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Army Data & Data Rights (D&DR) Guide A Reference for Planning and Performing Data Acquisition and Data Management Activities Throughout the DoD Life Cycle

1st Edition - August 2015

DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release.

CONTENTS

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Army Data & Data Rights Guide

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Preface

B. Applicability

i. Major Content Sections

Preface A. Purpose The Army Data & Data Rights Guide (D&DR Guide) was prepared by members of the Army Product Data and Engineering Working Group (PEWG) and Department of Defense (DoD) subject matter experts to help Army and other Military Service professionals better understand data and data rights acquisition and management throughout the DoD life cycle. The people and organizations that helped create this Guide are listed in the Acknowledgements section [§ 401, p 125]. Their contributions are gratefully appreciated. The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition Logistics and Technology (ASA(ALT)) issued a Delegation of Authority to Headquarters, Army Materiel Command (HQ AMC) in April 2004, giving HQ AMC responsibility for management of certain areas including Configuration Management, Data Management, and engineering, technical, and product data throughout the Army. The PEWG was formed to provide support to HQ AMC and ASA(ALT) in these areas. It is led by product data subject matter experts from the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center with membership from the other Army Research, Development and Engineering Centers and several Lifecycle Management Commands. The era of acquisition reform in the late 1980s and 90s taught a generation of Government professionals that acquisition of data and data rights was too costly and not necessary to have a successful program. Unfortunately, many DoD programs are now locked into sole source manufacturing and logistics support agreements due to a lack of data, data rights, or both. The Government cannot competitively source these manufacturing or sustainment functions to address changing requirements or reduce costs. This guide is a compilation of the known best practices regarding data and data rights to help readers make informed decisions in the future to avoid similar situations. Thoughtful consideration of the best practices discussed in this guide will enable programs to acquire the data and data rights to which it is legally entitled at no additional cost, and pay fair and reasonable costs for additional data and data rights (if needed). The result will maximize the Government's ability to use competitive sourcing to manage life cycle costs. Reader feedback to the Guide is strongly encouraged. Routine content updates to the Guide are planned and will be based on reader feedback received and any relevant changes to Public Law, DoD, or Army policy.

B. Applicability The D&DR Guide is a significantly expanded version of the 2010 Army Guide for the Preparation of a Program Product Data Management Strategy (DMS) and subsequent 2012 Addendum. The concepts and recommendations in this D&DR Guide are applicable to engineering professionals acquiring or working with Technical Data, Computer Software, or Contract Administration Information. When a DoD activity executes a research and development program performed by a contractor, the contractor owns the data created during that effort. However, contract clauses and provisions from the Federal Acquisition Regulation and Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement entitle the

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Preface

C. Synopsis

i. Navigation

Government to certain rights to use “noncommercial” Technical Data or Computer Software delivered by the contractor. In general, these rights can be: (1) Unlimited, i.e. useable by the Government in any manner or for any purpose, (2) Government Purpose, i.e. usable for Government purposes; or (3) Limited or Restricted, i.e. only usable within the Government and only for very limited and specific purposes without approval of the owner. The determination of the Government's data rights entitlements is critical to maximizing the ability to use competitive sourcing in the future. The D&DR Guide discusses best practices when acquiring data and data rights in the process of contracting for research and development and, recommendations for the management and use of that data after it is delivered. Resolution of data and data rights issues discovered during the Production & Deployment or Operations and Support phases will be the subject of a future publication. CAUTION: The contents of this Guide are in no way a substitute for appropriate legal counsel. All teams should seek the advice of their program attorney before proceeding with any recommendations contained herein.

C. Synopsis i. Major Content Sections The FUNDAMENTAL information sections provide definitions, concepts, and context for the subject areas discussed throughout the guide. The Fundamental content is identified with 100 series section numbers and red page footers. The CORE information sections address the major tasks necessary to successfully acquire and manage data and data rights and culminate with a list of best practice recommendations in the Data & Data Rights Program Checklist [§ 209, p 87] section. The Core content is identified with 200 series section numbers and blue page footers. The DETAILED information sections contain detailed information about select subjects discussed in the Fundamental or Core sections of the D&DR Guide. The Detailed content is identified with 300 series section numbers and yellow page footers. The REFERENCE information sections contain acknowledgements, a glossary, an acronym list, and an index. The Reference content is identified with 400 series section numbers and black page footers.

i. Navigation A graphical table of contents is shown in Table 1. Each listing is also a hyperlink to that section.

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C. Synopsis

i. Navigation

Table 1 - Graphical Table of Contents (HYPERLINKED) § 100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

§ 300. DETAILED INFORMATION

101. Data & DoD Life Cycle Fundamentals

301. Data Rights Details

102. Data Fundamentals

302. Data Markings Details

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

303. Life Cycle Data & Data Rights Requirements Details

104. Data Markings Fundamentals

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

§ 200. CORE INFORMATION 201. Intellectual Property Strategy

305. Data Rights Attachment Details 306. Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept)

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements 203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs

§ 400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

204. Data & Data Rights Potential Risks

401. Acknowledgements

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

402. Glossary & Acronyms

206. Proposal Evaluation and Data & Data Rights License Agreements

403. Index

207. Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance 208. Data Management and Use 209. Data & Data Rights Program Checklist

To assist reader navigation, the top of each page is styled like a web page as shown in Figure 1. The far left portion is a hyperlink to the full Guide table of contents followed by a link to the major section table of contents. The remaining portions shown the titles of the current section and sub section. Figure 1 - Page Header Navigation Information

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Preface

C. Synopsis

ii. Formatting

ii. Formatting This guide uses a variety of formatting to identify types of content. The colors used throughout the guide were chosen to enhance readability by persons affected by color blindness. Figure 2 depicts the Guide hyperlink formatting. Links to information within the guide have a grey dotted underline and include the corresponding section and page number in brackets. Links to material found external to the guide are blue text. Figure 2 - Hyperlink Formatting

Figure 3 shows additional content formatted. Recommendations are in full width boxes outlined with orange double borderlines. Anecdotes describing real world experiences are shown in partial width light blue boxes with no outline. Myths and explanation of the facts are shown in light tan boxes with black solid outline. Figure 3 - Additional Content Formatting

indicates new content that is related to the Data Rights (DR) Attachment (§ 205.K) and its implementation. Use of a DR Attachment is new to Army acquisition professionals.

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C. Synopsis

iii. Online Content

indicates notional content for addressing data and data rights costs considerations into program life cycle cost estimates. Program teams and costing subject matter experts are encouraged to scrutinize these concepts and provide feedback on how they can be improved. indicates notional content for addressing the use of contract options to acquire additional data rights. Program teams are encouraged to include provisions to acquire additional rights for their specific acquisition and provide feedback on the concept.

iii. Online Content An online version of the D&DR Guide has been created within DoDTechipedia, an online encyclopedia for the science and technology community hosted by the Defense Technical Information Center. The Data & Data Rights Guide (Online) site contains the entire D&DR Guide in web format. DoD military, civilian employees and contractors can access DoDTechipedia after registering their Common Access Card. Other US Federal Government employees and Contractors can access DoDTechipedia after registering with DTIC. The full web address for the online Guide is http://www.dodtechipedia.mil/dodc/x/ZoQGAQ.

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CONTENTS 100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION ................................................................................... 1 101. Data & DoD Life Cycle Fundamentals ............................................................................... 3 A. Data Acquisition Life Cycle .....................................................................................................................................3 B. DoD and Data Acquisition Life Cycles .....................................................................................................................3 C. Data & Data Rights License Agreement Timing .......................................................................................................4

102. Data Fundamentals ............................................................................................................... 7 A. D&DR Guide Perspectives of Data ..........................................................................................................................7 B. FAR/DFARS Data Rights Perspective of Data .........................................................................................................7 C. PEWG Product Data Deliverables Perspective of Data ............................................................................................9 D. Data Rights and Data Relationship ......................................................................................................................... 12

103. Data Rights Fundamentals ................................................................................................. 13 A. FAR and DFARS Overview .................................................................................................................................... 13 B. Data Related FAR Provisions & Clause Fundamentals .......................................................................................... 13 C. Data Related DFARS Provisions & Clause Fundamentals ..................................................................................... 14 D. DFARS Data Rights Categories .............................................................................................................................. 14 E. DFARS Clauses and Data Rights ............................................................................................................................ 17 F. Standard, Needed/Desired, and Additional Rights................................................................................................... 19 G. DFARS Data Rights Entitlement Determinations - Funding Source ...................................................................... 19 H. DFARS Data Rights Entitlement Determinations - Unlimited Rights .................................................................... 20 I. Contractor Data Rights Assertions ........................................................................................................................... 21

104. Data Markings Fundamentals ........................................................................................... 23 A. Distribution Statement Markings ............................................................................................................................ 23 B. Distribution Statements and Data Rights Markings ................................................................................................ 24 C. Export Control Markings ........................................................................................................................................ 24 D. Data Rights Markings ............................................................................................................................................. 24 E. Copyright Markings ................................................................................................................................................ 25 F. Security Classification Markings ............................................................................................................................. 25

200. CORE INFORMATION .................................................................................................... 27 201. Intellectual Property Strategy............................................................................................ 29 A. IP Strategy Background .......................................................................................................................................... 29 B. Intellectual Property Assets, Rights, and Protection Methods ................................................................................ 30 C. IP Strategy Timing .................................................................................................................................................. 32

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements .............................................................. 33 1st Edition - August 2015

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A. Program Strategies Review & Synchronization...................................................................................................... 33 B. Sub-System Manufacturing and Sustainment Models ............................................................................................ 33 C. Sub-System Design Documentation Approaches .................................................................................................... 34 D. Life Cycle Data Requirements ................................................................................................................................ 36 E. Life Cycle Data Rights Requirements ..................................................................................................................... 37 F. Data Rights Variation by Sub-System or Component .............................................................................................. 38 G. Sources to Meet Data and Data Rights Requirements ............................................................................................ 38 H. Data Repository System Choices ............................................................................................................................ 39 I. Repository Metadata Requirements ......................................................................................................................... 40

203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs .................................................................. 41 A. Introduction to Life Cycle Cost .............................................................................................................................. 41 B. Data & Data Rights Acquisition Costs .................................................................................................................... 42 C. Additional Data Rights Cost versus Sole Source Premium Cost ............................................................................ 42 D. Data & Data Rights Related Research and Development Costs ............................................................................. 43 E. Data & Data Rights Related Investment Costs........................................................................................................ 44 F. Data & Data Rights Related Operating and Support Costs ...................................................................................... 44 G. Data and Data Rights Related Disposal Costs ........................................................................................................ 45

204. Data & Data Rights Potential Risks .................................................................................. 47 A. Program Data Requirements Risks (Pre-Award) .................................................................................................... 47 B. Program Data Acquisition Risks (Pre-Award) ........................................................................................................ 47 C. Program Data Costs Risks (Pre-Award) .................................................................................................................. 48 D. Data Rights Risks (Pre-Award) ............................................................................................................................... 48 E. Data Delivery & Verification Risks (Post-Award) .................................................................................................. 48 F. Data Management & Use Risks (Post-Award)......................................................................................................... 49

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan ............................................................. 51 A. Request for Proposal (RFP) & Source Selection Basics ......................................................................................... 51 B. RFP Input - DATA Requirements ............................................................................................................................ 53 C. RFP Input - Data RIGHTS Requirements ............................................................................................................... 57 D. RFP Input - Source Selection Plan .......................................................................................................................... 57 E. Source Selection and Data Rights ........................................................................................................................... 59 F. Contract Line Items (RFP - Section B) .................................................................................................................... 60 G. Work Statement (RFP - Section C) ......................................................................................................................... 61 H. Special Contract Requirements (RFP - Section H) ................................................................................................. 62 I. Contract Clauses (RFP - Section I)........................................................................................................................... 62 J. Contract Data Requirements Lists (RFP - Section J) ............................................................................................... 63 K. Data Rights Attachment (RFP - Section J) .............................................................................................................. 65

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L. Data Rights Assertion Provision (RFP - Section K) ................................................................................................ 67 M. Instructions, Conditions, and Notices to Offerors (RFP - Section L) ..................................................................... 68 N. Proposal Evaluation Criteria (RFP Section M) ....................................................................................................... 69

206. Proposal Evaluation and Data & Data Rights License Agreements .............................. 71 A. DR Attachment and Assertions Inspection.............................................................................................................. 71 B. Commercial License Review & Approval .............................................................................................................. 71 C. Data & Data Rights License Agreement Documentation ........................................................................................ 72 D. License Agreement Resolution ............................................................................................................................... 72 E. Post-Award Data Rights Options Decisions (Concept) ........................................................................................... 73 F. Post-Award Data & Data Rights License Agreement Storage & Use ...................................................................... 73 G. Sole Source Data & Data Rights License Agreement Negotiations........................................................................ 74

207. Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance .................................................................... 75 A. Data Delivery .......................................................................................................................................................... 75 B. Data Rights Marking Verification ........................................................................................................................... 75 C. Post-Award Data Rights Assertions ........................................................................................................................ 77 D. Data Rights Assertions Review............................................................................................................................... 78

208. Data Management and Use ................................................................................................ 81 A. Data Management System Components & Functions ............................................................................................ 81 B. Data Repository ...................................................................................................................................................... 81 C. Data Repository Author/User Interactions .............................................................................................................. 84 D. Data Authoring Environments ................................................................................................................................ 84 E. Data Interfaces ........................................................................................................................................................ 85 F. External Systems ..................................................................................................................................................... 85

209. Data & Data Rights Program Checklist ........................................................................... 87 300. DETAILED INFORMATION ........................................................................................... 89 301. Data Rights Details ............................................................................................................. 91 A. Unlimited Data Rights Entitlement Details ............................................................................................................ 91

302. Data Markings Details ........................................................................................................ 93 A. Data Rights Markings Details ................................................................................................................................. 93 B. DFARS Clause Data Rights Marking Format versus Validation Details ................................................................ 95

303. Life Cycle Data & Data Rights Requirements Details .................................................... 97 A. Metadata Standards ................................................................................................................................................. 97 B. Sample Metadata Elements ..................................................................................................................................... 97

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details ........................................................................ 99

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A. Uniform Contract Format Details ........................................................................................................................... 99 B. Competition ............................................................................................................................................................ 99 C. Data Item Descriptions (DIDs) Details ................................................................................................................. 100 D. Relationships between SOW, CDRL, DR Attachment, and DIDs ........................................................................ 101 E. Contract Data Requirements List Details .............................................................................................................. 102 F. Sample Contract Line Items for Data & Data Rights ............................................................................................ 103 G. FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I) ............................................................................................................ 104

305. Data Rights Attachment Details ....................................................................................... 111 A. General DR Attachment Process ........................................................................................................................... 111 B. Government Preparation of DR Attachment ......................................................................................................... 111 C. Offeror Fill In of DR Attachment .......................................................................................................................... 115 D. Example Review of Offeror Submitted Table 1 .................................................................................................... 117 E. DR Attachment Table 1 Changes before Contract Award ..................................................................................... 118

306. Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept) ............................................................119 A. Overview .............................................................................................................................................................. 119 B. Program Inputs and Cost Estimates ...................................................................................................................... 120 C. Acquire Data Rights Costs .................................................................................................................................... 120 D. Accept Data Rights Restriction Costs ................................................................................................................... 120 E. Reverse Engineering Costs.................................................................................................................................... 121 F. Program Decision .................................................................................................................................................. 122

400. REFERENCE INFORMATION ..................................................................................... 123 401. Acknowledgements ............................................................................................................ 125 A. Subject Matter Expert Acknowledgements ........................................................................................................... 125 B. Contributor Acknowledgements............................................................................................................................ 126

402. Glossary & Acronyms ....................................................................................................... 127 A. Glossary ................................................................................................................................................................ 127 B. Acronyms .............................................................................................................................................................. 139

403. Index ................................................................................................................................... 141

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION CONTENTS 101. Data & DoD Life Cycle Fundamentals ..................................................................................................................3 102. Data Fundamentals ................................................................................................................................................7 103. Data Rights Fundamentals ................................................................................................................................... 13 104. Data Markings Fundamentals .............................................................................................................................. 23

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

Guide Content References

§ 100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

§ 300. DETAILED INFORMATION

101. Data & DoD Life Cycle Fundamentals

301. Data Rights Details

102. Data Fundamentals

302. Data Markings Details

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

303. Life Cycle Data & Data Rights Requirements Details

104. Data Markings Fundamentals

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

§ 200. CORE INFORMATION 201. Intellectual Property Strategy

305. Data Rights Attachment Details 306. Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept)

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements 203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs

§ 400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

204. Data & Data Rights Potential Risks

401. Acknowledgements

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

402. Glossary & Acronyms

206. Proposal Evaluation and Data & Data Rights License Agreements

403. Index

207. Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance 208. Data Management and Use 209. Data & Data Rights Program Checklist

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

101. Data & DoD Life Cycle Fundamentals

B. DoD and Data Acquisition Life Cycles

101. DATA & DOD LIFE CYCLE FUNDAMENTALS This section addresses steps in the data acquisition life cycle and how they relate to the DoD System Acquisition Framework.

A. Data Acquisition Life Cycle Figure 4 depicts a typical Defense-related data acquisition “life cycle” for identifying and contractually acquiring data and data rights and then using them to support production and sustainment of the product. The three digit identifiers (i.e. 201, 202, etc.) correspond to sections in the D&DR Guide. Figure 4 - Data Acquisition Life Cycle

An Intellectual Property (IP) Strategy [§ 201, p 29] defines and documents the program data and data rights needs and plans for each step in the data life cycle. The data and data rights requirements for the system [§ 202, p 33] must be defined for the entire life cycle to ensure all DoD life cycle activities will be supported. The life cycle costs [§ 203, p 41] related to data and data rights need to be estimated and accounted for in the program life cycle cost estimate. The potential data and data rights related risks [§ 204, p 47] should be identified and mitigated. A Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan must be properly prepared to acquire the desired data and data rights on contract [§ 205, p 51]. Offeror responses to the RFP should be evaluated [§ 206, p 71] from a data and data rights perspective and all data and data rights license agreements must be attached to the contract and stored for future reference. Data deliveries from the contract should be inspected and verified [§ 207, p 75] before Government acceptance. Once accepted, the Government manages and uses the data [§ 208, p 81].

B. DoD and Data Acquisition Life Cycles The DoDI 5000.02, January 7, 2015, “Operation of the Defense Acquisition System” describes the Defense Acquisition Management System and the DoD System Acquisition Framework (aka DoD Life Cycle). A summary depiction of the DoD Life Cycle is in Figure 5. The Government Accountability Office describes the early stages of the DoD life cycle in GAO-13-286 Defense Technology Development as “The Science &Technology (S&T) community engages in activities ranging from basic research through advanced technology development that are conducted by the government or externally by universities and commercial industry. Once the S&T community has completed its technology development, additional product development activities, such as technology

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

101. Data & DoD Life Cycle Fundamentals

C. Data & Data Rights License Agreement Timing

demonstration and testing, are often needed before incorporating the technologies into military weapon systems. Under the management of the acquisition community, product development further advances technology received from S&T developers and integrates it into systems that are ultimately delivered to support the warfighter.” Figure 5 - DoD System Acquisition Framework (aka DoD Life Cycle)

Figure 6 overlays the data life cycle to the DoD Life Cycle. The data life cycle repeats with each phase of development or new contract and then settles into management and use of the data once it has been delivered and accepted. Figure 6 - Data Life Cycle

C. Data & Data Rights License Agreement Timing When the Government's planning allows for exclusive private development of critical technology (or the Government simply finds that this is the reality upon first consideration of acquiring a technology), it is important to fully define and reach agreement on any private sector data rights restrictions as early as

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

101. Data & DoD Life Cycle Fundamentals

C. Data & Data Rights License Agreement Timing

possible in a development effort as shown in Figure 7. Execution of the Production & Deployment, and Operation & Support phases are significantly impacted by rights restrictions that could have been addressed in development. The Government's bargaining position is also strongest in the early phases of the program and the cost of additional data rights is normally lower. Figure 7 - Data & Data Rights License Agreement Timing In Development Phases

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

101. Data & DoD Life Cycle Fundamentals

C. Data & Data Rights License Agreement Timing

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

102. Data Fundamentals

B. FAR/DFARS Data Rights Perspective of Data

102. DATA FUNDAMENTALS This section includes definitions for data and categories of data. It also discusses how data can be viewed from a data rights or data deliverable and use perspective.

A. D&DR Guide Perspectives of Data For the purposes of this D&DR Guide, data can be viewed from the two perspectives shown in Figure 8. The “data rights” perspective focuses on how the data can be used by Department of Defense (DoD) activities and the “data deliverable & use” Figure 8 - Data & Data Rights Guide Perspectives of Data perspective focuses on what data is needed to develop, acquire, and sustain a DoD product. The data rights perspective is defined by federal regulations and the data deliverable and use perspective is defined by a taxonomy developed by the Army Product Data & Engineering Working Group (PEWG). It is important to keep these two perspectives in mind throughout the D&DR Guide.

B. FAR/DFARS Data Rights Perspective of Data The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) is the principal set of rules governing Federal acquisitions of supplies and services. It contains 53 parts and more than 1,800 pages of standardized policies and procedures used or referenced in federal contracts. Many Government Agencies and Departments supplement the FAR with additional regulations specific to its acquisitions needs. The Department of Defense supplement is the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS). The FAR can be found at http://www.acquisition.gov/far/. The DFARS and Procedures, Guidance, and Information (PGI) can be found at http://www.acq.osd.mil/dpap/dars/dfarspgi/current. The FAR and DFARS treatment of data is only in terms of the Government's rights to use that data on its behalf. These regulations define “data” as either Technical Data or Computer Software, and define Government rights entitlements based on a range of criteria such as product availability and data category. This DFARS view of data is Figure 9 - DFARS Data Rights Perspective of Data depicted in Figure 9. As explained further in section 103.B, DoD activities must generally follow the DFARS policies and utilize DFARS provisions and clauses in solicitations and contracts with respect to data rights.

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

102. Data Fundamentals

B. FAR/DFARS Data Rights Perspective of Data

i. FAR/DFARS Data Definition Most data related DFARS definitions come from subparts 227.71 (Rights In Technical Data) or 227.72 (Rights In Computer Software And Computer Software Documentation). Unfortunately, neither Subpart includes a definition for “Data.” FAR subpart 27.401 defines data as “...recorded information, regardless of form or the media on which it may be recorded. The term includes technical data and computer software. The term does not include information incidental to contract administration, such as financial, administrative, cost or pricing, or management information.” Note this definition is from the perspective of defining data rights for Technical Data and Computer Software only. Other types of data, such as Contract Administration Information, are NOT covered by any predefined rights in the FAR/DFARS.

ii. Product Availability The type or availability of the product the data is associated with must be defined before data rights determinations can be made. The two types of product availability are “commercial” and “noncommercial” as shown in row 2 of Figure 9. Commercial products are available to the public and noncommercial products are anything that is not a commercial product. These distinctions directly affect how some Government data rights entitlements are determined. Some Government terms often associated with commercial products are Commercially Available Off-The-Shelf and Non-Developmental Item. The full definition of commercial item can be found in FAR 2.101 - Definitions.

iii. DFARS Data Categories The categories of data derived from the DFARS are shown in row 3 of Figure 9. The three categories are Technical Data, Computer Software, and Contract Administration Information. DFARS 252.227-7013 defines Technical Data as “… recorded information, regardless of the form or method of the recording, of a scientific or technical nature (including computer software documentation). The term does not include computer software or data incidental to contract administration, such as financial and/or management information.” Note the inclusion of software documentation and exclusion of contract financial and/or management information. DFARS 252.227-7014 defines Computer Software as “computer programs, source code, source code listings, object code listings, design details, algorithms, processes, flow charts, formulae, and related material that would enable the software to be reproduced, recreated, or recompiled. Computer software does not include computer databases or computer software documentation.” Even though excluded from the definition of software, the rights to software documentation are covered in this clause. DFARS 252.227-7014 defines Computer Software Documentation as “...owner's manuals, user's manuals, installation instructions, operating instructions, and other similar items, regardless of storage medium, that explain the capabilities of the computer software or provide instructions for using the software.” The definition of Contract Administration Information can be derived from DFARS 252.227-7013 which refers to “...data incidental to contract administration, such as financial and/or management information”

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

102. Data Fundamentals

C. PEWG Product Data Deliverables Perspective of Data

C. PEWG Product Data Deliverables Perspective of Data The Army Product Data & Engineering Working Group (PEWG) recognized that additional distinctions beyond the DFARS types and categories of data would be helpful to DoD professionals, especially when determining program needs for data. This group created a data hierarchy and data groupings that focus on the uses of data to define, manufacture, and support a product. The following sections discuss the hierarchy and groupings.

i. Product Data Hierarchy The PEWG leveraged industry concepts and terms to create a data hierarchy focused on data needed to define, manufacture, and support a Product, Component, or Process. The PEWG hierarchy divides product data into three major groups: Product Definition Information, Product Operational Information, and Associated Information. Figure 10 depicts how these groups relate to the DFARS definitions of Technical Data and Computer Software. Product Data is a sub-set of Technical Data and Computer Software, as defined by the DFARS that directly relates to a product or weapon system. Product Data is distinct from other types of Technical Data that do not relate to a product; for example, a manpower staffing study of a DoD organization would be considered Technical Data but not Product Data as defined by the PEWG because it does not relate to a particular product or weapon system. The top of the hierarchy is the DFARS definitions for Technical Data and Computer Software. The PEWG hierarchy subsequently takes any Technical Data or Computer Software that defines or relates to a product and groups them together as “Product Data” which the PEWG defines as “All data created as a consequence of defining (requirements), designing, testing, producing, packaging, storing, distributing, operating, maintaining, modifying and disposing of a product.” Figure 10 - PEWG Product Data Hierarchy & Data Deliverables Perspective

ii. PEWG Data Group - Product Definition Information The PEWG definition of Product Definition Information is “Information that defines the product's requirements, documents the product's attributes, and is the authoritative source for configuration definition and control.” This set of information defines the product requirements, the product design, and any manufacturing or modification instructions. This group is sub-divided into Design Information,

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

102. Data Fundamentals

C. PEWG Product Data Deliverables Perspective of Data

Requirements Information, and Manufacturing Information. Examples of the content for these subgroups are listed in Table 2. Table 2 - PEWG Product Definition Information Sub-Groups and Examples

Requirements Information

Capabilities Development Document Capabilities Production Document System Specifications

Design Information

Design Concept Information Functional Breakdown Descriptions Trade Study Reports Design Selection Document, Engineering Analyses Models And Test Cases (Simulations) As Designed Product Configuration Technical Data Package (TDP) Computer Aided Design Models Interface Control Documents Computer Software Source Code Software Development Environment Definition

Manufacturing Information

Manufacturing Instructions, Process routings Depot Overhaul/Modification Information

The Technical Data Package (TDP) is specifically identified as a key part of the Design Information subgroup because so much product data is derived from it. Military Standard MIL-STD-31000A “Technical Data Packages” defines a TDP as “A technical description of an item adequate for supporting an acquisition, production, engineering, and logistics support (e.g. Engineering Data for Provisioning, Training, and Technical Manuals). The description defines the required design configuration or performance requirements, and procedures required to ensure adequacy of item performance. It consists of applicable technical data such as models, drawings, associated lists, specifications, standards, performance requirements, QAP, software documentation, and packaging details.” Note there is a conflict between the MIL-STD-31000A inclusion of software documentation as part of a TDP, and the DFARS definition of Computer Software Documentation as “...owner's manuals, user's manuals, installation instructions, operating instructions...” This edition of the Guide uses the DFARS definition and assigns software documentation to the Product Operational Information group. REF: Technical Data Package (TDP) [§ 205.B.i, p 53];

iii. PEWG Data Group- Product Operational Information The PEWG definition of Product Operational Information is “Information used to operate, maintain, and dispose of the product.” This group is sub-divided into Logistics Product Data, and Materiel In-Service Information. This set of information describes how to operate, maintain, repair, and otherwise logistically support the product and the configuration of each physical instance of the product. Examples of the content for these sub-groups are listed in Table 3.

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

102. Data Fundamentals

C. PEWG Product Data Deliverables Perspective of Data

Table 3 - PEWG Product Operational Information Sub-Groups and Examples

Logistics Product Data

Technical Manuals Maintenance Planning Information Technical Publications Support & Test Equipment Info Supply Support Info Manpower, Personnel & Training Info Packaging, Handling, Storage & Trans Info Environmental Safety & Occupational Health Info Computer Software Documentation

Materiel InService Information

Field Feedback Information Item Prognostics & Diagnostics Info Maintenance Actions Product Unit Configuration Info: As-Built As Maintained As-Modified

iv. PEWG Data Group - Associated Information The PEWG definition of Associated Information is “Information generated as part of the product development and life cycle management process, but isn't clearly definable as either of the other two groups.” The Associated Information group is sub-divided into Verification Information, Configuration Control Information, and Other Associated Information. Examples of the content for these sub-categories are listed in Table 4. Note: Some or all of associated information may be included by organizations as a part of either their product definition information or product operational information. Table 4 - PEWG Associated Information Sub-Groups and Examples

Verification Information

Test Reports Physical Configuration Audit Results Functional Configuration Audit Results

Configuration Control Information

Requests For Change Requests For Variance Configuration Control Board Decisions Product Configuration Management Status

Other Associated Information

Obsolescence Notices Government-Industry Data Exchange Program Supplier Notices Disposal Info

v. Software Related Information and PEWG Data Groups The DFARS distinguishes Computer Software from Technical Data for the purposes of data rights determinations. However, this distinction is irrelevant when considering the information from a product data perspective. Both Technical Data and Computer Software source code and executable programs must be acquired and managed as part of a development program, whenever present.

