball caps, and name tags for all fire and emergency services personnel (military and civilian) to wear while performing their official duties. 25–10. Fire and emergency services training a. Fire and Emergency Services Training Program. (1) Administration. Develop and implement a comprehensive F&ES training program and designate a training officer and department instructors as required. Include training requirements in the annual budget submission. Training program will include— (a) Development of monthly, quarterly, semiannual, and annual training schedules, approved by the fire chief, and posted in each operational fire station. (b) Preparation of lesson plans, or use approved accredited lesson plans in accordance with the DOD Firefighter Certification Program and/or International Fire Service Training Association (IFTA Standards). (2) Training exercises. (a) Quarterly, conduct ARFF exercises on a mission-assigned aircraft designated by the fire chief. (b) Semiannually, during darkness hours, at least one structural exercise will be conducted by each shift. (c) Annually, F&ES departments with an ARFF mission must conduct a live ARFF exercise and at least one crew extraction exercise during darkness hours by each shift. (d) Only the fire chief or his designee may authorize unannounced exercises involving F&ES resources. During responses to training exercises, fire departments will not use warning devices and must strictly observe all traffic laws. Upon arrival at the training site, fire departments will use visual warning devices and conduct critiques following each exercise. Announced training exercises will be pre-briefed prior to the exercise and critiqued after the exercise. (e) Interactive multimedia training systems may supplement above exercises. (3) Instructor qualifications. Fire service instructors must be certified to teach the particular subject per NFPA, AWFPG, and local/host nation/State/Federal requirements. (4) Fire and Emergency Services Training Plans. Fire chiefs will develop or approve all F&ES training plans on topics such as aircraft egress/extrication procedures, helicopter pilot/crew training for wildland fires, wildland red card training and certification, confined space rescue, fire brigade, WMD and HAZMAT, first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), fire extinguisher operations and other fire and emergency services awareness training required by the installation. (5) Training records. (a) Individual training evaluation record. Maintain individual training records that contain, at a minimum, a record of fire fighting training accomplished (DA Form 5376 (Individual Training Evaluation Record)), DOD Firefighter Certifications, Medical Education Training and Certifications, Army and Installation Training Requirements, Driver’s Training Information, and so forth. The individual training record may be maintained in an automated format. (b) Fire and emergency services training record. Use DA Form 5377 (Fire and Emergency Services Training Record). Attendee’s signature is required for each session. b. Training requirements. (1) The fire chief will attend the annual Department of Defense Worldwide Fire & Emergency Services Training Conference held concurrently with the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) conference. (2) The fire chief will assign a dedicated training officer for development and monitoring of the training program. The position may be dual hatted for installations where a dedicated position is not required. (3) The assigned training officer will— (a) Conduct a recurring proficiency training program with recommended training subjects outlined in Appendix Q. Each fire department member will receive a minimum of 120 hours proficiency training per year. (b) Secure specialized training through accredited and recognized professional training sources for fire and emergency services personnel. (4) Live-fire training areas that meet local environmental standards shall be developed by each applicable DOD

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Component at appropriate locations to provide realistic proficiency training at a reasonable cost. Thorough consideration shall be given to creating regional training facilities for closely located DOD installations and for cooperative arrangements with civil sector fire departments and off-base live-fire training. (5) Host nation firefighters will meet the DOD training requirements, but are not required to be DOD certified. Section III Provide Emergency Dispatch Services 25–11. Program objective Provide staff and/or manage emergency dispatch/E911 services. All garrisons shall maintain around the clock capability to conduct essential F&ES communications. These operations may be provided as part of joint operations. 25–12. Emergency Communications Center staffing Dispatch centers must be properly staffed with trained, qualified and certified personnel per DODI 6055.06. 25–13. Emergency Communications Center operations requirements a. DODI 6055.06 establishes requirements for emergency communications centers. Installations are authorized and are encouraged to move toward E911/Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) systems. Computer aided dispatching systems are encouraged. Fire station radio-based alerting systems shall be installed. b. Chapter 4, Army Military Construction and Nonappropriated-Funded Construction Program Development and Execution, and AR 70–1, Army Acquisition Policy, govern the purchase, procurement and installation of fire detection and transmission equipment. Minimum requirements are as follows: (1) Two-way radio communication net. Each garrison requires an effective two-way radio net with multiple channels to support tactical operations. Only fire stations, fire fighting vehicles, provost marshal or law enforcement agencies, explosive ordnance disposal, control tower, and ambulances will use transceivers on this net. Aircraft and ARFF vehicles require a separate two-way radio communication frequency known as the Discreet Emergency Frequency (DEF) (see NFPA 1221, Installation Maintenance and Use of Emergency Services Communication Systems). (2) Primary and secondary fixed wire operational crash alarm. Garrisons will provide a primary and secondary telephone crash alarm with two way capabilities only between the tower, base operations, fire, police and medical authorities only. Additional agencies will not be included unless authorized by the garrison commander. Garrisons will not overload or modify systems beyond their original design. Only those emergency agencies directly involved in first response to an airfield incident will be on the primary crash alarm system. (3) Direct communications line or integrated computer aided dispatch screen. Garrisons will provide a direct telephone two-way circuit with the air traffic control tower, aircraft maintenance control, ambulance, law enforcement, or any other agency designated by the fire chief. (4) Installed systems central alarm receiver. All installed facility fire detection and suppression systems will transmit an alarm to the fire communication center per NFPA 72 except for small or remote locations approved by IMCOM. (5) Station lighting. Each fire station will include adequate station/lighting alerting systems controlled and coupled with local combined public address or intercom systems. (6) Voice recorder. A voice recorder is required for all emergency dispatch centers and connected to all emergency communication equipment. (7) Maps and checklists. Each communications center will have installation grid maps, utility system maps, off-post maps, emergency response/notification checklists, and other reference documentation necessary for effective operations. Section IV Provide Emergency Response Services for Structure Fires 25–14. Program objective Provide emergency response and rescue services to structure, transportation equipment, natural and man made disasters, industrial, shipboard, ammunitions/explosives/dangerous articles, chemical and petroleum, oils and lubricant (POL) fires. 25–15. Required fire department staffing Garrisons will ensure apparatus are properly staffed with trained, qualified and certified personnel per DOD requirements, and validated by an assessment of risks. 25–16. Fire department structural fire operation requirements The F&ES equipment and response time requirements are shown in table 25–1. In addition— a. Garrison fire departments will use an assessment of F&ES risks to determine requirements.