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CONTENTS

100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

102. Data Fundamentals

D. Data Rights and Data Relationship

Figure 11 depicts how software related information fits within the PEWG product data groups. Source code is the authoritative source describing the software design and fits within the Design Information subgroup of Product Definition Figure 11 - Computer Software and PEWG Product Data Groups Information. The “master” executable program file compiled from the source code also fits under this sub-group. However, copies of the master executable program do NOT fit into this subgroup. These copies become “instances” of the original and are distributed as Firmware (embedded in a hardware system) or a product deliverable. It is important to distinguish which type of executable program is being discussed in a given situation.

D. Data Rights and Data Relationship The DFARS data rights and PEWG data deliverable perspectives are interdependent. Data deliverables and data rights form the foundation of a complete product solution as shown in Figure 12. The program manufacturing and sustainment plans for a particular component, sub-system, or system, define what data and data rights are needed. Figure 12 - Data + Data Rights = Complete Product Solution

A complete product solution is only realized by combining the needed data AND data rights for the particular item. Specifically, the Government must have all of the needed data in hand (preferred), or unrestricted access to it (for the life of the system), and the rights needed to use that data or share it with third parties as required by the program plans. Either partial or incomplete data, unclear data rights, or both, will prevent the Government from manufacturing and supporting the item as intended.

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

B. Data Related FAR Provisions & Clause Fundamentals

103. DATA RIGHTS FUNDAMENTALS This section addresses Government data rights. It discusses Government data rights types and how rights entitlements are determined. REF: Data Rights Details [§ 301, p 91];

A. FAR and DFARS Overview The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) is the principal set of rules governing Federal acquisitions of supplies and services. The Department of Defense supplements the FAR with the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) and the Army supplements the FAR and DFARS with the Army Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (AFARS). Other agencies and departments follow similar conventions. The Defense Procurement & Acquisition Policy (DPAP) organization is responsible for all contracting and procurement policy matters in the Department of Defense. This organization publishes a companion resource titled DFARS Procurement Guidance Information (PGI), which includes policy, and guidance that does not meet the criteria for inclusion in the DFARS. The FAR can be found at Acquisition Central. The DFARS and guidance can be found at Defense Procurement and Policy DFARS and PGI. Figure 13 shows how FAR and DFARS content is identified.

Figure 13 - FAR and DFARS Content Identifiers

The FAR and DFARS contain both “solicitation provisions“ and “contract clauses.” Solicitation provisions are for items used only in solicitations and applying before contract award. Contract clauses are for items used in both solicitations and contracts, applying solely after award or both before and after award.

B. Data Related FAR Provisions & Clause Fundamentals Some important data and data rights related FAR content are in Part 27 and Part 52. FAR Part 27--Patents, Data, and Copyrights prescribes “policies, procedures, solicitation provisions, and contract clauses pertaining to patents, data, and copyrights.” This content can be thought of as the “rules” prescribed by the Government. FAR Part 52--Solicitation Provisions and Contract Clauses delineates the provisions and clauses, which implement the prescriptions of FAR Part 27 in a contract. However, not all FAR subpart 27.4 and referenced provisions and clauses apply to DoD activities and contracts. FAR 27.400 states “The policy statement in 27.402 applies to all executive agencies. The remainder of the subpart applies to all executive agencies except the Department of Defense.” DFARS 227--Patents, Data, and Copyrights, subpart 227.4 states, “DoD activities shall use the guidance in Subparts 227.71 and 227.72 instead of the guidance in FAR Subpart 27.4.” Bottom line: DoD activities must use the DFARS for data rights in accordance with FAR 27.402 and DFARS 227.4.

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

D. DFARS Data Rights Categories

C. Data Related DFARS Provisions & Clause Fundamentals Some noteworthy DFARS content is shown in Figure 14. DFARS 227.70 (Infringement Claims, Licenses, and Assignments), 227.71 (Rights In Technical Data) and 227.72 (Rights In Computer Software And Computer Software Documentation) prescribe DoD-unique policies, procedures, provisions, and contract clauses (the “rules”) pertaining to the acquisitions and rights to data, patents, and copyrights.

Figure 14 - Data/Rights Related Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement Content

DFARS 252--Solicitation Provisions and Contract Clauses, and specifically, the DFARS 252.227.7013-7037 clauses delineate the provisions, which implement the prescriptions of DFARS 227.71 and 227.72.

D. DFARS Data Rights Categories Department of Defense data rights and entitlements are defined by specific clauses in the DFARS. These clauses were created to implement several statutes including 10 U.S.C. § 2320 Rights in Technical Data and 10 U.S.C. § 2321 Validation of Proprietary Data Restrictions as well as the policy at FAR 9.505-4 -Obtaining Access to Proprietary Information. The Intellectual Property Assets, Rights, and Protection Methods [§ 201.B, p 30] section introduces Intellectual Property assets. DoD contractors generally retain ownership of IP Assets created during the contract effort. The Government is afforded license rights to use these assets in accordance with FAR/DFARS and any specific agreements in the contract. These rights control how the Government can use, disclose, or reproduce contractor owned information. DFARS clauses 252.227-7013, 252.227-7014, 252.227-7018, and 252.227-7015, supported by other regulations, define the Government Standard Data Rights. These are the minimum data rights the Government is legally entitled to as determined by the FAR and DFARS clauses included in the contract used to order the delivery of the data. “Order” means to contractually require delivery of data to the Government. The DFARS data rights categories for data associated with noncommercial products are: •

Unlimited Rights



Government Purpose Rights



Specifically Negotiated License Rights



Small Business Innovation Research Data Rights



Limited Rights (for Technical Data)



Restricted Rights (for Computer Software)

Figure 15 is a summary view of what the Government is permitted to do with data associated with noncommercial products based on its data rights category. Rights in the upper, green rows allow

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

D. DFARS Data Rights Categories

maximum flexibility for the Government to use the data as needed to support a program. Rights in the red, lower rows significantly restrict how the Government can use the data and often will dictate that only a single source will be able to supply systems, parts, and/or support, which usually requires a justification and approval of a sole source to comply with the Competition in Contracting Act. Figure 15 - Data Rights and Permitted Uses of Data Associated with Noncommercial Products

i. Unlimited Rights Unlimited Rights give the Government the ability to use, modify, reproduce, perform, display, release, or disclose the data in any manner, and for any purpose whatsoever, and to have or authorize others to do so (absent any separate security classification or export control restriction).

ii. Government Purpose Rights Government Purpose Rights give the Government the ability to reproduce, modify, perform, display, use, disclose, or release the data for Government purposes without restriction. However, the Government cannot release the data for any commercial purpose. These rights are essentially a middle path unique to defense contracts that offers a way for contractors to exploit data in the commercial market for a limited time while the Government also gets immediate benefits. Government Purpose Rights expire after a time limit (the standard is five years after contract execution unless another time is negotiated in the contract) at which point the Government Purpose Rights become Unlimited Rights.

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

D. DFARS Data Rights Categories

iii. Specifically Negotiated License Rights A Specifically Negotiated License Rights (SNLR) agreement is required when the standard data rights arrangements, defined in the DFARS or by a commercial entity, are modified by mutual agreement between a contractor and the Government. The new terms are spelled out in a unique SNLR agreement. The DFARS limits the terms of SNLR agreements based on whether the data is associated with a noncommercial or commercial product. A SNLR agreement pertaining to Technical Data associated with noncommercial products or noncommercial Computer Software is usually a compromise between Limited or Restricted, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR), Government Purpose, and Unlimited Rights. A SNLR agreement for this type of data cannot result in the Government having lesser rights than Limited or Restricted Rights as defined in the DFARS. A SNLR agreement pertaining to commercial Computer Software has no limitations stipulated in the DFARS. However, DFARS 227.7202-1(a) states “Commercial computer software or commercial computer software documentation shall be acquired under the licenses customarily provided to the public unless such licenses are inconsistent with Federal procurement law or do not otherwise satisfy user needs.” SNLR agreements that go outside the bounds of or otherwise uses license terms inconsistent with DFARS Subparts 227.71 (Rights In Technical Data), 227.72 (Rights In Computer Software And Computer Software Documentation), or DFARS Subpart 201.4 (Deviations from the FAR), will require deviation approval from the Director of Defense Procurement and Acquisition Policy, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics). CAUTION: Definitions of terminology are binding in Government contracts when mandated by statute or regulation or agreed upon by the parties in a contract. In the data and data rights contexts, it may be especially important to expressly define critical or nonstandard terms in a specifically negotiated license within the license itself to avoid uncertainty and disputes regarding the meaning and scope of the license. The terminology listed in the glossary of this Guide are for illustrative purposes only and should not be taken as official endorsement or as meaning that such definitions will be binding in Government contracts.

iv. Limited Rights (Technical Data) Limited Rights apply to Technical Data associated with noncommercial products only. The Government may use the Technical Data within the Government but not release the Technical Data outside of the Government except in limited circumstances. The Government may not use the data for manufacturing additional quantities of the item. However, the Government may share this data with a Covered Government Support Contractor (CGSC). This type of contractor works directly with the Government to support the management and oversight of a program or effort.

v. Restricted Rights (Computer Software) Restricted Rights apply to noncommercial Computer Software only. The Government may only run the software on one computer at a time, and may make only the minimum copies needed for backup. The software may not be released outside of the Government except in limited circumstances and only after notice is provided to the owner. However, the Government may share this data with a Covered Government Support Contractor. This type of contractor works directly with the Government to support the management and oversight of a program or effort.

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

E. DFARS Clauses and Data Rights

vi. Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Data Rights Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) rights apply to both Technical Data associated with noncommercial products and noncommercial Computer Software. These rights apply when the Government enters into a research and development effort awarded as a Small Business Innovation Research contract. If a product was developed as part of an SBIR effort, the Government is entitled to SBIR Data Rights, which are generally equivalent to Limited or Restricted Rights, but for a fixed period known as the SBIR data rights period. This time frame is defined in DFARS 252.227-7018 as “...the period commencing with contract award and ending upon the date five years after completion of the project from which such data were generated.” The completion date should be understood and agreed to by all parties at the start of an SBIR effort.. SBIR efforts are divided into three successive phases (I, II, III) with the ultimate goal to commercialize the technology in question. Details of SBIR efforts and data rights entitlements are discussed in the DoD SBIR Desk Reference for Contracting and Payment.

E. DFARS Clauses and Data Rights The specific Government “standard” rights entitlements are dependent upon many factors such as the type of data, the type of item the data is associated with, and who paid for the development of the item and data. A contractor's agreement with the terms of a particular contract includes granting standard rights to the Government as specified by the FAR and DFARS clauses included in the contract. Different clauses define data rights based on the category of data and product availability as depicted in Figure 16 and discussed in the following sub-sections. Figure 16 - DFARS Data, Clauses, and Data Rights Categories

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CONTENTS

100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

E. DFARS Clauses and Data Rights

i. Data Rights Associated with Noncommercial Products (FAR Contract) DoD rights to Technical Data associated with a noncommercial product or noncommercial Computer Software are determined by DFARS clauses 252.227-7013 (Rights in Technical Data--Noncommercial Items) and 252.227-7014 (Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and Noncommercial Computer Software Documentation), respectively (Figure 16, Item 1). The resulting rights can be Unlimited, Government Purpose, Specifically Negotiated License, Limited (Technical Data), or Restricted (Computer Software). These clauses also define data rights marking requirements which are discussed in the Data Rights Markings section [§ 104.D, p 24].

ii. Data Rights Associated with Noncommercial Products (SBIR Contracts) DoD rights to Technical Data associated with a noncommercial product or noncommercial Computer Software acquired using a Small Business Innovation Research contract are defined in DFARS clause 252.227-7018 (Rights in Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software--Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program) (Figure 16, Item 2). The resulting rights can be Unlimited, Specifically Negotiated License, Limited (Technical Data), Restricted (Computer Software), or Small Business Innovation Research. This clause also defines data rights marking requirements for SBIR data including the expiration of the SBIR data rights period. These requirements are discussed in the Data Rights Markings section [§ 104.D, p 24].

iii. Data Rights Associated with Commercial Products (All Contracts) DoD rights to Technical Data associated with commercial products are defined in DFARS clause 252.2277015 (Technical Data–Commercial Items) (Figure 16, Item 3). Although not worded as such in the clause, the data disclosure and use restrictions in 252.227-7015 are the same as Limited Rights. However, DFARS section 227.7102 exempts certain types of data from this restriction. Section 103.H discusses this topic. There are no DFARS data rights definitions for commercial Computer Software (Figure 16, Item 4). The specific rights and terms of use for this information are dictated by the software developer in a license agreement. However, DFARS 227.7202-1 (a) states “Commercial computer software or commercial computer software documentation shall be acquired under the licenses customarily provided to the public unless such licenses are inconsistent with Federal procurement law or do not otherwise satisfy user needs.” As such, it is important to have Government legal representatives review all commercial software licenses before agreeing to them.

iv. Data Rights Associated with Contract Administration Information (All Contracts) Contract Administration information (Figure 16, Item 5) is frequently ordered by the Government and subsequently shared with non-Government entities. However, the DFARS does not define data rights for this information. Therefore, the rights to share Contract Administration information must be defined in a

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

G. DFARS Data Rights Entitlement Determinations - Funding Source

Specifically Negotiated License Rights agreement and the Contracting Officer must ensure compliance with FAR 9.505-4 -- Obtaining Access to Proprietary Information.

F. Standard, Needed/Desired, and Additional Rights Standard Data Rights are the minimum rights the Government is legally entitled to as determined by the FAR and DFARS clauses included in the contract used to order the delivery of the data. The specific “standard” rights entitlements are dependent upon many factors such as the type of data, the type of item the data is associated with, and who paid for the development of the item and data. A contractor's agreement with the terms of a particular contract includes granting standard rights to the Government as specified by the clauses included in the contract. Needed data rights are the minimum rights necessary for the Government to use the delivered data in support of the approved program strategies. The program team should determine the needed rights for each contract data deliverable. Any rights that are less restrictive than the standard rights are defined as “additional” rights per the DFARS. Therefore, the needed rights may be a mix of standard and additional rights. A Data Rights Attachment (§ 205.K) in the RFP is the recommended method for the Government to communicate the needed rights to potential contractors. However, the rights are labeled as “desired” rights. This is done to avoid potential misinterpretation that granting additional rights is a requirement to be responsive to the RFP. In some cases, the needed rights may align with the standard rights. For example, a program determines it needs Government Purpose Rights for a specific deliverable. The standard rights entitlement for that deliverable per the DFARS is also Government Purpose. As such, the needed/desired rights are the same as the standard rights. In other cases, the needed rights may be less restrictive than the standard rights. For example, a program determines it needs Government Purpose rights for a different contract data deliverable. However, the standard rights for that data deliverable are Limited. In this example, the needed/desired rights are “additional” to the standard rights. If a selected source is unwilling to grant the desired additional rights, the Government will need to revise the affected program strategies to reflect the presumed sole source, manufacture, spare parts, and support/sustainment of the affected item(s). As such, the Government must incentivize potential contractors to offer these additional rights. This can be done using compensation (contract price) or, when competitive procurement is still possible, evaluating offered data rights as a source selection factor. If an offeror is unwilling to grant the standard rights for any data deliverable, they can be determined to be non-responsive to the Government requirements. REF: Source Selection and Data Rights [§ 205.E, p 59]; Data Rights Attachment (RFP - Section J) [§ 205.K, p 65];

G. DFARS Data Rights Entitlement Determinations - Funding Source The data-related DFARS clauses describe a range of criteria that define the Standard Data Rights to which the Government is legally entitled to at no additional cost.

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CONTENTS

100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

H. DFARS Data Rights Entitlement Determinations - Unlimited Rights

A majority of disagreements regarding data rights entitlements for data associated with noncommercial products relate to who funded the creation or development of the product in question. This funding source determination is dictated by 10 U.S.C. § 2320. Rights in Technical Data and codified by DFARS clauses 252.227-7013 and 252.227-7014. Figure 17 depicts the funding source allocations and resulting standard data rights entitlement. The Government is entitled to specific rights Figure 17 - Data Rights & Funding Sources (Noncommercial Only) depending on funding source. If the product was developed exclusively with Government funding, the Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights and the contractor cannot restrict the use of the data in any way. If the product was developed using a combination of Government and private (contractor) funding in any ratio, the Government is entitled to Government Purpose Rights which revert to Unlimited Rights after five years unless different term lengths are negotiated. If a contractor funded the development of items, components, or processes completely at private expense, and can provide proper documentation supporting this claim, the contractor may restrict the Government's use of that data by asserting Limited Rights or Restricted Rights. If a product was developed as part of the Small Business Innovation Research program (SBIR), the Government is entitled to SBIR Data Rights as described in SBIR Desk Reference and DFARS 252.2277018. SBIR data rights are generally equivalent to Limited or Restricted Rights. SBIR rights become Unlimited Rights after expiration of the data rights period which is “...five years after completion of the project from which such data were generated.” This period can potentially be longer if the data is used on subsequent SBIR contracts. Note the SBIR data rights entitlements reflected in DFARS 252.227-7018 do not clearly align with those described in the Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive (Feb 24, 2014). Program teams are advised to consult legal counsel whenever dealing with SBIR data rights entitlements.

H. DFARS Data Rights Entitlement Determinations - Unlimited Rights The data related DFARS clauses also identify certain types of data to which the Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights irrespective of who funded its development. Noteworthy among the types of data are Form, Fit, and Function Data (FFF), Operation, Maintenance, Installation and Training Data (OMIT), “studies, analyses, test data, or similar data” and Computer Software Documentation. The Government is entitled to Unlimited rights to FFF, OMIT, and Computer Software Documentation associated with a noncommercial product in accordance with DFARS clauses 252.227-7013, 252.2277014, and 252.227-7018. The Government is entitled to similar rights for FFF, OMIT, and certain Technical Data associated with a commercial product. DFARS section 227.7102 exempts FFF, OMIT, and Technical Data that “describe the modifications made at Government expense to a commercial item or process in order to meet the requirements of a Government solicitation,” from the standard rights restrictions associated with commercial item Technical Data. DFARS clause 252.227-7015 defines these rights as the “unrestricted

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

I. Contractor Data Rights Assertions

right to use, modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose technical data....” rather than Unlimited Rights. The Government is also entitled to Unlimited Rights to “studies, analyses, test data, or similar data produced for the contract, when the study, analysis, test, or similar work was specified as an element of performance” in accordance with DFARS clause 252.227-7013. There are additional conditions under which the DFARS defines Government entitlement to Unlimited Rights to data. A complete list of these criteria is shown in the Unlimited Data Rights Entitlement Details [§ 301.A, p 91] section.

I. Contractor Data Rights Assertions DFARS provision 252.227-7017 requires contractors to “assert” in their proposals their belief that certain Technical Data or Computer Software ordered in the RFP should be provided to the Government with less than Unlimited Rights (i.e. with restrictions on the Government's use of that data). The provision also requires a rationale for each assertion be provided. DFARS clauses 252.227-7013, 252.227-7014, and 252.227-7018 allow for post-award assertions by stating “...other assertions may be identified after award when based on new information or inadvertent omissions unless the inadvertent omissions would have materially affected the source selection decision.” If there are “reasonable grounds,” DFARS 252.227-7019 or 252.227-7037 permit contracting officers “to challenge the validity of an asserted restriction.” This stringent and time-consuming process allows the Government to challenge a contractor's assertion that a product was developed exclusively at private expense and without any Government contribution. Contractors cannot legally assert more rights restrictions than those defined by the DFARS clauses included in the RFP and contract (i.e. the contractor cannot assert Limited Rights for data clearly defined as Unlimited Rights per the DFARS). REF: Data Rights Assertion Provision (RFP - Section K) [§ 205.L, p 67]; Post-Award Data Rights Assertions [§ 207.C, p 77];

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

I. Contractor Data Rights Assertions

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

104. Data Markings Fundamentals

A. Distribution Statement Markings

104. DATA MARKINGS FUNDAMENTALS This section discusses approved data markings as defined in the FAR and DFARS and how these markings should be applied to delivered data. Data markings are used to identify data ownership, use, and distribution restrictions. There are five types of data related markings acknowledged by the Government: Distribution Statement, Export Control, Data Rights, Copyright, and security classification. Figure 18 shows an example of markings applied to a typical drawing. Figure 18 - Drawing Data Markings Example

REF: Data Markings Details [§ 302, p 93];

A. Distribution Statement Markings Distribution statements are mandated by DoD Instruction 5230.24, “Distribution Statements on Technical Documents” and specify what “authorized audience” may see the data without additional authorization. Normally, a distribution statement will require a statement letter, some descriptive text and often the dates and offices associated with the distribution determination. The Government Controlling Office determines the authorized audience for specific data and can grant additional access if needed for a specific purpose. This office can take responsibility for applying the proper distribution statement to the data or has the option to require a third party to do so as part of data delivery. Data with restrictive data rights markings should use Distribution Statement B, E, or F to prevent unauthorized distribution of the information. Additional guidance on distribution statements is available on the Defense Technical Information Center web Page Distribution Statements for Use on Technical Documents, Journals Articles and Conference Proceedings.

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CONTENTS

100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

104. Data Markings Fundamentals

D. Data Rights Markings

B. Distribution Statements and Data Rights Markings One of the reasons for selecting the appropriate distribution statement for a data item is the nature of its Government data rights. DoD Instruction 5230.24 Enclosures 4 and 5 provide a complete discussion of the relationship between distribution statements and data rights markings. The distribution statement levels and allowable data rights markings are shown in Table 5. Table 5 - Distribution Statement Designation & Allowable Data Rights Markings

Distribution Statement

Dissemination Restriction (summary)

Allowable Data Rights Markings

DISTRIBUTION A.

Public Release

None (Unlimited Rights)

DISTRIBUTION B.

U.S. Govt Agencies

Government Purpose, SBIR, Restricted, Limited, or Specifically Negotiated

DISTRIBUTION C.

U.S. Govt Agencies & Contractors

None (Unlimited Rights)

DISTRIBUTION D.

DoD and U.S. DoD Contractors

None (Unlimited Rights)

DISTRIBUTION E.

DoD components only

Government Purpose, SBIR, Restricted, Limited, or Specifically Negotiated

DISTRIBUTION F.

Controlled Dissemination

Government Purpose, SBIR, Restricted, Limited, or Specifically Negotiated

C. Export Control Markings 22 U.S.C. § 2778 of the Arms Export Control Act describes the authority to limit export of data to foreign governments or industries. DoD Directive 5230.25, “Withholding of Unclassified Technical Data” describes the process to identify “all unclassified technical data with military or space application in the possession of, or under the control of, a DoD Component that may not be exported lawfully without an approval, authorization, or license...” Data identified as such must be marked as “export controlled” in accordance with DoD Instruction 5230.24, “Distribution Statements on Technical Documents.” The Government Controlling Office is responsible for ensuring export control markings are applied. The specific marking is defined in DoD Instruction 5230.24 as: “WARNING - This document contains technical data whose export is restricted by the Arms Export Control Act (Title 22, U.S.C., Sec 2751, et seq.) or the Export Administration Act of 1979 (Title 50, U.S.C., App. 2401 et seq), as amended. Violations of these export laws are subject to severe criminal penalties. Disseminate in accordance with provisions of DoD Directive 5230.25.”

D. Data Rights Markings Data rights markings are required by the Government to identify the data rights entitlements for third party owned data associated with noncommercial products. There are no marking requirements for Technical Data associated with commercial items or commercial Computer Software.

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

104. Data Markings Fundamentals

F. Security Classification Markings

The originator is responsible for properly marking any data delivered to the Government with less than Unlimited Rights. The originator is also responsible for identifying the specific information that is subject to the terms of the data rights restriction. There are three DFARS clauses applicable to the data rights markings for noncommercial products; 252.227-7013 for Technical Data, 252.227-7014 for Computer Software, and 252.227-7018 for Small Business Innovation Research data. These clauses define the correct and allowable rights markings “legends” for various categories of data rights, which ultimately define how the Government can use, disclose, or reproduce, the data. “All Rights Reserved,” “Proprietary,” “Company Confidential,” and similar markings do NOT conform with the Government marking requirements in these clauses and the originator should be required to change them to the correct and allowable rights legend. “All Rights Reserved,” “Proprietary,” “Company Confidential,” and similar markings may be acceptable for commercial Technical Data under DFARS 252.227-7015 or commercial Computer Software. REF: Data Rights Marking Verification [§ 207.B, p 75]; Data Rights Markings Details [§ 302.A, p 93]; DFARS Clause Data Rights Marking Format versus Validation Details [§ 302.B, p 95];

E. Copyright Markings 17 U.S.C. §§ 401 and 402 defines the requirements for a copyright “notice” or marking. This marking must contain three elements: the copyright symbol or abbreviation, the year of first publication of the work, and the name of the copyright owner.

F. Security Classification Markings Marking and handling classified information is beyond the scope of this guide. DoD Manual 5200.01 is the authoritative source on this topic explains the proper markings for classified information. The proper marking of a classified document is the specific responsibility of the original or derivative (Government) classifier (i.e., the author or originator of the information). Derivative classifiers shall refer to the source document(s), security classification guide(s), or other guidance issued by the original classification authority when determining the markings to apply. The holder of an improperly marked classified document must contact the document originator to obtain correct markings and then apply those markings as required.

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100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

104. Data Markings Fundamentals

F. Security Classification Markings

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200. CORE INFORMATION

200. CORE INFORMATION CONTENTS 201. Intellectual Property Strategy .............................................................................................................................. 29 202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements .................................................................................................. 33 203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs ..................................................................................................... 41 204. Data & Data Rights Potential Risks ..................................................................................................................... 47 205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan ................................................................................................. 51 206. Proposal Evaluation and Data & Data Rights License Agreements..................................................................... 71 207. Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance ....................................................................................................... 75 208. Data Management and Use .................................................................................................................................. 81 209. Data & Data Rights Program Checklist ............................................................................................................... 87

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CONTENTS

200. CORE INFORMATION

Guide Content References

§ 100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

§ 300. DETAILED INFORMATION

101. Data & DoD Life Cycle Fundamentals

301. Data Rights Details

102. Data Fundamentals

302. Data Markings Details

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

303. Life Cycle Data & Data Rights Requirements Details

104. Data Markings Fundamentals

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

§ 200. CORE INFORMATION 201. Intellectual Property Strategy

305. Data Rights Attachment Details 306. Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept)

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements 203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs

§ 400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

204. Data & Data Rights Potential Risks

401. Acknowledgements

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

402. Glossary & Acronyms

206. Proposal Evaluation and Data & Data Rights License Agreements

403. Index

207. Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance 208. Data Management and Use 209. Data & Data Rights Program Checklist

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200. CORE INFORMATION

201. Intellectual Property Strategy

A. IP Strategy Background

201. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY STRATEGY This section introduces the new DoD requirement for an Intellectual Property (IP) Strategy, which replaces the Technical Data Rights Strategy and is required by DoDI 5000.02, January 7, 2015, “Operation of the Defense Acquisition System”

A. IP Strategy Background The requirements to address program data and data rights needs stems from DFARS 207.106 Additional requirements for major systems which incorporates language from the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007. The name of the strategy to address these needs has evolved from “Data Management Strategy“ in 2007, to “Technical Data Rights Strategy“ in 2011, to “Intellectual Property Strategy” in 2013. DoDI 5000.02 describes the requirement for an IP Strategy as “Program management must establish and maintain an IP Strategy to identify and manage the full spectrum of IP and related issues (e.g., technical data and computer software deliverables, patented technologies, and appropriate license rights) from the inception of a program and throughout the life cycle.” It also states that “The IP Strategy will describe, at a minimum, how program management will assess program needs for, and acquire competitively whenever possible, the IP deliverables and associated license rights necessary for competitive and affordable acquisition and sustainment over the entire product life cycle...”. And that “The IP Strategy will be updated throughout the entire product life cycle, summarized in the Acquisition Strategy, and presented with the Life-Cycle Sustainment Plan during the Operations and Support Phase.''

RECOMMENDATION: Develop a comprehensive Intellectual Property Strategy and use it to govern data and data rights related program activities.

A team of DoD subject matter experts is developing guidance for the content, preparation, and use of an IP Strategy. Figure 19 - Program Strategy Content Evolution

It is expected that a program IP Strategy will address an expanded set of issues than was contained in previous data related strategies. This will include expanded sources of data and data rights, a broader range of acquisition mechanisms, and a wider array of IP Rights as shown in Figure 19. NOTE: The contents of this Army Data & Data Rights Guide only focus on Data, Data Rights, and FAR Contract acquisitions.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

201. Intellectual Property Strategy

B. Intellectual Property Assets, Rights, and Protection Methods

B. Intellectual Property Assets, Rights, and Protection Methods The term “Intellectual Property” is not well known or often used outside of legal circles, so some background, and explanation is in order. Intellectual property “assets” can be defined as original concepts or ideas having commercial value. Table 6 lists some potential IP assets from the United States Patent and Trademark Office IP Awareness Assessment. Table 6 - Potential Intellectual Property Assets (Partial List)

Specialized packaging of unique shape, color or design Slogan, name, logo, tag line Written or recorded material (books, music, operating manuals, catalogs, etc.) Computer hardware, software, web site or architectural materials Special design of products Physical products and processes using them (any machine, tool, instrument, compounds, formulations, medicines ... and methods of making and using any of these) Original art, graphic design, advertising, photography, written articles, poetry, books, music, audio or video recordings, films, or dramatic works Textile, apparel, jewelry or any other accessory designs Proprietary information that gives advantage over competitors (product formulas, manufacturing processes, customer lists, marketing strategies, computer source code...)

United States laws and policies regarding intellectual property generally incentivize and reward investments in time, effort, and funding that lead to the creation of IP assets by the granting of intellectual property rights. Intellectual Property assets can and should be protected using patents, copyrights, trademarks, or trade secrets. These protections provide the concept or idea owner methods to protect or restrict use of the subject matter by others. Patents, copyrights, and trademarks are protection methods enforceable through statutory and common law while trade secret protection is accomplished using physical and contractual means to maintain secrecy of the information. The U.S. Department of Commerce STOPFakes.gov “Understanding Intellectual Property Rights” document is an excellent resource to explain and illustrate IP rights. Quoted content in the following sections comes from the STOPFakes.gov web site.

i. Patents “A patent is a Government grant of a property right that permits an inventor to exclude others from making, using, selling, offering for sale, or importing his or her invention. In return, the inventor must fully disclose the invention in the patent application process. An invention is a product, machine, material, or process, including a new use for a known product and improvements of any of these; that provides a new way of doing something or offers a new technical solution to a problem. Patents may be obtained for a broad array of subject matter, including machines, tools, instruments, methods, systems, processes, compounds, formulations, and even plants and animals in some circumstances.” STOPFakes.gov Patents are time limited (20 years) and protect against unauthorized use of any new or improved “process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter” as defined in 35 U.S.C. § 101. Inventions Patentable.

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201. Intellectual Property Strategy

B. Intellectual Property Assets, Rights, and Protection Methods

ii. Trademarks A trademark is basically a brand name. “A trademark is a word, phrase, symbol or design-- or a combination of any of these--that serves to identify and distinguish a specific product or service from others in the marketplace. Nike's “Swoosh,” McDonald's “Golden Arches,” the names Coca-Cola, Starbucks and Amazon.com--all of these marks immediately conjure up certain feelings and images in the minds of consumers that these companies have worked extremely hard to achieve.” - STOPfakes.gov

iii. Copyrights “Copyright is a form of legal protection granted to the authors of original creative works. Copyrights are used to protect a wide range of subject matter, including: •

Pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works



Motion pictures and other audiovisual works



Computer programs” (abridged)

“Contrary to popular belief, copyright protection extends only to the tangible expression of an idea, not to the idea itself. ...the copyright owner has the exclusive right to do and to authorize others to do any of the following: •

Copy the work



Change the work



Distribute the work publicly



Perform or display the work publicly” - STOPFakes.gov

Formal registration with the US Copyright office is not required to claim copyright; however, it is useful should proof of ownership be required. Registration is also required to recover statutory damages and attorney's fees in an action for infringement per 7 U.S.C. § 412. Registration as prerequisite to certain remedies for infringement. Note that works created by officers or employees of the Government cannot be copyrighted. 17 U.S.C. § 105. Subject matter of copyright: United States Government works states “Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government, but the United States Government is not precluded from receiving and holding copyrights transferred to it by assignment, bequest, or otherwise.”

iv. Trade Secrets “In a general sense, a trade secret is confidential information that has commercial value. Under international agreements, trade secrets are defined to include information that: •

Is secret. International law defines secret information as that which is not “generally known among or readily accessible to persons within the circles that normally deal with the kind of information in question.”



Has commercial value because it is secret. Commercial value does not just mean dollar value; it can include anything that gives a business an advantage over competitors.



Has been subject to reasonable procedures designed to maintain its secrecy” - STOPFakes.gov

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200. CORE INFORMATION

201. Intellectual Property Strategy

C. IP Strategy Timing

The formula for Coca-Cola is an example of a trade secret. Trade secrets do not expire and are protected by Federal law per 18 U.S.C. § 1832. Theft of trade secrets and 18 U.S.C. § 1831. Economic espionage. All but three states have adopted similar protections under the Uniform Trade Secrets Act.

C. IP Strategy Timing Enclosure 1, Table 2 of DoDI 5000.02 specifies the timing for an IP Strategy as shown in Figure 20. A program IP Strategy should be Figure 20 - IP Strategy Timing Requirements prepared early in the development life cycle, updated prior to each life cycle phase, and approved before each RFP is issued to potential offerors. Figure 21 depicts the timing of these preparation and update events as they occur during the DoD Systems Acquisition Framework. The first program IP Strategy should be prepared and approved before the RFP supporting Technology Development is issued (Item 1). Figure 21 - IP Strategy Preparation and Update Timing The IP Strategy should then be updated before the RFP supporting Engineering and Manufacturing Development is issued (Item 2). It is optional, but potentially worthwhile, to update the IP Strategy as part of the Critical Design Review. The IP Strategy should be updated again before the Production & Deployment solicitation is issued and (optionally) before the Full-Rate Production decision review (Item 3). The IP Strategy and LCSP are updated in conjunction with any product support Business Case Analysis revalidation efforts (Item 4). Revision of the IP Strategy should be also considered any time there is new information such as new or more detailed assertions of restrictions from contractors or program consideration of new technologies with potential IP Rights restrictions (Item 5).

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200. CORE INFORMATION

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements

B. Sub-System Manufacturing and Sustainment Models

202. LIFE CYCLE DATA AND DATA RIGHTS REQUIREMENTS This section addresses how to identify the data and data rights required for managing and supporting the product from the beginning to the end of its life cycle. Topics include sources for the needed data, authoring environments necessary to maintain and update the data, repositories in which to keep the data, organizations that will be responsible for administering the data repository, and the metadata required to store, retrieve, and manipulate the data in the repository.

A. Program Strategies Review & Synchronization Program strategies and plans are documents that summarize the overall plans for a given acquisition related topic. The strategies or plans that affect data and data rights acquisition include the Acquisition Strategy (AS), Life Cycle Sustainment Plan (LSCP), Systems Engineering Plan (SEP), and Test and Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP). Synchronization of the program strategies is important for successful data acquisition and management. This synchronization is achieved by Figure 22 - Program Strategies Synchronization starting with an “initial” AS and concurrently and iteratively writing or revising all of the other program strategies such that each supports common program objective(s), development concept(s), and sustainment concept(s). The process depicted in Figure 22 should result in a complete and synchronized AS for the milestone review. The resulting AS should define what life cycle efforts are needed to support the program and when they will be performed. It should also describe who will perform the required efforts and how they will be obtained from Government and non-Government sources.

RECOMMENDATION: Synchronize the Program Plans and Strategies to have aligned program objective(s), development concept, and sustainment concept, before gathering data and data rights requirements.

B. Sub-System Manufacturing and Sustainment Models The synchronized program strategies and plans should enable grouping of the proposed system into functional subsystems. Each sub-system should have a specific manufacturing and sustainment model as shown in Figure 23.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements

C. Sub-System Design Documentation Approaches

Figure 23 - Sub-System Manufacturing & Sustainment Models The Open-Competitive (O-C) Model is applicable when both the data rights and the data deliverables are sufficient to permit competitive manufacturing and sustainment activities. The Restricted-Proprietary (R-P) Model is applicable when either the data rights or the data deliverables are insufficient to permit competitive manufacturing and sustainment activities.

The model used for individual sub-systems can vary depending on the program plans for manufacturing and sustainment of the specific sub-system.

C. Sub-System Design Documentation Approaches After a sub-system manufacturing and sustainment model is defined, it is important to define the planned design documentation approach. The chosen documentation approach will subsequently determine the specific data and data rights requirements for each sub-system. The available design documentation approaches are shown in Figure 24 and discussed in the following sections. Figure 24 - Design Documentation Approaches

i. Detailed Design Documentation Approach (Government Controlled) The Government controlled detailed design approach documents every aspect of a sub-system design in a Technical Data Package (TDP). The Government acquires the TDP during development and maintains configuration control throughout the life of the item. The Government must also obtain sufficient data rights such that the TDP can be used to obtain competitive bids for the manufacture and support of the sub-system exactly as documented.

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202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements

C. Sub-System Design Documentation Approaches

The detailed design approach is a viable option for sub-systems planned to have a reasonably long service life and the Government has rights for competitive use of the design information. If a sub-system using the detailed design approach encounters data rights restrictions and additional data rights cannot be acquired, a change to a modular/open system approach should be considered.

ii. Open Systems Design Documentation Approach The open systems design approach uses Open Systems Architecture (OSA) concepts. The Government acquires and maintains the performance and interface requirements and uses them to procure and support modular solutions from multiple vendors. Under this approach, the Government will not have visibility into, or configuration control over, the vendor's detailed design of the modular sub-system. By allowing competitive sourcing and multiple design solutions of the module or subsystem, this approach reduces the likelihood of sole source situations or costly acquisition of license rights to privately developed technology or Computer Software. While any weapon system can potentially benefit from an OSA approach, sub-systems expected to contain proprietary technology, have frequent technology updates, or are available from multiple sources, are particularly strong candidates. Another reason to consider the modular/open system approach would be if the sub-system were expected to have data rights restrictions, which are not likely to be mitigated through the acquisition of additional data rights. A major benefit of the modular/open systems approach from a data rights perspective is that the performance and interface information should meet the DFARS criteria of form, fit, and function data and thereby have no Government data rights restrictions. The OSA approach may not be practical or beneficial for all sub-systems. If multiple vendors do not exist, are not expected to bid on the manufacturing or support or new vendor qualification requirements are significant or costly, OSA may not be a good choice for that sub-system.

iii. Incomplete Design Documentation Approach (Source Controlled) The incomplete design approach does not document detailed aspects of the sub-system. The Government only acquires interface (form, fit, function) information. The item design details and configuration remain under the control of the source. The provided information is not subject to data rights restrictions but does not contain sufficient information to be used for competitive manufacturing or sustainment activities.

iv. Detailed Design Documentation Approach (Source Controlled) The source controlled detailed design approach documents every aspect of a sub-system design in accordance with that sources documentation standards and practices. The Government acquires a copy of this documentation with appropriate data rights markings that restrict its use for competitive manufacturing or sustainment activities. The source maintains configuration control of the documentation throughout the life of the item.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements

D. Life Cycle Data Requirements

D. Life Cycle Data Requirements The Acquisition Reform initiative of the 1980s and 90s promoted performance specifications rather than acquisition of detailed design data. For a variety of reasons the policy pendulum has swung back to acquiring the data to support competitive acquisition, manufacture, and sustainment of the product. However, due to the laws relative to data rights and limitations on program budgets it may not always be possible or feasible to just “acquire ALL the data.” Therefore, a more reasoned approach is recommended whereby each program must determine its life cycle data and data rights requirements based on its approved program strategies and objectives. Determining program life cycle data requirements is a complex task involving many different considerations, which evolve as time passes. Data related decisions made early in the life of a program can significantly affect its success during later phases. Gathering life cycle data requirements begins with an understanding of the program strategies and related activities and then determining what data is needed to support those strategies and activities. The best resources for the life cycle data needs are the functional area subject matter experts (SMEs) from the organizations that are or will be involved with the development, product manufacture, or product sustainment of the item or system Figure 25 - Life cycle Data Needs Gathering being developed. Figure 25 is an illustration of functional area subject matter experts that should be surveyed when gathering life cycle data requirements. The functional areas can be grouped into the categories of Program Management, Systems Engineering, Support Organizations, and Logistics Support. Each category has multiple functional areas representing a potentially vital source of data and data rights requirements for the project. The program strategies (AS, LCSP, SEP, TEMP, etc.) should explain what efforts are needed throughout the product life cycle and the entity planned to perform them. These strategies should be socialized with the relevant functional area SMEs to obtain their recommended short- and long-term data needs. The individual data needs from each subject matter expert will generally be defined by a Data Item Description, military standard, or FAR/DFARS clause. Support organizations such as Legal and Procurement traditionally do not supply specific data requirements. However, they are vitally important for properly translating the data requirements into contractual requirements. The collection of these requirements forms the program life cycle data needs. Figure 26 depicts how the list of life cycle data requirements might appear as provided by the functional area SMEs.

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202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements

E. Life Cycle Data Rights Requirements

Figure 26 - Defining Data Needs

RECOMMENDATION: Gather short- and long-term data and data rights requirements from every subject matter expert that will support the development, test, manufacture, operation, or support of the product.

E. Life Cycle Data Rights Requirements Once the life cycle data needs have been identified, it is necessary to determine the associated data rights needed for each data item. Program teams should consult with their legal representatives to carefully consider the data rights requirements for each data item and the statutory requirements to support a Government organic core maintenance capability per 10 U.S.C. § 2464. Core depot-level maintenance and repair capabilities. Figure 27 - Data RIGHTS Needs Determination and Master List Creation Figure 27 illustrates how the data rights needs are the result of combining the data needs and synchronized program strategies to answer the question: Will the data be used for competitive sourcing or just internal Government use? The Department of Defense (DoD) goal for competitive procurement of products and services can be satisfied when the Government has Unlimited or Government Purpose rights to the data. However, Specifically Negotiated License Rights may also be sufficient depending on the specific license terms.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements

G. Sources to Meet Data and Data Rights Requirements

The combination of the data and associated data rights needs for life cycle of the weapon system results in a master list that is quite valuable when defining data and data rights requirements in Requests for Proposals.

F. Data Rights Variation by Sub-System or Component Program teams should not assume data rights for a given data item will necessarily be the same for all components or assemblies of the system being developed. An offeror may claim that certain subsystems or components have been or will be developed entirely at private expense. As such, the offeror can legitimately claim the Government is only entitled to Restricted or Limited Rights to design information for those items. Therefore, offeror asserted data rights can, and most likely will, vary from one subsystem or component to another. Data rights assertions will also vary from one Figure 28 - Data Rights Variations in a Fictitious Product offeror to another. Figure 28 depicts a fictitious product and the potential Government's data rights variation among its sub-systems and components. As such, the Government should require offerors to identify these data rights variations by including DFARS provision 252.227-7017 which requires that an offeror assert any rights restrictions as part of their proposal. Adding a Data Rights Attachment in the RFP will provide detail about which data deliverables are proposed to have rights restrictions. REF: Data Rights Attachment (RFP - Section J) [§ 205.K, p 65]

G. Sources to Meet Data and Data Rights Requirements Once the data and data rights needs have been established, it is necessary to determine how those needs will be met. The usual choices for acquiring needed data are a new contract in the current or a later life cycle phase or from data already in the Government's possession. Figure 29 - In Hand and Contractual Sources of Data Figure 29 depicts the life cycle requirements mapping list of data needs and how they will be met by data already in Government possession (Data in Hand) or through new contract efforts. Many data needs must be satisfied iteratively through multiple contract efforts.

Finding data already owned or accessible by the Government should be a priority before ordering any new (and possibly duplicate) data on contract. Program team members should examine data repositories for potentially usable data and assess its

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200. CORE INFORMATION

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements

H. Data Repository System Choices

usability to their effort. Some of the evaluation criteria could include any data rights use restrictions and format of the data. Finding usable “Data in Hand” could eliminate the need to acquire it using a new contract. The remaining data needs will require contracting or other work efforts. The program team must coordinate when (life cycle phase) and how (specific contract) the data needs will be satisfied.

H. Data Repository System Choices Data will be created as part of any development program. Therefore, it is necessary to address the following questions for any contractor-developed data of interest to the Government: •

Where the resulting data will be stored? (Which data repository?)



Who will control the data repository? (Government or contractor?)



Who will maintain the data? (Government or contractor?)



Who will have access to the data and what type of access is permitted?

There are three general repository options: 1) Fund and establish a program unique data repository run by Government personnel, 2) Fund and establish a program unique data repository run by a contractor, or 3) Use an existing Government Enterprise data repository. The advantages and disadvantages of these options are shown in Table 7. Table 7 - Data Repository Options A program unique repository may not comply with the Title 40/Clinger-Cohen Act requirement to “establish effective and efficient capital planning processes for selecting, managing, and evaluating the results of all of its major investments in information systems” (40 U.S.C. § 11303. Performancebased and results-based management). This regulation mandates no duplication of existing information system capabilities within DoD and requires major information systems be approved by an Investment Review Board. A contractor repository may be appropriate when the program information will be shared by a variety of Armed Services, development partners, and foreign government customers. DFARS 227.7108 prescribes a range of conditions that the Government must contractually require from the repository management contractor. Contract Data Requirements Lists (CDRLs) are still required when utilizing a contractor repository. This is the only legally binding method to define data delivery requirements. The Government may also face the risk of disrupted or terminated access to data stored in contractoroperated repositories due to contract disputes, corporate mergers, or business failure. A potential step to mitigate this risk is to mirror (or synchronize) the contractor repository with a Government repository so the Government always has a current copy of the data under its control. In any case, all of the delivered data should be transfer all to a Government repository no later than the end of the contract effort.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements

I. Repository Metadata Requirements

The Government Enterprise repository option is highly recommended as it represents a good balance between risk and cost. This option supports extensive data sharing; there is little, if any, risk to losing access to the data, and most research and development organizations already operate such a repository so the costs to use it should be minimal. REF: Contract Data Requirements Lists (RFP - Section J) [§ 205.J, p 63]; Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance [§ 207, p 75]

RECOMMENDATION: Utilize a Government enterprise data repository to store and manage delivered data.

I. Repository Metadata Requirements Any data repository system uses Metadata elements to identify, manipulate, exchange, and control access to the data objects stored in the system. These elements consist of an element name and value for a particular data object. All data repository metadata requirements should be specified in the data deliverable requirements. REF: Metadata Standards [§ 303.A, p 97]; Sample Metadata Elements [§ 303.B, p 97];

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200. CORE INFORMATION

203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs

A. Introduction to Life Cycle Cost

203. DATA & DATA RIGHTS RELATED LIFE CYCLE COSTS This section identifies data and data rights related life cycle costs (incurred with purchasing data and data rights as well as costs resulting from decisions to not purchase the data and data rights) that may not have been accounted for in the program life cycle cost estimate. Data and data rights costs are frequently overlooked when estimating program life cycle costs. Program teams often look at the cost to acquire “additional” data and data rights in isolation rather than comparing them against the total life cycle cost benefits from having that data and data rights. A review of current DoD and Army cost analysis and estimation guidance revealed no specific information on data and data rights costs. Therefore, the Guide authors developed notional concepts for addressing data and data rights costs considerations in program life cycle cost estimates. The material in these sections are solely the brainchild of the Guide contributors/authors and do not necessarily represent those of the Offices of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Financial Management and Comptroller. indicates notional content for addressing data and data rights costs considerations into program life cycle cost estimates. Program teams and costing subject matter experts are encouraged to scrutinize these concepts and provide feedback on how they can be improved.

A. Introduction to Life Cycle Cost DoD 5000.4-M, DoD Cost Analysis Guidance and Procedures defines life cycle cost as “ALL affected appropriations; and encompasses the costs, both contractor and in house effort, as well as existing assets to be used, for all cost categories. It is the TOTAL cost to the Government for a program over its full life, and includes the cost of research and development, investment in mission and support equipment (hardware and software), initial inventories, training, data, facilities, etc., and the operating, support, and, where applicable, demilitarization, detoxification, or long term waste storage.” The OSD Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation Guide, March, 2014 categorizes life cycle cost as “...the sum of four major cost categories: (1) research and development costs; (2) investment costs, consisting of procurement, military construction, and acquisition-related operations and maintenance (O&M) associated with the production and deployment activities; (3) O&S costs; and (4) disposal costs.”

Figure 30 - System Life cycle Costs

These categories are shown in Figure 30, defined in the Glossary [§ 402.A, p 127], and discussed in the following sections, which identify data, and data rights related costs that may not have been accounted for in the program life cycle cost estimate.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs

C. Additional Data Rights Cost versus Sole Source Premium Cost

B. Data & Data Rights Acquisition Costs Many acquisition professionals assume that data is “too expensive” and subsequently do not order it as part of a research and development (R&D) effort. Unfortunately, this decision may be based on a misunderstanding of the distinction between data delivery costs and additional data rights costs. The costs for data delivery are negligible compared to the potentially high costs to acquire additional data rights. Figure 31 depicts how data rights and formatting requirements contribute to the cost of ordering data. Acquisition of data with DFARS standard data Figure 31 - Data Delivery Cost Contributors rights and in contractor format should be relatively inexpensive ($ A). Acquisition of the same data with standard rights but delivered in a Government specific format is more costly ($B). Acquisition of same data in Government format but with additional data rights can be very costly ($C). Contractors have no obligation to provide the Government the ability to acquire additional data rights to privately developed data. Many contractors will not offer to grant additional rights at all. Those that do will likely ask for significant compensation or consideration in exchange. The Data & Data Rights and Costs to Order [§ 205.B.v, p 56] section discusses how program teams can distinguish these costs contributors to make informed decisions regarding acquisition of data for a specific RFP. REF: Data & Data Rights and Costs to Order [§ 205.B.v, p 56];

C. Additional Data Rights Cost versus Sole Source Premium Cost The costs for data rights fall into a “pay me now or pay me later” scenario as depicted in Figure 32. If the rights to use data describing a component or process for competitive procurement were not obtained during the three Research & Figure 32 - Data Rights Cost versus Sole Source Premium Cost Development phases (“pay me now”), the program may have to use a sole source (“pay me later”) for spare parts, maintenance, and repair in the Production & Deployment and Operating & Support phases. The cost for systems, spare parts, maintenance, and repair, obtained from a sole source will likely be higher than those obtained using competition because the sole source will not experience any competitive pressure to keep costs low.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs

D. Data & Data Rights Related Research and Development Costs

The sole source “premium” cost is the difference between the estimated costs to obtain these from a sole source versus using competition. If a contractor proposes a price for the Government to acquire additional data rights, programs can estimate whether acquiring the rights is more cost effective than paying the estimated sole source premium over the life of the system. The Post-Award Data Rights Options Decisions (Concept) [§ 206.E, p 73] and Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept) [§306, p 118] sections discuss a conceptual methodology and calculations to make this determination.

RECOMMENDATION: Analyze costs and benefits of acquiring additional data rights, if offered.

D. Data & Data Rights Related Research and Development Costs Data and data rights related research and development costs should include data acquisition costs and can include data rights acquisition costs for all data and rights acquired during development phases of the life cycle as shown in Figure 33 and discussed in the following sub-sections.

i. Data Acquisition Costs Data acquisition costs include the costs for a contractor to collect and transmit or deliver the data and, if applicable, costs associated with reformatting or reworking of the data to conform to any specific Government unique requirements.

Figure 33 - Data Related Research and Development Costs

Costs for data delivery should be minimal since much of the data requested by the Government will already exist as a natural consequence of the contractor performing tasks required by the Statement of Work. Chapter 9 of the 1986 DoD Armed Services Pricing Manual describes this concept, as “the price you pay for a data item will be based on what it costs the seller to furnish the item, over and above the costs it would incur if you did not require it at all.” Additional costs for reformatting (rework, reformat, or marking) should be expected if the Government requires data to be delivered in a form or format other than what the contractor normally creates.

ii. Additional Data Rights Acquisition Costs A range of Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) clauses determine the Standard Data Rights the Government is entitled to for data. There should be NO additional costs to the Government to acquire the standard rights stipulated in the DFARS. Data rights acquisition costs are only explicitly recognized when the Government pays for additional rights (above the DFARS standard rights) to data developed exclusively with private funds.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs

F. Data & Data Rights Related Operating and Support Costs

If the program concludes that it would be advantageous to acquire additional data rights beyond the standard for some technologies (“pay me now”), these costs must be included in the program life cycle cost. REF: Additional Data Rights Cost versus Sole Source Premium Cost [§ 203.C, p 42];

RECOMMENDATION: Include data and data rights related Research & Development costs in the program life cycle cost estimate.

E. Data & Data Rights Related Investment Costs Data and data rights related investment (procurement) costs include costs for the data storage infrastructure and any cost premiums associated with purchase of sole source components that are integral to the complete system as Figure 34 - Data Related Investment Costs shown in Figure 34. Data storage infrastructure costs are for establishment or expansion of a data management system to store the data being acquired. The life cycle investment costs will be higher if the rights to competitively acquire all of the system components were not obtained during the Research & Development phase. The sole source system premium costs are the additional money required when competition cannot be utilized to acquire all the components necessary to produce complete systems.

RECOMMENDATION: Include data and data rights related Investment (procurement) costs in the program life cycle cost estimate.

F. Data & Data Rights Related Operating and Support Costs Data and data rights related operating & support costs include operation of the data storage and management system, data maintenance activities, and any cost premiums paid for sole source spare parts and/or support for system components affected by data rights restrictions as shown in Figure 35. Once the data associated with a product has been created and delivered, a repository and support staff will be needed to store, maintain, and manage that data to keep it current and usable for manufacturing and support.

Figure 35 - Data Storage & Management Long-Term Costs

The program operating and support costs will be higher if the rights to competitively acquire spare parts and support were not obtained during the Research &

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203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs

G. Data and Data Rights Related Disposal Costs

Development phase. The sole source support and spare parts cost premiums are the additional money required for sole source acquisition of support and spare parts for a fielded system. REF: Data Repository System Choices [§ 202.H, p 39], Data Management and Use [§ 208, p 81];

RECOMMENDATION: Include data and data rights related Operating and Support costs in the program life cycle cost estimate.

G. Data and Data Rights Related Disposal Costs Data and data rights related disposal costs include Figure 36 - Data/Rights Related Disposal Costs the cost premiums paid for disposal (phase-out or demilitarization) support of system components affected by data rights restrictions as shown in Figure 36. These premiums will be necessary if the rights to competitively acquire disposal support were not obtained during the Research & Development phase. The sole source disposal support premiums are the additional money required to obtain sole source support instead of competitive support.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs

G. Data and Data Rights Related Disposal Costs

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200. CORE INFORMATION

204. Data & Data Rights Potential Risks

B. Program Data Acquisition Risks (Pre-Award)

204. DATA & DATA RIGHTS POTENTIAL RISKS Data and data rights related risks could significantly affect the success of a program. These risks should be identified, analyzed, and addressed in the overall program risk management efforts. The following checklists show potential data related risks for the program and individual data items and suggested mitigations. “Program” risks apply to all the data being acquired and generally occur prior to contract award. The remaining “Data” risks apply to specific data items and generally occur after contract award. Teams are encouraged to use these lists as a starting point for identifying data related risks to their program.

RECOMMENDATION: Assess potential data & data rights risks and take steps to mitigate them.

A. Program Data Requirements Risks (Pre-Award) Program Data Requirements Risks (PreAward)

Mitigation

Program Strategies Not Aligned

Align AS, LCSP, SEP, and TEMP.

Data Needs Not Defined

Gather data requirements from program Integrated Product Team.

Data Rights Needs Not Defined

Fully consider data rights needs for life cycle of program. Gather data requirements from program Integrated Product Team.

B. Program Data Acquisition Risks (Pre-Award) Program Data Acquisition Risks (PreAward)

Mitigation

Data requirement(s) Not Included in RFP (by management decision)

Define impacts (performance, schedule, and cost) of not acquiring data to decision makers.

Data Requirement(s) Not Included in RFP (by mistake)

Modify RFP to include overlooked data requirements as soon as possible.

FAR/DFARS Clauses Not Included in RFP

Work with contracting professionals to update RFP. Ensure all data related clauses are included in RFP before release.

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204. Data & Data Rights Potential Risks

E. Data Delivery & Verification Risks (Post-Award)

C. Program Data Costs Risks (Pre-Award) Program Data Costs Risks (Pre-Award)

Mitigation

Data Rights Acquisition Costs Not Known

Include data rights option in RFP to acquire needed/desired additional data rights.

Costs to Prepare or Create Data Not Budgeted

Include data acquisition costs in program budget.

Costs to Store and Maintain Data Not Budgeted

Include data management costs in program budget.

Costs to Acquire Additional Data Rights Not Budgeted

Include additional data rights acquisition costs in program budget.

Premium Costs to Procure Sole Source Items Not Budgeted

Include additional costs for sole source manufacture and support in program budget.

D. Data Rights Risks (Pre-Award) Data Item Rights Risks (Pre-Award)

Mitigation

Data Restrictions Not Clearly Asserted or Defined by Originator

Include DFARS provision 252.227-7017 in RFP. Include data rights attachment (§205.K, p 65) in RFP.

Data Rights License(s) Forbid Planned Program Uses

Revise program strategies or acquire needed data rights.

E. Data Delivery & Verification Risks (Post-Award) Data Item Delivery & Verification Risks (Post-Award)

Mitigation

Data Ordered But Not Delivered

Inform contracting officer of missed deliveries and request appropriate action. (e.g. withholding of payment if DFARS clause 252.227-7030 is in contract)

Data Delivered only to Contractor Repository with Government Access

Thoroughly inspect all data deliverables before accepting. Copy or mirror delivered data from Contractor to Government repository after acceptance and no later than contract closeout.

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204. Data & Data Rights Potential Risks

F. Data Management & Use Risks (Post-Award)

Data Item Delivery & Verification Risks (Post-Award)

Mitigation

Government cannot access delivered Data stored in Contractor Repository

Inform contracting officer and request legal proceedings be initiated to stop any destruction or mismanagement of the Government data. Copy or transfer delivered data to Government repository if access restored.

Delivered Data Is Incomplete Or Poor Quality

Ensure DIDs and associated tailoring is clear. Thoroughly inspect all data deliverables before accepting.

Data Delivered with Restrictive Data Rights Markings without Prior Assertion

Require Post-Award Data Rights Assertions [§ 207.C, p 77]. Perform Data Rights Assertions Review [§ 207.D, p 78]. Challenge validity of unjustified data markings.

Data Delivered with Unauthorized or Nonconforming Data Rights Markings

Ensure proper clauses in contract. Compare data rights markings with Data Rights Attachment [§ 205.K, p 65]. Require contractor fix nonconforming marking(s) at own expense.

Data Cannot be Read or Revised by Government or Third Parties

Require native format delivery of data; acquire authoring file libraries, identify authoring tools.

Data Changes Not Controlled, Versions Unknown

Implement robust Configuration Management program by Government and contractor.

F. Data Management & Use Risks (Post-Award) Data Item Management & Use Risks (Post-Award)

Mitigation

Data Restrictions Not Widely Known

Publicize and explain data restrictions required by distribution statement and data rights markings to all team members.

Restricted Data Improperly Released (per Data Rights agreements)

Educate all team members about data use restrictions. Control access to restricted rights data. If improper release occurs, consult with appropriate Government officials and legal counsel regarding investigation and follow-up actions.