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b. Fire departments will prepare pre-fire plans for all major and mission-critical facilities and those having a highlife safety factor and review them at least every other year and whenever there is a change in mission. c. Fire department requirements at active, inactive, laidaway, standby, and caretaker installations are— (1) Active installations. Civilian personnel normally perform F&ES functions. Garrisons may assign MOS 21M military firefighters to fire departments because of geographical, legal, training, rotation, combat readiness, or security reasons. Military personnel selected must meet the criteria contained in AR 611–1 and should be selected based on long-term availability (minimum 2 years on station). (2) Inactive, laidaway, standby, and caretaker installations. An assessment of F&ES risks will be used to determine the level of service for these types of installations. The garrison commander will consider use of combined firefighter/ guard forces and trained security and maintenance personnel as auxiliary firefighters. (3) Base realignment and closure fire protection. The Army has the responsibility to maintain F&ES as long as the Army owns or maintains the property. With limited exceptions, 10 USC 2465 prohibits entering into a contract for the performance of fire fighting or security guard. The following guidance should also be considered in determining the level of F&ES required at bases that are closing: (a) Chapter 41 CFR Subpart 102–36.45 provides fire protection guidance for GSA surplus or excess property. (b) Garrison commanders should determine whether municipal (or other) fire departments will agree to include the closed installation within their service territory at no cost to the Army. (c) Maintenance of grounds and facilities to prevent fires such as plowing fire lanes.

Table 25–1 Announced structural fire response time Program element

Response time

Announced structural fire

First responding units 7 Minutes response time for 90 percent of all alarms based on: Call processing time(1 Minute) Turnout time(1 Minute) Travel time(5 Minutes) Remaining units: 12 Minutes response time for 90 percent of all alarms Minimum response: Initial alarm assignment capability

25–17. Special requirements for shipboard fire fighting Land based firefighters who are required to respond to marine vessel fires will attend formal shipboard fire fighting training that meets U.S. Navy Facilities Engineering Command training standards and NFPA 1405. 25–18. Special requirements for access or egress through hardened windows The Department of Defense Minimum Antiterrorism Standards for Buildings (UFC 4–010–01) require a minimum level of window hardening for the windows in all buildings that qualify as inhabited as defined in that document. In addition, threat or geography specific antiterrorism requirements sometimes result in window hardening greater than that required by UFC 4–010–01. All of these hardened windows provide additional challenges to firefighters attempting to breach them for access or egress during structural fire operations. To ensure firefighters are prepared where there are fires in buildings with hardened windows; fire departments will do the following: a. Coordinate with installation or other servicing facility engineers to catalog any hardened windows that may be installed in buildings served by that fire department. b. Develop data bases that indicate the construction of any hardened windows in specific buildings and where they are located. c. Provide special instructions that firefighters will need for breaching hardened windows and incorporate the instructions into the data base. Section V Provide Emergency Response Services for Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighting 25–19. Program objective Airfield fire departments shall staff ARFF apparatus to provide flight line protection 24 hours per day, even if the air traffic control tower is closed for flight operations. Provide a coordinated program of emergency response/stand-by and rescue services for ARFF to announced and unannounced in-flight/ground emergencies, crashes and mishaps, including ordnance and spill containment and other related incidents, if required. Fire departments will consider outside resources

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and coordinate their program with local airports, municipal ARFF organizations, medical activities, and other Federal agencies as required. 25–20. Required aircraft rescue fire fighting staffing Garrisons will ensure that apparatus are properly staffed with trained, qualified and certified personnel per NFPA, host nation, and DOD requirements, and validated by an assessment of risks. 25–21. Aircraft rescue fire fighting apparatus requirements The F&ES ARFF equipment and response time requirements as shown in table 25–2. a. The average number of military aircraft movements (arrivals and/or departures) per day determines the number and type of ARFF apparatus and stand-by requirements. The total number of aircraft movements during the previous 12-month period divided by 365 (366 if leap year) determines this average number. b. Airfields with or without permanently assigned rotary winged aircraft and fixed wing aircraft less than 60 feet in overall fuselage length, require the following ARFF protection: (1) Less than 25 movements (average) per day. Portable fire extinguishers (100 lb.) used by airfield personnel. (2) From 25 to 40 movements (average) per day. Installation may assign standard or nonstandard fire fighting equipment (with or without firefighter personnel). (3) More than 40 movements (average) per day. (a) An NFPA 403 ARFF apparatus or equivalent (with assigned staffing) for rotary wing and small fixed winged aircraft (less than 60 feet). (b) CH–47 and larger helicopters averaging 6 or more movements above the 40 movements per day (for example 46 per day average at airfield) require a second ARFF apparatus (with assigned staffing). c. IMCOM may approve additional ARFF apparatus (not covered in paragraph b above) to meet the requirements of Air Force Pamphlet 32–2004 (Aircraft Fire Protection for Military Operations Other Than War) or other unique operations. d. Cross staffed and ARFF trained structural fire fighting crews may backup primary ARFF apparatus and crews. e. AR 385–95, Air Force Technical Order 00–105E–9 and International Fire Service Training Association (IFSTA) contain suggested pre-accident plans and give detailed information on ARFF techniques.

Table 25–2 Aircraft rescue fire fighting response time Program element

Response time

ARFF

First responding unit(s) Unannounced emergency 3 minutes response time includes: Call processing time(1 Minute) Turnout time(1 Minute) Travel time(1 Minute) Announced emergency 1 Minute response time

Section VI Provide Fire Prevention Services 25–22. Program objective Develop, publish, and implement installation fire prevention and public education regulations. Components of this regulation include— a. Hazard, compliance and special fire safety inspections that meet Federal, state and local/host nation laws and, Child and Youth Services (CYS) and Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospital Organizations (JCAHO) support/ consultancy requirements. b. Project and plan review. c. Testing and inspection of fire protection systems and equipment. d. Training of building managers and evacuation managers, newcomers, Family members, schools, CYS employees and public assemblies (that is, churches, clubs, theaters, and so forth). e. Fire protection for facilities engineering, design and construction.

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25–23. Required fire prevention staffing Garrisons will ensure the fire prevention program is properly staffed with trained, qualified, and certified personnel per DODI 6055.06. Section VII Fire Prevention Operations 25–24. Building manager or evacuation coordinator The building manager or appointee (in writing) will serve as the evacuation coordinator. This individual will be trained by the F&ES fire prevention division and will execute fire prevention measures in the assigned building or facility, and provide written reports to the fire chief including self-inspections, emergency evacuation plans, and fire safety briefings/occupant training. RRC personnel will provide training for Army Reserve Centers Building Managers off active Army installations. 25–25. Housing facilities On-post housing facilities will comply with fire protection measures listed in chapter 3, Housing Management. 25–26. Monitoring and controlling contractor operations The fire chief (or designated F&ES representative) will monitor contractor operations on all maintenance, repair, construction, and self-help projects. The contracting officer representative (COR) will notify the contractor and request prompt corrective action when they find fire hazards, unsafe practices, or noncompliance with specifications. The fire chief may stop any operation or activity when there is imminent danger to life or property. 25–27. Fire risk management surveys a. The fire chief shall develop an inspection program which will include facility inspection frequencies. Mandatory Family housing and Unaccompanied Personnel Housing (UPH) inspections (except for common areas of UPH) are not required. b. The reproducible DA Form 538–1 (Building-Fire Risk Management Survey) provides a checklist and recording document. Each building will have a separate file folder containing past survey records, hazard/deficiency survey records, fire extinguisher inventory and maintenance information, a copy of the pre-fire plan, and other pertinent data. Fire departments will establish an automated record keeping system to monitor the building survey program. c. The reproducible DA Form 538–2 (Hazard/Deficiency Inspection Record), informs the building manager of fire hazards or deficiencies noted during surveys. d. The reproducible DA Form 5383 (Hot-Work Permit), shall be issued to contractors and installation personnel performing hot-work any place other than permanent shops. e. Automated forms may be substituted for forms required by this paragraph. f. Fire prevention inspection services at Army Reserve and Army National Guard facilities may be provided without cost by the local community. Section VIII Fire Prevention Engineering 25–28. General requirements The Fire Department and Department of Public Works (organization responsible for construction and building repair/ maintenance) shall have current or electronic copies of UFC code, Fire Protection for Facilities Engineering, Design and Construction, and NFPA Codes & Standards. New construction, renovations and modernization projects will comply with UFC 3–600–01, Fire Protection Engineering for Facilities. For repair projects, only the new work is required to comply with the requirements for new construction. As a minimum, existing buildings will comply with the requirements of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code. 25–29. Cost effectiveness Appropriate fire protection in facility and system designs guarantees the most economical and least interruption of essential missions. Installations will not omit fire protection from construction designs and plans for the sake of economy or expediencies, since add-ons are expensive and often less effective. 25–30. Review of projects a. DODI 6055.06 requires— (1) The plans for all military construction projects, facility modernization, rehabilitation programs, or self-help projects shall be reviewed by certified fire prevention personnel for compliance with the NFPA codes/standards and UFC 3–600–01.