Restricted Data Improperly Released (per Security requirements)

Educate all team members about data security restrictions. Control access to export controlled data. If improper release occurs, request investigation.

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204. Data & Data Rights Potential Risks

F. Data Management & Use Risks (Post-Award)

This Page Intentionally Blank

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205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

A. Request for Proposal (RFP) & Source Selection Basics

205. REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL AND SOURCE SELECTION PLAN This section discusses the data related content needed to create a Request for Proposal (RFP) that supports a contract prepared in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS). The Government must follow certain steps and use specific contract language to get all the Technical Data and Computer Software it needs and the data rights to which it is legally entitled. Due to the volume of information on this topic, Table 8 lists the topic of each sub-section. Table 8 - D&DR Guide RFP Content

Background

RFP Input

RFP Content

205.A

Request for Proposal (RFP) & Source Selection Basics

205.B

RFP Input - DATA Requirements

205.C

RFP Input - Data RIGHTS Requirements

205.D

RFP Input - Source Selection Plan

205.E

Source Selection and Data Rights

205.F

Contract Line Items (RFP - Section B)

205.G

Work Statement (RFP - Section C)

205.H

Special Contract Requirements (RFP - Section H)

205.I

Contract Clauses (RFP - Section I)

205.J

Contract Data Requirements Lists (RFP - Section J)

205.K

Data Rights Attachment (RFP - Section J)

205.L

Data Rights Assertion Provision (RFP - Section K)

205.M

Instructions, Conditions, and Notices to Offerors (RFP - Section L)

205.N

Proposal Evaluation Criteria (RFP Section M)

A. Request for Proposal (RFP) & Source Selection Basics The Government prepares a Request for Proposal when seeking offers to provide products or services. It then follows a source selection process to determine the winning entity to perform.

i. RFP Contents RFPs for “negotiated contracts” under FAR Part 15 follow the Uniform Contract Format (UCF) specified by FAR 15.204-1 FAR 15.204-1 and Standard Form 33 Solicitation, Offer, and Award. Commercial contracts using FAR Part 12 and simplified acquisitions using FAR Part 13 do not have to use the UCF. The UCF specifies the distinct sections of a contract and the sequence in which they must be arranged. Figure 37 shows the data and data rights related UCF sections and inputs. Significant to this Guide are the data requirements, data rights requirements, and source selection plan. Sections of the UCF itself have data and data rights related content requirements that are needed to ensure the best outcome for the Government. Guidance related to the inputs and UCF content is discussed in the following sections.

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205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

A. Request for Proposal (RFP) & Source Selection Basics

Figure 37 - Data & Data Rights Related UCF Sections and Inputs

REF: Uniform Contract Format Details [§ 304.A, p 99]; Request for Proposal Preparation Details [§ 304, p 99];

ii. Source Selection Process Figure 38 depicts a typical source selection process with Government and offeror activities and separated into Pre-Solicitation and the Evaluation processes. The Pre-Solicitation activities include preparation of an acquisition strategy or plan, development of the source selection plan, preparing and issuing the RFP. The Evaluation activities include initial proposal evaluations, competitive range determination (if applicable), Evaluation Notice release, discussions with offerors, request and receipt of final proposals, final proposal evaluation and results documentation, source selection decision, and debriefings of all offerors. Figure 38 - Typical Source Selection Activities

The RFP and Source Selection Plan (SSP) should be a collaborative effort with the Program Manager, program Integrated Product Team (IPT), contracting, legal, and other subject matter experts.

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B. RFP Input - DATA Requirements

The Program Manager and IPT are responsible for providing all the relevant information to the contracting organization, which facilitates the issuance and evaluation of proposals. Government legal participation in the RFP and SSP process is critical when dealing with data and data rights issues.

B. RFP Input - DATA Requirements Once the decision is made to pursue a contractual effort, the data requirements specific to that effort must be identified and reviewed by the Program Manager. Significant data to be ordered includes Technical Data and Computer Software. Once approved for inclusion in the RFP, the Contract Data Requirements Lists (CDRLs) need to be created. REF: Contract Data Requirements Lists (RFP - Section J) [§ 205.J, p63]; Request for Proposal Preparation Details [§ 304, p 99]; Anecdote: Get the Data “Most of the contracting and program officials at DOD that we spoke with pointed to the lack of access to technical data as one of the main barriers to competition. Some contracting officers described this condition as essentially being “stuck” with a certain contractor…Several officials pointed out that the situation the government is currently experiencing is a result of decisions made years ago, when first acquiring a weapon system, to not purchase critical technical data packages for reasons that include budgetary constraints or a push toward streamlined contracting processes by purchasing commercial items.” “…Some contracting and program officials have inquired about the cost of obtaining the technical data, only to discover that the package is not for sale or purchase of it would be cost-prohibitive, especially the systems and equipment that have been contracted out for decades.” - GAO Report 10-833, “Opportunities Exist to Increase Competition and Assess Reasons When Only One Offer Is Received”, July 2010, page 19

i. Technical Data Package (TDP) A particularly important data deliverable is documentation of the design. This documentation includes the Technical Data Package (TDP), which is vitally important for certain, types of DoD systems. TDPs are valuable for noncommercial systems with a relatively long lifespan and plans for competitively procuring end items and spare parts exactly as they are documented in the TDP. In this case, programs should take delivery of the Allocated Baseline, Functional Baseline, and Product Baseline TDPs for noncommercial products at the conclusion of each phase of development. Ordering the baseline documentation can also help establish what did or did not exist prior to the addition of Government-funded development, which could reduce the potential for disagreements and the need for time-consuming validation of restrictions processes. Some Data Item Descriptions associated with ordering a TDP include DI-SESS-80776A (Technical Data Package), DI-SESS-81001E (Conceptual Design Drawings/Models), DI-SESS-81002F (Developmental Design Drawings/Models), and DI-SESS-81000E (Product Drawings/Models and Associated Lists). There are conditions where acquiring a complete TDP may not be in the best interest of the Government. Some electronic systems and components have a relatively short life span because the supporting technology is constantly changing and frequently available from an array of sources. Items like this are candidates for the open system design documentation approach. As such, it would make more sense for

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205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

B. RFP Input - DATA Requirements

the Government to stay abreast of industry trends and replace short life span electronic items with newer technology rather than continue to acquire and support the old design specific technology. REF: PEWG Data Group - Product Definition Information [§ 102.C.ii, p 9]; Sub-System Design Documentation Approaches [§ 202.C, p 34]; Data Acquisition Documents & Data Item Descriptions (DIDs) [§ 205.J.i, p63];

RECOMMENDATION: Order a complete Technical Data Package for product baselines (Allocated, Functional, and Product) during development of a noncommercial product.

Anecdotes: Acquire the TDP “Our interviews revealed that Technical Data Packages (TDP) are not being procured as much as they should be. Furthermore, during system development the government has the leverage to get a useful TDP at a fair price. If TDPs are bought after EMD, the government runs the risk of buying something that is inadequate for re-compete not just at the system level, but also the subsystem and component level. When armed with a sound TDP, the Army has been able to successfully break out subsystems and components, and achieve rewarding price competition during production” - “Army Strong: Equipped, Trained and Ready” Final Report of the 2010 Army Acquisition Review, Chartered by the Secretary of the Army, January 2011

ii. Computer Aided Design (CAD) Authoring Environment Programs may not consider what will be required to modify or manipulate a TDP once it is delivered. An authoring environment augments the delivered data with authoring software and support files to enable this functionality. Modern TDPs are usually created using Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools, and the resulting CAD files are normally in a proprietary format that is directly tied to a proprietary authoring tool and frequently require specific file libraries for the complete design model to be accessible. Therefore, the CAD authoring environment requires the authoring software and support files to be fully functional. Programs must ensure they either already have or can establish a CAD authoring environment for purposes of data update and maintenance in the future. Ideally, programs can specify the TDP be delivered in a format that is fully functional in an existing Government authoring tool environment. If this is not possible, programs often have the contractor translate the CAD files into a “neutral” file format or an alternative CAD format that is usable by the Government authoring tool. Unfortunately, this translation usually results in a loss of fidelity and functionality when compared to the original native file. Therefore, programs should acquire a complete set of the native CAD files, all necessary library files, and full documentation of the native authoring tool including software version if it is different from what the program has in-house. Additional translated files can also be ordered but should be in addition to the native files.

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B. RFP Input - DATA Requirements

RECOMMENDATION: Order a complete set of the native Computer Aided Design files, including all standard library components, and require full documentation of the authoring tool(s) used in their creation.

iii. Computer Software and Authoring Environment Computer Software is another important deliverable. Frequently, the Government only orders the executable program. This deliverable alone will limit what the Government can do with the software in the future. It is important to order additional data to support duplication of the software-authoring environment. This information will enable the Government to reproduce, modify, and recompile the software. Delivery of this information is normally not possible for commercial Computer Software. However, it should be entirely possible for noncommercial Computer Software. Programs should acquire the source code, all necessary library files, and documentation (e.g. specifications, architectures, designs, test plans, manuals, etc.) for noncommercial Computer Software. Some Data Item Descriptions associated with ordering computer software include DI-IPSC-81441 (Software Product Specification), DI-IPSC-81434A (Interface Requirements Specification), DI-IPSC81431A (System/Subsystem Specification), and DI-IPSC-81437A (Database Design Description). Computer Software source code files are normally created in accordance with well-defined industry standards and can be opened and modified by a number of authoring tools. However, source code files frequently require a specific set of library files in order to compile into an executable program. As such, the Computer Software authoring environment does not require proprietary files or the original authoring tools, but does require the support files to function.

RECOMMENDATION: Order executable program, source code, supporting library files, and related documentation for noncommercial Computer Software.

iv. Data Ordering Determination The data needs identified for the specific RFP are traditionally evaluated by the Program Manager (PM) or designee who has the authority to decide what data will be acquired. PMs often elect not to acquire certain data because of budget or other programmatic concerns. These decisions are certainly within their prerogative but should be made with a full understanding of the potential impacts to the product development, manufacture, support, or all of these. The appropriate subject matter experts should be able to provide this information. If the decision is made not to acquire some data or data rights, the relevant program strategies should be reviewed and updated accordingly. Before deciding NOT to acquire data, discuss the impacts to product development, manufacture, and competitive or organic life-cycle sustainment with the appropriate subject matter experts.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

B. RFP Input - DATA Requirements

RECOMMENDATION: Discuss the impacts to product development, manufacture, and competitive or organic life-cycle support, with the appropriate subject matter experts before deciding not to acquire requested data. Update and resynchronize the relevant program strategies if the decision is made not to acquire any requested data.

v. Data & Data Rights and Costs to Order The Data & Data Rights Acquisition Costs [§ 203.B, p 42] section discusses how data rights and formatting requirements contribute to the cost of ordering data. Remember data ordered as part of an R&D effort does not always need Government Purpose or Unlimited Rights in order to be useable. There are many completely legal and valuable Government uses for data with DFARS standard Limited or Restricted Rights such as internal (non-manufacturing) uses or simply having the data in hand should it be needed for certain emergency situations. Therefore, program teams should order and take delivery of all relevant data regardless of the data rights restrictions. The cost for delivery of data without additional rights is minimal, and the benefits are potentially significant to the overall program. The Government does not have to pay for additional data rights just to take delivery of privately developed data as long as the use restrictions are honored. REF: Data & Data Rights Acquisition Costs [§ 203.B, p 42];

RECOMMENDATION: Order and take delivery of all required data regardless of data rights restrictions.

MYTH: Cost of Data Technical data is costly and separate from the acquisition program development cost. As such, it should not be ordered.

REALITY The costs to acquire data ordered in a contract and the Government's standard rights are priced into the cost of that contract. The only legitimate additional costs are for Government-unique media, data conversion, reproduction and marking (distribution statements, export control, etc.) delivery requirements or to acquire additional rights in data that may be necessary or desirable. The Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights for certain categories of Technical Data (commercial and noncommercial) and in noncommercial Computer Software when properly ordered regardless of the funding source. These categories of data include Form, Fit, and Function (FFF); Operation, maintenance, installation and training (OMIT); Computer Software Documentation.

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D. RFP Input - Source Selection Plan

C. RFP Input - Data RIGHTS Requirements Once the data requirements for the contract have been documented in the RFP Contract Data Requirements Lists (CDRLs), it is necessary to map the program data rights needs for each CDRL. The needed rights are defined in the Life Cycle Data Rights Requirements and/or contained in the synchronized program strategies. Department of Defense (DoD) competition requirements are usually satisfied when the Government has Unlimited or Government Purpose rights to the data. However, Specifically Negotiated License Rights may also be sufficient depending on the agreed to license terms. REF: Life Cycle Data Rights Requirements [§ 202.E, p 37]; Data Rights Attachment (RFP - Section J) [§ 205.K, p 65]; MYTH: What Rights Needed “The Government should only “buy” rights to technical data it has a defined and current need for.”

REALITY The Government should always pursue its “standard” rights to Technical Data and Computer Software. Since additional needs for the data may occur later, and postponed data acquisitions may not be economically executable, Program Manager's should be wary of “giving up” rights to which the Government is legally entitled but may only need to use years, if not decades, in the future.

Anecdote: Data Rights Needed “The Army and the Air Force have encountered limitations in their sustainment plans for some fielded weapon systems because they lacked needed technical data rights.… Although the circumstances surrounding each case were unique, earlier decisions made on technical data rights during system acquisition were cited as a primary reason for the limitations subsequently encountered.” - GAO Report 06-839 “DOD Should Strengthen Policies for Assessing Technical Data Needs to Support Weapon Systems”, page 6.

D. RFP Input - Source Selection Plan The DoD Source Selection Procedures states “Source selection is accomplished by a team that is tailored to the unique acquisition. Composition of the team generally consists of the Source Selection Authority (SSA), Procuring Contracting Officer (PCO) (if different from the SSA), Source Selection Advisory Council (SSAC), Source Selection Evaluation Board (SSEB), Advisors, Cost or Pricing Experts, Legal Counsel, Small Business Specialists, and other subject-matter experts.” The SSA designates a Chairperson who appoints Evaluators to a Source Selection Evaluation Board (SSEB). The SSEB is responsible for developing a Source Selection Plan (SSP), relevant RFP content, and evaluating offeror proposals in accordance with the SSP. In general, a SSP identifies the goals of an acquisition and describes how proposals will be evaluated and the winning offeror(s) selected. The contents of a typical SSP are shown in Table 9. The shaded SSP

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205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

D. RFP Input - Source Selection Plan

contents are placed in Section L (or equivalent) and Section M (or equivalent) of the RFP and discussed in the following sections. A SSP is required for all best value, negotiated, competitive acquisitions in accordance with the DoD Source Selection Procedures, Army Source Selection Manual, and FAR Part 15. Table 9 - Typical Source Selection Plan Contents - Description of what is being bought

- Solicitation/Proposal requirements

- Goals of the acquisition

- Definitions (ratings, strengths, etc.)

- Description of the Source Selection Organization and the duties and responsibilities of each of the key components

- Forms (Evaluation and Item For Negotiation format, etc.)

- Planned presolicitation activities (e.g., issuance of a draft solicitation, conduct of presolicitation, etc.)

- Source Selection Participation Agreement and Standards of Conduct

- Proposed acquisition strategy, including explanation of the contract type and whether multiple awards are anticipated

- Proposed evaluation methodology and any proposed innovative techniques

- Proposed evaluation factors and subfactors, their relative importance, and associated standards

- Source selection milestones occurring between receipt of proposals and signing the contract

i. SSP Evaluation Factors The DoD Source Selection Procedures defines part of the SSP development process as “Identify the evaluation factors, subfactors, their relative order of importance; the importance of all non-cost or price factors to the cost or price factor; and the evaluation process, including specific procedures and techniques to be used in evaluating proposals. Include within the SSP document or attach the relevant and most current portions of Sections L and M in the RFP (or a non-UCF solicitation) to preclude inconsistencies between the SSP and RFP.” These Procedures also state, “All source selections shall evaluate cost or price, and the quality of the product or services.” The “Quality of Product or Service” evaluation factors normally include Technical, Past Performance, and Small Business Participation. The combination of these factors and cost results in the typical set of SSP evaluation factors as shown in Figure 39. The Procedures state the evaluation factors “represent those specific characteristics that are tied to significant RFP requirements Figure 39 - Typical Source Selection Plan Evaluation Factors and objectives having an impact on the source selection decision and are expected to be discriminators, or are required by statute or regulation. They are the uniform baseline against which each offeror's proposal is evaluated allowing the Government to make a best-value determination.” More than one non-cost factor can be used and any non-cost factor can be divided into subfactors. However, the number of factors and subfactors should be kept to a minimum and restricted to those that will be true discriminators between offeror proposals.

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205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

ii. SSP Evaluation Factors Relative Order of Importance FAR 15.304 (e) requires solicitations to include priority statements that “relate one evaluation factor (or subfactor) to each of the other evaluation factors (or subfactors)” and “whether all evaluation factors other than cost or price, when combined, are (1) Significantly more important than cost or price; (2) Approximately equal to cost or price; or (3) Significantly less important than cost or price.”

iii. SSP Evaluation Factor Adjectival Ratings The DoD Source Selection Procedures defines all non-cost evaluation factors other than past performance to be “technical” factors regardless of whether “technical” is in its title. The Procedures further require all technical factors use “adjectival” rating levels defined therein. Three rating schemes available for technical factors are defined in the procedures as Table 1 - Combined Technical/Risk Ratings, Table 2 Technical Ratings, and Table 3 - Technical Risk Ratings.

iv. SSP Solicitation/Proposal Requirements The solicitation requirements from the SSP are placed in Section L (or equivalent) of the RFP. Typical contents of Section L are instructions regarding how proposals should be constructed and returned to the Government to facilitate evaluation.

E. Source Selection and Data Rights The evaluation of data rights as competitive source selection criteria by the Government has been the subject of debate within the DoD and industry due to the uneven and somewhat conflicting guidance provided in the DFARS. Nevertheless, some DoD components have successfully addressed data rights as an evaluation factor during competitive source selections. Language in DFARS sections 227.7102 (Commercial items...), 227.7103 (Noncommercial items...), 227.7202 (Commercial computer software...), and 227.7203 (Noncommercial computer software...) specify what the Government can and cannot do regarding data rights in DoD solicitations. Table 10 summarizes these limitations. Table 10 - DFARS Data Rights Evaluation Limitations

DFARS Data Rights Evaluation Limitations DFARS Section

Commercial Items (Technical Data)

Noncommercial Items (Technical Data)

Commercial Computer Software

Noncommercial Computer Software

227.7102

227.7103

227.7202

227.7203

Applicable

Applicable *

Applicable #

Applicable *

Can Require Unlimited Rights Data

NOT Applicable

Applicable

NOT Applicable

Applicable

Can Evaluate Impact of Data Rights

Applicable ?

Applicable

Applicable ?

Applicable

Cannot Require Additional Rights from Offerors

* = Limited exception for Major Systems # = Government CAN refuse to purchase commercial computer software if the licensing terms “...are inconsistent with Federal procurement law or do not otherwise satisfy user needs.”

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F. Contract Line Items (RFP Section B)

? = No specific DFARS guidance Bottom Line: Generally, DoD activities cannot require additional data rights from offerors, BUT can evaluate the impact of offered rights for Technical Data and Computer Software. DFARS 227.7102, 227.7103, 227.7202, and 227.7203, all have language specifying that the Government cannot require offeror's to relinquish rights to the Government in order to be considered responsive to a solicitation. However, the noncommercial item sections (227.7103 and 227.7203) include additional terms requiring offerors to provide what the DFARS defines as Unlimited Rights data. DFARS 227.7102-1(c) states “...offerors and contractors shall not be required, except for the technical data described in paragraph (a) of this subsection, to—(1) ... (2) Relinquish to, or otherwise provide, the Government rights to use, modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose technical data pertaining to commercial items or processes except for a transfer of rights mutually agreed upon.” DFARS 227.7202-1 has similar language addressing commercial software but also states the Government can refuse to purchase commercial computer software if the licensing terms “...are inconsistent with Federal procurement law or do not otherwise satisfy user needs” (e.g. single user licenses versus enterprise license). DFARS 227.7103-1(c) states “Offerors shall not be required, either as a condition of being responsive to a solicitation or as a condition for award, to sell or otherwise relinquish to the Government any rights in technical data related to items, components or processes developed at private expense except for the data identified at 227.7103-5(a)(2) and (a)(4) through (9).” DFARS 227.7203-1 has similar language addressing Computer Software. There is language in DFARS 227.7103 and 227.7203; however, that does allow the Government to ask for data rights information associated with noncommercial items and evaluate the impact of any data use restrictions. 227.7103-10(a)(5) states “Information provided by offerors in response to the solicitation provision may be used in the source selection process to evaluate the impact on evaluation factors that may be created by restrictions on the Government's ability to use or disclose technical data.” 227.720310(a)(5) has similar language addressing Computer Software. There is no specific DFARS guidance for commercial items on this topic. There are some very limited exceptions to the rule preventing DoD activities from requiring data rights in a solicitation. DFARS 227.7103 and 227.7203 refer to DFARS 207.106, which includes exceptions for noncommercial data and “major systems.” This clause permits the Government to require additional data rights if “the contracting officer determines that— (1) The original supplier of the item or component will be unable to satisfy program schedule or delivery requirements; (2) Proposals by the original supplier of the item or component to meet mobilization requirements are insufficient to meet the agency's mobilization needs; or (3) The Government is otherwise entitled to unlimited rights in technical data.” A future release will describe concepts for evaluating data rights as source selection criteria.

F. Contract Line Items (RFP - Section B) Section B contains Contract Line Item Numbers that describes separate items or services being procured as part of the contract effort. These deliverables can be hardware, services, software, data, or any combination thereof. Notable characteristics of contract line items are that each must be separately identifiable, have a single unit price, a separate delivery schedule, and defined acceptance requirements.

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G. Work Statement (RFP - Section C)

The program team should ensure that each contract line item is associated with a contract requirement. Pricing for each contract line item are included in each offeror's response to the Government RFP.

i. Data A separate line item just for data is routinely included in RFPs. This line item is used for delivery of all the data requirements defined by the contract data requirements list. Frequently, the line item for data is not separately priced. REF: Sample Contract Line Items for Data & Data Rights [§ 304.F, p 103];

ii. Data Rights Option A separate line item can also be defined for a contract option to acquire additional rights associated with the delivered data. This option is relatively new to Army contracting and is only practicable when a Data Rights Attachment (DR Attachment) (See Section 205.K) requirement is part of the RFP. Each offeror's completed DR Attachment can include costs to acquire additional data rights for specific data deliverables, which create the content of the data rights option. This option enables the Government to have flexibility regarding what additional data rights are acquired for each data deliverable. REF: Sample Contract Line Items for Data & Data Rights [§ 304.F, p 103];

RECOMMENDATION: Include contract option to acquire needed/desired additional data rights.

G. Work Statement (RFP - Section C) Section C wording establishes and defines the contractor work requirements. A range of work statement styles can be used by the Government to state the RFP objectives. The major styles are Performance Work Statement, Statement of Work, and Statement of Objectives. The content of the D&DR Guide focuses on the Statement of Work (SOW). However, many of the recommendations can be applied to the other styles. A Statement of Work (SOW) establishes and defines the requirements for contractor efforts and is an essential part of any development contract. Detailed guidance on the preparation of a statement of work is outside the scope of this guide. Program teams are urged to use MIL-HDBK-245, “Department Of Defense Handbook for Preparation of Statement of Work (SOW)” to prepare a SOW. A proper SOW is critical to requiring a contractor to perform tasks with Government funding that will result in the generation of required data deliverables. CDRLs describe the content, format, etc. of the data deliverables but do not require generation of the data itself. Clear SOW requirements also make it difficult for a contractor to develop needed and identified technologies as purportedly being outside the Government contract scope and then claim it as developed exclusively at private expense. If the

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200. CORE INFORMATION

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

I. Contract Clauses (RFP - Section I)

Government intends for certain development to be accomplished at Government expense, the SOW should clearly reflect that. SOW authors should confirm all the CDRLs tie back to specific work tasks and follow the guidance in MIL-HDBK-245.

H. Special Contract Requirements (RFP - Section H) Section H contains contractual requirements that are not included in other parts of the RFP/contract or when standard FAR or DFARS clauses do not adequately cover the Government's needs. A Specifically Negotiated License agreement is an example of a special contract requirement. All of these agreements must comply with current statutory and regulatory guidance and be approved by Government legal counsel. Higher headquarters approval may also be required. A Specifically Negotiated License Rights agreement could be included in Section H or included as a specific attachment to Section J. These agreements must be reviewed and approved by Government legal counsel before including in the RFP.

I. Contract Clauses (RFP - Section I) Section I is for clauses that will apply to the contract. The Government's rights in data are dependent on the clauses included in each contract. The use of some clauses is mandated by the FAR while others are dependent on the type of acquisition being undertaken, and many data related clauses are NOT mandated by the FAR or DFARS. Therefore, it is necessary for the integrated product team, Government contracting professionals, and legal advisors, to specify what additional FAR/DFARS clauses should be part of a specific solicitation. Program teams should seek legal counsel when determining what clauses to include in a RFP and the subsequent contract. Frequently cited DFARS clauses and provisions relating to data and data rights are shown in Table 11. DFARS provision 252.227-7017 is particularly important because it is the only DFARS specified method to require offerors to identify data right assertions. The FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I) [§ 304.G, p 104] section includes a more complete listing of clauses relevant to data, data rights, and Intellectual Property. The section also recommends which clauses to use for the major types of contractual efforts. Table 11 - Frequently Cited DFARS Clauses and Provisions Related to Data & Data Rights

Clause

Clause or Provision Title

Clause

Clause or Provision Title

252.227-7013

Rights in Technical Data-Noncommercial Items

252.227-7018

Rights in Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software--Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)

252.227-7014

Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and Noncommercial Computer Software Documentation

252.227-7019

Validation of Asserted Restrictions-Computer Software

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205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

J. Contract Data Requirements Lists (RFP - Section J)

Clause

Clause or Provision Title

Clause

Clause or Provision Title

252.227-7015

Technical Data–Commercial Items

252.227-7037

Validation of Restrictive Markings on Technical Data

252.227-7017

Identification and Assertion of Use, Release, or Disclosure Restrictions (Provision in Solicitation Section K)

Additional Clauses

FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I) [§ 304.G, p 104]

REF: FAR and DFARS Overview [§ 103.A, p 13]; FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I) [§ 304.G, p 104]; MYTH: Proprietary Data Assertions “The contractor “said” the data was proprietary and too expensive”

REALITY A contractor must assert and be able to prove all data it claims as protected prior to contract award. It must also make these assertions at the proper level of the product (top weapon system, subsystem, assembly, or component). A contractor has the burden of proving all assertions by maintaining and providing records showing the funding source(s) for development of the technology, component, or process in question.

J. Contract Data Requirements Lists (RFP - Section J) Section J is for attachments to the RFP. One of the important attachments from a data deliverable perspective is the Contract Data Requirements Lists (CDRLs).

i. Data Acquisition Documents & Data Item Descriptions (DIDs) A Data Acquisition Document is the authoritative source used by the Government to define the content and format requirements for acquired data. The majority of data acquisition documents are Data Item Descriptions (DIDs) but they can also be military standards or FAR/DFARS clauses. These descriptions are referenced in a Contract Data Requirements List, which contains legally binding requirements for delivery of the data specified. Data Acquisition Documents must display a currently valid Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control number to be legally enforceable per 44 U.S.C. § 3512. Public protection. Attempts to acquire data using less formal means may be unenforceable. An individual DID defines the content, format, and intended use for a single type or class of data product (Technical Report, Preservation and Packing Data, Test Procedure, etc.). All DIDs must be created in accordance with MIL-STD-963 (Data Item Descriptions) and categorized per the Department of Defense Standardization Directory-1 (Federal Supply Class and AREA Assignments). There are approximately 1500 DIDs approved for repetitive use in DoD contractual acquisitions. These DIDs are freely accessible through the Defense Logistics Agency Acquisition Streamlining and

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200. CORE INFORMATION

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

J. Contract Data Requirements Lists (RFP - Section J)

Standardization Information System (ASSIST) Document Database. In order to locate a specific DID in this database, the user must know its identification number (e.g., “DI-IPSC-81441A”) or the words used in the title (e.g., “Software Product Specification”). REF: Data Item Descriptions (DIDs) Details [§ 304.C, p 100];

ii. Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) Contents & Preparation The SOW details the tasks to be performed by the contractor. These tasks often result in the generation of data that the Government needs. All Technical Data and all Computer Software should be ordered using CDRLs. A CDRL (DD Form 1423) defines the data requirement as well as the frequency, method, and medium of the data to be delivered under the contract. Table 12 shows some key CDRL contents and their descriptions. Table 12 - Key CDRL Contents and Descriptions

CDRL Contents

Description

Data Item Description (DID) or data acquisition document reference

Format and content requirements

Tailoring instructions

Instructions to lessen the requirements of specified data acquisition document or DID.

Statement of work reference (s)

Statement of Work tasks that will result in generation of the data

Delivery requirements

Frequency, point of contact, delivery method, and delivery medium

Multiple CDRLs can refer to a single data acquisition document or DID but a separate CDRL is required for each type or class of data to be delivered. The collection of CDRLs becomes an attachment to the contract and creates a legally binding requirement for delivery of the data specified. Tailoring is a method used to lessen the requirements specified by the data acquisition document or DID as appropriate to the specific work task in the contract. This lessening or tailoring is encouraged as a way to avoid expense related to unnecessary information gathering or formatting. Tailoring instructions can be specified in Block 16 of the CDRL or other contract attachments but cannot be used to expand the requirements of the DID or data acquisition document, only to lessen those requirements. DoD 5010.12M, “Procedures for the Acquisition and Management of Technical Data” is an excellent reference for CDRL preparation. An update to 5010.12-M is expected to be released in 2015. Figure 40 depicts a typical translation from data requirement to a specific RFP CDRL.