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(2) The garrison F&ES office will keep all fire risk management surveys in separate facility folders until satisfactory completion of the project. b. IMCOM F&ES personnel shall participate in maintenance, repair, and construction real property charrettes and design reviews to ensure fire safety standards and criteria are adequately incorporated in project designs and costs estimates from the initiation of the project. c. Army Reserve Installations Directorate personnel will provide reviews for maintenance, repair, and construction projects on Army Reserve Centers off active Army installations. Louisville District Corps of Engineers will provide reviews for all Army Reserve MCAR projects. 25–31. Fire Protection Deficiency Correction Program Fire Protection Deficiency Correction Program F&ES organizations will use the risk management model employed in AR 385–16. This regulation prescribes policies and procedures, and identifies responsibilities to ensure hazards in Army systems and facilities are identified and the risks associated with these hazards are properly managed. It applies to all Army materiel systems and facilities. 25–32. Fire protection systems a. Garrisons shall provide fire protection systems (suppression and detection) per UFC 3–600–01. Army Reserve Installations Directorate will provide fire protection systems for Army Reserve Centers off active Army installations. Kitchen range hood fire extinguishing systems are not required in Family housing, UPH, hotels or other transient type facilities in accordance with UFC 3–600–01. b. Per Family housing provisions, install hard-wired smoke detectors and automatic sprinkler systems in certain Federal housing units in the United States and its territories per 15 USC 2201 et. seq. and the following Army policy. (1) Smoke detectors, hardwired to the building electrical system and meeting the requirements of NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code will be provided in all housing units. When smoke detectors are installed and where more than one smoke detector is required, they will be so arranged that operation of any smoke detector will cause the alarm sounding device in all smoke detectors within the unit to sound. Privately owned mobile homes will have smoke detectors as a prerequisite for assignment to mobile home space. Smoke detectors shall be replaced per NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code recommendations. (2) Carbon monoxide detectors shall be installed in structures serviced by natural gas, petroleum or other combustible fuel sources. Detectors shall be replaced per manufacturer’s recommendations. (3) Automatic sprinkler protection per the applicable NFPA 13, (Installation of Sprinkler Systems), 13R, (Sprinkler Systems in Residential Occupancies up to and Including Four Stories in Height), or 13D, (Installation of Sprinkler Systems in One and Two Family Dwellings and Manufactured Homes) standards will be provided for new multi–Family housing and for renovated multi–Family housing whose renovation cost is 70 percent or more of the DU costs, excluding the land. When replacement cost is less than 70 percent, Family housing will meet the requirements of UFC 3–600–01. For purpose of this regulation, multi–Family housing is defined as a residential building with more than two residential units under one roof. Townhouses with two-hour, fire-rated unit separation walls which extend from ground to the roof deck are not considered multi–Family housing and will be protected the same as single–Family housing. c. Title 10 USC Section 2872a (Public Law 104–106, 110 Stat. 186, Title XXVIII Subtitle A, Military Housing Privatization Initiative as amended) requires privatized Family housing to reimburse the government for police and fire protection. d. Army unaccompanied personnel housing, hotels, and transient quarters used for Federal personnel on official travel will comply with 15 USC 2224, 15 USC 2225, 15 USC 2226, and 15 USC 2227, requiring single station hard wired smoke detectors in each guest room per NFPA 72 and automatic sprinkler systems in buildings four or more stories. For new facilities, compliance with UFC 3–600–01 is required. e. The maintenance, inspection, and testing of fire protection systems, and water distribution systems will comply with applicable NFPA Codes and UFC 3–600–02, Inspection, Testing and Maintenance of Fire Protection Systems. f. Garrisons shall assign the highest repair priority for fire protection systems. 25–33. Fire extinguishers All fire extinguishers will be Underwriter’s Laboratories (UL) listed or Factory Mutual (FM) approved. a. Facilities. The facilities engineer or user will furnish the initial purchase and installation of fire extinguishers in newly constructed facilities and their replacement in existing facilities, per NFPA 101, Life Safety Code. The fire department will inspect and determine the type, size, and location of extinguishers per NFPA 10, Portable Fire Extinguishers. Garrisons will not furnish portable fire extinguishers in Family housing areas, unless required by NFPA 101. b. Flightlines. Garrisons will issue (on hand receipt) alkaline base (sodium and potassium bicarbonate), dry chemical, 50-pound and 125-pound or equivalents, class B and class C fire types (BC), wheeled extinguishers for the following aircraft. (They will replace existing 1211 extinguishers through attrition).

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(1) Every three parked, small, or ”medium helicopters “ (UH–60/AH–64 and below) and small ”fixed-wing “ aircraft (C–12 or equivalent) requires a 50-pound BC, dry chemical or equivalent, wheeled fire extinguisher. (2) Every three parked, large helicopters (CH–47 or equivalent), requires a 125-pound BC, wheeled, dry chemical or equivalent, fire extinguisher. (3) Every three parked, medium fixed-wing aircraft (for example, C–20, C–23A&B, C–26 or similar aircraft) requires a 125-pound BC, wheeled, dry chemical or equivalent fire extinguisher. (4) Every parked, large-frame aircraft (for example, C–17, C–130, C–5, C–141, KC–135, DC–8, B707, KC–10, DC–10 or similar aircraft) requires a 125-pound BC, wheeled, dry chemical or equivalent, extinguisher. (5) Every landing strip and helipad without regularly assigned ARFF vehicles requires a 125-pound BC, dry chemical or equivalent extinguisher. c. Aircraft. The user will provide fire extinguishers and extinguishing systems according to the specifications for specific type and model aircraft. d. Petroleum, oils, lubricant areas. The user will provide BC, dry chemical extinguishers at POL tanker truck dispensing points, tanker truck parking areas, and outside tracked vehicle maintenance areas. e. Tactical and other off-road mobile equipment. Provide per applicable technical bulletins. f. Troop units. Issue per TB 5–4200–200–10. g. Watercraft. Provide per Coast Guard regulations (available from the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard (G–M/A2), Washington, DC 20590). 25–34. Water distribution systems Requirements for water distribution systems are contained in UFC 3–600–01 and Army regulations. a. Fire departments are responsible to ensure fire flow testing is conducted annually. Enter results on DA Form 5384 (Water Flow Test) or equivalent automated system. b. Fire hydrants will be painted per Army Installation Design Standards (IDS). Flow capacity will be indicated by color scheme per NFPA 291, Flow Testing and Marking of Hydrants. As a minimum, there shall be a 360 degree, color coded, light reflective band on the bonnet of all hydrants. c. Out of service fire hydrants will be repaired on a priority basis. 25–35. Space heaters (liquid fuel) Portable gas or liquid fuel space heaters are prohibited in Family quarters or where personnel sleep (including tents), unless approved on a case-by-case basis by the garrison commander, with the advice of the installation fire chief or safety officials in order to mitigate risk, to provide temporary emergency heating, Section IX Provide Emergency Response Services for Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials, Weapons of Mass Destruction, and Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and High Explosives 25–36. Program objectives Provide emergency response, mitigation and rescue services for HAZMAT and WMD per DODI 6055.06, DODI 2000. 16, DODI 2000.18, AR 525–13, Antiterrorism, associated implementing Army Regulations (AR), and applicable local/ host nation laws and regulations. 25–37. Hazardous materials and weapons of mass destruction response services staffing a. The garrison commander will develop and implement a site-specific HAZMAT Response Plan implementing 42 USC 11011 et. seq.; 29 CFR 1910.120; 40 CFR Part 350, 355, 370, and 372; AR 200–1; and DA PAM 200–1. b. Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High Yield Explosive (CBRNE). Garrison commanders shall implement the requirements of DODI 2000.18., including development of a CBRNE emergency response plan that integrates facilities, equipment, training, personnel and procedures into a comprehensive effort designed to provide appropriate protection to personnel and critical mission activities. c. Installation Spill Response/Contingency Plan. The Garrison Environmental Division is responsible for development of this plan per AR 200–1, Environmental Protection and Enhancement. d. HAZMAT and WMD response times shall be per table 25–3.