Figure 40 - RFP Contract Data Requirements List Preparation

Once the data requirements for the specific RFP have been approved by the Program Manager, the CDRLs can be created. Organization of the

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200. CORE INFORMATION

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

K. Data Rights Attachment (RFP Section J)

CDRLs can significantly ease preparation of the DR Attachment (See Section K) and make validation of data deliverable markings much easier for the Government. REF: Relationships between SOW, CDRL, DR Attachment, and DIDs [§ 304.D, p 101]; Contract Data Requirements List Details [§ 304.E, p 102];

iii. CDRL Organization Validation of data rights markings on delivered Technical Data or Computer Software can be made much easier if multiple CDRLs are used and they are divided into separate categories as shown in Figure 41. The first step is to create separate CDRLs that require Form, Fit, and Function Data, Operation, Maintenance, Installation and Training Data, and Computer Software Documentation respectively since this information must be furnished to the Government with Unlimited Rights per the DFARS. The second step is to identify CDRLs where the delivered data will likely have different data rights and separating them into individual CDRLs with identical rights to the maximum extent practicable. Organizing the CDRL contents in this manner will mean all data delivered per that CDRL will require the same data rights markings and make Government validation of those markings easier. The third step is to separate the CDRLs into three groups. One group is for data associated with noncommercial products, another for commercial products, and a third for Contract Administration (cost, financial, schedule) information. Figure 41 - CDRL Organization

REF: CDRL Organization Details [§ 305.B.i, p 111];

K. Data Rights Attachment (RFP - Section J) An additional attachment recommended for RFPs is a Data Rights Attachment (DR Attachment). This attachment identifies all of the contract CDRLs and their data rights level in a single document. Various methods to document offeror data rights assertions at a more detailed level than DFARS 252.227-7017 have been explored by the Military Services in the past. The Air Force Space & Missile Systems Center, Office of the Staff Judge Advocate, refined and documented the idea of a DR Attachment in the routinely update handbook “Acquiring and Enforcing the Government's Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software Under Department of Defense Contracts: A Practical Handbook for Acquisition Professionals.” The Air Force handbook describes the use of a DR Attachment to clearly and specifically define data rights for each contract data deliverable.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

K. Data Rights Attachment (RFP Section J)

Army subject matter experts have adopted the DR Attachment concept with minor modifications and highly recommend its use in conjunction with DFARS provision 252.227-7017 for all research & development RFPs. Detailed explanations of the DR Attachment concept and its uses are discussed in this section and referenced sections.

RECOMMENDATION: Incorporate a Data Rights Attachment in research & development Requests for Proposal and contracts.

i. DR Attachment Contents The DR Attachment consists of three tables as shown in Figure 42. Table 1 is for Technical Data associated with noncommercial products and noncommercial Computer Software, Table 2 is for Technical Data associated with commercial products and commercial Computer Software, and Table 3 is for Contract Administration (cost, financial, schedule) information and data that does not fall within the DFARS definitions of Technical Data or Computer Software. Each data requirement (CDRL) from the RFP is put into one of the three tables according to DR Attachment criteria. The program team fills in the left columns of the tables (Figure 42, Item 1) to specify the desired data rights Figure 42 - Data Rights Attachment Tables for each CDRL before the DR Attachment is included in the RFP. Offerors fill in the right columns of the tables (Figure 42, Item 2) to specify agreement, agreement with conditions/terms, or disagreement, to grant the desired rights. There are some cases where offerors will be requested to fill in the left columns. The offerorcompleted tables constitute the complete DR Attachment, which is included in the proposal. The references listed identify other sections that discuss the DR Attachment. REF: General DR Attachment Process [§ 305.A, p 111]; Government Preparation of DR Attachment [§ 305.B, p 111]; Offeror Fill In of DR Attachment [§ 305.C, p 115]; Example Review of Offeror Submitted Table 1 [§ 305.D, p 117]; DR Attachment Table 1 Changes before Contract Award [§ 305.E, p 118];

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205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

L. Data Rights Assertion Provision (RFP - Section K)

ii. DR Attachment Uses & Benefits The completed DR Attachment can Figure 43 - Data Rights Attachment Uses provide valuable information for the program team. The offeror data rights and license costs information (Figure 43, Item 1) can support future competitiveness evaluations between offeror solutions as part of the source selection process (Figure 43, Item 2). The data rights and license costs can be combined into a data rights contract option with the data rights costs defining separately exercisable options (Figure 43, Item 3). The DR Attachment information also provides a significant head start when defining data and data rights license agreements with the winning offeror (Figure 43, Item 4). Finally, the DR Attachment provides the program team an easy to use reference to verify the data markings of delivered data (Figure 43, Item 5). REF: General DR Attachment Process [§ 305.A, p 111]; Offeror Fill In of DR Attachment [§ 305.C, p 115]; DR Attachment Table 1 Changes before Contract Award [§ 305.E, p 118];

L. Data Rights Assertion Provision (RFP - Section K) Section K is where provisions or requirements related to the RFP itself are listed. This information pertains primarily to the solicitation and most of the content is not included in the resulting contract. It is frequently not in an offeror's best interest to communicate what proprietary design content they intend to use to meet the contract requirements. However, the program team needs to clearly understand all data rights restrictions to avoid costly data use limitations, sole source items, or time consuming negotiations later in the program. Therefore, programs must require offerors to identify data rights assertions as part of the proposals in response to a development effort RFP. DFARS Provision 252.227-7017, “Identification and Assertion of Use, Release, or Disclosure Restrictions” should be included in Section K of all RFPs because the required information is critical to understanding and evaluating proposed restrictions on the Government's ability to use or disclose delivered Technical Data or Computer Software.

Figure 44 - DFARS Provision 252.227-7017 Assertion Table Format

When included in a RFP, this provision requires offerors to identify any data to be delivered with rights more restrictive than Unlimited Rights. Using the table format prescribed in 252.227-7017 and shown in Figure 44, the offeror is claiming the data was developed entirely or partially with private funding and is asserting the right to restrict Government dissemination and use of that data. REF: FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I) [§ 304.G, p 104];

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200. CORE INFORMATION

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

M. Instructions, Conditions, and Notices to Offerors (RFP - Section L)

RECOMMENDATION: Include DFARS provision 252.227-7017 in Section K of research & development Requests for Proposal.

M. Instructions, Conditions, and Notices to Offerors (RFP - Section L) Section L of the RFP includes content from the source selection plan including instructions for offerors regarding how to format, separate, and submit proposals for evaluation. The information in Section L primarily pertains to the solicitation and most of the content is not included in the resulting contract. The following sections discuss content for specific areas of instruction.

i. DR Attachment Instructions DR Attachment instructions are new content for Section L. Program teams should work with their legal advisors to word the instructions regarding the DR Attachment. The Air Force Data Rights Handbook contains DR Attachment instruction examples. Section L instruction content Suggested from the handbook includes: •

“...explain in Section L its minimum needs for rights in technical data and computer software and the pedigree of those needs so that if such a protest results, the program office will be able to establish that rationale existed prior to release of the RFP – it is not some after-the-fact rationale the program office created after the protester filed its protest.”



“...emphasize that the technical data and computer software rights described in the DFARS clauses listed in Section I of the RFP are the rights the program office expects to receive in exchange for paying for development of the technical data or computer software. The purpose of this information is to warn offerors they should not propose the Government have to pay an additional cost for acquiring those rights.”



“...describe how the offerors Technical volume must explain how its Data Rights Attachment will meet the Government's minimum needs and will result in an executable program underneath the appropriate sub factor(s).”



“...describing how they must fill-in their Data Rights Attachment...”



“... requiring them to complete their DFARS § 252.227-7017 certification/representation consistent with the manner in which offerors have filled-in the tables in their Data Rights Attachment.”



“...require offerors to provide copies of all licenses associated with all commercial technical data and computer software the offeror proposes to deliver to the Government.”

Additional instruction content suggestions include: •

Require copies of all terms and conditions associated with Government acquisition of additional data rights from the offeror.



Require acceptance or revision proposals to the specifically negotiated license terms for Contract Administration Data defined in the DR Attachment of the RFP.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

N. Proposal Evaluation Criteria (RFP Section M)

ii. Data Rights Option Instructions The Government is required to inform offerors what contract options will be included in proposal cost evaluations. The Data Rights Option costs defined by offerors in the proposal DR Attachment should be required, but not be subject to any Government cost analysis, nor included in the proposal cost evaluation. This decision may appear to contradict the requirements set forth in FAR Subpart 15.4—Contract Pricing. The issue is that no generally accepted methods to calculate the value of data rights exist. Subsequently, there are no means for the Government to analyze or determine the reasonableness of individual offeror proposed rights costs. Although not subject to Government cost analysis, the data rights option cost information is needed to define the offeror price for the Government to exercise data rights options by specific CDRLs. Note: Offerors must be given the choice to not price some or all of the data rights options for rights beyond the standard for the RFP to comply with the DFARS clauses discussed in the Source Selection and Data Rights section [§ 205.E, p 59].

N. Proposal Evaluation Criteria (RFP Section M) Section M of the RFP includes content from the Source Selection Plan including proposal evaluation factors, subfactors, and their relative importance. REF: RFP Input - Source Selection Plan [§ 205.D, p 57];

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200. CORE INFORMATION

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

N. Proposal Evaluation Criteria (RFP Section M)

This Page Intentionally Blank

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200. CORE INFORMATION

206. Proposal Evaluation and Data & Data Rights License Agreements

B. Commercial License Review & Approval

206. PROPOSAL EVALUATION AND DATA & DATA RIGHTS LICENSE AGREEMENTS This section provides guidance on evaluating offeror proposals for data related content, how to calculate what, if any, data rights options should be exercised, and the need to document and store data and data rights licenses.

A. DR Attachment and Assertions Inspection Table 13 lists proposal content that should be inspected during the evaluation process. Table 13 - Proposal Content Inspection Checklist

√ DR Attachment completely filled in by Offeror √ Table 1 CDRLs separated to have identical data rights √ Table 1 CDRLs identified with less than Unlimited Rights have corresponding rights assertion per DFARS 252.227-7017 provision √ Copies of terms and conditions to acquire additional rights for applicable CDRLs listed in Table 1 (if applicable) included in proposal √ Copies of commercial licenses for all CDRLs listed in Table 2 of the proposal √ Offeror acceptance of or proposed modifications (if applicable) to the specifically negotiated license terms defined in the Government RFP

B. Commercial License Review & Approval Copies of all license agreements associated with commercial Technical Data or Computer Software should be included with the DR Attachment. The specific content and terms of these licenses should be carefully reviewed by Government legal counsel during the proposal evaluation phase to ensure the terms are legally acceptable. There is the potential that some of the commercial license terms may contradict Federal law and therefore be unacceptable. There is also the potential the terms may simply not align with program technical requirements (e.g., site license versus individual licenses). Any issues found with the commercial licensees should be reported to the Procuring Contracting Officer for follow-up with the offeror. Once the issues are resolved to the satisfaction of both parties, the commercial licenses must be made attachments to the contract prior to award.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

206. Proposal Evaluation and Data & Data Rights License Agreements

D. License Agreement Resolution

C. Data & Data Rights License Agreement Documentation The content of license agreements should address what specific data is covered by the license, the terms of use for that data, and any marking requirements. License agreements for commercial Computer Software usually include all of this information. However, information from a range of sources is usually needed to fully define a license agreement for data associated with a noncommercial product. Figure 45 depicts how these information sources can be combined to meet the content requirements for a license agreement associated with a noncommercial product. DFARS clauses 252.227-7013, 252.227-7014, and 252.227-7018 fully define the terms of use for Unlimited, Government Purpose, Limited, Restricted, and SBIR Data Rights for Technical Data and noncommercial Computer Software. These DFARS clauses are also the authoritative source for all Government data rights marking definitions. However, these clauses do not identify what contract deliverables are associated with a particular data right. The data rights assertion list required by DFARS provision 252.227-7017 should identify any data to be delivered to the Government with less than Unlimited Rights. An offeror assertion list may or may not specify what CDRLs are affected but the DR Attachment is the recommended method to fully document what data deliverables are associated with what data rights.

Figure 45 - Data and Data Rights License Agreement Documentation

If the terms of use defined in the DFARS are modified by mutual agreement between the Government and contractor, the revised terms must be documented in a Specifically Negotiated License Rights agreement. Contract Administration information is not addressed by any DFARS clause and the terms of use for this data should be documented in a Specifically Negotiated License Rights agreement.

D. License Agreement Resolution Assertions of restrictions in noncommercial technical data and computer software are not necessarily determinative of final license agreements but may be subjected to pre-award or post-award challenge procedures. However, the DFARS discourages delay of competitive source selections by pre-award challenges “unless resolution of the assertion is essential for successful completion of the procurement.” This creates a dilemma since agreeing to licenses prior to resolution of any questions regarding the propriety of asserted restrictions and only resolving questions after a contract is awarded may both be disadvantageous to the Government. Legal counsel should be consulted with a consideration of whether specific license agreements made preaward and related to questionable assertions can be maintained as subject to later challenge. In addition, when time constraints do not permit resolution of all restriction concerns, priority should be given to

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200. CORE INFORMATION

206. Proposal Evaluation and Data & Data Rights License Agreements

F. Post-Award Data & Data Rights License Agreement Storage & Use

CDRLs identified as key. The content of license agreements should address what specific data is covered by the license, the terms of use for that data, and any marking requirements. License agreements for commercial Computer Software usually include all of this information. Accepted license agreements should be included as attachments in a contract.

E. Post-Award Data Rights Options Decisions (Concept) The data rights options cost information included in the contract DR Attachment can be used to determine what, if any, data rights options should be exercised. For each CDRL with a priced data rights option, the program can roughly calculate whether acquiring the additional rights is advantageous to the Government. The decision whether to exercise any data rights options should be made no later than the end of the contract. These decisions should preferably be made early in the contract to avoid disagreements or misunderstandings of data rights entitlements when data is delivered. The determination can be made by comparing the estimated life cycle costs for three program paths: •

Acquire the additional data rights and competitively purchase and support the item



Do not acquire the additional rights and procure the item and support from the sole source



Embark on a reverse engineering program to replace the restricted rights item

The Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept) [§ 306, p 119] section discusses these calculations.

F. Post-Award Data & Data Rights License Agreement Storage & Use It is important to keep track of all data and data rights license agreements throughout the life cycle of a program and beyond. The data rights markings and license agreements are the main source of information describing rights restrictions and how they affects the distribution and use of the data. The license agreement terms of use should be understood and available to anyone that may be sharing or releasing data to support Figure 46 - Data and Data Rights License Agreement Linkage development, manufacturing, and product support efforts. Data rights are normally granted to the Government as a whole rather than a specific organization or program. As such, other Government organizations may wish to use the Technical Data or Computer Software acquired by another program and will need to understand the terms of use. To facilitate this information sharing and reuse, data repositories should be configured to link license agreements and the subject data as shown in Figure 46. There are significant financial impacts to the Government as a whole and possible jail time for Government employees if data is distributed to unauthorized parties in violation of data or data rights

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200. CORE INFORMATION

206. Proposal Evaluation and Data & Data Rights License Agreements

G. Sole Source Data & Data Rights License Agreement Negotiations

license agreements. Awareness of these terms of use will avoid misunderstandings regarding what information can be shared outside of the Government and items can be competitively procured.

RECOMMENDATION: Maintain records of all data and data rights license agreements and link them to the applicable data.

G. Sole Source Data & Data Rights License Agreement Negotiations Reserved for Future Use.

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200. CORE INFORMATION

207. Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance

B. Data Rights Marking Verification

207. DATA DELIVERY, VERIFICATION, AND ACCEPTANCE This section discusses the need to have data delivered and the range of inspection and verification steps needed before the Government accepts any data.

A. Data Delivery Programs should take delivery of all Technical Data and Computer Software ordered as part of a contract. As a practical matter, it is simply the best way to confirm possession, quality, and data rights status of the acquired data. Some acquisition professionals believe merely having “access” to the data is sufficient. This is not true! To enforce the data rights marking requirements and empower the Government to validate and/or challenge restrictions on data, data must be properly required to be delivered. Merely requiring access does not secure the Government's license rights. The time and resources spent to perform inspection and acceptance of data items are small compared to the potential disagreements and costs avoided. Additionally, data stored only in a contractor repository has the risk that the Government may be denied access to the data should there be a disagreement between the two parties.

RECOMMENDATION: Verify Technical Data and Computer Software data ordered as part of a contract is actually delivered or otherwise furnished.

B. Data Rights Marking Verification Any data delivered to the Government with restrictive markings should have those markings verified before acceptance. The process shown in Figure 47 is derived from applicable content of DFARS clauses 252.227-7013, 252.227-7014, and 252.227Figure 47 - Data Rights Marking Verification Process 7018. Noncommercial data delivered without any restrictive data rights markings is treated as having Unlimited Rights and the rights marking verification process is not needed. The three verification steps are (1) assertion alignment, (2) markings format conformance, and (3) rights restriction justifiability. Each of these steps is discussed in the following sections. Although this verification process is focused on Technical Data associated with a noncommercial item, noncommercial Computer Software, and SBIR data, the assertion alignment step is also applicable to commercial data.

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CONTENTS

200. CORE INFORMATION

207. Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance

B. Data Rights Marking Verification

i. Assertions Alignment Verification The first step is to check that the data rights markings align with the contractor Data Rights Assertion Provision (RFP - Section K), the Data Rights Attachment (RFP - Section J), or Post-Award Data Rights Assertions. The DR Attachment is especially useful for this step because it defines the data rights assertion for each CDRL item as shown in Figure 48. The data rights Figure 48 - Data Rights Attachment and Data Rights Markings markings should align with the rights listed in the DR Attachment. Any data delivered with a data rights marking that does not align with a previously asserted data right is noncompliant with the terms of DFARS clauses 252.227-7013, 252.227-7014, or 252.227-7018 which require an “...assertion shall be submitted ...as soon as practicable prior to the scheduled date for delivery...” Consequently, the data delivery cannot be the first time an additional data rights restriction is disclosed to the Government. Any data delivered with restrictive markings and without a corresponding data rights assertion should not be accepted. REF: Data Rights Attachment (RFP - Section J) [§ 205.K, p 65]; Data Rights Assertion Provision (RFP Section K) [§ 205.L, p 67]; Post-Award Data Rights Assertions [§ 207.C, p 77];

ii. Format Conformance Verification The second step is to check the data rights markings for conformity with the marking formats defined in the applicable DFARS clause included in the contract. Markings for Technical Data associated with a noncommercial item or noncommercial Computer Software must conform to the formats required by DFARS clauses 252.227-7013, -7014, or -7018. This issue generally involves a contractor using terms like “All Rights Reserved,” “XYZ Proprietary,“ or “XYZ Company Confidential” to mark this type of data rather than the exact wording specified in these clauses. The Contracting Officer has the authority to order these nonconforming markings be removed and corrected. Contractors typically have 60 days to make the corrections and resubmit the data. Note the DFARS does not specify any marking requirements for Technical Data associated with a commercial item. If this type of data is received without any restrictive markings, the Government is relieved of any liability for releases of such data. Also, note that the DFARS does not address marking requirements for commercial Computer Software. These markings must be specified in the associated license. REF: Data Markings Fundamentals [§ 104, p 23]; Data Markings Details [§ 302, p 93];

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200. CORE INFORMATION

207. Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance

C. Post-Award Data Rights Assertions

iii. Rights Restriction Justification The third verification step focuses on the justification of the data rights assertion on which the restrictive rights marking was based. This step is primarily applicable to Technical Data associated with a noncommercial item, noncommercial Computer Software, and SBIR data. The contractor data rights assertions or DR Attachment included in the awarded contract is not an indication that the Government has accepted the assertion. As discussed in the Data Rights Assertions Review section [§ 207.D, p 78], these assertions may be subjected to post-award challenge procedures. If the validity of the assertion is questioned, the associated data should not be accepted until a data rights assertion review has been completed. Note Government representatives must honor the applied rights markings until the assertion review process is complete. REF: Data Rights Assertions Review [§ 207.D, p 78];

C. Post-Award Data Rights Assertions It is possible for a contractor make additional data rights assertions after award under certain circumstances. DFARS clauses 252.227-7013, 252.227-7014, and 252.227-7018 state “...other assertions may be identified after award when based on new information or inadvertent omissions unless the inadvertent omissions would have materially affected the source selection decision.” These clauses further state “Such identification and assertion shall be submitted to the Contracting Officer as soon as practicable prior to the scheduled date for delivery of the technical data or computer software, in the following format, and Figure 49 - Post-Award Data Rights Assertion Terms/Conditions signed by an official authorized to contractually obligate the Contractor.” (Underlining added). The “following format” mentioned in the quoted text is a table format like that in the data rights assertion provision 252.2277017 used in RFPs. The process for post-award data rights assertions is shown in Figure 49. In summary, post-award data rights assertions are permitted if they relate to new information or inadvertent omissions that would not have materially affected the source selection decision. The term “new information” is not clearly defined in the DFARS. However, if a post-award assertion can be tied to a change made by the Government, it would be reasonable to call it new information. In either case, these assertions must be submitted to the Government before the scheduled data delivery date. Assertions that meet these requirements, are subsequently reviewed using the Data Rights Assertions Review process [§ 207.D, p 78].

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207. Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance

D. Data Rights Assertions Review

Post-award assertions for inadvertent omissions that would have materially affected the source selection decision, or submitted after scheduled data delivery date, do not comply with the terms of the above mentioned clauses. In such cases, the Government is not obligated to evaluate or accept the new assertions. Contractor post-award assertions, allegedly based on new information that is not the result of a Government change, and, would have materially affected the source selection decision, should be thoroughly scrutinized by the Government. A typical case occurs when a new subcontractor is selected and has the right to assert new data rights restrictions. The Government must determine if selection of the new subcontractor is justified or was planned or intended by the prime contractor as a means to conceal data rights assertions during the source selection process. If the assertion is justifiably “new,” the program should consider negotiating for an equitable adjustment to the contract price if the assertion review process determines the assertion to be justified.

D. Data Rights Assertions Review The Government data rights assertion review can involve a request for additional information and/or the formal and protracted “challenge” process as shown in Figure 50. If the program is interested in obtaining additional information to evaluate a contractor data rights assertion, language from DFARS 252.227-7013(e)(4), 252.227-7014(e)(4), and 252.227-7018(e)(4) permit such a request without invoking the formal challenge process. The language states, “When requested by the Contracting Officer, Figure 50 - Data Rights Assertion Review Process the Contractor shall provide sufficient information to enable the Contracting Officer to evaluate the Contractor's assertions.” The program team can then use the requested information to determine whether to invoke the formal challenge process. The formal data rights assertion challenge processes are defined in DFARS clauses 252.227-7019 (Validation of Asserted Restrictions-Computer Software) and 252.2277037 (Validation of Restrictive Markings on Technical Data). Each clause prescribes a multitude of stringent steps both the Government and contractor must follow before the contracting officer determines whether the assertion is justified or unjustified. The results of the data rights assertion review process is a Government determination to: (1) invoke the formal challenge process, (2) elect not to challenge the assertion. The election not to challenge an assertion is not an indication the Government accepts the assertion. DFARS 252.227-7019 and 252.227-7037 state “A decision by the Government, or a determination by the Contracting Officer, to not challenge the restrictive marking or asserted restriction shall not constitute

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D. Data Rights Assertions Review

“validation.”“ This determination is basically a decision not to challenge an assertion and may be a viable option depending the program circumstances at the time. If the Government determines a post-award assertion to be justified, or elects not to challenge it, and the assertion would have materially affected the source selection decision, there are circumstances where it is reasonable to negotiate with the contractor for an “equitable adjustment” to the price of the contract. This type of assertion will likely lead to unforeseen increases in sustainment costs for the Government. As such, some amount of cost sharing between the contractor and the Government may be appropriate. Throughout the assertion review process, Government representatives must honor the applied rights markings until the process is complete. REF: Data Rights Assertion Provision (RFP - Section K) [§ 205.L, p 67]; Commercial License Review & Approval [§ 206.B, p 71]; License Agreement Resolution [§ 206.D, p 72];

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208. Data Management and Use

B. Data Repository

208. DATA MANAGEMENT AND USE Most, if not all, of the Technical Data and Computer Software associated with a product will need to be maintained and used throughout its life cycle. This section discusses the need to maintain and use data and then discusses the processes and infrastructure necessary to perform these functions.

A. Data Management System Components & Functions Effective data management and use is best described in the context of a typical data management system. This system exists to support the Figure 51 - Data Management System Components and Functions creation, revision, storage, and sharing, and protection of the data it stores. A range of components and processes are needed to accomplish this task as shown in Figure 51. These include the data repository system itself (Item 1), data authors and users (Item 2), data authoring environments (Item 3), data interfaces (Item 4), and external data systems (Item 5). Each of these components is discussed in the following sections.

B. Data Repository The data repository (Figure 51, Item 1) provides storage for a variety of data items. It should support data searching, configuration management, access or modification control, and restoration.

i. Storage, Backup, & Restoration The data repository system must be capable of storing, backing up, and recovering all the data items it stores. The system should be able to restore any data items lost due to accidental deletion, file corruption, or disaster.

ii. Search Function The data repository should support user or system searches to locate specific data items. The extent to which a data item can be located within a system is directly related to the quantity and quality of Metadata elements assigned to them. Inclusion of the proper metadata element values should be verified before an item is accepted into the repository. These metadata values will greatly enhance a user's ability to find that data item. REF: Repository Metadata Requirements [§ 202.I, p 40];

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208. Data Management and Use

B. Data Repository

RECOMMENDATION: Define and publicize metadata requirements for each data repository; require applicable metadata element values be properly entered before accepting data items into repository.

iii. Configuration Management Once a product's design and support concepts are approved for release, a Product Baseline should be established and placed under Configuration Management (CM). CM is a process for establishing and maintaining consistency of a product's attributes with its requirements, design and operational information throughout its life. A single set of “master” Product Configuration Documentation should be established as the authoritative source for all subsequent copies of that data to be used. CM ensures that modifications to the product and its associated documentation are reviewed and approved before any change is made to the defined master data. CM processes ensure that baselines are defined, only approved changes are made to the product data, and the physical product configurations are updated accordingly. When a proposed change to a configuration item is approved, there are usually corresponding modifications required to the data and documentation associated with the configuration-managed item. Traditional CM processes would require these changes be approved by an authorized individual known as the Configuration Approval Authority before the master set of data can be altered. Once the data is changed, traditional CM processes would require the Configuration Approval Authority confirm that all the changes were done correctly. The Approval Authority then “releases” the new versions of the data into the data management system, with new identifiers (usually a revision level or date marking), to differentiate it from any prior versions. An audit trail must be kept describing each change to the product configuration or configuration describing data, the data to be changed, the approver of the change, when the change was made to the associated data, and when the change was incorporated into physical configurations of the item. The data repository must prevent unauthorized modification to the master set of Product Configuration Documentation and be capable of identifying who users are, control what data they have access to, and control what functions they are allowed to perform with that data. While many people may have permissions to view and copy from the master set of product data, only a very limited number of users should have the ability to modify the master data. Any data modifications should be done in accordance with the program's CM procedures.

RECOMMENDATION: Place data associated with product configurations under Configuration Management control.

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B. Data Repository

iv. Access Controls Data users must know of any restrictions regarding access to or distribution of each data product and the data management system must be configured accordingly. Distribution Statement, Data Rights Marking, and Export Control information Figure 52 - Users and Access/Modification Control are all methods to ensure proper access control and must be known about each data product as shown in Figure 52. This information should be included in the data product content and defined as metadata element values. As discussed in the Post-Award Data & Data Rights License Agreement Storage & Use section [§ 206.F, p 73], unauthorized release or disclosure to a third party of any data with access restrictions can have a significant financial impact to the Government. It can also result in criminal penalties for Government employees involved per 18 U.S.C. § 1832. Theft of trade secrets and 18 U.S.C. § 1905. Disclosure of confidential information generally. Proper marking of the data combined with data management system capabilities and user education can avoid these situations. To ensure full compliance with data access restrictions, yet allow maximum data sharing and use, the data management system should have detailed business rules and user roles requirements to control access to specific data. This is a complex task and the system should minimally determine proper access to individual data objects for each user based on the combination of distribution statement and data rights marking. Government personnel can usually access and use Limited and Restricted Rights data for purposes other than manufacture. Contractor access to Limited and Restricted Rights data will require that the recipient's contract include DFARS 252.227-7025 or a non-disclosure agreement (NDA) between the user requesting the data and the data originator. An NDA binds the user from disclosing the restricted data without authorization from the data originator or owner. DFARS 227.7103-7 Use and Non-Disclosure Agreement provides a standard form for a non-disclosure agreement. Inclusion of DFARS clause 252.227-7025 in a contract can also serve as a Government NDA that a contractor agrees to with acceptance of the contract. A distinction must be made between a generic Contractor and the special case of a Covered Government Support Contractor (CGSC) relative to the need for an NDA. Contractors directly furnish an end item or service to accomplish a Government program or effort. CGSCs work directly with the Government to support the management and oversight of a program or effort. CGSCs can generally have data access permissions similar to DoD and Government employees without the need for an additional NDA provided the support contract contains DFARS clause 252.227-7025 and the contractor meets all the requirements to be a covered Government support contractor.