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Table 25–3 Hazardous materials response time (including first response to CBRNE/WMD incidents) Program element

Response time

HAZMAT (including first response to CBRNE/WMD incidents)

First responding units 7 Minutes response time for 90 percent of all alarms based on— Call processing time (1 Minute) Turnout time (1 Minute) Travel time (5 Minutes) Remaining units: 12 Minutes response time for 90 percent of all alarms Minimum response: F&ES working group concept of operations

Section X Provide Emergency Response Services for Wildland Fires 25–38. Program objectives Provide emergency response and rescue services for wildland fires, if required. Manage the installation integrated wildland fire management plan per the current Army Wildland Fire Policy Guidance (AWFPG) and current DODI 6055.06. 25–39. Wildland fire response services staffing a. Wildland fire support must be properly staffed with trained, qualified and certified personnel. Additional staffing requires preparation and submission of an assessment of wildland fire risk through the region and IMCOM or ARCOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs to HQDA (ACSIM). b. In accordance with the AWFPG, the Garrison Commander shall designate a Wildland Fire Program Manager. On installations and facilities where an organized fire department is not justified but for which an Integrated Wildland Fire Management Plan (IWFMP) is required by the AWFPG, the Garrison Command may assign additional duties and responsibilities to the Wildland Fire Program Manager to direct and manage the wildland fire program in accordance with this chapter up to but not exceeding the level to which the Wildland Fire Program Manager is qualified and certified in accordance with either NWCG or NFPA wildland firefighter standards. In the absence of an organized fire department, the wildland Fire Program Manager may be senior wildland fire protection specialist or senior wildland fire officer if qualified and certified per NWCG or NFPA wildland fire standards. 25–40. Wildland fire incident response planning a. Installations with unimproved grounds that present a wildfire hazard and/or installations that use prescribed burns as a land management tool will develop and implement an Integrated Wildland Fire Management Plan (IWFMP) that is compliant and integral with the Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP), the installation’s existing fire and emergency services program plan(s) and the Integrated Cultural Resources Management Plan (ICRMP). b. The IWFMP must consider availability and use of military personnel and equipment, specialized fire fighting apparatus, and other specialized requirements. The IWFMP will describe the wild land fire management organizational/ command structure and personnel responsibilities. Section XI Provide Emergency Medical Response Services 25–41. Program objectives This program provides emergency medical/transportation response services, if required. 25–42. Emergency medical services staffing a. Emergency medical “First Responder” services must be staffed with trained, qualified and certified personnel per DODI 6055.06, NFPA and local/host nation/DOT/State/Federal requirements. b. Fire departments assigned the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) mission will be funded, equipped, and trained/ certified per this regulation. c. Where installations can not provide emergency medical services through organic assets or contract, the installation commander shall develop an MOA/MOU with local agencies and/or governments to provide such services. 25–43. Emergency medical response planning a. Where fire departments provide emergency medical response, garrisons will establish and maintain emergency medical response programs that are appropriately staffed with certified “First Responder” or higher certified personnel

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and equipment per EMS National Standard Curriculum. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) shall be provided that comply with installation or local medical protocols. b. Emergency medical response time standards shall be per table 25–4. c. Provision of EMS services will be provided under the supervision of a qualified Operational Medical Director (OMD).

Table 25–4 Emergency medical response time Program element

Response time

Emergency medical response

First responding units 7 Minutes response time for 90 percent of all alarms based on— Call processing time (1 Minute) Turnout time (1 Minute) Travel time (5 Minutes) Advance life support: 12 Minutes response time for 90 percent of all alarms Minimum response: Initial alarm assignment capability or Basic life support/Advance life support will be staffed and trained at the level prescribed by the state responsible for providing emergency medical services licensing.

Section XII Conduct Technical Rescue Operations 25–44. Program objectives Provide emergency response to specialized technical rescue incidents such as: rope rescue, structure collapse, high angle, confined space, trenches, water, shipboard, aircraft, vehicle, natural disasters, and other specialized rescue operations. 25–45. Technical rescue operations staffing Technical rescue operations services must be staffed with trained, qualified and certified personnel per DODI 6055.06, NFPA and local/host nation/State/Federal requirements. 25–46. Technical rescue operations planning Fire chiefs will assess risk at their installations based on mission operations and develop appropriate standard operating guidelines (SOG) and/or SOP. The results of the unique assessment risk will determine specialized rescue apparatus and equipment required at the specific location. Section XIII Provide Specialized Training 25–47. Program objective Provide specialized fire, rescue, and emergency training to troop units and other users, if resources permit. 25–48. Instructor qualifications Fire service instructors must be certified to teach the particular subject per NFPA, Army Wildland Fire Policy Guidance, and local/host nation/state/Federal requirements. 25–49. Fire and emergency services training plans Fire chiefs will develop or approve all F&ES training plans on topics such as aircraft egress/extrication procedures, helicopter pilot/crew training for wildland fires, wildland red card training and certification, confined space rescue, fire brigade, WMD, HAZMAT, first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, fire extinguisher operations and other F&ES awareness training required by the installation.