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208. Data Management and Use

D. Data Authoring Environments

RECOMMENDATION: Control data access based on Distribution Statement designation, Data Rights Restrictions, License Agreements, and Export Controls.

v. Repository System Administration Any data repository system will require administration of the entire system including infrastructure and hardware updates, user accounts, backups, and repository software updates. REF: Data Repository System Choices [§ 202.H, p 39];

C. Data Repository Author/User Interactions Data users (Figure 51, Item 2), typically retrieve information from the data repository to accomplish a task. That task can involve either revision of existing data (data maintenance) or authoring new data. These tasks require specific data for input and frequently involve the creation of new (or derivative) data. Figure 53 depicts a scenario where one user has the task to update data product A.1 to create data product A.2. Other users may require the A.2 data to accomplish their task, which leads to more derivative data (B.1). This scenario is repeated throughout a program while users maintain and create data to support the effort. Figure 53 - Data Repository Author/User Interactions

D. Data Authoring Environments Data Authoring Environments (Figure 51, Item 3) are the tools and supporting data needed to create or modify a specific set of data stored in the repository system. Data authors using these environments will need to interact with the data repository system in order to retrieve and modify or submit new data. REF: Computer Aided Design (CAD) Authoring Environment [§ 205.B.ii, p 54]; Computer Software and Authoring Environment [§ 205.B.iii, p 55];

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F. External Systems

E. Data Interfaces The ease with which data can be shared or exchanged (Figure 51, Item 4) can significantly affect program success. A typical acquisition program data management system performs data interactions where data products are transferred from one system to another. These interactions require exchange protocol definitions and metadata requirements. Data system interface requirements are specific to the systems involved and beyond the scope of this guide. Program teams should contact the repository system administrator to understand the repository data exchange protocols.

F. External Systems It is likely the data management system will need to supply data to and receive data from other systems (Figure 51, Item 5). These interactions can be highly efficient but care must be taken to prevent unauthorized access to data or user information. In general, external systems should comply with all of the user access requirements before any transactions are begun.

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209. Data & Data Rights Program Checklist

209. DATA & DATA RIGHTS PROGRAM CHECKLIST This program checklist is a compilation of the key recommendations that should be followed to have a robust program from a data and data rights perspective. The checklist recommendations are hyperlinked to the relevant Guide section.

201. Intellectual Property Strategy  Develop a comprehensive Intellectual Property Strategy and use it to govern data and data rights related program activities.

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements  Synchronize the Program Plans and Strategies to have aligned program objective(s), development concept, and sustainment concept, before gathering data and data rights requirements.  Gather short- and long-term data and data rights requirements from every subject matter expert that will support the development, test, manufacture, operation, or support of the product.  Utilize a Government enterprise data repository to store and manage delivered data.

203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs  Analyze costs and benefits of acquiring additional data rights, if offered.  Include data and data rights related Research & Development costs in the program life cycle cost estimate.  Include data and data rights related Investment (procurement) costs in the program life cycle cost estimate.  Include data and data rights related Operating and Support costs in the program life cycle cost estimate.

204. Data & Data Rights Potential Risks  Assess potential data & data rights risks and take steps to mitigate them.

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan  Order a complete Technical Data Package for product baselines (Allocated, Functional, and Product) during development of a noncommercial product.  Order a complete set of the native Computer Aided Design files, including all standard library components, and require full documentation of the authoring tool(s) used in their creation.  Order executable program, source code, supporting library files, and related documentation for noncommercial Computer Software.

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 Discuss the impacts to product development, manufacture, and competitive or organic life-cycle support, with the appropriate subject matter experts before deciding not to acquire requested data.  Update and resynchronize the relevant program strategies if the decision is made not to acquire any requested data.  Order and take delivery of all required data regardless of data rights restrictions.  Include contract option to acquire needed/desired additional data rights.  Incorporate a Data Rights Attachment in research & development Requests for Proposal and contracts.  Include DFARS provision 252.227-7017 in Section K of research & development Requests for Proposal.

206. Proposal Evaluation and Data & Data Rights License Agreements  Maintain records of all data and data rights license agreements and link them to the applicable data.

207. Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance  Verify Technical Data and Computer Software data ordered as part of a contract is actually delivered or otherwise furnished.

208. Data Management and Use  Define and publicize metadata requirements for each data repository; require applicable metadata element values be properly entered before accepting data items into repository.  Place data associated with product configurations under Configuration Management control.  Control data access based on Distribution Statement designation, Data Rights Restrictions, License Agreements, and Export Controls.

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION CONTENTS 301. Data Rights Details .............................................................................................................................................. 91 302. Data Markings Details ......................................................................................................................................... 93 303. Life Cycle Data & Data Rights Requirements Details ........................................................................................ 97 304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details ............................................................................................................ 99 305. Data Rights Attachment Details ......................................................................................................................... 111 306. Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept) .............................................................................................. 119

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

Guide Content References

§ 100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

§ 300. DETAILED INFORMATION

101. Data & DoD Life Cycle Fundamentals

301. Data Rights Details

102. Data Fundamentals

302. Data Markings Details

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

303. Life Cycle Data & Data Rights Requirements Details

104. Data Markings Fundamentals

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

§ 200. CORE INFORMATION 201. Intellectual Property Strategy

305. Data Rights Attachment Details 306. Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept)

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements 203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs

§ 400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

204. Data & Data Rights Potential Risks

401. Acknowledgements

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

402. Glossary & Acronyms

206. Proposal Evaluation and Data & Data Rights License Agreements

403. Index

207. Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance 208. Data Management and Use 209. Data & Data Rights Program Checklist

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A. Unlimited Data Rights Entitlement Details

301. Data Rights Details

301. DATA RIGHTS DETAILS Additional information for topics discussed in the Data Rights Fundamentals [§ 103, p 13] section.

A. Unlimited Data Rights Entitlement Details Table 14 lists the four DFARS clauses that identify certain types of data or conditions under which the Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights to the data. Table 15 lists the conditions or types of data, a summary of the Unlimited Rights entitlement, and indicates (“X”) which of the four clauses contains that provision. Table 14 - DFARS Unlimited Rights Entitlements Table Legend

Table Heading

Clause Title

DFARS Clause

*7013 TD

Rights in Technical Data--Noncommercial Items

252.227-7013

*7014 CS

Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and Noncommercial Computer Software Documentation

252.227-7014

*7015 Com TD

Technical Data–Commercial Items

252.227-7015

*7018 SBIR

Rights in Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software--Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program

252.227-7018

Table 15 - DFARS Unlimited Rights Entitlement Details

Condition / Type of Data

Entitlement Summary

*7013 TD

*7014 CS

Funding Source

The Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights to Computer Software or data pertaining to an item, component, or process, or which has been or will be developed exclusively with Government funds.

X

X

Type of Data (Studies, Analyses, Test Data)

The Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights to studies, analyses, test data, or similar data produced for the contract, when the study, analysis, test, or similar work was specified as an element of performance.

X

Type of Data (FFF)

The Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights to Form, Fit, and Function Data. Form, Fit and Function data is data that describes the overall physical, functional, and performance characteristics of an item.

X

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*7015 Com TD

*7018 SBIR

X

X

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Condition / Type of Data

301. Data Rights Details

Entitlement Summary

A. Unlimited Data Rights Entitlement Details

*7013 TD

*7014 CS

*7015 Com TD

*7018 SBIR

X

X

Type of Data (OMIT)

The Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights to Operation, Maintenance, Installation and Training Data.

Type of Data (Computer Software Documentation)

The Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights to Computer Software Documentation required to be delivered under the contract.

Source of Data

The Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights to corrections or changes to Technical Data or Computer Software originally furnished to the Contractor by the Government.

X

X

X

X

Data Availability

The Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights to any data that is publicly available or that has been released to third parties without restrictions on its use.

X

X

X

X

Previous/Other Agreements

The Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights to any data, which was obtained, with Unlimited Rights under another Government contract or as a result of negotiations.

X

X

X

X

Rights Restriction Expiration

The Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights to data originally furnished with rights restrictions when the terms of the restrictive condition(s) has/have expired.

X

X

Government Purpose Rights Restriction Expiration

The Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights to data originally furnished with Government Purpose Rights when the Contractor's exclusive right to use such data for commercial purposes has expired.

X

X

Mixed Funding Source

The Government is entitled to Government Purpose Rights to data associated with items, components, or processes developed with a combination of Government and private funding.

X

X

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X

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302. Data Markings Details

A. Data Rights Markings Details

302. DATA MARKINGS DETAILS Additional information for topics discussed in the Data Markings Fundamentals [§ 104, p 23] section.

A. Data Rights Markings Details Technical Data associated with noncommercial products or noncommercial Computer Software provided by contractors must have DFARS compliant data rights markings. The specific markings for the data rights are defined in DFARS clauses 252.227-7013 and 252.227-7014. The following tables duplicate the information contained in these clauses as it pertains to: (A) Technical Data (Noncommercial Product) (Table 16), (B) Noncommercial Computer Software (Table 17), and (C) SBIR contract Technical Data and Computer Software (Noncommercial Product) (Table 18). Table 16 - Technical Data (Noncommercial Product) Data Rights Markings

(A) Data Markings - TECHNICAL DATA NONCOMMERCIAL PRODUCT Rights Legend

Legend Text

DFARS Clause

GOVERNMENT PURPOSE RIGHTS Contract No.: Contractor Name: Contractor Address:

“The Government's rights to use, modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose these technical data are restricted by paragraph (b)(2) of the Rights in Technical DataNoncommercial Items clause contained in the above identified contract. No restrictions apply after the expiration date shown above. Any reproduction of technical data or portions thereof marked with this legend must also reproduce the markings.”

252.227-7013 Rights in Technical DataNoncommercial Items

“The Government's rights to use, modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose these technical data are restricted by paragraph (b)(3) of the Rights in Technical Data-Noncommercial Items clause contained in the above identified contract. Any reproduction of technical data or portions thereof marked with this legend must also reproduce the markings. Any person, other than the Government, who has been provided access to such data, must promptly notify the above named Contractor.”

252.227-7013 Rights in Technical DataNoncommercial Items

“The Government's rights to use, modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose these data are restricted by Contract No. (Insert contract number), License No. (Insert license identifier). Any reproduction of technical data or portions thereof marked with this legend must also reproduce the markings.”

252.227-7013 Rights in Technical DataNoncommercial Items

Expiration Date:

LIMITED RIGHTS Contract No. Contractor Name: Contractor Address:

SPECIAL LICENSE RIGHTS

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A. Data Rights Markings Details

Table 17 - Noncommercial Computer Software Data Rights Markings

(B) Data Markings - NONCOMMERCIAL COMPUTER SOFTWARE Rights Legend

Legend Text

DFARS Clause

GOVERNMENT PURPOSE RIGHTS Contract No.: Contractor Name: Contractor Address:

“The Government's rights to use, modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose this software are restricted by paragraph (b)(2) of the Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and Noncommercial Computer Software Documentation clause contained in the above identified contract. No restrictions apply after the expiration date shown above. Any reproduction of the software or portions thereof marked with this legend must also reproduce the markings.”

252.227-7014 Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and Noncommercial Computer Software Documentation

“The Government's rights to use, modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose this software are restricted by paragraph (b)(3) of the Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and Noncommercial Computer Software Documentation clause contained in the above identified contract. Any reproduction of computer software or portions thereof marked with this legend must also reproduce the markings. Any person, other than the Government, who has been provided access to such software, must promptly notify the above named Contractor.”

252.227-7014 Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and Noncommercial Computer Software Documentation

“The Government's rights to use, modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose these data are restricted by Contract No. (Insert contract number), License No. (Insert license identifier). Any reproduction of computer software, computer software documentation, or portions thereof marked with this legend must also reproduce the markings.”

252.227-7014 Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and Noncommercial Computer Software Documentation

Expiration Date:

RESTRICTED RIGHTS Contract No. Contractor Name: Contractor Address:

SPECIAL LICENSE RIGHTS

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B. DFARS Clause Data Rights Marking Format versus Validation Details

302. Data Markings Details

Table 18 - SBIR Data Rights Marking

(C) Data Markings - SBIR Contract TECHNICAL DATA and COMPUTER SOFTWARE NONCOMMERCIAL PRODUCT Rights Legend

Legend Text

SBIR DATA RIGHTS Contract No. Contractor Name Contractor Address Expiration of SBIR Data Rights Period

DFARS Clause

“The Government's rights to use, modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose technical data or computer software marked with this legend are restricted during the period shown as provided in paragraph (b)(4) of the Rights in Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software– Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program clause contained in the above identified contract. No restrictions apply after the expiration date shown above. Any reproduction of technical data, computer software, or portions thereof marked with this legend must also reproduce the markings.”

252.227-7018 Rights In Noncommercial Technical Data And Computer Software-Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program

B. DFARS Clause Data Rights Marking Format versus Validation Details Data rights marking definitions and related validation processes are defined by DFARS clauses included in the contract. Table 19 shows how these DFARS clauses apply. Table 19 - Data Marking Related DFARS Clauses

DFARS Clause

Title

Marking Format Definition

Marking Validation

252.227-7013

Rights in Technical Data--Noncommercial Items

X

252.227-7014

Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and Noncommercial Computer Software Documentation

X

252.227-7018

Rights in Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software--Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program

X

252.227-7019

Validation of Asserted Restrictions-Computer Software

X

252.227-7037

Validation of Restrictive Markings on Technical Data

X

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303. Life Cycle Data & Data Rights Requirements Details

B. Sample Metadata Elements

303. LIFE CYCLE DATA & DATA RIGHTS REQUIREMENTS DETAILS Additional information on topics discussed in the Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements [§ 202, p 33] section.

A. Metadata Standards Table 20 identifies some Government and private industry standards that address metadata. Table 20 - Metadata Standards (Partial List)

Type of Data

Standard

Technical Data package (TDP) Computer Aided Design data, TDP Data Management products

Military Standard MIL-STD-31000A “Technical Data Packages”

Logistics Information

ANSI GEIA-STD-0007-A, “Logistics Product Data”

Configuration Management Information

ANSI EIA-836-2002, “Configuration Management Data Exchange and Interoperability”

B. Sample Metadata Elements Metadata elements are normally defined within the data management system. Table 21 lists sample metadata elements and characteristics that would be used with data objects stored in the system. Table 21 - Sample Metadata Elements

Type

Metadata Element Name

Description

Type

Length

CAD

part_number

Item part number

Numeric

10 characters

CAD

revision_level

Design Revision Level

String

4 Characters

CAD

data_rights_code

Data Rights Designation

String

10 Characters

LOG

end_item_acronym_code

End Item Acronym Code

String

10 Characters

LOG

mean_time_between_failures_operational

Mean Time Between Failures

String

10 Characters

LOG

maximum_time_to_repair

Maximum Time To Repair (MAXTTR)

Decimal

Numbers from 0-999.99

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B. Sample Metadata Elements

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304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

B. Competition

304. REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL PREPARATION DETAILS Additional information for topics discussed in the Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan [§ 205, p 51] section.

A. Uniform Contract Format Details Figure 54 shows page 1 of Standard Form 33 and descriptions of the content for each section. Figure 54 - Uniform Contract Format (page 1) and Section Descriptions

B. Competition The Defense Acquisition University Glossary of Defense Acquisition Acronyms and Terms defines competition as “An acquisition strategy whereby more than one contractor is sought to bid on a service or function; the winner is selected based on criteria established by the activity for which the work is to be performed.” Competition benefits the Government by lowering costs and increasing the likelihood of efficiencies and innovations. The Competition in Contracting Act as implemented in FAR Part 6 and DFARS Part 206 sets the standard of competition for Federal contracts. The Government needs certain data and the appropriate rights to support competitive procurements.

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

C. Data Item Descriptions (DIDs) Details

Anecdote: Competition “Though many of the defense industry's characteristics make competition difficult, most previous reports strongly encourage DoD to sustain competition to the maximum extent possible. Competition costs money at the front end, but in the long run can save the government money and improve contractor performance. Most experts agree that competition throughout a program's life cycle requires careful front-end planning to ensure that the government has access to the Technical Data Packages (TDP) necessary to compete a program at a reasonable price. Program characteristics typically requiring consideration include economies of scale, structure of Operations & Support (O&S) costs, and steepness of the contractor's learning curve.” - “Army Strong: Equipped, Trained and Ready” Final Report of the 2010 Army Acquisition Review, Chartered by the Secretary of the Army, January 2011, p. 27

C. Data Item Descriptions (DIDs) Details i. DID Resources The official source of DIDs is the Defense Logistics Agency ASSIST Quick Search Document Database (ASSIST). Users are able to locate available DIDs for a particular subject area (e.g. “software”) but ASSIST does not offer any recommendations for which to use. The Department of Defense (DoD) Standardization Program publishes a directory each fiscal quarter with a list of all DoD Standardization Area assignments and points of contact. The information contained in the DoD Standardization Directory - 1 can be used to find contact information for the Approval Authority for any DID. If no existing Data Item Descriptions (DIDs) provide sufficient content requirements or a new requirement is identified, a one-time DID can be created in accordance with MIL-STD-963 (Data Item Descriptions). One-time DIDs are approved for a unique data requirement applicable to a single contract, or to multiple contracts associated with a single acquisition program. Another resource is the ASSIST Online DIDs Section which includes a DID Selector tool based on research done by the Air Force. The selector is focused on product and software data useful for competition, spare parts, operations & support, upgrades, production, etc. Contract Administration (e.g., financial, schedule, program management) DIDs are not addressed in this tool. The selector tool displays DIDs based on the selection criteria chosen by the user. Information about each DID is then presented including priority, considerations, and information from ASSIST. The DID Selector tool is part of the Air Force Product Data Acquisition Portal web site contained in the Air Force equivalent of Army Knowledge Online. The pages are accessible by DoD Common Access Card registration and contain a great deal of reference information regarding data acquisition.

ii. Sample DID A sample DID for Interface Design Description is shown in Figure 55.

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304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

D. Relationships between SOW, CDRL, DR Attachment, and DIDs

Figure 55 - Sample Data Item Description (first page of 6)

D. Relationships between SOW, CDRL, DR Attachment, and DIDs Figure 56 depicts the relationships between various sections of the Request for Proposal (RFP). The statement of work should have language tasking the contractor to perform work. If the results of this work include data to be delivered, a specific contract data requirement list (CDRL) item should be referenced in the SOW. The CDRL should have the specific data item listed along with the data acquisition document reference in block 4 (Authority). Most data acquisition reference documents can be found in the ASSIST web site. The CDRLs are the basis for the DR Attachment, which identifies the Government's required rights and requires offerors to define the offered rights. DoD 5010.12-M, “Procedures for the Acquisition and Management of Technical Data” is an excellent reference for CDRL preparation. An update to 5010.12-M is expected to be released in 2015.

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

E. Contract Data Requirements List Details

Figure 56 - Relationships of SOW, CDRL, DR Attachment, and DIDs

E. Contract Data Requirements List Details The CDRL is the mechanism used to place data and delivery requirements on contract and is the bridge between the SOW and the Data Item Description (DID). While data should be inherently generated by a work task, recording and delivering the data in a specific format are cost drivers that must be considered when preparing the SOW and CDRL. The CDRL provides a contractual method to direct the contractor to prepare and deliver data that meets specific approval and acceptance criteria. The offerors are asked in a CDRL to provide a price estimate for each data requirement. The Government requiring activity uses the price estimates to decide whether the need for the data is worth the dollars the data will cost. If the activity concludes that it still needs and can afford the data, the requirement stays on the list; if it concludes that the price may be too high, it modifies or deletes the requirement. DFARS clause 215.470 “Estimated data prices” defines the requirement to use a CDRL when data are required to be delivered pursuant to a contract. Example content of a CDRL is shown in Figure 57.

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304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

F. Sample Contract Line Items for Data & Data Rights

Figure 57 - Example CDRL Content

F. Sample Contract Line Items for Data & Data Rights Item 0002 in Figure 58 depicts a contract line item for all of the data to be delivered in accordance with the CDRLs. Historically, a single contract line item is used for delivery of all the data requirements defined by the contract data requirements list. Often, the single line item for data is not separately priced. Item 0025 in Figure 58 depicts a contract line item to acquire the additional data rights listed in the offeror submitted DR Attachment. This option is critical to analyzing the cost-effectiveness of acquiring data rights for specific data deliverables.

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

G. FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I)

Figure 58 - Sample Contract Line Item for Data

G. FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I) i. Noteworthy FAR Clauses Table 22 lists some of the patent related Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) clauses that should be included in RFPs and contracts as applicable. The table includes the clause numbers, titles, and summarization of the rights and/or obligations contained therein. Each clause has a set of prescriptions or “rules” regarding its use defined in DFARS 227.70. REF: Data Related DFARS Provisions & Clause Fundamentals [§ 103.C, p 14]; Patents [§ 201.B.i, p 30]

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

G. FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I)

Table 22 - Patent Related FAR Clauses (Partial List)

Complete Text Link

FAR Ref

Title

Rights or Obligations

52.227-1

Authorization and Consent.

To extend the Government's limited waiver of sovereign immunity for U.S. patent infringement to its contractors.

LINK

52.227-2

Notice and Assistance Regarding Patent and Copyright Infringement.

To notify the Government of a patent infringement lawsuit that the Government must defend.

LINK

Patent Indemnity.

Ensures that the Government purchases items that otherwise incorporate commercially available components, free and clear of any patent claims or liability.

LINK

52.227-6

Royalty Information

To obtain royalty payment information in proposals to ensure the Government is not paying a royalty to which it otherwise has a license.

LINK

52.227-9

Refund of Royalties

To ensure that the Government does not overpay royalties.

LINK

52.227-10

Filing of Patent ApplicationsClassified Subject Matter.

To prevent classified information from entering the public domain through patent applications.

LINK

52.227-11

Patent Rights-Ownership by the Contractor.

To ensure that inventions developed by small business firms and domestic nonprofit organizations, with federal funding, are utilized for the public benefit.

LINK

52.227-3

ii. Noteworthy DoD DFARS Clauses/Provisions Table 23 lists most of the data, data rights, and Intellectual Property related DFARS clauses and provisions that should be included in RFPs and contracts as appropriate. The table includes the reference numbers, titles, summarization of the rights or obligations contained therein, and a hyperlink to the clause text. Each clause has a set of prescriptions or “rules” regarding its use defined in DFARS 227.71 and 227.72. REF: Data Related DFARS Provisions & Clause Fundamentals [§ 103.C, p 14]; Intellectual Property Assets, Rights, and Protection Methods [§ 201.B, p 30] Table 23 - Data, Data Rights, and Intellectual Property Related DFARS Clauses & Provisions (Partial List)

Complete Text Link

DFARS Ref

Title

Rights or Obligations

252.227-7013

Rights in Technical Data-Noncommercial Items

Defines respective rights to noncommercial Technical Data delivered pursuant to the contract.

LINK

252.227-7014

Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and Noncommercial Computer Software Documentation

Defines respective rights to noncommercial Computer Software and Computer Software documentation delivered pursuant to the contract.

LINK

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

G. FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I)

Complete Text Link

DFARS Ref

Title

Rights or Obligations

252.227-7015

Technical Data–Commercial Items

Defines Government rights in commercial item Technical Data delivered pursuant to the contract.

LINK

252.227-7016

Rights in Bid or Proposal Information

Defines Government ability to use information submitted in bids or proposals.

LINK

252.227-7017

Identification and Assertion of Use, Release, or Disclosure Restrictions (Provision in Solicitation only)

Identifies data to be delivered with other than “unlimited rights.“ (Assertion List Provision)

LINK

252.227-7018

Rights in Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software--Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program

Identifies the scope of data rights to be delivered as part of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.

LINK

252.227-7019

Validation of Asserted Restrictions--Computer Software

Defines validation methods used to evaluate the contractor's asserted restrictions for noncommercial Computer Software.

LINK

252.227-7021

Rights in Data--Existing Works

Specifies the Government license rights to distribute and use the works called for under the contract for Government purposes.

LINK

252.227-7025

Limitations on the Use or Disclosure of GovernmentFurnished Information Marked with Restrictive Legends

Defines limitations of contractor use of Government-furnished information having third party restrictive legends.

LINK

252.227-7026

Deferred Delivery of Technical Data or Computer Software

Defines Government's ability to defer delivery of Technical Data or Computer Software from the contract. Data must be listed as Deferred in contract.

LINK

252.227-7027

Deferred Ordering of Technical Data or Computer Software

Defines Government ability to defer ordering of Technical Data or Computer Software as part of the contract.

LINK

252.227-7028

Technical Data or Computer Software Previously Delivered to the Government

To identify all Technical Data and Computer Software that previously has been delivered to the Government, and that the contractor intends to deliver with less than Unlimited Rights.

LINK

252.227-7030

Technical Data--Withholding of Payment

To have leverage in enforcing the contract.

LINK

252.227-7037

Validation of Restrictive Markings on Technical Data

Defines validation methods used to evaluate the contractor's asserted restrictions for noncommercial Technical Data.

LINK

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

G. FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I)

Complete Text Link

DFARS Ref

Title

Rights or Obligations

252.227-7038

Patent Rights—Ownership by the Contractor (Large Business)

Defines Contractor and Government obligations associated with patent rights.

LINK

252.227-7039

Patents--Reporting of Subject Inventions

To require reporting of, and preserve the Government's rights in, inventions developed as part of the contract.

LINK

252.246-7001

Warranty of Data

Defines terms for Technical Data warranty delivered under contract.

LINK

iii. Clause Recommendations by Product The following tables depict the data related FAR (Table 25) and DFARS clauses or provisions (Table 26) which should be included in a RFP/contract depending on the product being developed. Table 24 describes the formatting and terminology used in both tables. If the product being developed is expected to include commercial and noncommercial content, DFARS 227.7102-4 Contract clauses prescribes both DFARS 252.227-7013, Rights in Technical Data– Noncommercial Items, and DFARS 252.227-7015, Technical Data-Commercial Items, be included in the contract in order to govern each portion of Technical Data. Table 24 - FAR and DFARS Clause Recommendations Legend

LEGEND

LEGEND

**Com

Commercial Item (In accordance with FAR 2.101)

**Non Com

Noncommercial Item, Component, or Process (Product)

**Non Com SW

Noncommercial Computer Software

**SBIR

Small Business Innovation Research

YES

Mandatory to Include in Solicitation and Contract.

YES+

Limited mandatory use in sealed bidding for “commercial” supplies or services & construction.

YES*

Mandatory to include in Solicitation and Contract if 52.227-11 is NOT used.

Y [r]

Strongly recommended for inclusion in Solicitation and Contract.

YES#

Mandatory to include in Solicitation and Contract if effort may result in patent.

N/A

Not applicable.

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304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

G. FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I)

Table 25 - FAR Clause Recommendations by Product

**Com

**Non Com

**Non Com SW

**SBIR

Authorization and Consent.

YES

YES

YES

YES

52.227-2

Notice and Assistance Regarding Patent and Copyright Infringement.

YES

YES

YES

YES

52.227-3

Patent Indemnity

YES#

N/A

N/A

N/A

52.227-6

Royalty Information

YES

YES

YES

YES

52.227-9

Refund of Royalties

YES

YES

YES

YES

52.227-10

Filing of Patent Applications-Classified Subject Matter.

YES+

YES+

YES+

YES+

**Com

**Non Com

**Non Com SW

**SBIR

Clause #

FAR Clause Title

52.227-1

Table 26 - DFARS Clause & Provision Recommendations by Product

Clause #

DFARS Clause Title

252.227-7013

Rights in Technical Data-Noncommercial Items ##

N/A

YES

N/A

N/A

252.227-7014

Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and Noncommercial Computer Software Documentation

N/A

N/A

YES

N/A

252.227-7015

Technical Data-Commercial Items

YES

Y [r]

Y [r]

Y [r]

252.227-7016

Rights in Bid or Proposal Information

Y [r]

YES

YES

Y [r]

252.227-7017

Identification and Assertion of Use, Release, or Disclosure Restrictions (Provision in Solicitation only)

Y [r]

YES

YES

Y [r]

252.227-7018

Rights in Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software-Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program

N/A

N/A

N/A

YES

252.227-7019

Validation of Asserted RestrictionsComputer Software

Y [r]

Y [r]

YES

Y [r]

252.227-7025

Limitations on the Use or Disclosure of Government-Furnished Information Marked with Restrictive Legends

Y [r]

Y [r]

Y [r]

Y [r]

252.227-7026

Deferred Delivery of Technical Data or Computer Software

Y [r]

Y [r]

Y [r]

Y [r]

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304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

G. FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I)

**Com

**Non Com

**Non Com SW

**SBIR

Deferred Ordering of Technical Data or Computer Software

Y [r]

Y [r]

Y [r]

Y [r]

252.227-7028

Technical Data or Computer Software Previously Delivered to the Government

Y [r]

YES

YES

Y [r]

252.227-7030

Technical Data-Withholding of Payment

Y [r]

YES

Y [r]

Y [r]

252.227-7037

Validation of Restrictive Markings on Technical Data

YES

YES

Y [r]

Y [r]

252.227-7038

Patent Rights-Ownership by the Contractor (Large Business)

YES*

YES*

YES*

YES*

252.227-7039

Patents-Reporting of Subject Inventions

YES

YES

YES

YES

252.246-7001

Warranty of Data

Y [r]

Y [r]

N/A

Y [r]

Clause #

DFARS Clause Title

252.227-7027

## Include clause if contract is for product expected to contain both commercial and noncommercial content.

iv. Sample Clause Listings Figure 59 shows clauses incorporated into a RFP by reference. Figure 60 shows a full text clause incorporated into a RFP. Figure 59 - Clauses Referenced by number and title

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

G. FAR and DFARS Details (RFP Section I)

Figure 60 - Clauses listed as full text

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

305. Data Rights Attachment Details

B. Government Preparation of DR Attachment

305. DATA RIGHTS ATTACHMENT DETAILS This section addresses specifics about the Data Rights Attachment (DR Attachment) introduced in the Data Rights Attachment (RFP - Section J) [§ 205.K, p 65] section. It addresses how the attachment can be used to define the data rights for each contract data deliverable.