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Section XIV National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) and Investigation of Fire Incidents 25–50. Reporting fires and emergency services responses This chapter establishes procedures for completing National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) or equivalent DOD fire reporting system, investigations, and other related reports. 25–51. Report format The NFIRS uses computer software to transmit reports to a central repository. 25–52. Approval and submission procedures a. Region directors, senior commander staff at Army Reserve Centers off active Army installations, ACOMs, and DRUs will ensure that procedures are established for processing electronic transfer of NFIRS reports at least bi-weekly. b. Fire chiefs will expeditiously report any fire related incident involving a fatality, equipment, or real property damage over $100,000 and any general and flag officer quarters fire to their garrison commanders. DA Form 7621 (Major Fire Report From Installation/Garrison thru Regions to Higher Headquarters) will be used to submit the Major fire Report. Fire Chiefs will coordinate these reports with the local Provost Marshal to avoid conflict with the serious incident report (SIR) submitted under AR 190–45, Law Enforcement Reporting. (1) Telephonic notification to Region fire protection specialists will be made expeditiously; in turn, Region fire protection specialists will expeditiously notify HQ IMCOM and HQDA (ACSIM). (2) Installation/garrison commanders will review/approve and transmit such reports to their respective regions within 24 hours of the fire incident. (3) Regions will approve/submit the Major Fire Report (DA Form 7621) by e-mail to HQDA (ACSIM), and HQ IMCOM within 48 hours of the fire incident. ACSIM will then notify the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army, Installations and Housing (SAIE–IH). 25–53. Investigation of fire Incidents The garrison commander will ensure thorough investigations of all fire incidents. a. IMCOM Fire Protection Specialists officials will conduct a supplemental technical investigation (STI) per NFPA 921, Fire and Explosion Investigation Guide, when a fire causes a death or more than $250,000 equipment or real property damage. IMCOM Fire Protection Specialists may delegate these investigations to the local garrison where appropriate. b. AR 15–6, Procedure for Investigating Officers and Boards of Officers, investigations may substitute for supplemental technical investigations. Financial Liability Investigation or authorized substitutes per AR 735–5, mainly concerned with financial responsibility and property accountability, are not acceptable. IMCOM will send one copy of the supplemental technical or substitute investigation report to HQDA (ACSIM) within 45 calendar days of the fire incident. This is separate from investigation of accidental fires per AR 385–10. c. The fire investigator who performs the investigation shall be qualified and trained per NFPA 1033, Fire Investigator Professional Qualifications. d. The U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command (USACIDC) has primary investigative jurisdiction over fire incidents when caused by criminal acts or intent. Additionally, USACIDC has responsibility for investigation of all unattended deaths per AR 195–2. 25–54. Environmental reporting Develop notification guidelines with installation environmental office for all incidents which release reportable smoke or substances into the environment to meet toxic release inventory for the installation and in accordance with IMCOM spill reporting guidance. 25–55. Public release of Incident Reports The release of copies of incident reports, fire investigative reports, and related documents will comply with— a. The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) provisions in AR 385–10 and AR 25–55. b. The Privacy Act provisions in— (1) DOD 5400.11–R. (2) AR 340–21. c. Provisions related to the release of private health information found in— (1) PL 104–191, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. (2) DOD 6025.18–R. (3) AR 40–66.

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Section XV Management of Army Military Firefighters 25–56. Overview a. This section sets forth the policies and procedures for the selection, qualification, certification, and revocation of certifications for Army Firefighters, military occupational skill (MOS) 21M. b. This section also sets forth the policies and procedures for the management of TO&E Army Firefighting Teams. 25–57. Applicability a. This section applies to all TO&E Fire Truck Teams, TO&E Firefighting Headquarters Teams, TO&E and TDA fire fighting squads embedded with ordnance company elements, and TO&E and TDA MOS 21M firefighters assigned to positions within commands in the capacity of subject matter expert, training developer, technical writer, training support, and instructor. b. This section applies to all the above mentioned entities within the active Army, U.S. Army Reserve, and the Army National Guard unless otherwise stated. The policies and procedures of this regulation remain in effect during war or mobilization. c. This section applies to all levels of command of the fire fighting entities mentioned in subparagraph a, above. d. This section applies to the above organizations in both CONUS and OCONUS theaters of operation. e. This publication should be used in conjunction with FM 5–415, Fire-Fighting Operations, and DODI 6055.06. 25–58. Tactical vehicle facilities Local chains of command will make every effort to ensure adequate facilities are provided to house Tactical Fire Fighting Trucks (TFFTs) and HEMTT-based Water Tender (HEWATT) tanker vehicles. Although the TFFT and HEWATT are tactical vehicles, it is highly encouraged that these vehicles are kept in an enclosed facility to provide shelter from the elements, prevent water lines from freezing, facilitate proper care and maintenance, and ensure longevity of service. 25–59. Selection criteria a. Personnel who enlisted for MOS 21M must meet the selection criteria contained in DA Pam 611–21. b. In-service Soldiers applying for engineer firefighter training must meet the requirements in DA Pam 611–21 and the following selection criteria: (1) Meet enlisted service requirements in accordance with AR 614-200, chapter 4. (2) Not be on a current term of enlistment in which an enlistment bonus or selective reenlistment bonus has been received. A request for waiver may be submitted with the application packet. (3) Complete and pass a DOD approved Firefighter Occupational Health Exam (OHE) that meets NFPA 1582 requirements. 25–60. Applications Applicants must submit the following DA Form 4187 (Personnel Action); DA Form 2–1 (Personnel Qualification Record); and DA Form 705 (Army Physical Fitness Test Scorecard) and copies of DD Form 2808 (Report of Medical Examination); and DD Form 2807–1 (Report of Medical History). Originals of DD Form 2808 and DD Form 2807–1 and all other Army medical records will be hand carried by the Soldier to firefighter training. 25–61. Certification requirements a. For initial award of MOS 21M Firefighter, Soldiers must attend mandatory formal training at Goodfellow AFB, TX, or must meet the Army Civilian Acquired Skills Program (ACASP) criteria per DA Pam 611–21 and have International Fire Service Accreditation Congress (IFSAC) or National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board) accredited certifications in Firefighter I and II, Airport Firefighter, and HAZMAT Awareness and Operations in accordance with DOD 6055.06–M. b. The certification levels in table 25–5 are the minimum mandatory qualification standards for the positions indicated. Individuals shall be DOD certified at these levels before being eligible to fill these grades and/or positions. c. The options available to Army Firefighters, both active and reserve components, for fulfilling certification requirements are: attend courses at the Louis F. Garland Fire Academy, Goodfellow Air Force Base (GAFB), TX; attend IFSAC or Pro Board accredited courses available through universities and colleges; or enroll in USAF Career Development Courses online. d. Soldiers who have completed IFSAC or Pro Board accredited training must obtain DOD equivalent certification through the DOD Fire and Emergency Services Certification Program in accordance with DOD 6055.06–M. Certification levels of all DOD Fire and Emergency Services personnel, to include MOS 21M Soldiers, can be viewed and verified at http://www.dodffcert.com.