A. General DR Attachment Process The basic process for the Government to use a DR Attachment is shown in Figure 61. The process involves some preparation work, partial completion of each table, and inclusion of the attachment and DFARS provision 252.227-7017 in the RFP before it is issued. Offerors receive the RFP and complete the DR Attachment tables as part of the proposal preparation. If an offeror wishes to assert any restrictions on the Government's ability to use, release, or disclose any CDRL to third parties outside the Government, it must document the assertion using the table format of 252.227-7017. Figure 61 - General DR Attachment Preparation and Use Steps

B. Government Preparation of DR Attachment The program team must complete some preparation work before the DR Attachment will be ready for inclusion in the RFP. The following sections discuss this preparatory work.

i. CDRL Organization Details The program team must first organize the RFP CDRLs before the Government portion of DR Attachment tables can be filled in. This work involves both grouping and categorizing the CDRLs as shown in Figure 62.

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

305. Data Rights Attachment Details

B. Government Preparation of DR Attachment

Figure 62 - CDRL Organization for Data Rights Attachment

Step 1 is to create specific CDRLs requiring Form, Fit, and Function Data (FFF), Operation, Maintenance, Installation and Training Data (OMIT) data, and Computer Software Documentation. These CDRLs will be assigned to Table 1 of the DR Attachment. . The Government is entitled to Unlimited Rights to FFF and OMIT Technical data associated with commercial and noncommercial products and software documentation associated with noncommercial Computer Software only. The Government is not entitled to these rights for FFF and OMIT associated with commercial Computer Software. Commercial Computer Software Documentation is acquired under the licenses customarily provided to the public. Step 2 is to identify and separate CDRLs such that the delivered data for each will have identical data rights to the maximum extent practicable. While the DFARS clauses contemplate and permit mixed levels of rights in a given CDRL or document, as a practical matter, having identical data rights entitlements for each CDRL should minimize data marking confusion, which can occur during the delivery and acceptance phase of the contract. Step 3 is to assign each CDRL to the appropriate DR Attachment table according to the table content criteria. CDRLs for Technical Data associated with noncommercial products and noncommercial Computer Software go in Table 1. CDRLs for Technical Data associated with commercial products and commercial Computer Software go in Table 2. CDRLs for Contract Administration (cost, financial, schedule) information and data that does not fall within the DFARS definitions of Technical Data or Computer Software go in Table 3.

ii. Table 1 Government Fill In Details The program team must fill in the Government portions of each row in the DR Attachment tables before releasing the RFP. Table 1 of the DR Attachment requires CDRL and data rights information as shown in Figure 63. The “desired” rights for each CDRL are determined by what data rights are needed to support the program strategies. These desired rights must be equal to, or less restrictive than, the DFARS standard rights. Unlimited or Government Purpose rights enable a program to follow DoD policies regarding competition. Inclusion of DFARS provision 252.227-7017 in an RFP requires offerors to identify any data intended by each offeror to be delivered to the Government with restrictive data rights. Offerors meet this requirement by filling out an assertion table as described in the DFARS clause. Though the clause requests general categories of information, offerors should be instructed to provide the appropriate level of detail for each restricted data item to ensure the Government can clearly understand what data and software the offeror plans to deliver with rights restrictions. An example of a DR Attachment Table 1 filled in by the Government is shown in Figure 64.

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

305. Data Rights Attachment Details

B. Government Preparation of DR Attachment

Figure 63 - Table 1 Government Fill Ins

Figure 64 - Example Government Fill In of DR Attachment Table 1

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

305. Data Rights Attachment Details

B. Government Preparation of DR Attachment

iii. Table 2 Government Fill In Details Table 2 of the DR Attachment requires CDRL and data item information as shown in Figure 65. When the RFP is being prepared, the program team may not know whether a CDRL will result in commercial or noncommercial items. In this case, these CDRLs should be listed in Table 1 and Table 2 should be left blank for offerors to fill in with proposed commercial items. There is no listing for desired rights in Table 2. The Government is entitled to a range of standard rights for commercial product data as described in sections 103.E.iii (p 18) and 103.H (p 20). In many cases, these standard rights are all that is needed for commercial products. If less restrictive rights are needed, the Government can request additional rights for commercial product data through negotiation per DFARS 7102-2(b). Each offeror should be required to submit a copy of the license for each CDRL item as part of its proposal. The specific content and terms of these licenses should be evaluated by Government legal counsel during the proposal evaluation phase as discussed in the Commercial License Review & Approval [§ 206.B, p 71] section. Figure 65 - Table 2 Government Fill Ins

iv. Table 3 Government Fill In Details Table 3 of the DR Attachment requires CDRL and data item information along with wording of a data or data rights license agreement as shown in Figure 66. The CDRLs Figure 66 - Table 3 Government Fill Ins in Table 3 would generally be for cost, financial, contract administration, and other data not covered by the standard FAR and DFARS license terms. As such, the Government must create a Specifically Negotiated License Rights agreement for this data and include it with the table or in the RFP. The contents of the agreement will vary by program but would likely include which companies the Government will be entitled to release the data, for

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

305. Data Rights Attachment Details

C. Offeror Fill In of DR Attachment

what purposes, and for what length of time. Such agreements must comply with FAR 9.505-4 -Obtaining Access to Proprietary Information.

v. DR Attachment Instructions to Offerors Instructions must be provided to offerors to explain how to complete the DR Attachment, data rights assertions per DFARS provision 252.227-7027, and related proposal content.

C. Offeror Fill In of DR Attachment Offerors are required to fill in the remaining portions of each DR Attachment table in accordance with the instructions provided by the Government. Each of the three tables must be filled forming a complete DR Attachment that should be included in the technical proposal.

i. Table 1 Offeror Fill In Details The DR Attachment Table 1 requires offerors to sub-divide CDRLs to have a common data rights level and specify the data rights that will be granted to the Government at no additional cost for each CDRL (Figure 67, Item 1) associated with a noncommercial product. The offered rights must be equal to, or less restrictive, than the Figure 67 - Table 1 Offeror Fill Ins DFARS standard rights for that data deliverable. If the offered rights for any CDRL are more restrictive than Unlimited Rights, offerors must complete the assertion list requirements of DFARS provision 252.2277017. If the offered rights are more restrictive than the desired rights, offerors can list the cost to grant the desired rights or enter the phrase “Decline” to indicate a refusal to grant the desired rights at any cost (Figure 67, Item 2). Table 1 will be reviewed during the proposal evaluation phase for data rights assertion requirements and any data rights “gaps.” A gap would exist anywhere the offered data rights are more restrictive than the desired rights. The offeror will be considered responsive if A data rights gap is allowable as long as the offered rights are equal to, or less restrictive, than the standard rights for that data deliverable. A gap is less significant if the offeror proposes a cost for to acquire the desired additional rights. A gap is more significant if the offer declines to list a cost to acquire the desired additional rights.

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

305. Data Rights Attachment Details

C. Offeror Fill In of DR Attachment

ii. Table 2 Offeror Fill In Details The DR Attachment Table 2 requires offerors to list information about any Technical Data associated with commercial products or Figure 68 - Table 2 Offeror Fill Ins commercial Computer Software as shown in Figure 68. This information includes the CDRL information (if not already listed), name of the vendor, Technical Data or Computer Software application name, license information, license quantities, and costs. The license terms of use should be evaluated by Government legal counsel during the proposal evaluation phase as discussed in the Commercial License Review & Approval [§ 206.B, p 71] section. The license quantity would be a specific number of licenses (“1-x” or “Unlimited”) for Computer Software and (“N/A”) for Technical Data. Note the Government is entitled to “unrestricted use” certain types of data associated with a commercial product per DFARS 227.7102 and 252.227-7015 [§ 103.E.iii, p18 and § 103.H, p 20].

iii. Table 3 Offeror Fill In Details Figure 69 - Table 3 Offeror Fill Ins The DR Attachment Table 3 requires offerors to fill in any costs required to provide the data in accordance with the Specifically Negotiated License rights agreement specified by the Government as shown in Figure 69.

Offerors may object to the terms of the license agreement during discussions and/or enter “DECLINE” in the appropriate cell.

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

305. Data Rights Attachment Details

D. Example Review of Offeror Submitted Table 1

D. Example Review of Offeror Submitted Table 1 This section lists some typical results from the Government review of an offeror submitted DR Attachment Table 1. The example Table 1 is shown in Figure 70 and the Government inspection results are listed in Table 27. Table 27 - Sample Table 1 Government Review Results

Item 1

The offeror divided CDRL A005 into separate CDRLs because the deliverables for each “sub-CDRL” would have a distinct data rights from the other sub-CDRLs.

Item 2

The offered rights for A005 and A006 align with the desired rights.

Item 3

The offered rights for CDRLs A005 A-D are more restrictive than the desired rights.

Item 4

The offeror proposed costs for the Government to acquire the desired rights for CDRLs A005 B-D.

Item 5

The offeror declined to list a price to grant the desired rights for A005 A.

Item 6

The offered rights are more restrictive than Unlimited Rights. Offeror must assert data rights for these CDRLs using the format prescribed by DFARS provision 252.227-7017.

Figure 70 - Example Offeror Submitted DR Attachment Table 1

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

305. Data Rights Attachment Details

E. DR Attachment Table 1 Changes before Contract Award

E. DR Attachment Table 1 Changes before Contract Award The “Desired Rights” column should be removed before the DR Attachment becomes part of the awarded contract. Since the contract describes what the contractor agrees to, there is no value in identifying desired rights . This column deletion is depicted in Figure 71. HOWEVER, any discrepancies between the desired and granted rights should be documented for use in future updates to the program Intellectual Property Strategy. Figure 71 - Table 1 Change before inclusion in Contract

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

306. Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept)

A. Overview

306. DATA RIGHTS OPTIONS DECISION DETAILS (CONCEPT) Additional information about topics discussed in the Additional Data Rights Cost versus Sole Source Premium Cost [§ 203.C, p 42] and Post-Award Data Rights Options Decisions (Concept) [§ 206.E, p 73] sections.

A. Overview The data rights options cost information included in the contract DR Attachment can be used to determine what, if any, data rights options should be exercised. The life cycle costs calculations and the subsequent data rights option decision can lead to three potential paths: •

Acquire the Additional data rights and competitively purchase and support the item (2)



Do not acquire the additional rights and procure the item and support using the sole source (3)



Embark on a reverse engineering program to replace the restricted rights item (4)

The first step is to gather relevant information about the program (Figure 72, Item 1), then compare the potential program paths (Figure 72, Items 2, 3, 4) and finally, make a determination which to follow (Figure 72, Item 5). The calculations described in this section do not take into account financial variables such as the time value of money, etc. Nor does the section describe how to estimate the competitive costs for specific items or their support. Figure 72 - Data Rights Options Decision Process (Concept)

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

306. Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept)

D. Accept Data Rights Restriction Costs

B. Program Inputs and Cost Estimates For each CDRL item with additional data rights offered, a range of program inputs and estimates are needed (Figure 72, Item 1). These include the estimated life cycle production and spare part quantities, estimated competitive production and spare part procurement costs, and estimated competitive support costs as shown in Figure 73. There are a number of estimating methods to calculate competitive acquisition costs. Program teams should refer to cost estimating subject matter experts in addition to DoD 5000.4-M, DoD Cost Analysis Guidance and Procedures and DoD Operating and Support Cost-Estimating Guide, October 2007. Figure 73 - Program Inputs to Data Rights Option Decision

C. Acquire Data Rights Costs The life cycle costs to acquire the additional data rights and competitively purchase and support the item involve the program inputs and estimates and the data rights acquisition cost as shown in Figure 74. The resulting cost estimate can be compared with the other program paths (Figure 72, Item 2). Figure 74 - Competitive Life Cycle Costs Calculation

D. Accept Data Rights Restriction Costs The life cycle costs of accepting the data rights restrictions involve the estimated sole source costs for production, spare parts, and support of the item as shown in Figure 75. The resulting cost estimate can be compared with the other program paths (Figure 72, Item 3).

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

306. Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept)

E. Reverse Engineering Costs

Figure 75 - Accept Data Rights Restriction Costs Calculation

E. Reverse Engineering Costs Another potential program path is to embark on a reverse engineering effort to replace the restricted rights item with another having few or no data rights restrictions. This would be separate but concurrent effort from the awarded contract. However, reverse engineering involves risk, time, and money. It is usually more cost-effective to acquire the data and data rights from the originator or accept the data rights restrictions than pursue a reverse engineering effort. The reverse engineering process involves taking existing Computer Software or a hardware item and redeveloping the necessary information to competitively procure or support it. Acquiring Form, Fit, and Function data for the proprietary technology can be valuable to support a reverse engineering effort. Reverse engineering of Computer Software usually involves “decompiling” a software program from machine language into human readable source code. The process of decompiling is relatively easy but is generally illegal and is not an option for DoD programs. The Government is specifically prohibited from decompiling noncommercial Computer Software by the Restricted Rights terms of DFARS clause 252.227-7014. License agreements for commercial Computer Software will most likely have similar provisions as well. Programs would generally have to start over from the requirements and redevelop the software from scratch. This effort would require careful isolation of any Restricted Rights information and should only be undertaken after consulting with IP counsel. Reverse engineering of a hardware product and its associated Technical Data may be more difficult than Computer Software but is generally legal. The DFARS PGI 217.7504 Acquisition of parts when data is not available addresses policy regarding spare parts acquisition in this situation. Otherwise, two paths can be taken; either create and fully document a replacement design, or, compartmentalize the proprietary technology into a modular element defined by performance specifications and interface requirements. (Reference Sub-System Design Documentation Approaches [§ 202.C, p 34]). The viability of either solution depends on its ability to pass the same qualification testing as the original, and, existence of competitive sources of supply that can provide the product. The life cycle costs of a reverse engineering program involve the quantities of production and spare parts, their estimated competitive costs, estimated competitive support costs, and the costs to develop and quality the new design as shown in Figure 76. The resulting cost estimate can be compared to other program paths (Figure 72, Item 4).

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300. DETAILED INFORMATION

306. Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept)

F. Program Decision

Figure 76 - Reverse Engineering Costs Calculation

F. Program Decision The program team can compare the life cycle cost estimates for each path and determine the best course of action (Figure 72, Item 5). The steps to take after a program decision is made are shown in Figure 77. If acquiring additional data rights is determined to be the best path, the program team must identify which desired data rights options to exercise to the contracting officer. If accepting the data rights restriction is determined to be the best path, the program team should review and revise any program strategies, which planned on competitive procurement and/or support of the affected technology or process. If reverse engineering is the best path, the program team must obtain approval and funding to begin the effort. Figure 77 - Data Rights Option Decision & Next Steps

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400. REFERENCE INFORMATION CONTENTS 401. Acknowledgements ............................................................................................................................................ 125 402. Glossary & Acronyms........................................................................................................................................ 127 403. Index .................................................................................................................................................................. 141

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CONTENTS

400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

Guide Content References

§ 100. FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION

§ 300. DETAILED INFORMATION

101. Data & DoD Life Cycle Fundamentals

301. Data Rights Details

102. Data Fundamentals

302. Data Markings Details

103. Data Rights Fundamentals

303. Life Cycle Data & Data Rights Requirements Details

104. Data Markings Fundamentals

304. Request for Proposal Preparation Details

§ 200. CORE INFORMATION 201. Intellectual Property Strategy

305. Data Rights Attachment Details 306. Data Rights Options Decision Details (Concept)

202. Life Cycle Data and Data Rights Requirements 203. Data & Data Rights Related Life Cycle Costs

§ 400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

204. Data & Data Rights Potential Risks

401. Acknowledgements

205. Request for Proposal and Source Selection Plan

402. Glossary & Acronyms

206. Proposal Evaluation and Data & Data Rights License Agreements

403. Index

207. Data Delivery, Verification, and Acceptance 208. Data Management and Use 209. Data & Data Rights Program Checklist

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400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

401. Acknowledgements

A. Subject Matter Expert Acknowledgements

401. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The contents of this Guide are the result of a collaborative effort by the Army Materiel Command Product Data & Engineering Working Group and other Department of Defense Service representatives. This Guide simply would not exist without the contributions and assistance from the people listed in Sections A and B. Their assistance is gratefully acknowledged.

A. Subject Matter Expert Acknowledgements The individuals listed in Table 28 are subject matter experts on data and data rights. They contributed significant content and assisted with development of the concepts discussed herein. “(PEWG)” indicates an Army Product Data & Engineering Working Group representative. * identifies the lead author. ## identifies the lead reviewer. Table 28 - Subject Matter Experts

Subject Matter Expert

Organization

Jane Barrow

Navy Office of Counsel, IP Section

John C. Campbell

Army ARDEC, AMC Data Support (PEWG)

Deborah Cornelius

Army AMRDEC (PEWG)

Jay Dean

Army ARDEC, AMC Data Support (PEWG)

Bill Decker

Defense Acquisition University, South

Nick Guertin

Navy, DASN, RDT&E

James Haag

Air Force SMC, Office of the Staff Judge Advocate

Chuck Harris

Army Office of General Counsel (PEWG)

Roger Hamerlinck

Army ASA(ALT)

Gordon Ney

Army ARDEC, AMC Data Support (PEWG)

Gene Pickarz

National Reconnaissance Office

Kevin Robinson

Air Force AF/A4ID

Tom Schneider

Army ARDEC, AMC Data Support (PEWG)

George Winborne

Army Materiel Command, Command Counsel (PEWG)

Brian Womble

Navy DASN, RDT&E

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*

##

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400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

401. Acknowledgements

B. Contributor Acknowledgements

B. Contributor Acknowledgements The individuals listed in Table 29 provided valuable feedback during the Guide drafting process. Their feedback helped ensure the content was correct, understandable, and applicable, for typical acquisition professionals. “(PEWG)” indicates an Army Product Data & Engineering Working Group representative. Table 29 - Guide Contributors

Contributor

Organization

Contributor

Organization

Matthew Adams

Army ASA(ALT)

Scot Motquin

Army LOGSA (PEWG)

Bill Adams

Department of Army General Counsel (PEWG)

John “Jack” Murtha

Paul Barany

Air Force AF/A4ID

Army Sustainment Command, Office of Counsel

Elizabeth Bieri

Army ASA(ALT)

Alfred Naigle

Army PD AMIS

Julie Nelson

Center for Naval Analysis

Michelle Breitbach

Army Contracting Command, Rock Island

Maria Ovalles

Air Force AF/A4ID

Diana Cantres

Army Materiel Command Headquarters (PEWG)

Gary Owen

Army PM DCGS-A

Rachel College

Army AESIP

Smit Patel

Army Materiel Command, SoSE&I (PEWG)

Mary Comerford

Army PD JS

Leslie Polsen

Army PEO GCS

Katie CromptonSilvis

Army Contracting Command, Rock Island

Jean Price

Army PM I3C2

Nancy Darnell

Army TARDEC (PEWG)

Adelaide Tkatch

Army Contracting Command, Rock Island

Karen Donahue

Army GFEBS-SA

Jose Figueroa

Army AMCOM Logistics Center (PEWG)

Lawrence Visconti

Army Contracting Command, New Jersey

Mike Walsh

Army ARDEC, Legal

Judy Furmato

Army CERDEC (PEWG)

Rachel Ward

Army PD WESS

Henry Goldfine

Army ARDEC Legal

Maricia Ward

Army PM I3C2

Roger Hamerlinck

Army ASA(ALT)

Robert Wesnofske

Army DAIM-FD

Ken Hanko

Army ARDEC Legal

John Wheeler

Army ECBC (PEWG)

Linda Harvey

Army PEO IEW&S

Elissa Zadrozny

Army PM JPI

Robert Kowalski

Army PM-MAS

Lou Mayo

PM National Capabilities and Special Programs

Mark Zator

Army Contracting Command, New Jersey

Tom Moran

Army PM AESIP

Various Individuals

Army PEO Soldier

Kristy Mosher

Army ARDEC (PEWG)

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400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

402. Glossary & Acronyms

A. Glossary

402. GLOSSARY & ACRONYMS A. Glossary Key words or phrases used in this guide are listed here along with their definitions and the source of that definition. Newly defined words or phrases are identified with (D&DR Guide Context) as the source of their definition. CAUTION: Definitions of terminology are binding in Government contracts when mandated by statute or regulation or agreed upon by the parties in a contract. For example, FAR 2-101 provides definitions and the 252.227-7013 clause defines certain terms. In the glossary of this Guide, where are there no clear authoritative sources, some terms are explained with reference to third party definitions. References to these definitions are meant to be illustrative and informative, but their inclusion should not be taken as official endorsement or as meaning that such definitions will be binding in Government contracts. Where the meaning of terminology is critical, it may be important for the parties to a contract to expressly agree upon definitions in the contract itself.

Acquisition

The conceptualization, initiation, design, development, test, contracting, production, deployment, logistics support (LS), modification, and disposal of weapons and other systems, supplies, or services (including construction) to satisfy DoD needs, intended for use in, or in support of, military missions. Source: DAU Glossary

Acquisition Strategy

A business and technical management approach designed to achieve program objectives within the resource constraints imposed. It is the framework for planning, directing, contracting for, and managing a program. It provides a master schedule for research, development, test, production, fielding, modification, postproduction management, and other activities essential for program success. The acquisition strategy is the basis for formulating functional plans and strategies (e.g., Test and Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP), Acquisition Plan (AP), competition, Systems Engineering Plan (SEP), etc.). Source: DAU Glossary

Allocated Baseline

(Also known as Allocated Configuration Documentation) The documentation describing a CI's functional, performance, interoperability, and interface requirements that are allocated from those of a system or higher level configuration item; interface requirements with interfacing configuration items; and the verifications required to confirm the achievement of those specified requirements. Source: MIL-HDBK-61A and MIL-STD-3046(ARMY)

Associated Information

Information that includes configuration control information, verification information, and other associated information not categorized as definition or operational information. Examples include change requests, configuration control board decisions, audit and test reports, and obsolete part notifications. Source: D&DR Guide PEWG Data Group - Associated Information

(AS)

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A. Glossary

Commercial

(1) Any item, other than real property, that is of a type customarily used by the general public or by non-governmental entities for purposes other than governmental purposes, and— (i) Has been sold, leased, or licensed to the general public; or (ii) Has been offered for sale, lease, or license to the general public; (abridged definition) Complete definition at FAR Definitions

Competition

“An acquisition strategy whereby more than one contractor is sought to bid on a service or function; the winner is selected based on criteria established by the activity for which the work is to be performed.” Source: DAU Glossary

Competition in Contracting Act

1984 Federal law requiring the use of competition for Government acquisitions. Source: Federation of American Scientists (fas.org) presentation: Competition in Federal Contracting: An Overview of the Legal Requirements, DPAP Memo (24 Nov 10): Improving Competition in Defense Procurements, DPAP Memo (27 Apr 11): Improving Competition in Defense Procurements Amplifying Guidance

Component

In logistics, a part or combination of parts having a specific function, which can be installed or replaced only as an entity. Source: Joint Publication 1-02, Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Computer Aided Design

Any of a class of computer software programs used to design manufactured or constructed objects, such as buildings, power plants, vehicles, weapons systems or their subsystems or components. Source: MIL-STD-31000

Computer Software

Information consisting of “…computer programs, source code, source code listings, object code listings, design details, algorithms, processes, flow charts, formulae and related material that would enable the software to be reproduced, recreated, or recompiled. Computer software does not include computer databases or computer software documentation.” Sources: DFARS 227.72, 252.227-7013, 7014, -7015, and -7018

Computer Software Documentation

“...owner's manuals, user's manuals, installation instructions, operating instructions, and other similar items, regardless of storage medium, that explain the capabilities of the computer software or provide instructions for using the software.” Source: DFARS 252.227-7014

Configuration

The functional and physical characteristics of existing or planned hardware, firmware, software or a combination thereof, as detailed in requirements and technical documentation and ultimately achieved in a product. Source: MIL-STD3046 (ARMY)

Configuration Approval Authority

“The organization or person authorized to approve: 1) A configuration change to a product, 2) Changes to product definition information and other related documents, 3) Release (or cancellation) of documents for use anywhere or in a specific program and 4) Commitment of resources.” Source: ANSI/EIA-649-B 2011. Also known as change approval authority, configuration change management authority, change control board chairperson, decision authority, configuration manager

(CAD)

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Configuration Management

A process for establishing and maintaining consistency of a product's performance, functional and physical attributes with its requirements, design and operational information throughout its life. The five elements of Configuration Management and their descriptions are listed below. Configuration Management Planning - The planning and preparation for all CM activities to be performed for the program. Configuration Identification - The selection and identification of Configuration Items and the associated documentation and data that describes the item configuration. Configuration Change Control - The control of changes to the configuration of an item to assure that only beneficial changes are made, and that all associated documentation is also changed accordingly to reflect the actual item configuration change. Configuration Audits - Verification that the item meets its performance requirements and that the associated documentation and data matches the item configuration. Configuration Status Accounting - The historical record of the original product configuration and all approved changes that have occurred since. Source: MILHDBK-61A(SE) Configuration Management Guidance

Contract Clause

“Contract clause” or “clause” means a term or condition used in contracts or in both solicitations and contracts, and applying after contract award or both before and after award. FAR 2.101 Definitions

Contract Data Requirements List

A list of contract data requirements using DD Form 1423 that are authorized for a specific acquisition and made a part of the contract. Source: DAU Glossary

Contract Line Item Number

“Separately identifiable contract line and sub line items shall include a description of the item or service being procured, the associated Product Service Code, the quantity, a unit of measure, defined acceptance and inspection locations and requirements, and the delivery schedule or performance period.” Source: PGI 204.7103

Contractor

Any individual or other legal entity that -(1) Directly or indirectly (e.g., through an affiliate), submits offers for or is awarded, or reasonably may be expected to submit offers for or be awarded, a Government contract, including a contract for carriage under Government or commercial bills of lading, or a subcontract under a Government contract; or (2) Conducts business, or reasonably may be expected to conduct business, with the Government as an agent or representative of another contractor. Source: FAR 9.403

Controlling Office

The DoD activity that sponsored the work that generated the technical document for the DoD and has the inherently Governmental responsibility for determining the distribution of a document containing such technical information. ... Only the controlling office or higher authority may authorize distribution beyond the distribution statement. Source: DoD Instruction 5230.24

(CM)

(CDRL)

(CLIN)

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Covered Government Support Contractor

A contractor under a contract, the primary purpose of which is to furnish independent and impartial advice or technical assistance directly to the Government in support of the Government's management and oversight of a program or effort (rather than to directly furnish an end item or service to accomplish a program or effort), provided that the contractor— (i) Is not affiliated with the prime contractor or a first-tier subcontractor on the program or effort, or with any direct competitor of such prime contractor or any such first-tier subcontractor in furnishing end items or services of the type developed or produced on the program or effort; and (ii) Receives access to technical data or computer software for performance of a Government contract that contains the clause at 252.227-7025, Limitations on the Use or Disclosure of Government-Furnished Information Marked with Restrictive Legends. Source: DFARS 252.227-7013

Data

Recorded information, regardless of form or the media on which it may be recorded. The term includes Technical Data and Computer Software. The term does not include information incidental to contract administration, such as financial, administrative, cost or pricing, or management information. Source: FAR 52.227-14

Data Acquisition Document

A collective term for DIDs, specifications, and standards that contain requirements for the preparation of data products or for recordkeeping. With the exception of one-time DIDS, these documents require the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) clearance and must be listed in the AMSDL. Source: DoD 5010.12-M (1993) The Acquisition Management System and Data Requirements Control List (AMSDL) was cancelled in 2001. The Acquisition Streamlining & Standardization Information System (ASSIST) is now the official source of all Defense Standardization Program documents.

Data in Hand

Data in possession of the Government with defined terms of use. Source: D&DR Guide Sources to Meet Data and Data Rights Requirements

Data Item Description

A completed document that defines the data required of a contractor. The document specifically defines the data content, format, and intended use. Source: MIL-STD-963

Data Rights Attachment

A RFP or contract attachment containing three tables that list all of the CDRLs and the Government desired rights (RFP) or the agreed to data rights (Contract). The three tables are for (1) Technical Data associated with noncommercial products and noncommercial Computer Software, (2) Technical Data associated with commercial products and commercial Computer Software, and (3) contract administration information such as cost/financial/schedule data. Source: D&DR Guide Data Rights Attachment (RFP - Section J)

Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS)

Department of Defense supplement to Federal Acquisition Regulation. Contains additional regulations specific to DoD acquisition needs. Source: D&DR Guide FAR and DFARS Overview

(CGSC)

(DID)

(DR Attachment)

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A. Glossary

Development

The process of working out and extending the theoretical, practical, and useful applications of a basic design, idea, or scientific discovery. Design, building, modification, or improvement of the prototype of a vehicle, engine, instrument, or the like as determined by the basic idea or concept. Includes all efforts directed toward programs being engineered for Service use but which have not yet been approved for procurement or operation, and all efforts directed toward development engineering and test of systems, support programs, vehicles, and weapons that have been approved for production and Service deployment. Source: DAU Glossary

Disposal Costs

Consists of costs associated with demilitarization and disposal of a military system at the end of its useful life. Costs associated with demilitarization and disposal may include disassembly, materials processing, decontamination, collection/storage/disposal of hazardous materials and/or waste, safety precautions, and transportation of the system to and from the disposal site. Systems may be given credit in the cost estimate for resource recovery and recycling considerations. The disposal cost category is used in a life-cycle cost estimate so that design and other decisions made early in a program consider the effects on the long-term costs that can be attributed logically to the program. Note that demilitarization and disposal costs may also be incurred during the sustainment phase prior to formal entry into a distinct disposal phase. Any disposal expenses anticipated during the sustainment phase (due to combat losses, other destruction of systems beyond economical repair, or unique demilitarization activities) are nevertheless considered part of disposal costs. Source: OSD Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation Guide, March, 2014

Evaluation Factors/Sub-Factors

Information used in competitive source selections to “...represent those specific characteristics that are tied to significant RFP requirements and objectives having an impact on the source selection decision and are expected to be discriminators, or are required by statute/regulation. They are the uniform baseline against which each offeror's proposal is evaluated allowing the Government to make a best-value determination.” Source: DoD Source Selection Procedures

Evaluation Notice

Primary Contractor Officer’s written notification to the offeror for purposes of clarifications, communications, or in support of discussions. Source: DoD Source Selection Procedures

Federal Acquisition Regulation

The principal set of rules governing Federal acquisitions of supplies and services. It contains 53 parts and more than 1,800 pages of standardized policies and procedures used or referenced in federal contracts. Source: D&DR Guide FAR and DFARS Overview

Firmware

The combination of a hardware device and computer instructions or computer data that reside as read-only software on the hardware device. The software cannot be readily modified under program control. Source: DAU Glossary

Form, Fit, and Function Data

Information that describes “...the required overall physical, functional, and performance characteristics (along with the qualification requirements, if applicable) of an item, component, or process to the extent necessary to permit identification of physically and functionally interchangeable items.” Sources: DFARS 252.227-7013, -7014, -7015, -7018

(FAR)

(FFF)

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A. Glossary

Functional Baseline

(also known as Functional Configuration Documentation) The documentation describing the system's functional, performance, interoperability, and interface requirements and the verifications required to demonstrate the achievement of those specified requirements. Sources: MIL-HDBK-61A and MIL-STD-3046 (ARMY)

Government Purpose Rights

The rights to reproduce, modify, perform, display, use, disclose or release the Technical Data or Computer Software without restrictions within the Government and outside the Government to third parties (if the recipient's contract contains DFARS clause 252.227-7025 or the recipient has an approved non-disclosure agreement) for Government purposes. The Government can release Government Purpose rights data for further competitions on another Government contract but cannot release the data for any commercial purpose. Sources: DFARS 252.2277013 and -7014

Integrated Product Team

A team composed of representatives from appropriate functional disciplines working together to build successful programs, identify and resolve issues, and make sound and timely recommendations to facilitate decision-making. There are three types of IPTs: Overarching IPT that focus on strategic guidance, program assessment, and issue resolution; Working-level IPT that identify and resolve program issues, determine program status, and seek opportunities for acquisition reform; and Program-level IPT that focus on program execution and may include representatives from both government and industry after contract award. Source: DAU Glossary

Intellectual Property

Intellectual (i.e., intangible) assets include products of the human intellect—such as inventions, discoveries, technologies, creations, developments, or other forms of expressing an idea—whether or not the subject matter is protectable under the laws governing the different forms of intellectual property. Intellectual property is that subset of intellectual assets that can be legally protected, and is defined by the forms of protection that have been enacted into law. Source: The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer Technology Transfer Desk Reference. Creations of the mind - creative works or ideas embodied in a form that can be shared or can enable others to recreate, emulate, or manufacture them. There are four ways to protect intellectual property - patents, trademarks, copyrights, or trade secrets. Source: United States Patent and Trademark Office Glossary

Investment Costs

Consists of procurement and related activities from the beginning of low rate initial production (LRIP) through completion of deployment. Investment typically includes costs associated with producing and deploying the primary hardware; systems engineering and program management; product support elements (i.e., peculiar and common support equipment, peculiar training equipment/initial training, technical publications/data, and initial spares and repair parts) associated with production assets; interim contractor support that is regarded as part of the system procurement and is included in the scope of the Acquisition Program Baseline (APB); and military construction and acquisition-related O&M associated with production and deployment activities (e.g., site activation). Source: OSD Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation Guide, March, 2014

Key CDRLs

CDRLs determined by a program to be important for successful execution of the program strategies (acquisition, sustainment, etc.) including those pertaining to key components or key interfaces of the system. Source: D&DR Guide

(IPT)

(IP)

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Life Cycle Cost

Life-cycle cost can be defined as the sum of four major cost categories, where each category is associated with sequential but overlapping phases of the system life cycle. Life-cycle cost consists of (1) research and development costs, associated with the concept refinement phase, technology development phase, and the system development and demonstration phase, (2) investment costs, associated with the production and deployment phase, (3) O&S costs, associated with the sustainment phase, and (4) disposal costs, occurring after initiation of system phase-out or retirement, possibly including demilitarization, detoxification, or long-term waste storage. Source: Operating and Support Cost-Estimating Guide, Office Of The Secretary Of Defense Cost Analysis Improvement Group October 2007

Life Cycle Sustainment Plan

Documents the Program Manager and Product Support Manager's plan for formulating, implementing, and executing the sustainment strategy, and is part of the overall Acquisition Strategy of a program. The LCSP describes the approach and resources necessary to develop and integrate sustainment requirements into the system's design, development, testing, deployment, and sustainment phases. The LCSP evolves from a strategic outline to a management plan describing the sustainment efforts in the system design and acquisition processes to achieve the required performance and sustainment outcomes necessary to ensure required Warfighter capabilities. It evolves at Milestone B into a detailed execution plan for how the product support package is to be designed, acquired, sustained, and how sustainment will be applied, measured, managed, modified, and reported from system fielding through disposal. By Milestone C, the LCSP describes the implementation status of the product support package (including any sustainment related contracts, e.g. Interim Contractor Support, Contractor Logistics Support) to achieve the Sustainment key performance parameters or key system attributes. Source: ACQuipedia Article

Limited Rights

(Applies to Technical Data associated with Noncommercial product): The Government may use the technical data within the Government but not release the technical data outside of the Government except in limited circumstances (e.g., emergency repair or overhaul, or to Covered Government Support Contractors). The Government may not use the data for manufacturing additional quantities of the item. In order to assert that the Government will only have Limited Rights in Technical Data, the contractor must be prepared to present evidence that the product itself was developed exclusively at private expense. Source: DFARS 252.227-7013

Manufacturing or Process Data

Information that describes, “the steps, sequences, and conditions of manufacturing, processing or assembly used by the manufacturer to produce an item or component or to perform a process.” Sources: DFARS 252.227-7013, 7014, -7015, -7018

Metadata

Information describing the characteristics of data; data or information about data; or descriptive information about an entity's data, data activities, systems, and holdings. For example, discovery metadata is a type of metadata that allows data assets to be found using enterprise search capabilities. Source: DoDD 8320.02 Data about data, properties (title, document number, creation date, etc.) used to identify or define a data item. Source: ANSI/EIA-649-B 2011

(LCSP)

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A. Glossary

Model

A representation of an actual or conceptual system that involves mathematics, logical expressions, or computer simulations that can be used to predict how the system might perform or survive under various conditions or in a range of hostile environments. Source: DAU Glossary

Noncommercial

The FAR does not specifically define noncommercial. Anything that does not qualify as commercial should be considered noncommercial. “Noncommercial computer software” means software that does not qualify as commercial computer software under paragraph (a) (1) of this clause. Source: DFARS 252.227-7014

Non-Disclosure Agreement

A legal contract between two or more parties that signifies a confidential relationship exists between the parties involved. The confidential relationship often will refer to information that is to be shared between the parties but should not be made available to the general public. Source: Investopedia.com

Open Systems Architecture

The organized decomposition, using carefully defined execution boundaries, layered onto a framework of software and hardware shared services and a vibrant business model that facilitates competition. OSA is composed of five fundamental principles; 1. Modular designs based on standards, with loose coupling and high cohesion, that allow for independent acquisition of system components: 2. Enterprise investment strategies, based on collaboration and trust, that maximize reuse of proven hardware system designs and ensure we spend the least to get the best; 3. Transformation of the life cycle sustainment strategies for software intensive systems through proven technology insertion and software product upgrade techniques; 4. Dramatically lower development risk through transparency of system designs, continuous design disclosure, and Government, academia, and industry peer reviews; 5. Strategic use of data rights to ensure a level competitive playing field and access to alternative solutions and sources, across the life cycle. Source: Open Systems Architecture - Acquisition Community Connection, DoD Open Systems Architecture Contract Guidebook

Operating & Support Costs

Consists of sustainment costs incurred from the initial system deployment through the end of system operations. Includes all costs of operating, maintaining, and supporting a fielded system. Specifically, this consists of the costs (organic and contractor) of personnel, equipment, supplies, software, and services associated with operating, modifying, maintaining, supplying, and otherwise supporting a system in the DoD inventory. O&S costs are composed of the following lowerlevel elements: Unit-Level Manpower, Unit Operations, Maintenance, Sustaining Support, Continuing System Improvement, Indirect Support Source: OSD Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation Guide, March, 2014

Operation, Maintenance, Installation and Training Data (OMIT)

Information that is “necessary for installation, operation, maintenance, or training purposes (other than detailed manufacturing or process data).” Sources: DFARS 252.227-7013, -7014, -7015, and -7018

(NDA)

(OSA)

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order ordering ordered

To contractually require delivery of data to the Government. At a minimum, ordering requires a clear statement of the data to be delivered with a reference to a Data Acquisition Document that has a control number assigned by the Office of Management and Budget. Source: D&DR Guide

Procedures, Guidance, and Information

A companion resource to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulations Supplement (DFARS). Procedures, Guidance, and Information (PGI) is a webbased tool for simply and rapidly accessing guidance and information relevant to FAR and DFARS topics. The DFARS remains the source for regulations, which include the implementation of statutes and DoD-wide contracting policies, authorities, and delegations. The PGI contains both mandatory and nonmandatory internal DoD procedures, guidance, and supplemental information. Source: ACQuipedia (DAU). See also Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement and Procedures, Guidance, and Information

Process

A set of interrelated or interacting activities which transforms inputs into outputs. Source: ISO 9000:2005(E)

Product

The result of research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E) in terms of hardware or software being produced (manufactured). Also known as an end item. Source: DAU Glossary A product can be an item, component, or process. Source: D&DR Guide Product Data Hierarchy

Product Baseline

(also known as Product Configuration Documentation) The written performance and detailed design documentation, which define an item. The Product Configuration Documentation (PCD) incorporates performance, interoperability, and interface requirements and the verifications required to confirm the achievement of those specified requirements. The PCD also includes detailed design documentation, ranging from form, fit, and interface information to a complete detailed design disclosure package. Once approved, serves as the official record of the product baseline. (For example, a production level (3) TDP per MIL-STD-31000 would constitute the PCD for an item.) Sources: MILHDBK-61A and MIL-STD-3046(ARMY)

Product Data

All data created as a consequence of defining (requirements), designing, testing, producing, packaging, storing, distributing, operating, maintaining, modifying and disposing of a product. Source: D&DR Guide Product Data Hierarchy

Product Data & Engineering Working Group

In April 2004, the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology (ASA(ALT)) issued a Delegation of Authority (DOA) to Headquarters, Army Materiel Command (HQ AMC) giving them responsibility for management of Value Engineering (VE), Reduction in Total Ownership Cost (RTOC), Configuration Management (CM), Data Management (DM) and engineering, technical and product data throughout the Army. The Army Product Data & Engineering Working Group (PEWG) was formed in March 2005 and chartered by HQ AMC to help them address the DOA data related issues including contractual ordering of data using Data Item Descriptions and a Contract Data Requirements List, Configuration Management and Configuration Status Accounting, Data Management and data repositories. The PEWG mission can be divided into the categories of: Product Data Definitions, Product Data Acquisition, Product Data Management, Product Data Exchange and Use, and Product Data and Data Rights Education.

(PGI)

(PEWG)

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CONTENTS

400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

402. Glossary & Acronyms

A. Glossary

Product Definition Information

The product's requirements, documents the product's design and attributes, and the authoritative source for configuration definition. Examples include requirements trace matrices, drawings, specifications, computer aided design models, analyses, trade studies, and manufacturing information. Source: D&DR Guide PEWG Data Group - Product Definition Information

Product Operational Information

Information that includes logistics support or sustainment, and operation information. Examples include technical manuals, packaging, preservation, and transportation information, maintenance records, and field feedback information. Source: D&DR Guide PEWG Data Group- Product Operational Information

Program Acquisition Cost

The estimated cost of development research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E); procurement; and system-specific military construction necessary to acquire the defense system. RDT&E costs are accumulated from the point in time when the DoD acquisition program is designated by title as a program element (PE) or major project within a PE. Military construction costs include only those projects that directly support and uniquely identify with the system. Source: DAU Glossary

Provision

“Solicitation provision or provision” means a term or condition used only in solicitations and applying only before contract award. FAR 2.101 Definitions

Request for Proposal

A solicitation document used in negotiated procurements to communicate Government requirements to prospective contractors and to solicit proposals or offers from them. RFPs must have the information necessary to enable prospective contractors to prepare proposals properly. Source: DAU Lesson

Research and Development Costs

Consists of costs of materiel solution trade studies and advanced technology development; system design and integration; development, fabrication, assembly, and test of hardware and software for prototypes and/or engineering development models; system test and evaluation; systems engineering and program management; and product support elements associated with prototypes and/or engineering development models. For some programs, this may include additional development costs associated with follow-on builds or increments. Source: OSD Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation Guide, March, 2014

Restricted Rights

Government may not release noncommercial Computer Software outside of the Government except in limited circumstances (e.g., correction of defects and emergencies, or to Covered Government Support Contractors) and only after notice is provided to the owner. The Government may only run the software on one computer at a time, and may make only the minimum copies needed for backup. In order to assert that the Government will only have Restricted Rights in Computer Software, the contractor must be prepared to present evidence that each software module was developed exclusively at private expense. Source: DFARS 252.227-7014

Small Business Innovation Research

“a program under which a portion of a Federal agency's research or research and development effort is reserved for award to small business concerns through a uniform process...” Source: 15 U.S.C. 638

(RFP)

(SBIR)

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CONTENTS

400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

402. Glossary & Acronyms

A. Glossary

Small Business Innovation Research Data Rights

Government may not release data for manufacturing without contractor approval or previous agreement except for emergency repair. If a product was developed as part of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, the Government is entitled to SBIR Data Rights, which are generally equivalent to Limited/Restricted Rights. These rights apply to both Technical Data associated with a noncommercial product and noncommercial Computer Software. If the SBIR contract includes the March 2011 or later version of DFARS 252.227-7018, SBIR Data Rights revert to Unlimited Rights after five years. Source: DFARS 252.227-7018

Sole Source Premium Cost

The additional cost to obtain end items, spare parts, or support from a sole source rather than obtaining the same using competition. Source: D&DR Guide Additional Data Rights Cost versus Sole Source Premium Cost

Source Selection Evaluation Board

A group of military and/or government civilian personnel, representing functional and technical disciplines, that is charged with evaluating proposals and developing summary facts and findings during source selection. Source: DAU Glossary

Source Selection Plan

A plan that describes how the source selection will be organized, how proposals will be evaluated and analyzed, and how source(s) will be selected. Source: DoD Source Selection Procedures

(SSEB) (SSP)

Written by the program office (PO) and approved by the Source Selection Authority (SSA). Typically, the SSP consists of two parts. The first part describes the organization and responsibilities of the source selection team. The second part identifies the evaluation criteria and detailed procedures for proposal evaluation. Source: DAU Glossary

Specifically Negotiated License Rights

Rights when a standard license rights arrangement (commercial or DFARS) is modified by mutual agreement of the contractor and the Government. The exact terms of the new agreement are spelled out in a unique Specifically Negotiated License Rights agreement. Sources: DFARS 252.227-7013, -7014, -7015, -7018.

Standard Data Rights

Minimum data rights the Government is legally entitled to as determined by the FAR and DFARS clauses included in the contract and applicable statutes and regulations. The specific “standard” rights entitlements are dependent upon many factors such as the type of data, the type of item the data is associated with, and who paid for the development of the item and data. Standard rights include Government entitlements to Unlimited Rights for FFF and OMIT data. Source: D&DR Guide DFARS Data Rights Entitlement Determinations - Funding Source, and DFARS Data Rights Entitlement Determinations - Unlimited Rights.

Statement of Objectives

A Government-prepared document incorporated into the solicitation that states the overall performance objectives. It is used in solicitations when the Government intends to provide the maximum flexibility to each offeror to propose an innovative approach. That portion of a contract that establishes a broad description of the government's required performance objectives. Source: DAU Acquipedia

Statement of Work

That portion either of a contract that establishes and defines all non-specification requirements for contractor's efforts directly or with the use of specific cited documents. Source: DAU Acquipedia

(SOO)

(SOW)

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CONTENTS

400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

402. Glossary & Acronyms

A. Glossary

Support Contractor

See Covered Government Support Contractor.

Sustainment

Sustainment involves the supportability of fielded systems and their subsequent life cycle product support - from initial procurement to supply chain management (including maintenance) to reutilization and disposal. It includes sustainment functions such as initial provisioning, cataloging, inventory management and warehousing, and depot and field level maintenance. Source: Acquisition Community Connection - Sustainment The provision of logistics and personnel services required to maintain and prolong operations until successful mission accomplishment. Source: JP 1-02

Systems Engineering Plan (SEP)

A roadmap for the technical execution of a program. It describes the overall technical approach and details the activities, work products, schedule, risks, contracting requirements, contracting plans, resource and funding requirements for the system development effort. Source: Systems Engineering Plan (SEP)

Technical Data

Information that is “…recorded information, regardless of the form or method of the recording, of a scientific or technical nature (including computer software documentation). The term does not include computer software or data incidental to contract administration, such as financial and/or management information.” Sources: DFARS 227.71, 252.227-7013, -7014, -7015, and -7018.

Technical Data Package

A technical description of an item adequate for supporting an acquisition strategy, production, and engineering and logistics support. The description defines the required design configuration or performance requirements, and procedures required to ensure adequacy of item performance. It consists of applicable Technical Data such as models, drawings, associated lists, specifications, standards, patterns, performance requirements, quality assurance provisions, software documentation and packaging details. Source: MIL-STD-31000A

Test and Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP)

Documents the overall structure and objectives of the Test and Evaluation (T&E) program. It provides a framework within which to generate detailed T&E plans, documents schedule, and resource implications associated with the T&E program. The TEMP identifies the necessary Developmental Test and Evaluation, Operational Test and Evaluation, and Live Fire Test and Evaluation activities. It relates program schedule, test management strategy and structure, and required resources to: Critical Operational Issues, Critical Technical Parameters, objectives and thresholds documented in the Capability Development Document, evaluation criteria, and milestone decision points. For multi-Service or joint programs, a single integrated TEMP is required. Component-unique content requirements, particularly evaluation criteria associated with COIs, can be addressed in a component-prepared annex to the basic TEMP. Source: DAU Glossary

Unlimited Rights

The rights to use, modify, reproduce, perform, display, release, or disclose data in any manner, and for any purpose whatsoever, and to have or authorize others to do so. The Government may freely use or disclose the data to third parties for any purpose whatsoever (absent any separate security classification or export control restriction). Sources: DFARS 252.227-7013, -7014, -7018

(TDP)

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CONTENTS

400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

402. Glossary & Acronyms

B. Acronyms

B. Acronyms AMC

Army Materiel Command

GEIA

Government Electronics & Information Technology Association

AS

Acquisition Strategy

ASA(ALT)

Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology)

IDE

Integrated Digital Environment

IP

Intellectual Property

CAD

Computer Aided Design

IPT

Integrated Product Team

CDRL

Contract Data Requirements List

LCSP

Life Cycle Sustainment Plan

NDA

Non-Disclosure Agreement

CGSC

Covered Government Support Contractor

OMB

Office of Management and Budget

OMIT

Operation, Maintenance, Installation and Training Data

CLIN

Contract Line Item Number

CM

Configuration Management

DAU

Defense Acquisition University

OSA

Open Systems Architecture

DFARS

Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement

OSD

Office of the Secretary of Defense

DID

Data Item Description

DoD

Department of Defense

PDUSD(AT&L)

Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics

DPAP

Defense Procurement Acquisition Policy

PEWG

Product Data & Engineering Working Group

DTIC

Defense Technical Information Center

PGI

Procedures, Guidance, and Information

FAR

Federal Acquisition Regulation

QAP

Quality Assurance Provision

FFF

Form, Fit, and Function Data

RFP

Request for Proposal

FSC

Federal Supply Class SBIR

Small Business Innovation Research

SEP

Systems Engineering Plan

SOO

Statement of Objectives

GAO

Government Accountability Office

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CONTENTS

400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

SOW

Statement of Work

SSEB TDP

402. Glossary & Acronyms

B. Acronyms

TEMP

Test and Evaluation Master Plan

Source Selection Evaluation Board

U.S.C.

United States Code

Technical Data Package

UCF

Uniform Contract Format

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CONTENTS

400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

403. Index

403. INDEX Disposal Costs - 41, 45 Investment (Procurement) Costs - 41, 44 Life Cycle Costs - 3, 41, 44, 73, 119, 120, 121, 122 Operating & Support Costs - 44 Research & Development Costs - 41, 43

A Access Control (Data) - 83 Acquisition Strategy (Program) - 29, 52, 58, 99 Additional Data Rights - 5, 19, 35, 42, 43, 44, 56, 60, 61, 68, 71, 73, 76, 77, 103, 114, 115, 119, 120, 122 Agreements - License/Data Rights - 3, 67, 73, 74, 114 Assertions (Data Rights) - 21, 67, 71, 72, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 106, 111, 112, 115 Government Review - 77, 78 Post-Award - 77 Associated Information (Product) - 9, 11 Authoring Environment Design/CAD - 54 General - 81, 84 Software - 55

C Challenge (Data Rights Assertion) - 21, 72, 75, 77, 78, 79 Clauses (FAR / DFARS) - 13, 14 Commercial Computer Software - 16, 18, 24, 25, 55, 66, 72, 73, 76, 112, 116, 121 Commercial Product (Tech Data for) - 8, 18, 66, 112, 116 Competition - 42, 44, 53, 54, 57, 99, 100, 112 Computer Aided Design (CAD) - 97 Configuration Management (CM) - 81, 97 Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) - 39, 53, 57, 61, 63, 103 Key CDRLs - 64 Contract Line Item - 103 Contract Option Additional Data Rights - 61, 69, 71, 73, 119 Contractor Data Repository - 39, 75 Copyright Markings - 23, 25, 31 Costs

1st Edition - August 2015

D Data & Data Rights PROGRAM CHECKLIST 87 Data & Data Rights Requirements Gathering 36, 64 Data Access Control - 83 Data Acquisition - 3, 33, 43, 47, 57, 63, 64, 101 Data Authoring Environment - 81, 84 Design/CAD - 54 Software - 55 Data Deliverables - 7, 12, 19, 34, 38, 40, 53, 61, 63, 65, 72, 103, 111, 115 Data Delivery - 14, 19, 23, 39, 42, 43, 48, 53, 55, 56, 60, 61, 63, 64, 75, 76, 77, 78, 102, 103, 106, 112 Data in Hand - 12, 56 Data Item Description (DID) - 53, 55, 63, 64, 100, 102 Data Maintenance - 37, 41, 42, 44, 54, 56, 84 Data Management and Use - 4, 81 Data Management Strategy (obsolete) - 29 Data Management System - 44, 81, 82, 83, 85, 97 Data Markings - 17, 23, 67 Copyright - 23, 25, 31 Data Rights - 18, 23, 24, 25, 35, 65, 72, 73, 75, 76, 83, 93 Distribution Statement - 23, 24, 56, 83 Export Control - 24 Security Classification - 15, 23, 25 Data Ordering - 18, 21, 53, 54, 56, 64 Data Repository Contractor - 39, 75

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CONTENTS

400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

403. Index

General Info - 33, 39, 40, 81, 82, 84 Government - 40 Data Rights Acquisition - 33, 43, 120 Additional - 5, 19, 35, 42, 43, 44, 56, 60, 61, 68, 71, 73, 76, 77, 103, 114, 115, 119, 120, 122 Assertions - 21, 32, 38, 62, 63, 65, 67, 71, 72, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 106, 111, 112, 115 Challenge Assertions - 21, 72, 75, 77, 78, 79 Contract Option for - 61, 69, 71, 73, 119 Definitions - 18 Entitlements - 7, 8, 13, 14, 17, 19, 20, 24, 73, 112 Funding Source and - 20, 56, 63 Needed/Desired - 19, 57, 66, 112, 114, 115, 117, 118, 122 Standard - 16, 17, 19, 20, 42, 56, 112, 114, 115 Data Rights Attachment - 19, 38, 61, 65, 68, 111 Table 1 - 59, 66, 71, 112, 114, 115, 117 Table 2 - 32, 59, 66, 71, 112, 114, 116 Table 3 - 59, 66, 112, 114, 116 Data Rights Markings Nonconforming - 76 Unjustified - 78 Data Sharing - 40, 83 Data Types - 8, 18, 20, 23, 91, 116 Definition Information (Product) - 9, 12 Design Documentation Approach Detailed Design - 34, 35, 36 Open Systems - 35 Design/CAD Authoring Environment - 54 Disclosure - 18, 83 Disposal Costs - 41, 45 Distribution Statement Markings - 23, 24, 56, 83

E Entitlements (Data Rights) - 7, 13, 14, 17, 19, 20, 21, 91 Evaluation Data Rights - 59

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Evaluation Factors - 58, 59, 60 Export Control & Marking - 24

F Form, Fit, Function (FFF) Data - 20, 35, 56, 91

G Government Data Repository - 39, 40 Government Purpose Rights - 15, 19, 20, 92

I Integrated Product Team (IPT) - 62 Intellectual Property Rights Copyrights - 23, 25, 31 Patents - 30, 104, 105, 107 Trade Secrets - 30, 31, 32 Trademarks - 30, 31 Intellectual Property Strategy - 29, 32, 32 Investment (Procurement) Costs - 41, 44

K Key CDRLs - 64

L License/Data Rights Agreement - 18, 71, 72, 73, 116 Life Cycle Costs - 3, 41, 73, 90, 119, 120, 121 Disposal Costs - 41, 45 Investment (Procurement) Costs - 41, 44 Operating & Support Costs - 44 Research & Development Costs - 41, 43 Life Cycle Data Requirements - 36 Life Cycle Sustainment Plan - 32, 36 Limited Rights - 16, 18, 20, 21, 38

M Maintenance (Data) - 44, 84 Metadata - 33, 83, 85, 97

N Native Files/Format - 54

1st Edition - August 2015

CONTENTS

400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

403. Index

Needed/Desired Rights - 19, 57, 66, 112, 114, 115, 117, 118, 122 Noncommercial Computer Software - 16, 17, 18, 55, 56, 66, 72, 75, 76, 77, 93, 105, 106, 112, 121 Noncommercial Products (Tech Data for) - 14, 16, 17, 20, 24, 65, 66, 93, 112

O Open Systems Architecture - 35, 53 Open Systems Design Documentation Approach - 35 Operating & Support Costs - 44 Operational Information (Product) - 9, 10, 82

P Patents - 30, 104, 105, 107 PEWG Data Groupings Associated Information (Product) - 9, 11 Product Definition Information - 11 Product Operational Information - 11 Procedures, Guidance, and Information (PGI) - 7 Product Associated Information (PEWG) - 9, 11 Product Availability - 7, 8, 17 Product Data (PEWG) - 9, 10, 11, 12, 82, 114 Product Data Hierarchy (PEWG) - 9 Product Definition Information - 9, 12 Product Operational Information - 9, 10, 11, 82 PROGRAM CHECKLIST - 87 Program Strategies / Plans Acquisition Strategy - 29, 52, 58, 99 General - 19, 33, 36, 37, 55, 57, 112, 122 Intellectual Property Strategy - 29, 32, 32 Life Cycle Sustainment Plan - 32, 36 Systems Engineering Plan - 36 Test and Evaluation Master Plan - 36 Proposal Evaluation - 52, 69, 71, 114, 115, 116 Proprietary - 35, 54, 55, 63, 67, 121 Provisions (DFARS) - 7, 13, 14, 24, 62, 67, 105, 107, 121

1st Edition - August 2015

R Repository (Data) Contractor - 39, 75 Government - 39 Request for Proposal (RFP) Contract Data Requirements List - 39, 53, 57, 61, 63, 103 Section B (Contract Line Items) - 60, 103 Section C (Statement of Work) - 61 Section H (Special Requirements) - 62 Section I (Clauses) - 62, 68 Section J (Attachments) - 62, 63, 64, 71, 73 Section K (Representations) - 67 Section L (Instructions, Conditions, Notices) 58, 59, 68, 117 Section M (Evaluation Factors) - 58, 69 Source Selection Plan - 3, 51, 52, 57, 68, 69, 90 Requirements Gathering Life Cycle Data Requirements - 36 Research & Development Costs - 41, 43 Restricted Rights - 16, 17, 20, 56, 73, 83, 119, 121 Reverse Engineering - 73, 119, 121, 122 Risks (Data or Data Rights Related) Data Acquisition Risks - 47 Data Costs Risks - 48 Data Management & Use Risks - 49 Data Requirements Risks - 47 Data Rights Risks - 48 Delivery & Verification Risks - 48

S SBIR Data Rights - 17, 18, 20 SBIR Data Rights Period - 17, 18 Software Authoring Environment - 55 Solicitation - 13, 20, 32, 58, 59, 60, 62, 67, 68 Source Selection Plan - 3, 51, 52, 57, 68, 69, 90 Specifically Negotiated License Rights - 16, 19, 37, 57, 62, 72, 114 Standard Data Rights - 16, 17, 19, 20, 42, 56, 112, 114, 115

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CONTENTS

400. REFERENCE INFORMATION

403. Index

Statement of Work (SOW) - 61, 101 Subject Matter Experts - 29, 36, 41, 52, 55, 66, 120 Sustainment - 3, 12, 19, 29, 33, 34, 35, 36, 55, 57, 79 Systems Engineering Plan (SEP) - 36

T Technical Data Package (TDP) - 10, 53, 54, 97, 100 Technical Data Rights Strategy (obsolete) - 29 Terms of Use (License) - 18, 72, 73, 74, 116 Test and Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP) - 36

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Trademarks - 30, 31

U Uniform Contract Format - 51 Unlimited Rights - 15, 16, 20, 21, 25, 56, 59, 60, 65, 71, 72, 75, 91, 92, 106, 112, 115, 117

V Verification Data Quality - 58, 75, 81, 121 Data Rights Markings - 11, 75, 77

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145 - Army Data & Data Rights Guide

1st Edition - August 2015

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