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e. The minimum DOD certification levels required for award and retention of the skill levels are listed in table 25–5 following subparagraph h. f. Commissioned officers are not eligible to hold firefighter certifications or function as Army firefighters. Engineer branch commissioned officers in the grades of O-1 to O-3 and warrant officers in the grades of WO-1 to CWO-3 may be assigned to paragraph 101, line 1 on the MTOE of a Firefighting Headquarters Team as Fire Marshal. The position of Fire Marshal is a supervisory management role and does not engage in direct command of fire ground operations. The Fire Marshal is responsible for managing assets and resources assigned to a Firefighting Headquarters Team to include subordinate Fire Truck Teams. g. Commissioned officers and warrant officers assigned as Fire Marshals are authorized to attend the Fire Marshal Course, course # X3OZR32E4-0F1A at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas. The course is three academic days in length. h. Procedures for the revocation of firefighter certificates are outlined in DOD 6055.06–M, DOD Fire and Emergency Services Certification Program, chapter 4.9.

Table 25–5 Certification levels Positions

Certification levels

Firefighter 21 M10 (E–1 through E–4)

Firefighter I and II Airport Firefighter Hazardous Materials Awareness Hazardous Materials Operations

Driver/Operator 21M10 (E–1 through E–4)

Driver Operator – Pumpers1 Driver Operator – ARFF1 Mobile Water Supply Apparatus1

Lead Firefighter (Crew Chief) 21M20 (E–5)

Fire Officer I Fire Instructor I Fire Inspector I Airport Firefighter

Fire Inspector 21M30 (E–6)

Fire Inspector I and II Fire Instructor I HAZMAT Awareness

Station Chief/Station Captain/Fire Team Chief 21M30 (E–6)

Fire Officer II Fire Instructor I Fire Inspector I HAZMAT Incident Commander Airport Firefighter

Fire Chief 21M40 (E–7)

Fire Officer IV Fire Inspector II Fire Instructor II HAZMAT Incident Commander Airport Firefighter

Notes: 1 All Firefighting detachment Driver Operators must be certified to the level of Driver Operator-Pumper and Driver Operator ARFF prior to performing duties in the Driver Operator positions on the Tactical Fire fighting Truck (TFFT). To perform duties as the Driver Operator for the Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck Based Water Tender (HEWATT), the Driver Operator must be certified to the Mobile Water Supply Apparatus level. Both Fire Apparatuses also require the driver trainee to be Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck (HEMTT) driver qualified.

25–62. MOS proficiency training To remain MOS qualified, firefighters must participate in annual refresher training in specific subject areas. Table 25–6 outlines these requirements. All refresher training must be conducted within the guidelines of paragraph 25–10.

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Table 25–6 Required firefighter proficiency training Subject area

Frequency per component

Skill level

Active

USAR and National Guard

21M10

21M20

21M30

21M40

Aircraft egress

Q

A

X

X

X X

X

First aid/CPR

SA

A

X

X

Pumper operation

M

Q

X

X

Rescue Tools

Q

A

X

X

Structural training fires

A

A

X

X

X

X

Aircraft training fires

A

A

X

X

X

X

Structural drills

M

Q

X

X

X

Breathing apparatus

SA

Q

X

X

X

Natural cover fires

Q

A

X

X

X

X

Fire department communications

SA

SA

X

X

X

X

Hazardous materials awareness

Q

A

X

X

X

X

Hazardous materials operations

Q

A

X

X

X

X

Apparatus test

A

A

X

X

Water supply for fire protection

Q

SA

X

X

X

Motor vehicle accidents

Q

A

X

X

X

Fire inspection procedures

SA

A

X

X

X

M=Monthly Q=Quarterly SA=Semi-Annually A=Annually

25–63. Periodic medical examinations Firefighters are required to undergo a firefighter Occupational Health Exam (OHE) according to NFPA 1582 and NFPA 1583 and a Fit Test for the firefighter’s assigned Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) annually at a DOD approved medical facility. Record of annual exams shall be permanently placed in the Soldier’s individual medical record file and maintained at the local unit. Guidelines for the occupational safety and health of firefighters are outlined in paragraph 25–9a(1)(b). 25–64. Supervising fire fighting operations Fire fighting operations are managed and supervised in the field by engineer firefighter MOS 21M noncommissioned officers in the ranks of sergeant and above utilizing the National Incident Management System (NIMS) as outlined in HSPD-5. Fire fighting teams report via the chain of command to the senior commander, usually through the local safety officer. Further information on the supervision of fire fighting operations is outlined in paragraph 25–9. 25–65. Orders, files, and records a. Orders. Orders announcing effective and termination dates of special pay and/or hazardous duty incentive pay will be published in accordance with AR 600-8-105, using the appropriate order format. b. Personnel files. One copy of orders will be filed in the Soldier’s local military personnel file and one sent to CDR, HRC (AHRC–EPB–E), 2461 Eisenhower Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22331-0453.

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c. Records. Annotate on Enlisted Records Brief (ERB) or DA Form 2–1, the highest levels of IFSAC Certifications held. d. Training files. All records of firefighter training (to include recurring proficiency training) shall be annotated in each individual Soldier’s personal training file and maintained at the unit level until PCS, at which time the record is forwarded to the gaining command’s training officer. Upon the Soldier’s ETS, the Soldier is issued the record. 25–66. Firefighter methods of identification a. Distinctive unit fire department identification insignia or badge shall be authorized for wear, centered on the upper right chest of the Nomex flyers coverall or centered on the left pocket of the Army Combat Uniform (ACU) flight suit blouse when worn as a firefighter station duty uniform. Individual units will design and issue the insignia for local use. Insignia shall use subdued colors, no larger than 3 inches by 4 inches in size with hook and loop fasteners for application to the uniform. The purpose of the insignia is to identify fire protection personnel performing their official fire fighting duties. b. Fire fighting personnel may also be identified via distinctive uniform items in the following ways: (1) Brassard. The he common military brassard, worn on the left sleeve, with the words “Fire Department” and a Maltese cross emblem, along with the fire fighting team’s numeric identification. (2) Ball cap. A black ball cap, with the words “Fire Department” embroidered and centered on the cap. (3) Short sleeved shirt. A standard issue sand colored tee shirt with the words “Fire Department” embroidered or silk screened on the shirt, front and back. Specific design and layout is to be determined by local policy so long as the design is not visible when wearing the ACU flight suit blouse or flyers coverall. (4) Distinctive physical fitness uniform. A distinctive PT uniform may be authorized for wear by on-duty firefighters when engaged in on-duty physical fitness activities, specific design per local policy. This does not replace requirement for Soldiers to possess and/or maintain the Army physical fitness uniform (APFU). c. These policies apply to the active Army, USAR, and Army National Guard. 26–67. Promotion and reclassification a. Promotion. For promotion certification requirements, see paragraph 25–62b. b. Reclassification. Soldiers who wish to reclassify into MOS 21M and possess valid IFSAC firefighter certificates issued by a participating IFSAC educational entity within the United States may present their certificates for review by the Air Force Civil Engineer Support Agency at Tyndal AFB, Florida via the DOD Fire Academy at Goodfellow AFB, Texas where, upon curriculum review of the issuing entity, DOD IFSAC firefighter certifications will be issued-in-kind by Air Force Civil Engineer Support Agency in order to justify awarding 21M as a primary MOS based on Army Civilian Acquired Skills program guidelines. 25–68. Interservice transfers Soldiers transferring into the active Army, USAR, or Army National Guard from the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, or USMC with the primary MOS of firefighter in that respective branch of service may enlist directly into MOS 21M provided that the Soldier has all the required certifications to grade outlined in table 25-5 of this publication. A grade determination will be made consistent with the level of certification achieved. 25–69. Personal protective equipment a. ACOM, ASCC, and DRU commanders, senior commanders, and/or reporting unit commanders (in the case of USAR and National Guard units on TPU status) will provide personal protective equipment that meets DODI 6055.06; NFPA 1404; and 29 CFR 1910.134; NFPA 1971; NFPA 1975 (station/work uniforms are considered personal protective equipment); CTA–50–900 (predominantly Nomex flyer’s coveralls); NFPA 1981; NFPA 1982; and 29 CFR 1910.132, General requirements; 29 CFR 1910.133, Eye and face protection; 29 CFR 1910.135, Head protection; 29 CFR 1910.136, Foot protection; 29 CFR 1910.138, Hand protection; and 29 CFR 1910.134, General Industry Respiratory Protection standard. Also, mission requirements may require supplemental personal protective equipment per NFPA, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and National Wildfire Coordinating Group standards. b. Army firefighters assigned to TO&E fire fighting teams are required by FM 5–415, chapter 2, paragraph 2–3 to have, at a minimum, 1 set each of structural fire fighting turnout gear and proximity (aircraft) fire fighting turnout gear. Firefighters are required to deploy with both sets of gear at a minimum as well as additional PPE as the mission requirements dictate. 25–70. Hazardous materials; nuclear, biological, chemical; and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear personal protective equipment Firefighters engaged in hazardous materials operations are required to utilize personal protective equipment appropriate to the threat level of the material involved. Common military-specific NBC protective over-garments are NOT appropriate PPE for the mitigation of hazardous materials incidents. Firefighters are issued the standard Joint Service Lightweight Integrated Suit Technology (JSLIST) NBC ensemble which, when worn as a uniform and not an over-

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garment and used along with proximity firefighter PPE, constitutes the Joint Firefighter’s Integrated Response Ensemble (J-FIRE) system. Table 25–7 outlines J-FIRE as applied to Mission Oriented Protective Posture (MOPP).

Table 25–7 Mission oriented protective posture levels for the J-FIRE ensemble MOPP 0 JSLIST Ensemble Nomex Hood Firefighter boots CW firefighter SCBA mask Proximity gloves Butyl rubber NBC gloves Proximity coat Proximity trousers w/ suspenders Proximity firefighter helmet Self contained breathing apparatus

MOPP 1

MOPP 4

carried carried carried/available carried

worn worn carried/available carried

worn worn worn worn

MOPP 4 Firefighting mode worn worn worn worn

carried carried carried/available carried/available

carried carried carried/available carried/available

worn worn worn carried/available

worn worn worn worn

carried/available

carried/available

carried/available

worn

carried/available

carried/available

carried/available

worn

Notes: 1 Carried/Available means that the equipment is at the ready, on or near the apparatus that the individual firefighter uses when responding to an emergency. More detailed ensemble information is found in USAF technical order (TO) 14P3-1-181.

Chapter 26 Private Organizations on Department of the Army Installations 26–1. Introduction This chapter concerns policy for procedures and responsibilities for private organizations operating on Army garrisons. 26–2. Policy AR 210–22 contains the policy information referred to in paragraph 26–1 above. Subjects within that regulation include: a. Requirements and procedures for on-post operation. b. Restrictions on private organizations approved to operate on Army garrisons. c. Participation in activities of private organizations operating on Army garrisons. d. Support of private organizations.

Chapter 27 Civilian Inmate Labor Program 27–1. Introduction This chapter concerns Army policy and guidance for establishing civilian inmate labor programs and civilian prison camps on Army garrisons. 27–2. Policy AR 210–35 contains the policy information referred to in paragraph 27–1 above. Subjects within that regulation include— a. Establishing installation civilian inmate labor programs. b. Establishing civilian inmate prison camps on army installations. c. Reporting and recordkeeping.

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